The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00224

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
^Jewish Ftoridian
Of Tampa
Volume
6 Number 4
Tampa, Florida Friday, January 27,1984
< frtdShochtl
Price 35 Cents
$uper $unday $uper $ucce$$
Super Sunday Jan. 15
marked the opening of the 1984
Tampa Jewish Federation-UJA
Campaign. At this time S72.000
has been pledged and when all
the commitments are in the
$75,000 goal for Super Sunday
will be surpassed. This third
annual Tampa Super Sunday
shows a 21 percent increase over
last year.
As of Jan. 18 the Combined
Campaign has been pledged a
total of $550,000.
One hundred and fifteen en-
thusiastic workers donated their
time in two hour shifts during the
day. The excitement was fur-
thered by balloons being raced to
Continued on Page 5-
Annual Federation
Campaign Dinner:
Circus of Illusion Feb. 4
Rumsfeld Doubtful
U.S. Says Syria Ready to Exit Lebanon
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Reagan
Administration believes that the Syrians want to
negotiate a withdrawal of their troops from Lebanon, but
on their terms.
The Jewish Telegraphic Agency has learned that this is
I the feeling of the Administration despite the lack of
progress made during special Mideast representative
Donald Rumsfeld's three-and-a-half hour talk in
Damascus with Syrian President Hafez Assad. Rumsfeld
reportedly told the Israelis later that chances for an
agreement had "decreased."
Assad has made it clear that he
Iwants Lebanon to abrogate its
[May 17 agreement with Israel
land for I sraeli troops to pull out
Inf Lebanon before he will con-
sider the withdrawal of Syrian
jtroops trom that country. At his
Imeeting with Rumsfeld, he
I report .k) |y added the condition
[that the United States withdraw
pta troops too.
THE ADMINISTRATION
believes that a major concern of
with the May 17 agreement
y- thai it will make Israel the
r of Lebanon. Syria sees
|tsell as the protector of Lebanon.
The U.S. does not believe that
[Syria wants to absorb Lebanon.
something that is believed in
Israel. Instead, the Administra-
tion noted that when Lebanon
and Syria were removed from the
control of the French in 1946 the
Syrians agreed that they were
two countries, but one people. At
the same time, the Syrians
maintained that they will not let
Lebanon be used as a base or
corridor for an attack on Syria.
The U.S. has accepted that
Svria has long played an influen-
tial role in Lebanon. It is believed
here that Syria wants stability in
Lebanon, and that is one of the
reasons its army first went into
the country in 1976 at the request
of the then Lebanese govern-
ment.
BUT THE Administration is
arguing that the security
arrangements that are now being
negotiated between the various
factions in Lebanon will provide
the beginning of national recon-
ciliation in Lebanon and thus
stability. Syria is believed behind
the groups opposing that agree-
ment.
However, Syria also opposes
the May 17 agreement as part of
what it sees its role as the leader
of the Arab world. They want to
derail Egypt's peace treaty with
Israel and the Camp David
process. They believe that the
Arabs can get more from Israel
united then negotiating separ-
ately and do not want to see Leb-
anon go the way of Egypt.
The Administration has both
publicly and privately supported
the agreement, which after all,
came about through the personal
mediation of Secretary of State
George Shultz. But it has been
stressing that it is not a peace
treaty and that Lebanon rejected
many Israeli demands. Instead,
the agreement is a "delicately
balanced package of compro-
mises," is the way it is put.
The 1984 Jewish Federation-
United Jewish Appeal Annual
Campaign Dinner will be taking
place on Saturday evening, Feb.
4, 7 p.m. at TECO Plaza in
Tampa. The "Circus of Illusion,"
as this year's event is known,
promises to be an evening that no
one in the Tampa Jewish commu-
nity will want to miss.
Open to all contributors
making a minimum of a $1,250
family gift, the event is being
coordinated by party-planner
Bruce Sutka. To call Sutka just a
party-planner is not enough. He
is a se designer creating a kind
of electrical field, staging parties
that end up being "events."
Sutka, who studied at Cooper
School of Art, considers himself
above all an artist. The most
recent aspect of his career was
launched with an extremely
successful benefit for the Ameri-
can Red Cross a few years ago.
Reservations can be made by
calling the Tampa Jewish
Federation at 875-1618, but hurry
as space is limited and the closing
date for reservations is Jan. 31.
No one will want to miss the
party of the year.
Cranston Vows He'd Move
U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The U.S. and Israel signed a five-
year agreement here providing
for the exchange of information
on social services and human
developent. It covers the adop-
tion of children with special
needs, services for the function-
ally impaired, housing for the
elderly, in-home day care for chil-
dren and the prevention of
juvenile delinquency.
The signatories were Israel's
Minister of Labor and Welfare
Aharon Uzan and the U.S. Assis-
tant Secretary of Health, Dorcas
Hardy.
Meanwhile, talks have begun
in Washington on the estab-
lishment of a free trade zone
between Israel and the U.S. An
agreement in principle was reach-
ed during Premier Yitzhak
Shamir's visit to Washington
late last November. The current
discussions are expected to last
for several months because of the
technical nature of the subject.
Talks between Israel and the
U.S. on the level of American
economic aid to Israel for the
next fiscal year, are scheduled, to
begin in a few days in Washing-
ton. The U.S. has already ear-
marked $1.4 billion in military
assistance grants to Israel. Israel
is requesting an additional $1.3
billion in economic assistance.
Envoy Says Moellemann
Harms Peace Prospects
95 House Members Ask Shultz
To Support Ethiopian Jews
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Is-
rael's Ambassador to West
jGermany, Itzchak Ben Ari,
|has accused Deputy For-
leign Minister Juergen
IMoellemann of harming
prospects for negotiations
|m the Middle East by
|urging the European
Inations to put pressure on
IIsrael for concessions that
[would bring Jordan to the
[peace table.
Im?n A,?s rem"k8. published
" a lite Welt interview, appeared
ress than a week before Chancel-
EI, Ut Kohl i8 scheduled to
^f*en an official visit to Israel.
unusual for an envoy to so sharp-
IL, *a membep of the
Eh ,ent, Moellemann is
P S'dent of ^e German-Arab
Friendship Association and the
most outspoken critic of Israel on
the Bonn political scene.
BEN ARI expressed hopes
that Moellemann's statements
would be seen in Jerusalem as a
one-sided reflection of Arab
interests and not damage the
prospects for fruitful dialogue
between Kohl and Israeli leaders
this week.
According to Ben Ari, Israel's
"Arab neighbors, and notably
Jordan, have been taking the
unrealistic stance that the
Europeans and Americans can
pull their chestnuts out of the fire
for them. Amman is therefore
sticking to its line of refraining
from peace talks with Israel.''
Moellemann has no contacts
with Israeli diplomats in Bonn.
Although he accompanied Kohl
on his recent visits to Saudi
Arabia, Egypt and Jordan, he is
not accompanying him to Israel.
Also Urged To Increase U.S. Aid
To Drought Stricken Nation
WASHINGTON December
5, 1983 Ninety-five members
of the U.S. House of Representa-
tives sent a letter to Secretary of
State George Shultz, November
22 fc expressing their concern for
the particular plight of the ap-
proximately 20,000 Ethiopian
Jews. They also asked the Ad-
ministration to reply "promptly"
to requests from international
relief agencies and members of
Congress for stepped up aid to
drought stricken Ethiopia.
Conditions in Ethiopia due to
the drought and famine have
"reached crisis proportions,"
according to the letter. "At least
three million" Ethiopians are
endangered by the drought and
"there is fear that the death and
destruction wrought by the
famine and drought of 1973-74
may be repeated." According to
official reports, the letter said, 50-
150 people have been dying every
day in Ethiopia since June.
A Congressional delegation
touring Africa met with
Ethiopian officials in August,
1983, to discuss increasing U.S.
relief aid, U.S.-Ethiopian rela-
tions in general, and the plight of
the Ethiopian Jews. The letter to
Secretary Schultz said that the
obstacles to the free emigration
of Ethiopian Jews to Israel "are
not insurmountable."
The American Association For
Ethiopian Jews, Bread for the
World, and the Interreligious
Task Force on Food Policy have
all been instrumental in lobbying
Congress and the Agency for
International Development to al-
locate increased funds for relief
supplies and food for Ethiopia in
the wake of the worsening crisis.
The American Association for
Ethiopian Jews is a nonprofit or-
ganization founded in 1973 to
assist Ethiopian Jews in reaching
Israel and to educate the Amer-
ican Jewish community and the
American public on the Falashas'
plight. The Association has more
than 19,000 members, and is
headquartered in Chicago, 111.


-



Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, January 27 1
I
3
3D
Dr. J. Leon Schwartz
Association Honors Dr. Schwartz .... The Florida Dental
Association honored J. Leon Schwartz, DDS at a gala dinner on
Jan. 13 at the Airport Marriott. The event celebrated Dr. Sch-
wartzes 50 years of service to the dental profession and the
Florida Dental Association (FDA). Proceeds from the evening
benefitted the FDA Student Loan Fund.
Joining Dr. Schwartz was his wife, Charlotte Cracowaner
Schwartz, and their daughters, Rhoda Lumia and Car la
Goldman. Rhoda and Carla wrote a poem in his honor and read it
during the evening's presentations.
Dr. Schwartz attended the University of Florida and the
Atlanta Southern Dental School, now Emory University. He is
the longest practicing oral surgeon in Florida, according to the
FDA president. Dr. Milton Wood.
Dr. Schwartz has served as past president of the Florida
Dental Association, the American Society of Oral Surgeons,
Florida Dental Service Corps, Hillsborough County Dental
Society, and the West Coast Dental Society. He is currently
treasurer of the Florida Dental Association and was recipient of
their service award in 1974 and 1981.
He and Charlotte are Tampa natives and have been married
for 47 years.
Fiftieth Anniversary Celebrate .... Joseph and Ruth
Warshaw were married secretly on Dec. 30, 1933, in Brooklyn,
New York. They had a Jewish ceremony six months later.
Longtime friends and relatives joined them for their fiftieth
wedding anniversary and a full weekend celebration. All nine
grandchildren were also in town for the occasion. The War-
shaws" daughters are Binnie Coppersmith and Sandy Freedman,
both of Tampa, and Iris Salzer of St. Petersburg.
The special weekend included a party at the Tower Club on
the night of the anniversary, and a dinner party at the Warshaw
home on New Year's Eve.
Babyline ... A son. Adam Ross, was born on November 26 to
Bruce and Sheri Pasternack of Miami. They have another child,
Ein Lynne, who is two-years-old. The grandparents are Zennith
and Midge Pasternack of Tampa, and Stuart and Phyllis Cohen
of Miami.
NCJW Plans Birthday Celebration .The National Council
of Jewish Women (NCJW) is planning a party in observance of
the National organization's 90th birthday and the Tampa
Section's 60th birthday. The evening is set for March 10 and will
consist of cocktails, dinner, music and entertainment. It will
begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Downtown Riverside Hilton.
Committee members working on the event are Betty Cohen,
overall coordinator; Marsha Brenner and Fran Bernstein, in-
vitations: Lucille Falk, program: and Sheila Feldman, ad-
ministrative. Many NCJW members will be involved with the
birthday celebration.
Super Evening Raises Funds ... A "Super Fun Evening"
drew about 80 people and raisesd some $9,000 for the Jewish
Community Center's general operating fund. The first prize of
two Super Bowl tickets went to Glenn Tobin. (Glenn sold his
tickets and donated the money to the Center.) The second prize
of a color television went to Marshall Linsky and the third prize
of a Bern's Steak House gift certificate went to Tom Alexander.
The evening's program, which included comedians from Giggles
Comedy Club, was lead by the two masters of ceremonies, Bob
Levin and Randy Freedman.
Let us share "Your News." Call the Jewish Floridian at 872-
4470, or drop us a note, care of "It's Your News," 2808 Horatio,
Tampa. 33609
Endowment Development Tops $2 Million
At the TOP Jewish Founda-
tion's quarterly meeting, held
Jan. 5, it was announced that
through December, 1983 the
combined total of endowment
gifts developed by each part-
icipating community passed the
two million dollar mark. Accord-
ing to Abe Wise, Orlando. TOP
President, this figure represents
a combination of cash gifts, real
estate, closely held corporate
stock and other securities. "It is
quite interesting," said Wise,
"That each community has had
success in different areas of its
endowment development
program. Endowment gift sup-
port for a community is not only
measured by what is in the pot
today, but the potential for the
future."
Reporting for TAMPA, BUI
Kalish stated that its current gift
total is only $134,000 out of the
total of two million. Kalish indic-
ated, however, that Tampa con-
tinues to get deferred gift com-
mitments via bequests in wills,
life insurance and other deferred
gift vehicles. "Because estate
planning is usually a confidential
matter between attorney and
client," said Kalish. "We can
only estimate the potential value
of these commitments to
Tampa's endowment fund based
on what we know about. Using
that as our barometer, we estim-
ate the value at over $2,000,000."
Tampa's goal is to improve its
efforts in securing current gifts
while continuing to encourage
people to perpetuate their com-
munal financial support by
naming TOP as a beneficiary of a
part of their estate.
In ORLANDO'S report it was
noted by Joe Wittenstein,
Endowment Development Chair-
man, that his community'8 suc-
cess has been more in the area of
getting current gifts. "Our net
portion of the TOP total is
roughly 1.17 million dollars,"
said Wittenstein. "As a result of
some hard work, throughout the
year on the part of our trustees in
cooperation with Joel Breitstein,
we secured over $430,000 in gifts
during December. We are excited
because we are the first of the
three participating communities
to break the $1,000,000 barrier in
Hadassah Leaders Get
Urgent Plea From Israel
Local Hadassah leaders
received a letter from Frieda
Lewis. Hadassah National Presi-
dent, informing them of the cur-
rent crisis in Israel.
"The inflation rate of nearly
200 percent has affected Hadas-
sah's programs on all levels
salaries, purchases of medical
equipment and commodities. The
needs are far greater than antic-
ipated."
"How can we tell the sorely
pressed people of Israel that we
can do no more. Many millions of
dollars are needed if the Hadas-
sah Medical Organization, Youth
Aliyah, Hadassah Israel Educa-
tion Services, Youth Activities,
and the Jewish National Fund
Sunday Reception
Honors JCC
Staff Member
Donna Davis, stepping down
after five years as Program
Director for the Seniors program
of the Jewish Community Center,
will be honored with a reception
on Sunday afternoon from 5 to 7
p.m. at the JCC Library. Every-
one is invited to join in wishing
Davis well as she leaves the JCC
to enter real estate.
"I say goodbye as a staff
person, but never goodbye as a
friend, said Davis. During her
tenure the Senior program of the
JCC has developed many new
aspects (such as the volunteer
insurance assistance program)
and grown in stature as well as in
numbers.
Martin Pear, Executive
Director of the Jewish Commu-
nity Center, said a search is
underway for a new senior direc-
tor and he expects the JCC to
have the position filled shortly.
Engagement
FELDMANHARWELL
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Feldman
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Robin, to Ralph
Harwell, son of Anna Harwell
and the late Hilton Harwell of
Columbus, Georgia.
The bride's grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Cloth of
Toronto, Canada.
The wedding is planned for
July, 1984, at Temple Israel in
Columbus, Georgia.
Robin is a teacher of the deaf
and Ralph is a bank collections
supervisor, both in Columbus.
are to maintain Hadassah stan-
dards."
Tampa can help many thou-
sands of people in Israel by
coming to the Broadway Revue
Evening with Games and Prizes
on Saturday, March 3 at the JCC.
Ellie Fishman. President of
Tampa Chapter of Hadassah.
explained that the proceeds of the
benefit will immediately go to the
Hadassah Medical Organization
in Israel.
The Grand Prize is a trip for
two to Epcot and Disney World,
2 nights and 3 days at the
Sheraton Twin Towers. For
tickets call Dorothy Skop at 839-
0167 or Bert Green at 879-3359.
current total community
ment gifts. "
Bruce Bokor, Chairman oft
PINELLAS Endows,.
Development Team also 1
some successful results. "DunVl
the month of December, weij
ceived close to $150,000 in mJ
gifts or additions to "fundi"|
already on the books. There 3
several leads that Joel BreitsuJ
is currently pursuing that horJ
fully will take our communal
over the $1,000,000 mark intl|
near future.
In other business, the Foui&1
tion board reviewed a new iwl
op men t program involving Staul
of Israel bonds. Joel Breitsteml
Executive Director of TOP anil
Endowment Development!
Consultant to each Federatiotl
pointed out that part of TOftl
general investment portfoll
consists of over $100,000 worth oil
Israel bonds.
"These bonds," stated Brad
stein, "pay a return to Founda-
tions favorable to other invest-
ments in the market place. Ail
part of our endowment develop-
ment program we are encourag-[
ing those people in our com-1
munity who invest in Israeli
bonds to invest in top for the I
benefit of his community's en-l
dowment fund and let TOP in-1
vest in the bonds. By doing thai
in lieu of or in addition to buying I
the bonds directly, the donor
gains three major benefits: 1) the I
gift to TOP is fully tax deductible
(buying an Israel bond is not): 31j
the gift to TOP helps provide for
the future of the donor's local I
community; and 3) it is still |
being used to help Israel."
For information about your I
community's endowment fund
program operated through the
TOP Jewish Foundation, contact
the Tampa Jewish Federation
office, or Joel Breitstein, TOP
Jewish Foundation Executive |
Director at 112 Magnolii
Avenue. Tampa. Fl 33606: 25jU
3569.
Breakfast J E Jeff & (lathyr Levine
7 a.m.- 10:30 a.m.
Lunch F Continental & Gourmet Catering
11:00 a.m. -2:30 p.m. F (Kosher & Non-Kosher 1
R E Banquet facilities
up to 100 people
8I3/87S-SMS or in your home.
4815 W. ljurr\ Y
Tampa, Florida 33607 1 S of wVsbiliore

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Corporation Toll Free (800)221-48:


Women's Division Diamonds Plan Luncheon
The Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division 1984 Diamond
division co-chaired by Ann
Rudolph and Joan Saul will hold
- brunch on Tuesday, Jan. 31 at
[he new Monte Carlo Towers.
The Co-chairmen stated
we have planned a wonder-
,ul brunch and are so excited
tbout Howard Stone coming to
Tampa once again and sharing
_his historic adventure* with us;
he is a dynamic Derson and it
lalways is a thrill to hear him
speak. Women whose commit-
ment to the Tampa Jewish
Federation is a $1,000 minimum
pledge are invited to the Brunch.
Ann Rudolph and Joan Saul
are both valued leaders in the
Federation. They have filled
many roles in service to the Jew-
ish community of Tampa.
For further information please
contact the Tampa Jewish Fed-
eration Women's Division office,
875-1618.

t I
V tr
il
TJSS Offers
PET Classes
The North West Counseling
IService of Tampa Jewish Social
IService will offer a Parent Effec-
Itiveness Course on Thursday
[evenings, Feb. 16-April 5, from 7-
110 p.m. at the new branch office,
18902 N. Dale Mabry, Suite No.
|208.
Elliot Greenbaum, Chairman
[of the TJSS Program committee
(noted that "Many parents no
llonger want to rely on chance or
Igood luck in raising their chil-
Idren. Today they are ready to
Iseek assistance in dealing with
Isuch matters as: a) issues of open
[communication between parents
land children; b) issues of appro-
priate and effective punishment;
jc) problems of nagging, tantrums
find value conflicts."
The Parent Effectiveness
ICourse as developed by Dr.
[Thomas Gordon will be led by
Michele Goldstein, TJSS family
counselor and a certified PET
instructor. The course teaches
parents how to use the no lose
method of family discipline; a
special set of skills which helps
parents resolve "conflicts" so
that everyone can feel satisfied
and become a willing participant
in family decisions. This method
has proven effective in reducing
rebellion, irresponsibility,
selfishness and resentment
between family members.
In light of the positive commu-
nity response to this course when
offered previously, and the limit-
ed space available, parents are
urged to register as quickly as
possible and assure themselves a
place.
For further information
regarding registration materials
and fees for the course, please call
the North West office at 932-6676
or 932-6410.
Joan Saul
Ann Rudolph
Defense Budget Cut Back To $6.4 Billion
LONDON (ZINS) -
(The annual report of the
llnternational Institute for
Strategic Affairs contains
I data on the military
balance in the Middle East
that says that Israel will be
spending in the year 1983-
84 for defense some $6.4
billion compared with an
I outlay of $8.2 billion in
1982,"a reduction of 20 per-
cent.
Israel will also have to make up
$2 billion as the cost of con-
ducting the war in Lebanon.
Israel's regular army this year
Readers
Write
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
We would like to call your
Wtent ion to a momentous event
curring in the Jewish commu-
ty in Florida. The landmark
xhibit of Jewish artifacts from
pastern Europe will be in Miami
[or a limited time. We strongly
Fge you to join a community
ussion to see this unique
tubit.
, The Tampa Jewish Federation
pas made arrangements with the
"ass Museum for a community
i?^,,0" Sunday, March 4, to view
F* Precious Legacy." This will
, a one-day trip. Our tentative
Nans can for a round trfp jj^ht
Eluding lunch and the tour. The
8i is approximately $75. We
ue yu to immediately contact
p* Federation office, 876-1618
[or reservations; a $25 check will
noid your reservation.
MIKE LEVINE
President,
Tamp. Jewish Federation
LILI KAUFMAN
_, President,
Tmpa Jewish Federation
Women's Division
numbers 172.000 compared with
174,000 the previous year. The
Institute's conclusions are that
Israel still remains the pre-
eminently strongest military
force in the Middle East. In
addition to its regular army
personnel, Israel is capable of
fielding an additional 500,000
reservists, 100.000 of whom can
be mobilized within 24 hours.
IN ITS yearly report on the
"Balance of Armaments" in the
Middle East, the International
Institute cites the following data:
Israel has 3,600 tanks and 4,000
armored personnel carriers. With
respect to naval forces, Israel has
3 submarines and 2 men-of-war
with helicopter decks. In ad-
dition, there are 20 torpedo boats
armed with rockets.
MAN
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JCC's Senior Advisory Council
Elects New Officers
At their January meeting, the
members of the Senior Center
Program Advisory Committee of
the Jewish Community Center
elected new officers for 1984 to be
installed at the February meeting
Becky Margolin, who has
served as president for two years,
will be succeeded by Dorothy
Garrell. Dan Salin, vice presi-
dent, was re-elected. Anne
Margolin will succeed Dorothy
Garrell, who served for more than
5 years as recording secretary.
For corresondmg secretary, Ilse
Blanck was re-ellected.
Responsibilities of the Senior
Advisory Council include:
providing consumer input to,
feedback on and evaluation of the
programs and policies of the
Senior Center Program, which is
operated with an Older
Americans Act grant (channeled
through Florida's Department of
Health and Rehabilitative Serv-
ices and Manahill Area Agency
on Aging, with matching funds
from the Jewish Community
Center).
The programs are open to
anyone 60 or better in Hills-
borough County at no charge,
though donations are always
welcome.
Some of the programs offered
by the Senior Center of the JCC
are: health services; income
supplement services; trips;
coping skills classes; social,
fitness, cultural and educational
activities; consumer services,
special services to handicapped
and minorities, and hundreds of
volunteer opportunities.
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
INVITES YOU TO IT'S
1984 TRAVEL MEETING
Marriott Inn at Airport, Tampa
MONDAY, JANUARY 30,7:30 p.m.
Audio-Visual Color Presentation and Discussion of the
Places We Gc.Why We Go...How We Go...
ALASKA CANADA CHINA EGYPT EASTERN
EUROPE GREECE HOLLAND AUSTRIA SWIT-
ZERLAND INDIA ISRAEL ITALY LONDON
ORIENT PARIS SCANDINAVIA SPAIN & POR-
TUGAL.
PERSONALIZED JEWISH GROUP TOURS
FIRST TIMERS: REPEATERS: SINGLES UNDER 40:
SINGLES OVER 35: SINGLE PARENT FAMILIES:
FAMILY EXPERIENCES: BAR/BAT MITZVAHS
EVERYONE!!!
Call to R.S.V.P. for this meeting and for a free copy of
our handsomely illustrated 1984 Travel Guide. Toll
Free (outside of New York) 1-800-221-4694 or Broward 1-
763-8177.
SHIP
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Friday. January 27, 1984
Volume 6
23SHEVAT5744
Number

Meeting in Jerusalem
Some say that one of the many reasons
Menachem Begin resigned as Prime
Minister of Israel is that last October West
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl was due
to visit him in Jerusalem. Begin could not,
so the story goes, face the prospect of
welcoming West Germany's leader to the
Jewish State, so engrained in him still is
the anguish he feels about the Hitler
period.
There is at least some substance to this.
In the final days of Chancellor Helmut Sch-
midt's office, Begin had some decidedly
undiplomatic things to say about Schmidt,
which among other things focused on Sch-
midt's young years during the Nazi era.
Begin could simply never restrain himself
on this issue.
Apparently, one hopes that Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir will have no such
crippling feelings when he welcomes
Chancellor Kohl to Jerusalem this week.
Shamir is reported by his close aides to be
far sturdier physically and far less
emotional than Begin was.
But this does not mean that Shamir can
be expected to be more polite and less
forthright about the major questions
dividing the two countries at this time.
Mainly at issue are the arms deals that
Bonn recently arranged with Arab
countries some of them consummated
when Kohl visited these countries on his
Middle Eastern tour last October when he
was also scheduled to stop off in Jerusalem
for a meeting with Mr. Begin.
To put the potential impact on Israel of
these arms deals into perspective, one need
only be reminded that but a few short
weeks ago, it was officially confirmed in the
Bundestag that Bonn will sell arms to
Saudi Arabia in the near future.
A letter of protest the other day from the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation to West
Germany's Ambassador to the United
States in Washington and to Bonn's
Consul in Miami lists the variety of the
proposed arms sale package: Tornado
aircraft, advanced Leopard tanks, Roland
II surface-to-air mobile missile systems
the list is formidable and lengthier still.
No wonder the Israelis and Jews
throughout the world are concerned. Nor is
this concern eased by the knowledge that
Deputy Foreign Minister Juergen
Moellemann has played a jubilant hand
behind-the-scenes in these arms sales
developments and, what is more, with the
approval of Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher.
Moellemann, our Page One story on this
issue reports today, is the president of the
German-Arab Society in his country. While
this may explain a lot of things, it hardly
makes them any pleasanter.
What all of this adds up to is a strained
meeting between Chancellor Kohl and
Prime Minister Shamir. We may not know
the full import of this meeting for some
time. But one thing is already clear: the so-
called "special relationship" that existed
between Israel and West Germany almost
from the moment of the founding of the
State of Israel in 1948 is now a thing of the
past.
Kohl Faces Hot
Time In Jerusalem
Arms Sales to Arabs
Seen as Burning Issue
By ARNO HERZBERG
BONN Chancellor
Helmut Kohl is scheduled
to visit Israel this week. He
intended to go there last
October as the first stop on
a swing through the Middle
East. But Menachem
| Begin's illness and his
resignation as Premier
made it necessary for Kohl
to postpone his visit to the
Jewish State.
In the meantime, relations
between the two countries have
deteriorated. After years of hesit-
ating to deliver arms to "areas of
tension." West Germany has
embarked on a selling spree to
Arab counries. Germany wants
to sell sophisticated military
hardware long sought by Israel's
enemies. The lure of the petro-
dollar is. after all. too great to
pass up.
THERE IS a change going on
in Germany. Official policy is
moving away from the "special
relationship" to Israel that was
an outgrowth of the past. In the
wake of a new approach to war
and peace, and as a matter of self-
assertion, the past might be for-
gotten. Germany wants to be free
to deal with the Middle East
conflict in its own way.
When Kohl visited Arab coun-
tries last October, he went in
search of orders for military
hardware. When he returned, not
much was said publicly about the
success or failure of his quest.
But soon after, high-ranking del-
egations from Arab countries
came here to look at the materiel
Germany had to offer and a few
weeks ago it was officially con-
firmed in the Bundestag that
Bonn will sell arms to Saudi
Arabia in the near future.
The man who confirmed this
was Deputy Foreign Minister
Juergen Moellemann. In his
"private" life he is the president
of the German-Arab Society.
Some time ago. he accepted this
"honor with the approval for
Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich
Genscher. "I am a politician who
is especially interested in the
problems of the Arab region,"
Moellemann explained.
ACTUALLY, he is the head of
a powerful pro-Arab lobby which
has infiltrated the German
government and is hard at work
to change public opinion about
the Arabs and Israel.
There is nothing new about a
lobby representing the Arab
cause. What makes the German-
Arab Society so special is that of-
ficials participating in formulat-
ing the nation's policies are, at
the same time, active part-
icipants in the Society's lobbying
efforts.
After it was founded in 1965,
the German-Arab Society was
fairly inactive. This changed with
the Arab oil embargo following
the Yom Kippur War, with the
spread of petrodollars and with
the changed political climate in
the Middle East.
Presently, the society is the
center of Arab propaganda in
Germany. Its influence has
grown in spite of the fact that it
does not have more than 750
members. Included in the
membership are 200 powerful
corporations, prominent poli-
ticians and civil service
bureaucrats. The Arabs supply
the money, if necessary, to keep
the machinery of the organization
running smoothly.
IT IS NO secret that the Arab
League and several Arab embas-
sies support the Society. This or-
ganization is, as an article in the
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
CHANCELLOR HELMUT KOHL
recently called it, "a faithful
partner of the Arabs."
During the war in Lebanon, the
Society gained national publicity
when it obtained the names of
150 German politicians, scient-
ists, theologians and journalists
on a petition demanding that
Israel unconditionally get out of
Lebanon. The Society is also
active in trying to open markets
for German industry in Arab
countries and cement German-
Arab political bonds.
Since 1980, Arab lobbyists in
Germany have tried to persuade
policymakers to sell arms to
Arabs. At that time, the British
newspaper. Observer, reported
about Germany's negotiations
with Libya, Saudi Arabia. Iraq
and Syria. It disclosed the vital
role a German company by the
name of Magirus-Deutz played in
the Yom Kippur War.
THIS COMPANY devised a
method to breach the fortifica-
tions and barriers erected on the
Israeli side of the Suez Canal. It
manufactured a water cannon
which was delivered to Egypt one
week before the outbreak of the
war. The firm's engineers super-
vised the training of Egyptians in
the use of the water cannon. Par-
enthetically, it is interesting to
note that Magirus-Deutz refused
to do business with Israel.
Israel is very well aware of the
turn in German policy, despite
efforts by politicians such as
Moellemann to minimize the
seriousness of the situation. He
told the Parliament recently that
the sale of military hardware to
Saudi Arabia will not affect Is-
rael's security. Other pro-Arab
apologists, in what has become a
game of terminology, seek to dis-
tinguish between "offensive" and
"defensive" weapons. Israel has
rejected this distinction without
a difference.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir in-
structed Deputy Foreign Min-
ister Yehuda Ben-Meir to
summon the German Ambas-
sador and to deliver a stiff
complaint about the intended
arms sale to Arb countries. Kohl
has a lot of explaining to do when
he meets with Israeli officials in
Jerusalem.
ISRAELS POSITION on the
arms sale is not new Last
August, Begin told German of-
ficials that Germany has no
moral right to sell arms to Arabt. j
At that time, it was reported that
Saudi Arabia wanted to buy 300
German Leopard tanks which
rate as about the best in the j
world and which would give
Saudi Arabia a definite tech-
nological advantage over Israeli |
armor.
Meanwhile. Saudi Arabia
started some adroit maneuvering |
behind the scenes. If they cannot
buy the tanks outright, they
might as well buy the comr,
that manufactures the tanks. The
Saudis have sought to acquire24
percent of the share of Rhein-
metall A.G. Such an acquisition
would give them a formidable
voice in company affairs, a veto |
over sales, and a political foot-
hold of major proportions on a I
world scale.
Frequently, a look behind thj
scenes reveals a great deal about
ongoing and changing policies. It
is to explain the continuing and
constant extension of the Arab
Israeli conflict involving more
and more governments. It also
points to the harsh reality that
government policies are not
permanent but really quite
ephemeral. So, too, Germany'i,
"special relationship" to Israel
cannot withstand the factor of
time and what Germany sees at
more urgent and imperative real-
ities.
JTA Feature Syndicate
Herzog, Wife
Welcomed
TEL AVIV (JTA) 7
President Chaim Herzog and hia
wife, Ora, received a warm
welcome last week when they
arrived at Kinshasa, Zaire, tht|
first Black African nation to j
restore diplomatic ties with Israel
after breaking them during tbt
Yom Kippur War. Herzog. on hi
first African tour since taking
office, will also visit Liberia.
Israeli reporters accompanying
the Presidential party, said the
road from Kinshasa airport W
President Mobutu Seae Sekoi
residence was lined *H>
thousands of people waving
Israeli flags. The government
daily, Elima. called Herzog J
visit "the consecration oi|
renewed friendship between Zairt
and Israel."


Page 5
$uper $unday $uper $ucce$$
Continued from Page 1
the area where commitments
were being made. The volunteers
each received a Super Sunday
visor on behalf of their dedicated
effort.
Special thanks to Thomson-
McKinnon Securities for
donating their facilities and
hosting the Telethon.
Thanks to the following area
businesses for donating food for
the volunteers throughout the
day: Zyndorf's Bakery and Deli-
catessen, Marty's Sandwiches
and Salads, Sunset Delicatessen,
and Bagel Works.
The chairmen for this 1984
Telethon are Merilyn Burke, Neil
Crystal, and Debbie Gitomer.
Inschel Weiss
Tampa leadership directing Super Sunday (from
left) Michael Levine, president Tampa Jewish
Federation; the three co-chairmen of Super
Sunday, Merilyn Burke, Neil Crystal, Debbie
Gitomer; John Osterweil, 1984 Campaign
Chairman.

/
video training tape produced by Jay Kopelman
itroduced the volunteers to telephone
felicitation. (From left seated) Arlene Newman,
Hick Lockenbach, Don Weinbren, David Abrams,
Hosalyn Feldman, Alfred Haubenstock, Bob
Wise, and Dale Robbins. (Standing from left)
Marvin Newman, Joel Breitstein, director, TOP
Jewish Foundation; Steve Mendell, Merilyn
Burke, Neil Crystal, Debbie Gitomer, and Joel
Karpay.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger
Jay Older
BBG volunteers during the morning hours
pumping balloons and sending acknowledge-
ments immediately following Super Sunday
telephoning. The AZA worked during the af-
ternoon. (From left) Sheri Levenson, Frances
Saphier, Tammy Smith, Celeste Ganderson,
Stefanie Baumgarten, Dana Shriver, and Susan
Leibowitz.
Joseph Kerstein
M
Nancy Linsky
{Robert Lewis and Bob Levi
Nat Shorstein


Congregations/Organizations Events
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER
Enhancing Intimacy in Your
Relationship
The topic for the next JCC
Lunch Bunch on Wednesday,
Feb. 8, from 10-12 at the Peking
Restaurant will be "Enhancing
Intimacy in your Relationship."
"With the many demands *
placed upon us in this complex
world, achieving the kind of
closeness we truly want in our
relationship becomes increasing-
ly difficult," say Dr. David
Richter and Rudina Richter,
guest speakers for this lecture
and open discussion. The
Richters are family therapists in
private practice and would like to
share their years of experience on
this subject.
This program and lunch at the
Peking Restaurant, 2310 N. Dale
Mabry, will be $5 which includes
babysitting by reservation only.
Reservations may be made
with Muriel Feldman at the JCC,
872-4451.
Jonathan Levine
Charles Miller
Caryn Zielonka
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
JONATHAN LEVINE
Jonathan David Levine, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Edward Levine, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Jan. 28 at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Kol Ami. Rabbi
Leonard Rosenthal will officiate.
Jonathan is a student in the
Hey Class at Congregation Kol
Ami and is a member of Kadima.
He is in the seventh grade at
Sligh Junior High School and a
forward on the Tampa Bay
Rangers Soccer Team.
Dr. and Mrs. Levine will host
the Oneg Shabbat and Kiddush
following the services. They will
also host a reception on Jan. 28 at
the Marriott Hotel in honor of the
occasion.
Special guests will include
grandparents, Mr. Irving Levine
and Mrs. Eve Levine, New York
City, and Mr. Israel Nurman and
Mrs. Rachel Nurman, New York
City; aunts and uncles, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Malhin, Phoenix;
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Nurman,
Tampa: Mr. Freddie Nurman,
New York City; Mr. Judi Levine,
Phoenix, and Mrs. Wendy
Gilbert, Phoenix: and special
friends, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Gralla. New York City.
CHARLES MILLER
Charles Miller, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Max Miller, will lead ser-
vices on Jan. 27 and will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Jan. 28 at 10 a.m. at Congre-
gation Rodeph Sholom. Rabbi
Kenneth Berger and Cantor
William Hauben will officiate.
Charles is in the eighth grade
at Middleton Junior High School.
He participates in youth soccer
and his team has won the district
championship for the past two
years.
Mr. and Mrs. Miller will host
the Oneg Shabbat and Kiddush
following services in honor of the
occasion.
Special guests will include
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Miller from Bangor, Maine.
CARYN ZIELONKA
Caryn Michelle Zielonka,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Carl I.
Zielonka, will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on Jan.
28 at 11 a.m. at Congregation
Schaarai Zedek. Rabbi Frank
Sundheim will otf iciate.
Community Calendar
Friday, January 27
Candlelighting time 5:46 p.m.
Saturday, January 28
OR!-Bay Horizons
Sunday, January 29
Schaarai Zedek Adult Education Mini-Series, 930 Jewish Wa;
Veterans, 930; JWV Auxiliary, 10 a.m. at JCC Rodeph Sholom
Sisterhood Torah Fund Luncheon, 11 a.m.
Monday, January 30
Schoara. Zedek Sisterhood Open Board Meeting, 9-12
Community Relations Committee of Tampa Jewish Federation, 8
p.m.
Tuesday, January 31
Jewish Towers Board Meeting, 4 p.m.
Wednesday, February 1
Kol Ami Senior Socialites, 12 noon Kol Ami Sisterhood Board
Meeting. 745 p.m. Rodeph Sholom Board Meeting, 8 p.m.
Tampa Jewish Federation Board Meeting, 8 p.m.
Thursday, February 2
JCC Food Co-op, 10-12 ORT-Tampa Evening Chapter, 9:30
B'nai B'nth Area Meeting at Hillel USF, 7:30 Schaarai Zedek -
Kotler Memorial Lecture Professor Lowell McCoy of HUC-JIR, 8
p.m.
Friday, February 3
Candlelighting time 5:52 p.m. Kol Ami Adult Education
Weekend
Saturday, February 4
Kol Ami Adult Education Weekend Continues Kol Ami
Religious School Havdallah, 6 p.m. Brandon Chavurah -
party. 8 p.m. TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION CAMPAIGN EVENT -
CIRCUS OF ILLUSION, 7 P.M. TECO PLAZA
Caryn is in the seventh grade
at Congregation Schaarai
Zedek's Religious School and is a
member of the Junior Youth
Group. She is also in the seventh
grade at Berkeley Preparatory
School where she has been on the
Headmaster's List each grading
period. She is a class I gymnast
at LaFleur's Gymnastic Club in
Largo. She was also the sixth
grade art editor for Berkeley's
literary magazine, Soundings.
Carol Zielonka will host the
Oneg Shabbat on Friday evening
in honor of her granddaughter.
Dr. and Mrs. Zielonka will host
the Kiddush luncheon following
services tomorrow at Congre-
gation Schaarai Zedek.
Caryn s grandparents are Sara
Lena and Paul Shapiro, Shreve-
port, Louisiana, and Carol
Zielonka, Tampa, and the late
Rabbi David Zielonka.
Special guests will include
Sarah Boutte and Marguerite
May from Zachary, Louisiana:
Jackie, Sheldon, Marianne
Mollye, and Ilene Fleschman
from Overland Park, Kansas:
Suzanne. Paul, Stephanie and
Lisa Gellens from Sarasota; Joan
and Elihu Harris from Cin-
cinnati; Lenora Kleban, Libby
Lipson, Bett and Ralph Segall.
Paul and Sara Lena Shapiro, all
from Shreveport; Peter and
Alfred Eric Levine from Los '
Angeles; Kate Groner from i
Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Harvey I
and Marcia Lebos from Savan- j
nah, Georgia; Michele and |
Stephen Morrow and Sharon, I
Marty, Lisa and Michael Roth-,
berg from Miami; Louise and'
Nathan Rothberg from Royal'
Palm Beach, Florida; Helene and j
Gordon Saskin from St.
Petersburg, Jane and Henri
Teichelr from New York City;
Frances Weill and Clarice
Weinstein from New Orleans;
Judie Fred, Mark and Scott
Wider-man from Cocoa Beach,
Florida; and Marty and David
Zielonka from Gastonia, North
Carolina.
Drama at the JCC
The Tampa Alliance of
Dramatic Arts is coming to the
Jewish Community Center for a
ten week workshop beginning
Monday, Feb. 6, from 4:3CM5p.m.
The 10 week workshop is open to
children in third through 12th
grade for $55.
This will be a workshop in
creative dramatics culminating in
a public performance on Satur-
day, April 14. The workshop will
be conducted by Kathi Grau and
Darryln Caudill of "TA-DA."
both state certified teachers
trained in the visual and per-
forming arts. This is a process
rather than a product oriented
workshop, therefore the childrens
ideas will be used in an ensemble
format production at the end of
the ten weeks. The play will be
chosen according to what best
suits the group attending the
workshop. The production will
reiterate the theory that the sum
of it's parts equal the whole.
The workshop will also be held
at Kol Ami Beginning Feb. 8,
Wednesday, from 4:30-6p.m.
CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHOLOM
ADL Director to Speak
Leslye Winkelman, West
Florida Regional Director of the
Anti-Defamation League will
address Congregation Rodeph
Sholom during Shabbat Services
Feb. 3 on "Anti-Semitism Today;
Are We Really threatened?"
Winkelman has recently
moved to Tampa from Houston,
Tex., where she was Assistant
Director of the Southwest
Region. She has also served as
Staff Consultant in the agency's
New York office. She holds a
Masters of Social Work degree in
Community Organization from
Yeshiva University.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
Women in Power Tampa Style
Sexism In Health Care
Tampa Section, National
Council of Jewish Women will
present "Sexism In Health Care"
Thursday. Feb. 9, 7 p.m. at Univ-
ersity Community Hospital.
Dr. Linda Whiteford will be the
keynote speaker oh "Cultural and
Historical Reasons for the Exist-
ence and Continuation of Sexism
in HealthCare."
This will be followed by four
workshops covering childcare,
gynecology, menopause and
gerontology. Workshop leaders
are Dr. Jan Judisch, Dr. Janette
Sasmore. Dr. Bonnie Saks and
Vivan Ross.
The public is welcome to at-
tend this program and there is an
admission charge of $2.50.
Dessert and coffee will be served
from 7-7:30 and the program
scheduled from 7:30 to 10 p.m.
For further information call i
2755.
BNAIBRITH
Bowling League
B'nai B'rith has a bo,
league in formation according]
Michael Yoelson, chairmw il
short league is planned now aj
a full Summer and Winter WJ
being formed for the remainde!n
the year. To sign up, ZZM
Yoelson at 963-1629 or 963-21% '
HILLEL
USF-UT Programs
Dr. Reuben Luckens, Scholar
in-Residence and Authority 0.
Jewish Mysticism for Hillel S
well received by students, facult,
and community on Jan. 10-151
With the response so positive I
Dr. Luckens will probably retur
to the Tampa area. Dr. Rud,,-
Adler, outstanding TalmudT
scholar, found an equally en.
thusiastic crowd responding to
his talk.
Upcoming Hillel events are
USF-UT softball game, sup.,.
bowl party, ping-pong tourna-
ment, Kosher Kooking Kontest
joint programming with JSIM
and a weekend get-away. Dr. I
Steven Kaplan, Hillel director,
and rabbi, will be offering classes
in Jewish Customs and Cer-
emonies, Jewish History and
Thought. Adult Bar-Bat Mit-
zvah, Jewish Philosophy and
Theology, and the Torah. Those
interested in attening are urged
to call the office at 988-7076.
No fee required.
SENIORS
Jewish Mysticism
Would you like to learn more
about the ancient healing plants
and herbs? Rabbi Theodore Brod.
scholar in residence at Rodeph
Sholom, will conduct a series 0/
lectures on this and other sub-
jects as found in the Kabala.
Class sessions will be held on Fri-
day mornings from 10 to 11 a.m.
through Feb. 24 at the Jewish
Community Center.
Wine and Cheese Party
Are you 40 plus (single or
married)? Do you consider your-
self vital and alive? Are you look-
ing for new friends who share
your interests in social, cultural'
or sports activities? You are
invited to attend the kick-off
event of "Club Variety," a new
social organization. Join us on
Saturday night Feb. 18 at 8 p.m.
for a Wine and Cheese Party.
RSVP with a check for $3 per
person by Feb. 10 to the Jewish
Community Center, 2808
Horatio, Tampa, Florida 33609.
This is open to the public.
For details on this and future
events call Barbara Powell at the
JCC 872-4451. Follow up acti-
vities will be selected at the
party.
A REMINDER
vSSSrUlS'Sft WCdding and "! I I fa, are
tZZEk2t J -he g***W" or my be picked up at the
rtZ^* f dW? fBce ^ fonns m"* >T compiled and
reined to our offices no later than two full weeks before it is
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 201-4215 Rabbi Samuel Malllnger Servtcei:
Friday. 8 p.m.; Saturday. Bam. Dally morning and evening mlnyan,T:IO
a.m., 8 46pm ^ w
CON OREG ATION KOL AMI Coneerv Mi ve
S919 Moran Road B62-6M8 Rabbi Leonard Roeenthal Service*
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday. 10 a.m
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Con.crv.Uvc
wmi B*y'ho1? Bo^verd S87-1W1 Rabbi Kenneth Berger. Hauan
Mlny^T^ls 8,rvlea": Frt CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
MMIB Swauan Avenue 876-2.77 Rabbi Frank Sundheim Service*
naay.s p.m.
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewlah Center. Unlveralty of South Florida* UC217, Box 2*63 Tampa 3fl
(College Para Apia.) 971-6768 or 877-8418 RaMX Laaar Rivkln and Rabbi
Joeeph Oubrowakl Friday. 7 p.m. Shabbat Dinner and Service.. Saturday
Service 10: SO am Monday Hebrew Claa. 8 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
m2L3 rlliUSU-J roun<*on. JwUh Student Center, University of South
L.TX? JL2*^5L! attvm J K*PtaB- PhD- Duster S014 Pitrldaa,
No. 172. Tampa. Florida SM17 (Village Square Apt. MS-TOTS e Shabbat
Servlcee 7: SO p.m. e, Sunday Bagel Brunche.. 12 noon


av, January 27,1964
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 7
\Fx-Envou Warns
Soviets Will Continue
Military Aid to Syria
BRUSSELS (JTA) A former U.S. Ambassador
o Saudi Arabia said here that the Sovietr Union has in-
formed the Reagan Administration that it intends to
maintain its presence in the Middle East and will continue
to supply arms and support to Syria "in an unlimited
way" to further that objective.
According to Robert Neumann, an American expert
on the Middle East, "The Soviets would not hesitate to
escalate the conflict (in Lebanon) if there was a threat
against Syria. Moscow is determined to remain in the area
and will not allow itself to be excluded."
NEUMANN MADE his remarks at an international
conference on the future of NATO and global security or-
ganized in Brussels by the Georgetown University Center
for Strategic Studies. The session last Saturday was
chaired by former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.
Neumann maintained that the multinational force
presently in Beirut faces a "growing crisis" that is likely
to reach a climax in the next 2-3 months. He urged the
withdrawal of the U.S. Marines as well as the French,
Italian and British contingents of the MNF from Leb-
anon. The Lebanese authorities, he said, must institute
political reforms.
"The United States must withdraw the Marines .
or will be forced by domestic pressures to withdraw as the
failure of American policy become more dramatic,"
Neumann declared. He suggested that the Europeans
could have an important, positive impact on the Palestine
Liberation Organization and might encourage and
facilitate a larger role for Egypt in the peace process.
Arm and Kaplan, French WJC
Secretary, Dead at Age 63
Kol Ami Adult Education Weekend
Judith Sobel, Adult Education
Chairman of Congregation Kol
Ami, has announced that Friday,
Feb. 3 and Sunday, Feb. 5 Rabbi
Baruch Frydman-Kohl will be the
featured guest speaker during a
special weekend of study
"MYSTICISM FOR THE
MASSES" An Introduction
To Chassidism will be the topic
for discussion on Friday evening
with an in-depth study session
following services and an Oneg
Shabbat.
"WHAT'S JEWISH ABOUT
JEWISH ART?" is the topic
planned for Sunday Brunch. This
is a slide presentation and lecture
that will highlight characteristics
which help to identify "Jewish
Art."
Rabbi Frydman-Kohl serves
Congregation Ohav Shalom in
Albany, N.Y. Ordained at the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
Rabbi Frydman-Kohl is a
member of the Editorial Board of
Conservative Judaism Magazine.
As the rabbinic intern of
MAKOM: An Experiment in
Jewish Community, in Chicago,
Rabbi Frydman-Kohl developed
an interest in working with single
adults, Jews-by-Choice and
alcoholics. He continues this
activity in the Albany area. He
has lectured in synagogues, in
behalf of Jewish Federations, and
for various communal and acad-
emic organizations about his
scholarship and communal inter-
ests. He is currently engaged in
doctoral studies in Medieval
Jewish Philosophy and
Mysticism at the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary.
Both sessions are open to the
public. Please call the synagogue,
962-6338, to make your reser-
vations for the Sunday Brunch,
for which there will be a charge of
. S3 per person.
PAKIS (JTA) Armand
Kaplan, who served as Secretary
General of the World Jewish
Congress-French Section for
many years and who was made
an officer of the Legion of Honor
by the French government last
March, died here Jan. 12 follow-
ing a long illness. He was 63
Lveare old-
Kaplan was born in Budapest,
hut his family emigrated to
Strasbourg when he was three
years old. They resided there un-
til they fled from the city on the
eveol World War II. He took an
active part in the Strasbourg
Jewish community affairs and
attained a reputation as an
operatic singer and as a member
of the community's choir.
Having found refuge in the
Alsatian region at the outbreak
of the war, Kaplan was arrested
by the Vichy authorities in 1941
and was interned in various
concentration camps throughout
the country. With the overthrow
of the Vichy regime, he joined the
resistance movement with whom
he fought until the end of the
war.
USY Walk-A-Thon
On Sunday. Feb. 5, members of
USY from the Southeast Region
will participate in a Tikun Olam
Walk-A-Thon. Tikun Olam con-
cerns people: orphans caused by
the fighting in Israel; students in
Israel, such as those at the
American Student Center in
Jerusalem; USY ers scholarships
'or summer programs, all these
are supported by Tikun Olam
funds. "Tzedakot" 40 percent
of funds goes to a variety of orga-
nizations, such as Israel Emerg-
ency Fund; Soviet Jewry,
Falashan Jewry, the Jewish poor
and aged and many others.
The members of Rodeph
Sholom and Kol Ami USY have
undertaken this campaign as
they believe that the cause is
worth giving of themselves. For
those interested in participating
in the Walk-A-Thon or sponsor-
ing a walker, please contact the
synagogue offices of Rodeph
Sholom and Kol Ami.
SAFAMAt Tampa Theater
Tickets are currently on sale
for the exciting Jewish musical
SAP AM, a six-man Jewish group
from Boston, appearing at the
Tampa Theatre on Saturday
night. Feb. 11.
The musical, presented by the
Tampa Jewish Community
Center, is the third musical
production of the year presented
by the JCC, and looks to be one
of the best ever in Tampa.
^/-^-^ "From A Bit*
/"** **^\ To A Banquet"
( s~\ J Scwciatuinf tn Koatof
NCg&a&*a Nwt-KaaHar Cawnnt
K^--*-/^i Full lint of Frtth
T*r^^ -in. V .*-* /*^. *v /s\ /ffi App^ntmg
^wt3few@L Full lint of homo
^a5*****^ mod* Jtwiih oWiescm
tf 9*m*. d- *~ MU COLLECT
14688- 118th Avenue 596-3580
Largo. Florida 33540 ,n Tampa call 257-2859
Robert A. Levin
Andy Lewis
EF Hutton & Company Inc.
315 East Madison Street
Tampa, Fl 33602
Telephone (813) 223-4946
\NNX\\X\N
Economical
PRIVATE NURSES
in Tampa 55 years
Request:
NURSES PROFESSIONAL
REGISTRY
839-6369
Rabbi Baruch Frydman-Kohl
Advertising
Salesperson
Wanted
Full-time. Salary/Draw. Call Joan collect or
write:
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
P.O. BOX 012973
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
PHONE 305-373-4605
Decorate
the value way at
Drapeman Textile Outlet
WHERE YOUR IMAGINATION COMES ALIVEWITH IDEAS
Tickets are available at the
front desk of the JCC and at the
box office of the Tampa Theatre.
Costs for the seats, all reserved,
are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors
and students, and $6 for children
under 13.
"We would like to see a large
turn-out for SAFAM," said JCC
President Leah Davidson. "This
promises to be a group that
everyone of every age will enjoy."
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moji
Fridsy, Janui
North American Federation Movement
In New Book 'To Dwell In Unity'
NEW YORK The full story
of the Jewish Federations and
their present status as the lead-
ing institution in American Jew-
ish life is told in Philip Bern-
stein's To Dwell in Unity, pub-
lished recently by the Jewish
Publication Society. Bernstein
served as chief executive officer
of the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions from 1956 until his retire-
ment in 1979.
The record of Federation
growth and accomplishments is
presented in detail, painting a
portrait of the North American
Jewish community in action. It
sets out Federation approaches.
action and allocations in virtually
every aspect of Jewish life by the
more than 200 such organizations
now flourishing throughout
North America.
More than a simple presenta-
tion of facts and figures, To
Dwell in Unity is a manifesto of
organized and cohesive American
Jewry, setting forth its priorities,
its values, and its strategies. A
primary concern is Israel, con-
centrating on support for her
peace and security. In the area of
domestic services, the entire
spectrum of Jewish life has been
covered education, culture,
Jewish community centers,
health and vocational services,
and family and social services.
The key to Federations' ef-
fectiveness, Bernstein points out,
has been the quality of its
volunteer leaders and profes-
sional staff. This meant not only
attracting the best people, but in
providing the essential training
for fulfilling the comprehensive
responsibilities.
To Dwell in Unity is a con-
tinuation of an earlier JPS book,
A Heritage Affirmed, by Harry
L. I.urie. which analyzed the
origin and growth of the Federa-
tions from their earliest begin-
nings.
New Publication In Planning for the Future Series
Issued By CJF Community Planning Dep't.
NEW YOrtK Three new
publications dealing with social
planning by Federations, the
Jewish disabled, and data utiliza-
tion systems have been published
and are available from the Com-
munity Planning Department of
the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations.
According to Sheldon Cohen of
Washington. Chairman of the
CJF Community Planning Com-
mittee, all three represent part of
the continuing "Planning for the
Future" series which the Depart-
ment will be issuing periodically.
The publication "Social Plan-
ning in Federations Status
and Challenges" is based on a
presentation made by Sanford
Solender, Executive Consultant
to the New York Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies at the
1983 Social Planners Institute
held in Philadelphia, July 24-25,
1983.
In his paper, he analyzes the
role of planning in Federations
and identifies a number of pertin-
ent issues to be addressed in the
next decade or two: "... in the
years ahead, the necessity for
significant social planning in the
Jewish community will be un-
diminished; the prospect of con-
tinuing social change and the
evolution of Jewish life will
require planning with skill, fore-
sight and courage."
"Community Approaches to
Serving the Jewish Disabled"
reports on a CJF survey under-
taken in 1983 in which Federa
tions were asked for information
on existing services specifically
designed for Jewish children and
adults with disabilities. These
responses are reported along with
papers on some approaches to
serving the handicapped.
Increasingly, the Jewish dis-
abled are turning to the organ-
ized Jewish community for serv-
ice, the report states. These
requests are usually related to
service in the context of a Jewish
environment and the Jewish
community is responding with an
increase in service programs and
approaches that are fairly new to
Jewish communal services.
"Developing a Data Utilization
System for Jewish Demographic
Studies" discusses a strategy
and structure for demographic
utilization of data designed for
the Jewish Federation of St.
Louis by Dr. Gary Tobin. study
U.S., Israel Sign Agreement
For Exchange of Information
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) Sen
Alan Cranston (D.. Calif.), a
presidential hopeful, vowed here
that should he be elected Presi-
dent he would move the United
States Embassy from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem.
"I am in favor of moving the
American Embassy to
Jerusalem. And I will move it if I
am the President." Cranston told
a meeting of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations. Two of the
eight Democratic Presidential
Beach Park
By Owner: 4 BR 2Vi bath
New Listing $185,000
872-0736 early A.M.
Evening.
candidates. former Vice
President Walter Mondale and
Sen. Ernest Hollings of South
Carolina, had already appeared
before the group. Others are to
appear in the next two months.
IN A STRONG pro Israel
speech, Cranston reiterated his
commitment to Israel's survival
and security and his opposition
to "an even-handed policy as long
as Arab nations are at war with
Israel." He stated that "I will
remain steadfast in support of
Israel and in support of the
Israel-American special relation-
ship." He expressed opposition
to selling American arms to
Israel's enemies, including the
proposed sale of sophisticated
arms to Jordan.
On the issue of Lebanon.
Cranston called for the with-
drawal of U.S. Marines from that
country.
Tampa Bay
Alterations
Facilities for Fitting. Expert workmansnip
Tampa Bay
Shoe Service
Shoe Repair snoes & Bags Dyed
Village Square West
11608N. Dale Mabry Hwy.
Tampa. Florida 33618
consultant. and Nancy
Boguslaw. Federation Director of
Planning. Too often, in the past
the utilization of data has not
been "built" into the study
structure and process. The St.
Louis case study provides other
Federations with a solid base of
experience for developing other
models.
Copies of all three publications
are available from the CJr" Com
munity Planning Department.
575 Lexington Ave., New York.
NY 10022. Lester I. Levin is Di-
rector of the Department.
The CJF is the association of
200 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils which
serve nearly 800 communities
embracing a Jewish population of
more than 5.7 million in the U.S.
and Canada.
Established in 1932, the
Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective com-
munity service: through estab-
lishing guidelines for fund raising
and operation; and through joint
national planning and action on
common purposes dealing with
local, regional, national and
international needs.
5 DAYS
THE
wtomiu
HOTR
JERUSMEfTl
Enioy 15 days at the super
3-star Windmill Hotel and
pay tor only 10 days
(including breakfast!
Vahd 6 11 83 22 12 83
1 1 84 29 2 84
Kosher restaurants
Sabbath elevator
133 Air conditioned
rooms
Complete facilities for all
types of functions
Walking distance to the
center of Jerusalem and
the Old City
3 Mendele St Talbieh
Jerusalem 92147 Israel
To Dwell in Unity can beat be
summarized in the words of Boria
Smolar, Editor-in-Chief Emeritus
of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency: "Vividly presenta the
American Jewish community aa
coming of age in a most demand-
ing and creative period. A
masterly portrait of the com-
munity. Does not miss a nuance
in the development of Jewish or-
ganizational life ... a funda-
mental contribution to the
history of organized Jewish com-
munal life."
The author stresses the
constant cooperation of the Fed-
erations in reaching their goals,
thus establishing a "declaration
of interdependence" among all
parts of the community. It is also
a testimony to the Jewish
people's observance, through
daily action, of Psalm 13:
"Behold how good and pleasant
it is for brethren to dwell together
in unity."
Prior to joining the Council of
Jewish Federations in 1943.
Bernstein was Assist** |
of the Cleveland JewLLl
munity Federation |H
Secretary of the CleveSH
ish Community CouncaJj
the faculty of Case \v '
Reserve University He CT
President of the Conf^JS
Jewish Communal s*2]
Chairman of the CotS
National Voluntary o2
tions, professional assoSI
the Executive of thej
Agency for Israel, a fbj]
the Independent Sector iyf
Chairman for Government]
tions. Honorary degree* L
been awarded him by seveJ!
versities. Bernstein's L
have appeared in theJouJJ
Jewish Communal $
Encyclopedia of Social
American Jewish Yt*.
Social Work Yearbook, andi
publications.
Copies of To Dwell in [fcj
available from the Council.
Jewish Federations, \\
Lexington Ave., New York.!
10022 at $19.95, plus a C!
dling and postage charge.
MDA Mobile First Aid Station
Inaugurated In Eilat
TEL AVIV Magen David
Adorn has recently inaugurated a
new and modern Mobile First Aid
Station to serve the local popula-
tion in Eilat. The town borders
the States of Jordan. Egypt and
is not far from the northwestern
frontier of Saudi Arabia.
The MDA Mobile First Aid
Station is staffed by specially
trained medics and doctors and is
equipped with a vast amount of
medical equipment and supplies
as well as sophisticated resus-
citation kits and lighting facil-
ities. They are capable of pre
ing initial medical treatment]
20 casualties at a time.
other such units were previ
situated in the MDA N
region, namely, the Beerh
Ofakim and Dimona MDA:
tions. They are specially desif
to intervene in the
distances in cases of major i
accidents. In this way, in
vanced, modern Mobile First i
Station can reach almost
point in the Negev within a i
time.
Xchaanat
kooci^Cfijr'Qm
3303 Swann Avenue
Tampa. Fla 33609
876-2377
Books and Religious
Symbols are
Lifetime Gifts.
10-3 Mon.Frl.
9-12:30 Sunday
Office 962-3888
Home 962-2557
"CINDY" SPER
Broker Associate
Million Dollar Club
1983 Top Associate
An experienced professional servir
residential buyers and sellers.
HENDER!
HI All COt
^Better ,
%
Dr. Louis Lubet and Dr. Martin Port
associated in the practice of
Podiatry
Treatment of Foot Disorders
Wish to Announce
the extension of office hours
to include evenings and Saturdays
2210 S.MacDill Ave. 254-41
Managing Director
H

1500 Church St.
Tampa, FL. 33629
Custom Nurseries
Children's Gifts
254-2>
Drawing free cradle with this ad


Full Text
rewisi
Friday, January 27
North American Federation Movement
In New Book To Dwell In Unity'
NEW YORK The full story
of the Jewish Federations and
their present status as the lead-
ing institution in American Jew
iah life is told in Philip Bern-
stein's To Dwell in Unity, pub-
lished recently by the Jewish
Publication Society. Bernstein
served as chief executive officer
of the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions from 1956 until his retire-
ment in 1979.
The record of Federation
growth and accomplishments is
presented in detail, painting a
portrait of the North American
Jewish community in action. It
sets out Federation approaches,
action and allocations in virtually
every aspect of Jewish life by the
more than 200 such organizations
now flourishing throughout
North America.
More than a simple presenta-
tion of facts and figures. To
Dwell in Unity is a manifesto of
organized and cohesive American
Jewry, setting forth its priorities,
its values, and its strategies. A
primary concern is Israel, con-
centrating on support for her
peace and security. In the area of
domestic services, the entire
spectrum of Jewish life has been
covered education, culture,
Jewish community centers,
health and vocational services,
and family and social services.
The key to Federations' ef-
fectiveness, Bernstein points out,
has been the quality of its
volunteer leaders and profes-
sional staff. This meant not only
attracting the best people, but in
providing the essential training
for fulfilling the comprehensive
responsibilities.
To Dwell in Unity is a con-
tinuation of an earlier JPS book,
A Heritage Affirmed, by Harry
L. Lurie. which analyzed the
origin and growth of the Federa-
tions from their earliest begin-
nings.
New Publication In Planning for the Future Series
Issued By CJF Community Planning Dep't.
NEW YOrtK Three new
publications dealing with social
planning by Federations, the
Jewish disabled, and data utiliza-
tion systems have been published
and are available from the Com-
munity Planning Department of
the Council of Jewish Fed-
erations.
According to Sheldon Cohen of
Washington. Chairman of the
CJF Community Planning Com-
mittee, all three represent part of
the continuing "Planning for the
Future-" series which the Depart-
ment will be issuing periodically.
The publication "Social Plan-
ning in Federations Status
and Challenges" is based on a
presentation made by Sanford
Solender, Executive Consultant
to the New York Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies at the
1983 Social Planners Institute
held in Philadelphia, July 24-25.
1983.
In his paper, he analyzes the
role of planning in Federations
and identifies a number of pertin-
ent issues to be addressed in the
next decade or two: "... in the
years ahead, the necessity for
significant social planning in the
Jewish communitv will be un-
diminished: the prospect of con-
tinuing social change and the
evolution of Jewish life will
require planning with skill, fore-
sight and courage."
"Community Approaches to
Serving the Jewish Disabled"
reports on a CJF survey under
taken in 1983 in which' Federa
tions were asked for information
on existing services specifically
designed for Jewish children and
adults with disabilities. These
responses are reported along with
papers on some approaches to
serving the handicapped.
Increasingly, the Jewish dis-
abled are turning to the organ-
ized Jewish community for serv-
ice, the report states. These
requests are usually related to
service in the context of a Jewish
environment and the Jewish
community is responding with an
increase in service programs and
approaches that are fairly new to
Jewish communal services.
"Developinga Data Utilization
System for Jewish Demographic
Studies" discusses a strategy
and structure for demographic
utilization of data designed for
the Jewish Federation of St.
Louis by Dr. Gary Tobin, study
U.S., Israel Sign Agreement
For Exchange of Information
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTAI Sen
Alan Cranston (D., Calif.), a
presidential hopeful, vowed here
that should he be elected Presi-
dent he would move the United
States Kmbassy from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem.
"I am in favor of moving the
American Embassy to
Jerusalem. And I will move it if 1
am the President," Cranston told
a meeting of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations. Two of the
eight Democratic Presidential
Beach Park
8y Owner: 4 BR 2Vi bath
New Listing $185,000
872-0736 early A.M.
Evening.
candidates. former Vice
President Walter Mondale and
Sen. Ernest Hollings of South
Carolina, had already appeared
before the group. Others are to
appear in the next two months.
IN A STRONG pro-Israel
speech, Cranston reiterated his
commitment to Israel's survival
and security and his opposition
to "an even-handed policy as long
as Arab nations are at war with
Israel.'" He stated that "I will
remain steadfast in support of
Israel and in support of the
Israel-American special relation-
ship." He expressed opposition
to, selling American arms to
Israel's enemies, including the
proposed sale of sophisticated
arms to Jordan.
On the issue of Lebanon,
Cranston called for the with-
drawal of U.S. Marines from that
country.
Tampa Bay
Alterations
Facilities for Fitting Expert workmanship
Tampa Bay
Shoe Service '
snoe Repair Shoes & Bags Dyed
Village Square West
11608N. Dale Mabry Hwy.
Tampa, Florida 33618
consultant. and Nancy
Boguslaw. Federation Directorol
Planning. Too often, in the past
the utilization of data has not
been "built" into the study
structure and process. The St.
Louis case study provides other
Federations with a solid base of
experience for developing other
models.
Copies of all three publications
are available from the CJF Com-
munity Planning Department,
575 Lexington Ave., New York,
NY 10022. Lester I. Levin is Di-
rector of the Department.
The CJF is the association of
200 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils which
serve nearly 800 communities
embracing a Jewish population of
more than 5.7 million in the U.S.
and Canada.
Established in 1932, the
Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective com-
munity service; through estab-
lishing guidelines for fund raising
and operation; and through joint
national planning and action on
common purposes dealing with
local, regional, national and
international needs.
5 DAYS
THE
winomiu
HOTBl
JERUMiEfTI
tn/oy 15 days at the super
3-star Windmill Hotel and
pay tor only W days
/including breakfasti
Valid 6 H 83 22 12 83
1 1 84 29 2 84
Kosher restaurants
Sabbath elevator
133 Air conditioned
rooms
Complete facilities for all
types of functions
Walking distance to the
center of Jerusalem and
the Old City
3MendeleSt Talbieh
Jerusalem 92147 Israel
jmg Director .
Fre
To Dwell in Unity can beat be
summarized in the words of Boris
Smolar, Editor-in-Chief Emeritus
of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency: "Vividly presents the
American Jewish community as
coming of age in a most demand-
ing and creative period. A
masterly portrait of the com-
munity. Does not miss a nuance
in the development of Jewish or-
ganizational life ... a funda-
mental contribution to the
history of organized Jewish com-
munal life."
The author stresses the
constant cooperation of the Fed-
erations in reaching their goals,
thus establishing a "declaration
of interdependence" among all
parts of the community. It is also
a testimony to the Jewish
people's observance, through
daily action, of Psalm 13:
"Behold how good and pleasant
it is for brethren to dwell together
in unity."
Prior to joining the Council of
Jewish Federations in 1943.
Bernstein was Assistant U
of the Cleveland Jewiah
munity Federation, Exea
Secretary of the Cleveland j.
iah Community Council til
the faculty of Caae 'wj,1
Reserve University. He htaL
President of the Confere*?
Jewish Communal Servi,'
Chairman of the Coalition
National Voluntary Ortum
tions, professional associate
the Executive of the ,W
Agency for Israel, a founder!
the Independent Sector and
Chairman for Government
tions. Honorary degrees
been awarded him by several i
versitiea. Bernstein's artk.
have appeared in the Journal,
Jewish Communal ServitH,
Encyclopedia of Social W,3
American Jewish Yearbtjj\
Social Work Yearbook, andotkJ
publications.
Copies of To Dwell in Unity ud
available from the Council oil
Jewish Federations. 57J
Lexington Ave., New York Nfl
10022 at S19.95, plus a $2'
dling and postage charge.
MDA Mobile First Aid Station
Inaugurated In Eilat
TEL AVIV Magen David
Adorn has recently inaugurated a
new and modern Mobile First Aid
Station to serve the local popula-
tion in Eilat. The town borders
the States of Jordan. Egypt and
is not far from the northwestern
frontier of Saudi Arabia.
The MDA Mobile First Aid
Station is staffed by specially
trained medics and doctors and is
equipped with a vast amount of
medical equipment and supplies
as well as sophisticated resus-
citation kits and lighting facil-
ities. They are capable of provid
ing initial medical treatment
20 casualties at a time. Th
other such units were previoi
situated in the MDA Negwl
region, namely, the Beerhevil
Ofakim and Dimona MDA Su-I
tions. They are specially designed!
to intervene in the desertl
distances in cases of major road]
accidents. In this way. an
vanced, modern Mobile First Aid I
Station can reach almost any
point in the Negev within a short ]
time.
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Dr. Louis Lubet and Dr. Martin Port
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Drawing free cradle with this ad


Women's Division Diamonds Plan Luncheon
JCC's Senior Advisory Council
Elects New Officers
The Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division 1984 Diamond
Division co-chaired by Ann
Rudolph and Joan Saul will hold
la brunch on Tuesday, Jan. 31 at
the new Monte Carlo Towers.
The Co-chairmen stated
I- we have planned a wonder-
Iful brunch and are so excited
labout Howard Stone coming to
[Tampa once again and sharing
Ihis 'historic adventure' with us;
[he is a dynamic Derson and it
always is a thrill to hear him
speak. Women whose commit-
ment to the Tampa Jewish
Federation is a $1,000 minimum
pledge are invited to the Brunch.
Ann Rudolph and Joan Saul
are both valued leaders in the
Federation. They have filled
many roles in service to the Jew-
ish community of Tampa.
For further information please
contact the Tampa Jewish Fed-
eration Women's Division office,
875-1618.
XT7
TJSS Offers
PET Classes
The North West Counseling
I Service of Tampa Jewish Social
Service will offer a Parent Effec-
Itiveness Course on Thursday
I evenings. Feb. 16- April 5, from 7-
10 p.m. at the new branch office,
8902 N. Dale Mabry, Suite No.
1208.
Elliot Greenbaum, Chairman
I of the TJSS Program committee
[noted that "Many parents no
longer want to rely on chance or
I good luck in raising their chil-
Idren. Today they are ready to
[seek assistance in dealing with
[such matters as: a) issues of open
[communication between parents
land children; b) issues of appro-
priate and effective punishment;
|cl problems of nagging, tantrums
id value conflicts."
The Parent Effectiveness
I Course as developed by Dr.
Thomas Gordon will be led by
iMichele Goldstein, TJSS family
counselor and a certified PET
instructor. The course teaches
parents how to use the no lose
method of family discipline; a
special set of skills which helps
parents resolve "conflicts" so
that everyone can feel satisfied
and become a willing participant
in family decisions. This method
has proven effective in reducing
rebellion, irresponsibility,
selfishness and resentment
between family members.
In light of the positive commu-
nity response to this course when
offered previously, and the limit-
ed space available, parents are
urged to register as quickly as
possible and assure themselves a
place.
For further information
regarding registration materials
and fees for the course, please call
the North West off ice at 932-6676
or 932-6410.
)
At their January meeting, the
members of the Senior Center
Program Advisory Committee of
the Jewish Community Center
elected new officers for 1984 to be
installed at the February meeting
Becky Margolin, who has
served as president for two years,
will be succeeded by Dorothy
Garrell. Dan Salin, vice presi-
dent, was re-elected. Anne
Margolin will succeed Dorothy
Garrell, who served for more than
5 years as recording secretary.
For corresondmg secretary, Ilse
H la nek was re-ellected.
Responsibilities of the Senior
Advisory Council include:
providing consumer input to,
feedback on and evaluation of the
programs and policies of the
Senior Center Program, which is
operated with an Older
Americans Act grant (channeled
through Florida's Department of
Health and Rehabilitative Serv-
ices and Manahill Area Agency
on Aging, with matching funds
from the Jewish Community
Center).
The programs are open to
anyone 60 or better in Hills-
borough County at no charge,
though donations are always
welcome.
Some of the programs offered
by the Senior Center of the JCC
are: health services; income
supplement services; trips;
coping skills classes; social,
fitness, cultural and educational
activities; consumer services,
special services to handicapped
and minorities, and hundreds of
volunteer opportunities.
Joan Saul
Ann Rudolph
Defense Budget Cut Back To $6.4 Billion
LONDON (ZINS) -
I The annual report of the
1 International Institute for
trategic Affairs contains
I data on the military
balance in the Middle East
that says that Israel will be
spending in the year 1983-
84 for defense some $6.4
billion compared with an
| outlay of $8.2 billion in
1982. a reduction of 20 per-
cent.
Israel will also have to make up
182 billion as the cost of con-
ducting the war in Lebanon.
Israel's regular army this year
Readers
Write
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
We would like to call your
attention to a momentous event
furring in the Jewish commu-
*y in Florida. The landmark
exhibit of Jewish artifacts from
eastern Europe will be in Miami
For a limited time. We strongly
^ge you to join a community
"ussion to see this unique
rtubit.
The Tampa Jewish Federation
I made arrangements with the
88 Museum for a community
IU.2P Sunday, March 4, to view
m Precious Legacy." This will
" a one-day trip. Our tentative
nans call for a round trip flight
fncluding lunch and the tour. The
t is approximately 176. We
ikFpOU to ""mediately contact
F1* Federation office, 876-1618
fori reservations; a $26 check will
'a your reservation.
MIKE LEVINE
President,
Tampa Jewish Federation
LILI KAUFMAN
Pre.ident,
Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division
numbers 172,000 compared with
174,000 the previous year. The
Institute's conclusions are that
Israel still remains the pre-
eminently strongest military
force in the Middle East. In
addition to its regular army
personnel, Israel is capable of
fielding an additional 500,000
reservists, 100,000 of whom can
be mobilized within 24 hours.
IN ITS yearly report on the
"Balance of Armaments" in the
Middle East, the International
Institute cites the following data:
Israel has 3,600 tanks and 4,000
armored personnel carriers. With
respect to naval forces, Israel has
3 submarines and 2 men-of-war
with helicopter decks. In ad-
dition, there are 20 torpedo boats
armed with rockets.
MAN
AMERICAN JEWISH CONGRESS
INVITES YOU TO ITS
1984 TRAVEL MEETING
Marriott Inn at Airport, Tampa
MONDAY, JANUARY 30,7:30 p.m.
Audio-Visual Color Presentation and Discussion of the
Places We Go...Why We Go...How We Go...
ALASKA CANADA CHINA EGYPT EASTERN
EUROPE GREECE HOLLAND AUSTRIA SWIT-
ZERLAND INDIA ISRAEL ITALY LONDON
ORIENT PARIS SCANDINAVIA SPAIN & POR-
TUGAL.
PERSONALIZED JEWISH GROUP TOURS
FIRST TIMERS: REPEATERS: SINGLES UNDER 40:
SINGLES OVER 35: SINGLE PARENT FAMILIES:
FAMILY EXPERIENCES: BAR/BAT MITZVAHS
EVERYONE!!!
Call to R.S.V.P. for this meeting and for a free copy of
our handsomely illustrated 1984 Travel Guide. Toil
Free (outside of New York) 1-800-221-4694 or Broward 1-
763-8177.
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Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, January 27
H
I
do
Endowment Development Tops $2 Million!
current total community <>m^ I
ment gifts." J na'
Dr. J. Leon Sch wartz
Association Honors Dr. Schwartz .... The Florida Dental
Association honored J. Leon Schwartz, DDS at a gala dinner on
Jan. 13 at the Airport Marriott. The event celebrated Dr. Sch-
wartz's 50 years of service to the dental profession and the
Florida Dental Association (FDA). Proceeds from the evening
benefitted the FDA Student Loan Fund.
Joining Dr. Schwartz was his wife. Charlotte Cracowaner
Schwartz, and their daughters. Rhoda Lumia and Car la
Goldman. Rhoda and Carla wrote a poem in his honor and read it
during the evening's presentations.
Dr. Schwartz attended the University of Florida and the
Atlanta Southern Dental School, now Emory University. He is
the longest practicing oral surgeon in Florida, according to the
FDA president. Dr. MUton Wood.
Dr. Schwartz has served as past president of the Florida
Dental Association, the American Society of Oral Surgeons,
Florida Dental Service Corps, Hillsborough County Dental
Society, and the West Coast Dental Society. He is currently
treasurer of the Florida Dental Association and was recipient of
their service award in 1974 and 1981.
He and Charlotte are Tampa natives and have been married
for 47 years.
Fiftieth Anniversary Celebrate .... Joseph and Ruth
Wars haw were married secretly on Dec. 30, 1933, in Brooklyn.
New York. They had a Jewish ceremony sue months later.
Longtime friends and relatives joined them for their fiftieth
wedding anniversary and a full weekend celebration. All nine
grandchildren were also in town for the occasion. The War-
shaws' daughters are Binnie Coppersmith and Sandy Freedman,
both of Tampa, and Iris Salzer of St. Petersburg.
The special weekend included a party at the Tower Club on
the night of the anniversary, and a dinner party at the Warshaw
home on New Year's Eve.
Babyline ... A son, Adam Ross, was born on November 26 to
Bruce and Sheri Pasternack of Miami. They have another child,
Ein Lynne, who is two-years-old. The grandparents are Zennith
and Midge Pasternack of Tampa, and Stuart and Phyllis Cohen
of Miami.
NCJW Plans Birthday Celebration .The National Council
of Jewish Women (NCJWI is planning a party in observance of
the National organization's 90th birthday and the Tampa
Section's 60th birthday. The evening is set for March 10 and will
consist of cocktails, dinner, music and entertainment. It will
begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Downtown Riverside Hilton.
Committee members working on the event are Betty Cohen,
overall coordinator; Marsha Brenner and Fran Bernstein, in-
vitations: Lucille Falk, program; and Sheila Feldman, ad-
ministrative. Many NCJW members will be involved with the
birthday celebration.
Super Evening Raises Funds ... A "Super Fun Evening"
drew about 80 people and raisesd some $9,000 for the Jewish
Community Center's general operating fund. The first prize of
two Super Bowl tickets went to Glenn Tobin. (Glenn sold his
tickets and donated the money to the Center.) The second prize
of a color television went to Marshall Linsky and the third prize
of a Bern's Steak House gift certificate went to Tom Alexander.
The evening's program, which included comedians from Giggles
Comedy Club, was lead by the two masters of ceremonies, Bob
Levin and Randy Freedman.
Let us share Your News." Call the Jewish Floridian at 872-
4470, or drop us a note, care of "It's Your News," 2808 Horatio,
Tampa, 33609
At the TOP Jewish Founda-
tion's quarterly meeting, held
Jan. 5, it was announced that
through December, 1983 the
combined total of endowment
gifts developed by each part-
icipating community passed the
two million dollar mark. Accord-
ing to Abe Wise, Orlando, TOP
President, this figure represents
a combination of cash gifts, real
estate, closely held corporate
stock and other securities. "It is
quite interesting," said Wise,
"That each community has had
success in different areas of its
endowment development
program. Endowment gift sup-
port for a community is not only
measured by what is in the pot
today, but the potential for the
future."
Reporting for TAMPA, Bill
Kalish stated that its current gift
total is only $134,000 out of the
total of two million. Kalish indic-
ated, however, that Tampa con-
tinues to get deferred gift com-
mitments via bequests in wills,
life insurance and other deferred
gift vehicles. "Because estate
planning is usually a confidential
matter between attorney and
client," said Kalish, "We can
only estimate the potential value
of these commitments to
Tampa's endowment fund based
on what we know about. Using
that as our barometer, we estim-
ate the value at over $2,000,000."
Tampa's goal is to improve its
efforts in securing current gifts
while continuing to encourage
people to perpetuate their com-
munal financial support by
naming TOP as a beneficiary of a
part of their estate.
In ORLANDO'S report it was
noted by Joe Wit tens tein,
Endowment Development Chair-
man, that his community's suc-
cess has been more in the area of
getting current gifts. "Our net
portion of the TOP total is
roughly 1.17 million dollars,"
said Wittenstein. "As a result of
some hard work, throughout the
year on the part of our trustees in
cooperation with Joel Breitstein,
we secured over $430,000 in gifts
during December. We are excited
because we are the first of the
three participating communities
to break the $1,000,000 barrier in
Hadassah Leaders Get
Urgent Plea From Israel
Local Hadassah leaders
received a letter from Frieda
Lewis. Hadassah National Presi-
dent, informing them of the cur-
rent crisis in Israel.
"The inflation rate of nearly
200 percent has affected Hadas-
sah's programs on all levels
salaries, purchases of medical
equipment and commodities. The
needs are far greater than antic-
ipated."'
"How can we tell the sorely
pressed people of Israel that we
can do no more. Many millions of
dollars are needed if the Hadas-
sah Medical Organization, Youth
Aliyah, Hadassah Israel Educa-
tion Services, Youth Activities,
and the Jewish National Fund
Sunday Reception
Honors JCC
Staff Member
Donna Davis, stepping down
after five years as Program
Director for the Seniors program
of the Jewish Community Center,
will be honored with a reception
on Sunday afternoon from 5 to 7
p.m. at the JCC Library. Every-
one is invited to join in wishing
Davis well as she leaves the JCC
to enter real estate.
"I say goodbye as a staff
person, but never goodbye as a
friend, said Davis. During her
tenure the Senior program of the
JCC has developed many new
aspects (such as the volunteer
insurance assistance program)
and grown in stature as well as in
numbers.
Martin Pear, Executive
Director of the Jewish Commu-
nity Center, said a search is
underway for a new senior direc-
tor and he expects the JCC to
have the position filled shortly.
Engagement
FELDMAN-HARWELL
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Feldman
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Robin, to Ralph
Harwell, son of Anna Harwell
and the late Hilton Harwell of
Columbus, Georgia.
The bride's grandparents are
Mr. and Mrs. Alex Cloth of
Toronto, Canada.
The wedding is planned for
July, 1984, at Temple Israel in
Columbus, Georgia.
Robin is a teacher of the deaf
and Ralph is a bank collections
supervisor, both in Columbus.
are to maintain Hadassah stan-
dards."
Tampa can help many thou-
sands of people in Israel by
coming to the Broadway Revue
Evening with Games and Prizes
on Saturday, March 3 at the JCC.
Ellie Fishman, President of
Tampa Chapter of Hadassah,
explained that the proceeds of the
benefit will immediately go to the
Hadassah Medicul Organization
in Israel.
The Grand Prize is a trip for
two to Epcot and Disney World,
2 nights and 3 days at the
Sheraton Twin Towers. For
tickets call Dorothy Skop at 839-
0167 or Bert Green at 879-3359.
Bruce Bokor, Chairman of tk
PINELLAS Endow!.,i
Development Team also report!!
some successful results. "Durb,
the month of December, wenl|
cerved close to $160,000 in Jj
gifts or additions to "fund?
already on the books. There .
several leads that Joel Breitstebl
is currently pursuing that hot*
fully will take our commuX
over the $1,000,000 mark in $A
near future.
In other business, the Founfcl
tion board reviewed a new deveM
opment program involving State
of Israel bonds. Joel Breitstein
Executive Director of TOP and
Endowment Development
Consultant to each Federation
pointed out that part of TOP',
general investment portfolio I
consists of over $100,000 worth of I
Israel bonds.
"These bonds," stated Breit-
stein, "pay a return to Foundi-1
tions favorable to other invest' I
ments in the market place. As
part of our endowment develop-
ment program we are encourag.
ing those people in our com-
munity who invest in Israel
bonds to invest in top for toe
benefit of his community's en-
dowment fund and let TOP in-
vest in the bonds. By doing this I
in lieu of or in addition to buying
the bonds directly, the donor
gains three major benefits: 1) the
gift to TOP is fully tax deductible |
(buying an Israel bond is not); 2;
the gift to TOP helps provide for
the future of the donor's local
community; and 3| it is still
being used to help Israel."
For information about your
community'8 endowment fund
program operated through the
TOP Jewish Foundation, contact
the Tampa Jewish Federation
office, or Joel Breitstein, TOP
Jewish Foundation Executive
Director at 112 Magnolia
Avenue. Tampa, Fl 33606; 25
3569.
Breakfast
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ay, January 27,1964
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 7
-Envou Warns
Soviets Will Continue
Military Aid to Syria
BRUSSELS (JTA) A former U.S. Ambassador
ju, Saudi Arabia said here that the Soviet Union has in-
formed the Reagan Administration that it intends to
'oaintain its presence in the Middle East and will continue
supply arms and support to Syria "in an unlimited
?ay" to further that objective.
According to Robert Neumann, an American expert
_on the Middle East, "The Soviets would not hesitate to
Escalate the conflict (in Lebanon) if there was a threat
against Syria. Moscow is determined to remain in the area
land will not allow itself to be excluded."
NEUMANN MADE his remarks at an international
conference on the future of NATO and global security or-
ganized in Brussels by the Georgetown University Center
Jfor Strategic Studies. The session last Saturday was
[chaired by former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.
Neumann maintained that the multinational force
presently in Beirut faces a "growing crisis" that is likely
[to reach a climax in the next 2-3 months. He urged the
Iwithdrawal of the U.S. Marines as well as the French,
(Italian and British contingents of the MNF from Leb-
anon. The Lebanese authorities, he said, must institute
political reforms.
"The United States must withdraw the Marines .
or will be forced by domestic pressures to withdraw as the
1 failure of American policy become more dramatic,"
Neumann declared. He suggested that the Europeans
could have an important, positive impact on the Palestine
Liberation Organization and might encourage and
facilitate a larger role for Egypt in the peace process.
Arm and Kaplan, French WJC
Secretary, Dead at Age 63
PARIS (JTA) Armand
Kaplan, who served as Secretary
General of the World Jewish
Congress-French Section for
many years and who was made
an officer of the Legion of Honor
In the French government last
March, died here Jan. VI follow-
ing a long illness. He was 63
[rjears old.
Kaplan was born in Budapest,
but his family emigrated to
Strasbourg when he was three
years old. They resided there un-
til ihev iled from the city on the
eve ol \\ orld War II. He took an
active part in the Strasbourg
Jewish community affairs and
attained a reputation as an
operatic singer and as a member
of the community's choir.
Having found refuge in the
Alsatian region at the outbreak
of the war, Kaplan was arrested
by the Vichy authorities in 1941
and was interned in various
concentration camps throughout
the country. With the overthrow
of the Vichy .regime, he joined the
resistance movement with whom
he fought until the end of the
war.
USY Walk-A-Thon
On Sunday, Feb. 5, members of
USY from the Southeast Region
will participate in a Tikun Olam
nalk-A-Thon. Tikun Olam con-
cerns people: orphans caused by
the fighting in Israel; students in
Israel, such as those at the
American Student Center in
Jerusalem; USY ers scholarships
for summer programs, all these
are supported by Tikun Olam
lunds. "Tzedakot" 40 percent
of funds goes to a variety of orga-
nizations, such as Israel Emerg-
SAFAMAt Tampa Theater
Kol Ami Adult Education Weekend
Judith Sobel, Adult Education
Chairman of Congregation Kol
Ami, has announced that Friday,
Feb. 3 and Sunday, Feb. 5 Rabbi
Baruch Frydman-Kohl will be the
featured guest speaker during a
special weekend of study.
"MYSTICISM FOR THE
MASSES" An Introduction
To Chassidism will be the topic
for discussion on Friday evening
with an in-depth study session
following services and an Oneg
Shabbat.
"WHAT'S JEWISH ABOUT
JEWISH ART?" is the topic
planned for Sunday Brunch. This
is a slide presentation and lecture
that will highlight characteristics
which help to identify "Jewish
Art."
Rabbi Frydman-Kohl serves
Congregation Ohav Shalom in
Albany, N.Y. Ordained at the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
Rabbi Frydman-Kohl is a
member of the Editorial Board of
Conservative Judaism Magazine.
As the rabbinic intern of
MAKOM: An Experiment in
Jewish Community, in Chicago,
Rabbi Frydman-Kohl developed
an interest in working with single
adults, Jews-by-Choice,, and
alcoholics. He continues this
activity in the Albany area. He
ency Fund; Soviet Jewry,
Falashan Jewry, the Jewish poor
and aged and many others.
The members of Rodeph
Sholom and Kol Ami USY have
undertaken this campaign as
they believe that the cause is
worth giving of themselves. For
those interested in participating
in the Walk-A-Thon or sponsor-
ing a walker, please contact the
synagogue offices of Rodeph
Sholom and Kol Ami.
Tickets are currently on sale
for the exciting Jewish musical
SAFAM, a six-man Jewish group
from Boston, appearing at the
Tampa Theatre on Saturday
night. Feb. 11.
The musical, presented by the
Tampa Jewish Community
Center, is the third musical
production of the year presented
by the JCC, and looks to be one
of the best ever in Tampa.
"From A Bit*
To A Banquet"
_/^) y StMiaNttnt m Kmmm
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^ mod* Jow$fi doiicocm
S, **. Z la* CALL COLLECT
14688 118th Avenue 396-3380
Largo. Florida 33640 m Tampa Call 237-2859
has lectured in synagogues, in
behalf of Jewish Federations, and
for various communal and acad-
emic organizations about his
scholarship and communal inter-
ests. He is currently engaged in
doctoral studies in Medieval
Jewish Philosophy and
Mysticism at the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary.
Both sessions are open to the
public. Please call the synagogue,
962-6338, to make your reser-
vations for the Sunday Brunch,
for which there will be a charge of
I $3 per person.
Tickets are available at the
front desk of the JCC and at the
box office of the Tampa Theatre.
Costs for the seats, all reserved,
are $10 for adults, $8 for seniors
and students, and $6 for children
under 13.
"We would like to see a large
turn-out for SAFAM," said JCC
President Leah Davidson. "This
promises to be a group that
everyone of every age will enjoy."
Robert A. Levin
Andy Lewis
EF Hutton & Company Inc
315 East Madison Street
Tampa, PI 33602
Telephone (813) 223-4946
Economical
PRIVATE NURSES
in Tampa 55 years
Request:
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839-6369
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Advertising
Salesperson
Wanted
Full-time. Salary/Draw. Call Joan collect or
write:
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Page 5
$uper $unday $uper $ucce$$
Continued from Page 1
the area where commitments
were being made. The volunteers
each received a Super Sunday
visor on behalf of their dedicated
effort.
Special thanks to Thomson-
McKinnon Securities for
donating their facilities and
hosting the Telethon.
Thanks to the following area
businesses for donating food for
the volunteers throughout the
day: Zyndorf's Bakery and Deli-
catessen, Marty's Sandwiches
and Salads, Sunset Delicatessen,
and Bagel Works.
The chairmen for this 1984
Telethon are Merilyn Burke, Neil
Crystal, and Debbie Gitomer.
^^H ^^^r
I *"5|
* V >UPEn XH jH ^ UNDAY _fl^H 64 ^mA f^r M
1 **' 1 239 ^H
> \^ V
H i | f
Tampa leadership directing Super Sunday (from
left) Michael Levine, president Tampa Jewish
Federation; the three co-chairmen of Super
Sunday, Merilyn Burke, Neil Crystal, Debbie
Gitomer; John Osterweil, 1984 Campaign
Chairman.

^
\A video training tape produced by Jay Kopelman
\introduced the volunteers to telephone
\ solicitation. (From left seated) Arlene Newman,
\Rick Lockenbach, Don Weinbren, David Abrams,
\Rosalyn Feldman, Alfred Haubenstoch, Bob

t\
Wise, and Dale Robbins. (Standing from left)
Marvin Newman, Joel Breitstein, director, TOP
Jewish Foundation; Steve Mendell, Merilyn
Burke, Neil Crystal, Debbie Gitomer, and Joel
Karpay.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger
Jay Older
Lois Older
'

BBG volunteers during the morning hours
pumping balloons and sending acknowledge-
ments immediately following Super Sunday
telephoning. The AZA worked during the af-
ternoon. (From left) Sheri Levenson, Frances
Saphier, Tammy Smith, Celeste Ganderson,
Stefanie Baumgarten, Dana Shriver, and Susan
Leibowitz.
Joseph Kerstein
Nancy Linsky
Nat Shorstein
Robert Lewis and Bob Levi
J


*Jewish FlcricJi&n
Of Tampa
[volume 6- Number 4
Tampa, Florida Friday, January 27,1964
" FrtdShochot
Pficv 35 Cents
$uper $unday $uper $ucce$$
Super Sunday Jan. 15
marked the opening of the 1984
Tampa Jewish Federation-UJA
Campaign. At this time $72,000
has been pledged and when all
the commitments are in the
$75,000 goal for Super Sunday
will be surpassed. This third
annual Tampa Super Sunday
shows a 21 percent increase over
last year.
As of Jan. 18 the Combined
Campaign has been pledged a
total of $550,000.
One hundred and fifteen en-
thusiastic workers donated their
time in two hour shifts during the
day. The excitement was fur-
thered by balloons being raced to
Continued on Page 5-
Annual Federation
Campaign Dinner:
Circus of Illusion Feb. 4
Rumsfeld Doubtful
U.S. Says Syria Ready to Exit Lebanon
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Reagan
Administration believes that the Syrians want to
negotiate a withdrawal of their troops from Lebanon, but
on their terms.
The Jewish Telegraphic Agency has learned that this is
the feeling of the Administration despite the lack of
progress made during special Mideast representative
Donald Rumsfeld's three-and-a-half hour talk in
Damascus with Syrian President Hafez Assad. Rumsfeld
reportedly told the Israelis later that chances for an
I ^agreement had "decreased."
Assad has made it clear that he
wants Lebanon to abrogate its
May 17 agreement with Israel
and for Israeli troops to pull out
of Lebanon before he will con-
sider the withdrawal of Syrian
troops trom that country. At his
with Rumsfeld, he
port< lly added the condition
that .d States withdraw
* troops too.
THE ADMINISTRATION
s that a major concern of
with the May 17 agreement
' will make Israel the
i"r of Lebanon. Syria sees
as the protector of Lebanon.
he U.S. does not believe that
' wants to absorb Lebanon.
something that is believed in
Israel. Instead, the Administra-
tion noted that when Lebanon
and Syria were removed from the
control of the French in 1946 the
Syrians agreed that they were
two countries, but one people. At
the same time, the Syrians
maintained that they will not let
Lebanon be used as a base or
corridor for an attack on Syria.
The U.S. has accepted that
Syria has long played an influen-
tial role in I^banon. It is believed
here that Syria wants stability in
Lebanon, and that is one of the
reasons its army first went into
the country in 1976 at the request
of the then Lebanese govern-
ment.
BUT THE Administration is
arguing that the security
arrangements that are now being
negotiated between the various
factions in Lebanon will provide
the beginning of national recon-
ciliation in Lebanon and thus
stability. Syria is believed behind
the groups opposing that agree-
ment.
However, Syria also opposes
the May 17 agreement as part of
what it sees its role as the leader
of the Arab world. They want to
derail Egypt's peace treaty with
Israel and the Camp David
process. They believe that the
Arabs can get more from Israel
united then negotiating separ-
ately and do not want to see Leb-
anon go the way of Egypt.
The Administration has both
publicly and privately supported
the agreement, which after all,
came about through the personal
mediation of Secretary of State
George Shultz. But it has been
stressing that it is not a peace
treaty and that Lebanon rejected
many Israeli demands. Instead,
the agreement is a "delicately
balanced package of compro-
mises," is the way it is put.
The 1984 Jewish Federation-
United Jewish Appeal Annual
Campaign Dinner will be taking
place on Saturday evening, Feb.
4, 7 p.m. at TECO Plaza in
Tampa. The "Circus of Illusion,"
as this year's event is known,
promises to be an evening that no
one in the Tampa Jewish commu-
nity will want to miss.
Open to all contributors
making a minimum of a $1,250
family gift, the event is being
coordinated by party-planner
Bruce Sutka. To call Sutka just a
party-planner is not enough. He
is a set designer creating a kind
of electrical field, staging parties
that end up being "events."
Sutka, who studied at Cooper
School of Art, considers himself
above all an artist. The most
recent aspect of his career was
launched with an extremely
successful benefit for the Ameri-
can Red Cross a few years ago.
Reservations can be made by
calling the Tampa Jewish
Federation at 876-1618, but hurry
as space is limited and the closing
date for reservations is Jan. 31.
No one will want to miss the
party of the year.
Cranston Vows He'd Move
U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The U.S. and Israel signed a five-
year agreement here providing
for the exchange of information
on social services and human
developent. It covers the adop-
tion of children with special
needs, services for the function-
ally impaired, housing for the
elderly, in-home day care for chil-
dren and the prevention of
juvenile delinquency.
The signatories were Israel's
Minister of Labor and Welfare
Aharon Uzan and the U.S. Assis-
tant Secretary of Health, Dorcas
Hardy.
Meanwhile, talks have begun
in Washington on the estab-
lishment of a free trade zone
between Israel and the U.S. An
agreement in principle was reach-
ed during Premier Yitzhak
Shamir's visit to Washington
late last November. The current
discussions are expected to last
for several months because of the
technical nature of the subject.
Talks between Israel and the
U.S. on the level of American
economic aid to Israel for the
next fiscal year, are scheduled to
begin in a few days in Washing-
ton. The U.S. has already ear-
marked $1.4 billion in military
assistance grants to Israel. Israel
is requesting an additional $1.3
billion in economic assistance.
Envoy Says Moellemann
Harms Peace Prospects
95 House Members Ask Shultz
To Support Ethiopian Jews
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Is-
rael's Ambassador to West
Germany, Itzchak Ben Ari,
has accused Deputy For-
I eign Minister Juergen
Moellemann of harming
Prospects for negotiations
lr> the Middle East by
urgmg the European
nations to put pressure on
Israel for concessions that
would bring Jordan to the
Peace table.
in an AJJ '*, remark. published
ma I)>e Welt interview, appeared
gS than a week before Chancel-
Dmln^" ?" Lfficial vUit to *l.
U'piomats here said it was
"usual for an envoy S so 8J".
gover^T member of the
|pS?nt. Moe"eniann is
r9ldnt of the German-Arab
Friendship Association and the
most outspoken critic of Israel on
the Bonn political scene.
BEN ARI expressed hopes
that Moellemann *s statements
would be seen in Jerusalem as a
one-skied reflection of Arab
interests and not damage the
prospects for fruitful dialogue
between Kohl and Israeli leaders
this week.
According to Ben Ari, Israel's
"Arab neighbors, and notably
Jordan, have been taking the
unrealistic stance that the
Europeans and Americans can
pull their chestnuts out of the fire
for them. Amman is therefore
sticking to its line of refraining
from peace talks with Israel.'"
Moellemann has no contacts
with Israeli diplomats in Bonn.
Although he accompanied Kohl
on his recent visits to Saudi
Arabia, Egypt and Jordan, he is
not accompanying him to Israel.
Also Urged To Increase U.S. Aid
To Drought Stricken Nation
WASHINGTON December
5, 1983 Ninety-five members
of the U.S. House of Representa-
tives sent a letter to Secretary of
State George Shultz, November
22, expressing their concern for
the particular plight of the ap-
proximately 20,000 Ethiopian
Jews. They also asked the Ad-
ministration to reply "promptly"
to requests from international
relief agencies and members of
Congress for stepped up aid to
drought stricken Ethiopia.
Conditions in Ethiopia due to
the drought and famine have
"reached crisis proportions,"
according to the letter. "At least
three million" Ethiopians are
endangered by the drought and
"there is fear that the death and
destruction wrought by the
famine and drought of 1973-74
may be repeated.' According to
official reports, the letter said, 50-
150 people have been dying every
day in Ethiopia since June.
A Congressional delegation
touring Africa met with
Ethiopian officials in August,
1983, to discuss increasing U.S.
relief aid, US-Ethiopian rela-
tions in general, and the plight of
the Ethiopian Jews. The letter to
Secretary Schultz said that the
obstacles to the free emigration
of Ethiopian Jews to Israel "are
not insurmountable.''
The American Association For
Ethiopian Jews, Bread for the
World, and the Interreligious
Task Force on Food Policy have
all been instrumental in lobbying
Congress and the Agency for
International Development to al-
locate increased funds for relief
supplies and food for Ethiopia in
the wake of the worsening crisis.
The American Association for
Ethiopian Jews is a nonprofit or-
ganization founded in 1973 to
assist Ethiopian Jews in reaching
Israel and to educate the Amer-
ican Jewish community and the
American public on the Falashas'
plight. The Association has more
than 19,000 members, and is
headquartered in Chicago, 111.


Congregations/'Organizations Events
JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER
Enhancing Intimacy in Your
Relationship
The topic for the next JCC
Lunch Bunch on Wednesday,
Feb. 8, from 10-12 at the Peking
Restaurant will be "Enhancing
Intimacy in your Relationship."
"With the many demands *
placed upon us in this complex
world, achieving the kind of
closeness we truly want in our
relationship becomes increasing-
ly difficult," say Dr. David
Richter and Rudina Richter,
guest speakers for this lecture
and open discussion. The
Richters are family therapists in
private practice and would like to
share their years of experience on
this subject.
This program and lunch at the
Peking Restaurant, 2310 N. Dale
Mabry, will be $8 which includes
babysitting 6y reservation only.
Reservations may be made
with Muriel Feldman at the JCC,
872-4451.
Jonathan Levine
Charles Miller
Car\-n Zielonka
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
JONATHAN LEVINE
Jonathan David Levine, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Edward Levine, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Jan. 28 at 10 a.m. at
Congregation Kol Ami. Rabbi
Leonard Rosenthal will officiate.
Jonathan is a student in the
Hey Class at Congregation Kol
Ami and is a member of Kadima.
He is in the seventh grade at
Sligh Junior High School and a
forward on the Tampa Bay
Rangers Soccer Team.
Dr. and Mrs. Levine will host
the Oneg Shabbat and Kiddush
following the services. They will
also host a reception on Jan. 28 at
the Marriott Hotel in honor of the
occasion.
Special guests will include
grandparents, Mr. Irving Levine
and Mrs. Eve Levine, New York
City, and Mr. Israel Nurman and
Mrs. Rachel Nurman, New York
City; aunts and uncles, Mr. and
Mrs. Robert Malhin, Phoenix;
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Nurman,
Tampa: Mr. Freddie Nurman,
New York City; Mr. Judi Levine,
Phoenix, and Mrs. Wendy
Gilbert. Phoenix; and special
friends, Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Gralla, New York City.
CHARLES MILLER
Charles Miller, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Max Miller, will lead ser-
vices on Jan. 27 and will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Jan. 28 at 10 a.m. at Congre-
gation Rodeph Sholom. Rabbi
Kenneth Berger and Cantor
William Hauben will officiate.
Special guests will include
grandparents. Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Miller from Bangor, Maine.
CARYN ZIELONKA
Caryn Michelle Zielonka.
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Carl I.
Zielonka. will be called to the
Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on Jan.
28 at 11 a.m. at Congregation
Schaarai Zedek. Rabbi Frank
Sundheim will officiate.
Charles is in the eighth grade
at Middleton Junior High School.
He participates in youth soccer
and his team has won the district
championship for the past two
years.
Mr. and Mrs. Miller will host
the Oneg Shabbat and Kiddush
following services in honor of the
occasion.
Community Calendar
Friday, January 27
Candlelighting time 5:46 p.m.
Saturday, January 28
OR" Ba^ Horizons
Sunday, January 29
Schaarai Zedek Adult Education Mini-Series, 9:30 Jewish Wo;
Veterans, 9 30; JWV Auxiliary, 10 a.m. at JCC Rodeph Sholom
Sisterhood Torah Fund Luncheon, 11 a.m.
Monday, January 30
Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Open Board Meeting, 9-12
Community Relations Committee of Tampa Jewish Federation, 8
p.m
Tuesday, January 31
Jewish Towers Board Meeting, 4 p.m.
Wednesday, February 1
Kol Ami Senior Socialites, 12 noon Kol Ami Sisterhood Board
Meeting, 7 45 p.m Rodeph Sholom Board Meeting, 8 p.m.
Tampa Jewish Federation Board Meeting, 8 p.m.
Thursday, February 2
JCC Food Co-op, 10-12 ORT-Tampa Evening Chapter, 9:30
B'nai B'nth Area Meeting at Hillel USF, 7:30 Schaarai Zedek -
Kotler Memorial Lecture Professor Lowefl McCoy of HUC-JIR, 8
p.m.
Friday, February 3
Candlelighting time 5:52 p.m. Kol Ami Adult Education
Weekend
Saturday, February 4
Kol Ami Adult Education Weekend Continues Kol Ami
Religious School Havdallah, 6 p.m. Brandon Chavurah -
party, 8 p m TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION CAMPAIGN EVENT -
CIRCUS OF ILLUSION, 7 P.M. TECO PLAZA
Caryn is in the seventh grade
at Congregation Schaarai
Zedek"s Religious School and is a
member of the Junior Youth
Group. She is also in the seventh
grade at Berkeley Preparatory
School where she has been on the
Headmaster's List each grading
period. She is a class I gymnast
at LaFleur's Gymnastic Club in
Largo. She was also the sixth
grade art editor for Berkeley's
literary magazine, Soundings.
Carol Zielonka will host the
Oneg Shabbat on Friday evening
in honor of her granddaughter.
Dr. and Mrs. Zielonka will host
the Kiddush luncheon following
services tomorrow at Congre-
gation Schaarai Zedek.
Caryn's grandparents are Sara
Lena and Paul Shapiro, Shreve-
port, Louisiana, and Carol
Zielonka. Tampa, and the late
Rabbi David Zielonka.
Special guests will include
Sarah Boutte and Marguerite
May from Zachary, Louisiana:
Jackie, Sheldon, Marianne
Mollye, and Ilene Fleschman
from Overland Park, Kansas;
Suzanne, Paul, Stephanie and
Lisa Gellens from Sarasota; Joan
and Elihu Harris from Cin-
cinnati; Lenora Kleban, Libby
Lipson, Bett and Ralph Segal I.
Paul and Sara Lena Shapiro, all
from Shreveport; Peter and
Alfred Eric Levine from Los I
Angeles; Kate Groner from
Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Harvey I
and Marcia Lebos from Savan- i
nan, Georgia; Michele and |
Stephen Morrow and Sharon, I
Marty, Lisa and Michael Roth-,
berg from Miami; Louise and '
Nathan Rothberg from Royal'
Palm Beach, Florida; Helene and
Gordon Saskin from St.
Petersburg, Jane and Henri
Teichelr from New York City;
Frances Weill and Clarice
Weinstein from New Orleans;
Judie Fred, Mark and Scott
Widerman from Cocoa Beach,
Florida; and Marty and David
Zielonka from Gastonia, North
Carolina.
Drama at the JCC
The Tampa Alliance of
Dramatic Arts is coming to the
Jewish Community Center for a
ten week workshop beginning
Monday, Feb. 6, from 4:30-6 p.m.
The 10 week workshop is open to
children in third through 12th
grade for $55.
This will be a workshop in
creative dramatics culminating in
a public performance on Satur-
day. April 14. The workshop will
be conducted by Kathi Grau and
Darryln Caudill of "TA-DA,"
both state certified teachers
trained in the visual and per-
forming arts. This is a process
rather than a product oriented
workshop, therefore the childrens
ideas will be used in an ensemble
format production at the end of
the ten weeks. The play will be
chosen according to what best
suits the group attending the
workshop. The production will
reiterate the theory that the sum
of it's parts equal the whole.
The workshop will also be held
at Kol Ami Beginning Feb. 8,
Wednesday, from 4:30-6 p.m.
CONGREGATION
RODEPH SHOLOM
ADL Director to Speak
Leslye Winkelman, West
Florida Regional Director of the
Anti-Defamation League will
address Congregation Rodeph
Sholom during Shabbat Services
Feb. 3 on "Anti-Semitism Today;
Are We Really threatened?"
Winkelman has recently
moved to Tampa from Houston,
Tex., where she was Assistant
Director of the Southwest
Region. She has also served as
Staff Consultant in the agency's
New York office. She holds a
Masters of Social Work degree in
Community Organization from
Yeshiva University.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
Women in Power Tampa Style
Sexism In Health Care
Tampa Section, National
Council of Jewish Women will
present "Sexism In Health Care"
Thursday. Feb. 9. 7 p.m. at Univ-
ersity Community Hospital.
Dr. Linda Whiteford will be the
keynote speaker on "Cultural and
Historical Reasons for the Exist-
ence and Continuation of Sexism
in HealthCare."
This will be followed by four
workshops covering childcare,
gynecology, menopause and
gerontology. Workshop leaders
are Dr. Jan Judisch, Dr. Janette
Sasmore, Dr. Bonnie Saks and
Vivan Ross.
The public is welcome to at-
tend this program and there is an
admission charge of $2.50.
Dessert and coffee will be served
from 7-7:30 and the program
scheduled from 7:30 to 10 p.m.
963-21001
For further information oil!
2766.
B'NAI BRITH
Bowling League
B'nai B'rith has a t
League in formation accorum
Michael Yoelson, chairm^
short league is planned now,
a full Summer and Winter lean,
being formed for the remainS
the year. To sign up, qZ1
Yoelson at 963-1629or!
HILLEL
USFUT Programs
Dr. Reuben Luckens, Schob
in-Residence and Authority
Jewish Mysticism for Hillel
well received by students, fac
and community on Jan.
With the response so positiv.1
Dr. Luckens will probably ret
to the Tampa area. Dr. Ru
Adler, outstanding Talmuditl
scholar, found an equally
thusiastic crowd responding
his talk.
Upcoming Hillel events
USFUT softball game, sup
bowl party, ping-pong tourr*|
ment, Kosher Kooking Kontestl
joint programming with JSU.I
and a weekend get-away. Dr.'
Steven Kaplan, Hillel director I
and rabbi, will be offering classeJ
in Jewish Customs and Cer-'
emonies, Jewish History and I
Thought. Adult Bar-Bat Mit
zvah, Jewish Philosophy and
Theology, and the Torah. Those
interested in attening are urged
to call the office at 988-7076.
No fee required.
SENIORS
Jewish Mysticism
Would you like to learn more
about the ancient healing plants
and herbs? Rabbi Theodore Brod,
scholar in residence at Rodeph
Sholom. will conduct a series of
lectures on this and other sub-
jects as found in the Kabala.
Class sessions will be held on Fri-
day mornings from 10 to 11 a.m.
through Feb. 24 at the Jewish
Community Center.
Wine and Cheese Party
Are you 40 plus (single or
married)? Do you consider your-
self vital and alive? Are you look-
ing for new friends who share
your interests in social, cultural'
or sports activities? You are
invited to attend the kick-off
event of "Club Variety." a new
social organization. Join us on
Saturday night Feb. 18 at 8 p.m.
for a Wine and Cheese Party.
RSVP with a check for $3 per
person by Feb. 10 to the Jewish
Community Center, 2808
Horatio, Tampa, Florida 33609.
This is open to the public.
For details on this and future
events call Barbara Powell at the
JCC 872-4451. Follow up acti
vities will be selected at the
party.
Bar-Bat Mitzvah,
A REMINDER
wedding and engagement
-v_i -" engagement forms are
available at all of the synagogues or may be picked up at the
rot^nedLTud'a?r !"5 **!*" ""* competed and
ZZ5Z? no bter than two fuU w~k- **jt
.
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swarm Avenue 251-4218 Rabbi Samuel Mailing*r Services:
Friday. 8 p.m.; Saturday. 0 a.m. Dally mornlnf and evening mlnyan, 7:10
a.m..5:4Bpm
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Ceaservative
8919 Moran Road 082-8338 Rabbi Leonard Rosenthal Service!
Friday.8p.m.; Saturday. 10a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM OWW
271S Bayshore Boulevard > 837-1911 Rabbi Kemeth Barter. Hassan
William Hauben Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a m. Daily:
Mlnyan. 7: IB.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
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23SHEVAT5744
Number 1
Friday, January 27, 1984
Volume 6
Meeting in Jerusalem
Some say that one of the many reasons
Menachem Begin resigned as Prime
Minister of Israel is that last October West
German Chancellor Helmut Kohl was due
to visit him in Jerusalem. Begin could not,
so the story goes, face the prospect of
welcoming West Germany's leader to the
Jewish State, so engrained in him still is
the anguish he feels about the Hitler
period.
There is at least some substance to this.
In the final days of Chancellor Helmut Sch-
midt's office, Begin had some decidedly
undiplomatic things to say about Schmidt,
which among other things focused on Sch-
midt's young years during the Nazi era.
Begin could simply never restrain himself
on this issue.
Apparently, one hopes that Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir will have no such
crippling feelings when he welcomes
Chancellor Kohl to Jerusalem this week.
Shamir is reported by his close aides to be
far sturdier physically and far less
emotional than Begin was.
But this does not mean that Shamir can
be expected to be more polite and less
-"ftjillirtght about the major questions'
~*****?frv'idirtg the two countries at this time.
Mainly at issue are the arms deals that
Bonn recently arranged with Arab
countries some of them consummated
when Kohl visited these countries on his
Middle Eastern tour last October when he
was also scheduled to stop off in Jerusalem
for a meeting with Mr. Begin.
To put the potential impact on Israel of
these arms deals into perspective, one need
only be reminded that but a few short
weeks ago, it was officially confirmed in the
Bundestag that Bonn will sell arms to
Saudi Arabia in the near future.
A letter of protest the other day from the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation to West
Germany's Ambassador to the United
States in Washington and to Bonn's
Consul in Miami lists the variety of the
proposed arms sale package: Tornado
aircraft, advanced Leopard tanks, Roland
II surface-to-air mobile missile systems
the list is formidable and lengthier still.
No wonder the Israelis and Jews
throughout the world are concerned. Nor is
this concern eased by the knowledge that
Deputy Foreign Minister Juergen
Moellemann has played a jubilant hand
behind-the-scenes in these arms sales
developments and, what is more, with the
approval of Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher.
Moellemann, our Page One story on this
issue reports today, is the president of the
German-Arab Society in his country. While
this may explain a lot of things, it hardly
makes them any pleasanter.
What all of this adds up to is a strained
meeting between Chancellor Kohl and
Prime Minister Shamir. We may not know
the full import of this meeting for some
time. But one thing is already clear: the so-
called "special relationship" that existed
between Israel and West Germany almost
from the moment of the founding of the
State of Israel in 1948 is now a thing of the
past.
Time In Jerusalem
By ARNO HERZBERG
BONN Chancellor
Helmut Kohl is scheduled
to visit Israel this week. He
intended to go there last
October as the first stop on
a swing through the Middle
East. But Menachem
| Begin's illness and his
resignation as Premier
made it necessary for Kohl
to postpone his visit to the
Jewish State.
In the meantime, relations
between the two countries have
deteriorated. After years of hesit-
ating to deliver arms to "areas of
tension," West Germany has
embarked on a selling spree to
Arab counries. Germany wants
to sell sophisticated military
hardware long sought by Israel's
enemies. The lure of the petro-
dollar is, after all, too great to
pass up.
THERE IS a change going on
in Germany. Official policy is
moving away from the "special
relationship" to Israel that was
an outgrowth of the past. In the
wake of a new approach to war
and peace, and as a matter of self-
assertion, the past might be for-
gotten. Germany wants to be free
to deal with the Middle East
conflict in its own way.
When Kohl visited Arab coun-
tries last October, he went in
search of orders for military
hardware. When he returned, not
much was said publicly about the
success or failure of his quest.
But soon after, high-ranking del-
egations from Arab countries
. came here to look at the materiel
. Germany had to offer and a few
weeks ago it was officially con-
firmed in the Bundestag that
Bonn will sell arms to Saudi
Arabia in the near future.
The man who confirmed this
was Deputy Foreign Minister
Juergen Moellemann. In his
"private" life he is the president
of the German-Arab Society.
Some time ago, he accepted this
"honor with the approval for
Foreign Minister Hans-Dietrich
Genscher. "I am a politician who
is especially interested in the
problems of the Arab region,"
Moellemann explained.
ACTUALLY, he is the head of
a powerful pro-Arab lobby which
has infiltrated the German
government and is hard at work
to change public opinion about
the Arabs and Israel.
There is nothing new about a
lobby representing the Arab
cause. What makes the German-
Arab Society so special is that of-
ficials participating in formulat-
ing the nation's policies are, at
the same time, active part-
icipants in the Society's lobbying
efforts.
After it was founded in 1965,
the German-Arab Society was
fairly inactive. This changed with
the Arab oil embargo following
the Yom Kippur War, with the
spread of petrodollars and with
the changed political climate in
the Middle East.
Presently, the society is the
center of Arab propaganda in
Germany. Its influence has
grown in spite of the fact that it
does not have more than 750
members. Included in the
membership are 200 powerful
corporations, prominent poli-
ticians and civil service
bureaucrats. The Arabs supply
the money, if necessary, to keep
the machinery of the organization
running smoothly.
IT IS NO secret that the Arab
League and several Arab embas-
sies support the Society. This or-
ganization is, as an article in the
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
Arms Sales to Arabs
Seen as Burning Issue
CHANCELLOR HELMUT KOHL
recently called it, "a faithful
partner of the Arabs."
During the war in Lebanon, the
Society gained national publicity
when it obtained the names of
150 German politicians, scient-
ists, theologians and journalists
on a petition demanding that
Israel unconditionally get out of
Lebanon. The Society is also
active in trying to open markets
for German industry in Arab
countries and cement German-
Arab political bonds.
Since 1980, Arab lobbyists in
Germany have tried to persuade
policymakers to sell arms to
Arabs. At that time, the British
newspaper. Observer, reported
about Germany's negotiations
with Libya. Saudi Arabia, Iraq
and Syria. It disclosed the vital
role a German company by the
name of Magirus-Deutz played in
the Yom Kippur War.
THIS COMPANY devised a
method to breach the fortifica-
tions and barriers erected on the
Israeli side of the Suez Canal. It
manufactured a water cannon
which was delivered to Egypt one
week before the outbreak of the
war. The firm's engineers super-
vised the training of Egyptians in
the use of the water cannon. Par-
enthetically, it is interesting to
note that Magirus-Deutz refused
to do business with Israel.
Israel is very well aware of the
turn in German policy, despite
efforts by politicians such as
Moellemann to minimize the
seriousness of the situation. He
told the Parliament recently that
the sale of military hardware to
Saudi Arabia will not affect Is-
rael's security. Other pro-Arab
apologists, in what has become a
game of terminology, seek to dis-
tinguish between "offensive" and
"defensive" weapons. Israel has
rejected this distinction without
a difference.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir in-
structed Deputy Foreign Min-
ister Yehuda Ben-Meir to
summon the German Ambas-
sador and to deliver a stiff
complaint about the intended
arms sale to Arb countries. Kohl
has a lot of explaining to do when
he meets with Israeli officials in
Jerusalem.
ISRAELS POSITION on the
arms sale is not new. Last
August. Begin told German of-
ficials that Germanv has no
moral right to sell arms to Arab*/1
At that time, it was reported that
Saudi Arabia wanted to buy 300
German Leopard tanks which
rate as about the best in the
world and which would give
Saudi Arabia a definite tech-
nological advantage over Israeli
armor.
Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia
started some adroit maneuvering
behind the scenes. If they cannot
buy the tanks outright, they
might as well buy the company
that manufactures the tanks. The
Saudis have sought to acquire 24
percent of the share of Rhein-
met all A.G. Such an acquisition
would give them a formidabk
voice in company affairs, a veto
over sales, and a political foot-
hold of major proportions on I
world scale.
Frequently, a look behind the
scenes reveals a great deal about
ongoing and changing policies. It
is to explain the continuing and
constant extension of the Arab
Israeli conflict involving more
and more governments. It also
points to the harsh reality that
government policies are not
permanent but really quite
ephemeral. So, too, Germany's
"special relationship" to Israel
cannot withstand the factor of
time and what Germany sees as
more urgent and imperative real-
ities.
JTA Feature Syndicate
Herzog, Wife
Welcomed
TEL AVIV IJTAI -
President Chaim Herzog and hi*
wife, Ora, received a warm
welcome last week when they
arrived at Kinshasa, Zaire, the
first Black African nation U>
restore diplomatic ties with Israel
after breaking them during the
Yom Kippur War. Herzog. on nil
first African tour since taking
office, will also visit Liberia.
Israeli reporters accompanying
the Presidential party, said the
road from Kinshasa airport to
President Mobutu Sese Seko'a
residence was lined w>tn
thousands of people waving
Israeli flags. The government
daily. Elima, called Herzog i
visit "the consecration of
renewed friendship between Zaire
and Israel."