The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00126

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
wjewist FilariidlHai in
Volume 3 Number 42
Off Tampa
Tampa, Florida Friday, December 4,1981
''tfSAOCW'
Price 35 Centa
Record Budget Adopted by Federation;
Shortfall Raises Serious Concerns
A record budget distributing
$870,000 to local, national and
overseas agencies was adopted
by the Tampa Jewish Federation
Board of Directors last week.
The budget adoption
represents months of deliberation
and meetings by the Federation
Budget and Allocation Com-
mittee. The committee chaired by
Mike Levine, included Terry Aid-
man, Herbert Friedman, Maril
Jacobs, George Karpay, Edward
Leibowitz, Franci Rudolph, Gol-
die Shear, Herbert Swarzman, M.
William Saul, and Hope Barnett,
Federation President.
"While the 1981 Campaign
raised the largest amount ever in
the history of the Tampa Jewish
community, budget requests
totaled $70,000 more than was
available for allocation," Levine
reported. "This presented the
budget committee and Board of
Directors the difficult task of
trying to meet the necessary
budget requirements of each
agency without the dollars being
available." The budget require-
ments of each agency were re-
viewed by subcommittees and
the full budget committee and
they represent real community
needs. Our campaign shortfall
has placed us in the unenviable
position of facing cutbacks in
service during the 1981-82 budget
year," Levine concluded.
The largest amount approved
by the Board was for United
Jewish Appeal and overseas
needs. Following the announced
pre campaign formula of 45 per-
cent of the gross campaign going
to United Jewish Appeal,
$391,500 was allocated to UJA.
That left $375,000 to be
distributed to local and national
agencies.
Hope Barnett, President of the
Tampa Jewish Federation stated
that "our local community
agencies have been most sym-
pathetic to our budgeting
dilemma and are revising their
budgets to minimize the curtail-
ment of their services; but they
all recognize that unless the
amount needed in 1982 is
realized, we face the real possibil-
ity of putting our agencies out of
business, at a time when the need
and demand for services are
expanding."
How will the local agencies fare
under the budget allocations?
For the current year (July 1,
1981-June 30, 1982) here is how
the funds from the 1981 cam-
paign were distributed:
Foundation
River Garden
B.B.Y.O.
Jewish Floridian
of Tampa
T.O.P. Jewish .
Foundation
Florida Legislative
Consultant
Tampa Jewish
Federation
National Agencies
ofCJF
Campaign Results
Shrinkage (5 percent)
Campaign Expenses
United Jewish
Appeal
Available for
Allocation
AGENCIES
Jewish Community
Center
Tampa Jewish
Social Service
Hussian Reaettlemen
Hillel School
of Tampa
Chai Dial-A-Bus
State Hillel
1981-82
$870,000
43,500
60,000
$766,600
391,500
$375,000
$88,200
71,000
15,140
37,000
8,000
6,000
+ 11,200
1,000
5,600
20,000
3,800
93,060
$360,000
15,000
$375,000
+Includes monthly mainten-
ance deficit for residents from
Tampa.
While the figures abot look like
generous allocations, the local
agencies requests totaled
$430,710. That is $70,000 more
than was available. That is what
makes the budget committees job
so difficult. Not only were the
local allocations less than were
requested, the allocations also
came later than scheduled. The
fiscal year began July 1, 1981,
but the campaign at that time
was at such a low point, the
decision was made to have a spe-
cial emergency appeal at the close
of the campaign. Only at the con-
clusion of that special effort did
the Federation Allocations
committee begin its
deliberations.
At the start of the 1981 cam-
paign, many thought the cam-
paign goal of $1,000,000 was pure
rhetoric. Repeatedly it was stated
that this figure represented the
community agencies needs
combined with the "45 percent
formula" for UJA. The difference
in the local agencies receiving
during this past year.
The three largest community
agencies did receive increases
The Jewish Community Center
received $8,200 more than last
year; the Tampa Jewish Social
Service received $10,000 more
than last year and Hillel School
received $2,000 more than last
year.
While these three agencies re-
ceived $206,200, their total alloc-
ation requests were $255,150.
(Last year, these three agencies
received a total of $176,000).
Tamrja has the means to
deliver services. Tampans are
used to receiving services. Now,
Tampa must raise the $$$ to
support these services.
PLO Week at UN Features
Photos of Israel's 'Victims'
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Gruesome photo-
graphs of maimed Pales-
tinian children, women and
men, allegedly the victims
of Israeli aggression, was
displayed here this week at
an exhibition sponsored by
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
The exhibition, titled "The
Palestinian Invalid," is part of
the events and activities of the
UN Palestine Week, which
opened here Monday. In addition
to the PLO-sponsored exhibition,
the UN itself presented an
exhibition featuring the Pales-
tinian's culture and way of life,
and emphasing their "inalienable
rights" to self-determination.
PALESTINE WEEK began
with a special meeting of the
General Assembly attended by
Secretary General Kurt Wald-
hiem who as in previous years
delivered a short speech
honoring the yearly event Dur-
ing the week, the UN also
screened the documentary film.
'Palestinians Do Have Rights,
which was produced two years
ago by the UN under PLO di-
rection and supervision.
On Tuesday, the General
Assembly opened
Palestinian Debate" a yearly
exercize in anti-Israel speeches,
culminating in n over-
whelminghr adP^, /?'
lution calling for the establish-
ment of a Palestinian state.
Yehuda Blum. Israel's Am-
bassador to the United Nations,
presented Israels view at the
debate claiming that tn*
Palestinians already have a state
of their own Jordan and
that the autonomy talks,
currently underway between Is-
rael, Egypt and the United
States, are the solution to the
Palestinian problem.
ISRAELI DIPLOMATS at
the UN pointed out that begin-
ning with Palestine Week, Israel
upheld under relentless fire in the
form of anti-Israeli resolutions in
the Assembly for the next two
weeks.
In addition to an anti-Israel
resolution at the conclusion of the
"Palestinian Debate," there will
also be anti-Israel resolutions at
the end of the debate on the
"Mideast Question" and on
various other items before the
Assembly, such as Israel's rela-
tions with South Africa, Israel's
treatment of the Palestinian
population on the West Bank and
Gaza Strip, and Israel's archa-
eological excavation. The debate
on the "Mideast Question" is
scheduled to begin Dec. 7.
The Mideast will also be on the
agenda of the Security Council
Dec. 18.
NJ. Police Patrol
Activity on Rise
FAIR LAWN, N.J. (JTA)
Police patrols have been in-
creased at all the six synagogues
in this middle class community
following the desecration of two
synagogues several days ago.
Swastikas and anti-Semitic
slogans were spraypainted on
Shomrei Torah and Temple Beth
Sholom.
In addition, vandals also
daubed anti-Semitic epithets and
swastikas on the Fair Lawn Jew-
ish Center, the community's
water tower and the door of an
auto shop at the high school.
Women's Plea For
Soviet Jewry Dec, 9
It has been jointly announced
by Franci Rudolph, President of
the Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division, and Connie
Spitolnick, President of B'nai
B'rith Women, that Tampa will
observe the Women's Plea for
Soviet Jewry on Wednesday
Evening, Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m. in the
Library of the Jewish Com-
munity Center. The two groups,
are jointly sonsoring the program
which is open to the entire com-
munity.
The special guest speaker will
be Mrs. Faina Tsukerman, wife of
Soviet Refusenik Vladimir
Tsukerman. Mrs. Tsukerman
was born in Kishnev in 1956 and
studied Phycology at the Univer-
sity of Kishnev. She married
Vladimir in January 1974; their
son Aleksander was born on
June, 1975. In 1978 she immi-
grated to Israel with her son and
parents. Her husband was re-
fused permission to leave because
of his military service.
The story of Vladimir Tsuker-
man is unfortunately similar to
thousands of other "prisoners of
Zion" residing within the Soviet
Union, caught in a vicious
"Catch 22" in which he was fired
from his job as soon as he applied
for exit visa to join his wife and
family in Israel, he was subse-
quently placed in the criminal
ranks as an "economic parasite"
because he had no job. After be-
ing turned down repeatedly in his
request for emmigration on the
premise that he was once in the
Soviet Navy (discharged in 1975)
and therefore was privy to "state
secrets," he became increasingly
frustrated. He resorted to a
peaceful demonstration outside
Faina Tsukerman
the OVIR office in Kishnev and
was immediately arrested for
"disturbing public order;" he
now awaits trial.
Mrs. Tsukerman has been
touring this country in an at-
tempt to win support for her
husband and the thousands like
him. It is a fact that the flood of
Russian Jewish em migrants
which started in 1970 has slowed
to barely a trickle. From a recond
high at 51,303 Jews leaving
Russia in 1979, the numbers have
decreased to the point where only
405 wer permitted to leave in
October with eve less expected
out this month. Only public pres-
sure can help change the tide and
that is why meetings such as this
are of the utmost importance.
For inquiries as to the program
on Wednesday, Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m.
in the Library of the Jewish
Community Center, call the
Tampa Jewish Federation office
872-4451.
Arab Moderate Shot on W.
Bank Dies of Wounds
JERUSALEM Yussuf Al-
Khatib, an Arab moderate shot
by terrorists, died of his wounds
at the Hadassah Medical Center
here. Al-Khatib, 60, was the
chairman of the Ramallah Region
Farmers Association which co-
operated with Israeli authorities
on the West Bank.
He was ambushed while
driving to Ramallah with his son,
Khazem, 23, who was killed
instantly by a fusillade of bullets.
The Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization in Beirut claimed
responsibility for the act and re-
peated death threats to other
Arab moderates.
MUSTAPHA DOUDIN, head
of the Hebron Region Farmers
Association, has been under 24-
hour guard since the assault on
the Al-Khatibs. His colleague,
Bishara Kawmisaiya of Beth-
lehem said that the village asso-
ciations would continue to func-
tion despite the assassination of
Al-Khatib and the threats to oth-
ers.
The associations were estab-
lished with the encouragement of
/the Israeli Military Government
to counter pro-PLO elements on
the West Bank.
Scattered incidents were
meanwhile reported on the West
Bank. Security forces used tear
gas to disperse youthful Arab
demonstrators in Banina village
near Hebron where tires were
burned and rocks were thrown at
Israeli vehicles.
THE DEMONSTRATION
followed complaints by villagers
that Jewish settlers had smashed
the headlights on their cars.
Youths threw rocks at a vehicle
passing the Dayaishe refugee
camp slightly injuring a
passenger.
Meanwhile, protests over the
demolition of three houses in Beit
Sahour and one in Bethlehem
continue. Mayor Hanna Al-
Atrash of Beit Sahour appeared
at a Rskah (Communist) Party
sponsored press conference to de-
mand compensation. The houses
were blown up because members
of the owning families allegedly
threw gasoline bombs at Israeli
vehicles.
This JTA report was filed in
Jerusalem by Gil Sedan.


Page2
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, December
Stein Named Florida's Outstanding
Young Woman of the Year
a^M Graduate and Editor-in Chief of
the Stetson Law Review.
Leslie Reicin Stein, Tampa
attorney, has been named
Florida's Outstanding Young
Woman of the Year for 1981.
Mrs. Stein is the daughter of
Frank and Abranita Reicin of
Chicago, Illinois. She is the wife
of Tampa attorney Richard
Nathan Stein, son of Connie and
Melvin Stein, Tampa, and the
mother of Michael Bennett, a
student at Berkeley Lower
School. She, along with the wo-
men representing each of the
other 49 states and the District of
Columbia were considered for the
Ten Outstanding Young Women
of America awards.
Nominated for this honor by
Rosalyn Schiro Cherry of Tampa,
Mrs. Stein's biography and
record of accomplishments will
appear in the 1981 awards
volume Outstanding Young
Women of America.
Leslie Stain is the Labor and
Employment Law Attorney for
the General Telephone Company
of Florida. She received her AB
Leslie Reicin Stein
with Distinction from the Uni-
versity of michigan and a MA in
History from the University of
South Florida. She received her
JD with honors from Stetson
University College of Law where
she was most Outstanding Law
After graduation from law
school she was Associate General
Counsel at the University of
South Florida and Chairman of
the State University System
Attorney's Association.
Leslie is Chairman of the Cor-
porate Counsel Committee of the
Hillsborough County Barr Asso-
ciation and is an active member
of the Florida Bar Association,
the American Bar Association
and the Florida Women's Bar
Association. She is a member of
the City of Tampa Civil Service
Board, the Children's Home
Board, the Athena Society, Inc.,
the Florida Women's Network,
Inc., the Greater Tampa
Chamber of Commerce, and the
League of Women Voters. She is
a Phi Beta Kappa, a Phi Kappa
Phi and a Branstrom Book
Award Winner.
Try Falls Flat
Reagan Attempts to Calm Fears
President Reagan made a
major effort last week to
try to allay the fears that
have arisen in the American
Jewish community in the
aftermath of the debate
over the sale of AW ACS
surveillance planes and
other military equipment to
Saudi Arabia.
But at the end of the day, dur-
ing which the President met with
two groups of Jews, Howard
Squadron, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
said that while he was "satisfied"
that Reagan. *tas..'lsinceTe" jn
wishing to'allay" the concerns,
there would have to be "tangible
things" done before these fears
would go away.
SPECIFICALLY, Squadron
said that while Reagan re-
iterated his support for the
Camp Daivd peace process, there
should be a "more active part in
the Camp David process" by the
Administration, "pushing harder
for autonomy."
Reagan also expressed his con-
cern over the emergence of anti-
Semitism during the AWACS
debate, Squadron said. But the
Jewish leader said the President
should express his concern, not
just to Jews, but to a more
general group.
Squadron made his remarks to
reporters after he had led a dele-
gation of more than 20 repre-
sentatives of the Presidents Con-
ference to the meeting with
Reagan. The group first met with
Vice President George Bush,
White House Counselor Edwin
Meeee. National Security Ad-
viser Richard Allen, and Eliza-
beth Dole, a special adviser to the
President for public liaison, be-
fore they were joined by Reagan.
A similar scenario took place
Thursday morning whan some 30
Jewish Republicans mat with
At both meetings, the Jewish
leaders expressed thair concerns
"strongly and firmly," Squadron
said Ha noted that the President
gave basically the same response
at both meetings.
JACOB STEIN, the Presi-
dent's special liaison to the Jew-
ish community, in a telephone in-
terview with the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, said that the
meetings war* an "important
tap in setting the record
straight" and ware "a forward
movement" in claaiing up rela-
tions with the Jewish com-
that a great deal
It
of the time at both meetings was
devoted to the concern by the
Jewish leaders with the favorable
view the Reagan Administration
has taken toward the eight-point
plan porposed by Crown Prince
Fahd of Saudi Arabia.
Squadron said Reagan re-
iterated his support for the Camp
David process as the means for
achieving peace in the Mideast.
He said that Reagan felt that the
Fahd plan showed "some hope"
and demonstrated a "less belli-
gerent attitude" than earlier
Saudi calls for & jihad (holy war)
against Israel. Reagan said he
"thought that this kind of hope
ought to be pursued," Squadron
aatdv--::--
IN REPLY, Squadron said he
told the President that he was
"concerned" that the Saudis "are
not serious" about helping the
peace process. He pointed out
that Saudi Arabia did not lose
any territory in the 1967 Six-Day
War, and they had nothing to
negotiate with Israel. He said
they could sign e peace agree-
ment with Israel, a step which he
said Israel would welcome.
Reagan said the Saudis are
considered leaders in their region
and can be "useful" in getting
other countries to join the peace
process, Squadron said.
Stein, who participated in the
meeting between Reagan and the
Presidents Conference, stressed
that Reagan had declared he was
committed to following the Camp
David process, not the Fahd
plan, as the path to peace in the
Middle East.
SQUADRON noted that both
Meaae and the President recon-
firmed the statements Reagan
made to the Presidents Con-
ference on Sept. 16, i960 whan
Reagan waa a candidate for the
presidency. Squadron said this
included support for a united
Jerusalem under Israeli
sovereignty, opposition to a
Palestinian state and refusal by
the United SUtea to deal with the
Palestine Liberation Organisa-
tion until it ended its terrorism
and accepted United Nations
Security Council Resolution 242
and Israel's right to exist.
Several hours after Squadron
reported on the President's state-
ment on Jerusalem, the White
House issued a clarification.
"American policy towards Jeru-
salem is that it should remain un-
divided with free access to the
holy sites," the statement said.
"The future status of Jerusalem
is to be determined through
negotiations."
"~" The statement added: "The
President aaid that he preferred
for Jerusalem to remain undi-
vided under Israeli sovereignty,
but the President also said that
he favored some type of a Vati-
can-like solution that will con-
tinue to preserve the free access
to the holy sites that Israel has
afforded since 1967."
STEIN SAID there was no
contradiction between
Squadron's statement and the
President's. He said Reagan had
reconfirmed what he had told the
Presidents Conference 14 months
ago.
Meanwhile, at the State De-
partment, spokesman Dean
Fisher said the United States of-
ficial position on Jerusalem is
that "we believe Jerusalem
should remain united" with ac-
cess to all the holy places, but
that its final status should be de-
termined by negotiations.
The State Department also had
a different nuance on Reagan's
statement to the Jewish leaders
that the renunciation of terrorism
by the PLO is one of the condi-
tions for the United States to
deal with the PLO. Fischer said
the United States would study
whether to deal with the PLO
once it accepts Israel's right to
exist and UN Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338. He said
that "clearly, terrorism is not
consistent" with the recognition
of Israel's right to exist and the
two UN resolutions.
Vegetable Casserole
By NORMA BARACH
(Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
For a nice, light supper, try
serving a vegetable casserole,
garlic bread and a plain omelet.
Use fresh fall produce for this
colorful casserole
VEGETABLE CASSEROLE
2 Spanish onions,
thinly sliced
4 large, firm tomatoes,
thinly sliced
2 cups diced potatoes
1 cup thinly ahead
carrot rounds
1 cup fresh mushrooms,
thinly sliced
1 small red pepper, diced
1 tap. salt
dash white pepper
1 tap. paprika
4 tblaps. butter, melted
Layer vegetables in a round,
greased, 6-cup casserole,
sprinkling every other layer with
spices. Pour melted butter over
top with a dash of paprika. Bake
rnvararl^t, m.dagiaas for ape
hew. Servos 6.
::
8
9fo QAM
(About Touw
By LESLIE AIDMAN
(Call me about your social news
at 872-4470)
The youth at Congregation Kol Ami is so active this year
(something we really enjoy hearing about) and thought you
would too. A new group has been formed called "Boneem" with
sponsors Stu and Helene Silyerman. Made up of synagogue
youth who are in the fifth and sixth grades, all sorts of exciting
activities and field trips were planned at their first meeting held
recently.
The older kids, who are part of the Kadima Youth Group
have also gotten off on the right foot this year. Recently they
have had a pool party, seen slides of Israel, led the Friday night
services, held a bake sale at Sunday School, and had a movie
night and a talent show. Also, they juat elected new officers who
are:
Sheryl ZsJkin preeidentJeir Fox, 1st vice-president; Robin
Shaw, 2nd vice-president; AUeea Berger, secretary and Neil
Shaw, treasurer.
Kids we are so proud of all of you. Keep up the en-
thusiasm, hard work, and dedication to your religion the
benefits are terrific!
The Hiltel School's "Gift of Gold" was a smashing success,
as we were most enthusiastically informed by Laura Kreitzer,
who .j president of the School's Parents Association. Co-chair,
men of the evening, Marda Sacks and Delia Mallin, planned a
beautiful wine and cheese party, and exciting raffle with 60 other
prizes, in addition to the "biggy" given away at this evening af-
fair, and a delicious culmination of coffee and elegant desserts.
Susan Forman and Leonore Stein really helped put the word
"gift" into "The Gift of Gold" by obtainning contributions of 60
exciting prizes from local businessmen and retailers. The big
winners of the evening were Larry and France* Weinfeld, of
Seminole. who have two children at Hillel a seventh grader
Shawn and a fourth grader Daniel. The Weinfeld's graciously
donated $2,000 of the $10,000 prize money back to the Hillel
School; and second place winner was Bookie Burn man, who
received a stunning gold watch. All in all, it was a wonderfully
successful evening.
Bruce Goldstein, president of the Brotherhood of Congre-
gation Schaarai Zedek, reports that the November meeting was
a huge success. First the men enjoyed a delicious dinner of
Mexican fare, catered by Consuello's Mexican Cuisine After-
ward v the group heard a most stimulating talk by Robert
Kitrell. Director of the National Conference of Christians and
.Jeuv Mr. Kitrell spoke on "The Moral Majority." Sounds like it
was a truly enjoyable and interesting evening.
You may be thinking winter, but the UAHC (Union of
American Hebrew Congregations) camp committee for Camp
Coleman in Cleveland, Ga. is planning for next summer and for
many summer-- alter that. The committee met in Tampa this
past weekend with committee members coming from South
( urolina. Georgia and of course, Florida. Committee chairman is
Al Reisenburger from Columbus, Ga., and the camp director is
Allan Solomon from Miami. Millie Woolf, Tampa, was in charge
of the arrangements. She and her husband, Walter are longtime
members of the camp committee.
I know it seems like a century away but mark Monday,
February 1, from 11 a.m. 1:30 p.m., on your calendar now as
the Sisterhood of Congregation Schaarai Zedek is planning one
fabulous "Fashion Fantasia." Following a scumptious brunch,
which will be prepared by Gloria Barr and her capable February
Circle, those in attendance will delight to a spectacular fashion
show. Models of all ages from three years old on up will swirl and
twirl down the runway in fashions from Cappy's Childrens Wear
and the Fashion Wearhouse. Everyone is invited to enjoy this
delightful day so keep it in mind and mark down February 1.
Co-chairmen of this event, Janet Kaas and Pauls Zielonka
guarantee a fun morning!
Please let us know about your holiday plans who ia
coming to visit, are you going away on vacation, are the children
or grandchildren coming down for a stay? Come on give us a
call at 872-4470.
Meet Audrey and Fred Guth who moved to Tampa from
Toronto this past June. The Gutha reside in the Carrollood area.
Audrey is originally from Columbus, Ohio and Fred hails from
Toronto. Fred is Financial Vice President of DM America (
development firm). Audrey has opened up a completely kosher
bakery and candy shop with her brother David Beiford, called
"Nutcracker Sweets." This delicious, yummy store is located in
Village Square East Shopping Center stop in and see them!
The Guths have already joined Congregation Kol Ami, and the
JCC, and Audrey is a member of ORT. Fred loves to water ski
and Audrey spends her free time sailing. We are so glad that
y'aU are here in Tampa (I don't know how glad my diet i*.
Audrey) but I am.
Until next week .
Village Photographer
or kttzvah or Wedding Paokapa P
962-2327
Video Taping of Special Occasions
Avallaba on request
Complimentary Formal Sitting lor
Bride or Bar Mltzvah
The VHIage Carter


-
tion receive
Federation?
support from the
What is Your TJF
Women's Division IQ?
[11111V


By
FRANCI RUDOLPH,
President
jave some fun test your-
f note: some questions may
e more than one answer)
What is the approximate Jew-
[population of Tampa?
J25.00O
13,000
Il2.000
116,000
,1981, the Tampa Jewish
ation Campaign raised:
I $870,000
|ll,200,000
|750,0OO
|$1,500,000
iw many contributors were
in the Tampa Jewish
Nation Campaign?
1,000
11.800
12,500
14,000
What percentage of the total
es were raised by the
n's Division in 1981?
jl
150
30
116
How much did Women's
[vision raise in 1981?
I $50,000
I $100,000
[$140,000
1 $200,000
[pproximately what percen-
1 of the money raised went to
i A and overseas needs?
I 28
1100
150
1 75
What percentage of the funds
i are used for local agency
Federation services and
ograms?
10
I 24
I 48
75
a) 1
b) 7
c) 10
d) 12
9. How many agencies are bene-
ficiaries of the TJF's annual cam-
paign?
a) 6
b) 15
c)20
d) More than 30
10 Those who solicit for the
Federation receive a commission
of:
a) 1
b) 5
c) 10
d) None
11 Which of the following local,
cultural and educational institu-
a) Jewish Community Center
b) Tampa Museum
c| University of Tampa
d) Hillel School
e) Russian Resettlement
f) Chai Dial-A-Bus
g) BBYO
h) Tampa Jewish Social Service
12 The Tampa Jewish Federation
shares the responsibility for
funding which agencies with the
United Way?
a) Hillel School
b) Tampa Jewish Social Services
c) JCC
13 Anti-semitism may be subtle
in 1981 America, yet it does exist.
Which Federation-supported
agencies fight anti-Semitism and
concern themselves with com-
munity relations?
a) American Jewish Committee
b) Anti-Defamation League
c) Tampa Jewish Federation
Community Relations Com-
munity
d) Jewish War Veterans
e) American Jewish Congress
f) National Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council
g) American Jewish Historical
society
14 Joint Distribution Committee
U.S. 'Warmly Welcomes'
Four EEC Nations'
Decision to Join MFO
serves our fellow Jews in which of
the following countries?
a) Germany
b> Italy
c) Morocco
d) Sweden
e) Poland
f) Rumania
g) Brazil
h) Austria
i) India
j) Spain
k) Australia
I) Israel
m) Tunisia
n) China
o) Yugoslavia
p) Belgium
q) Algeria
r) Great Britain
s) Uruguay
t) Norway
u) France
v)Iran
wl Portugal
15 HI AS is:
a) The International Jewish emi-
gration service helping to resettle
Jews in countries throughout the
world.
b) An institution of higher learn-
ing in Israel
c) A beneficiary agency of our
Tampa Jewish Federation
d) A national defense agency
16 True or False:
a) UJA funds are used to pur-
chase weapons and armaments in
Israel
b) ORT schools receive funds
from UJA
c) The "Joint" is a nickname for
the Israeli parliament
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The United States
said that it "warmly wel-
comes" the decision by four
Western European coun-
tries to join the peacekeep-
ing force that will patrol
Sinai after Israel's final
withdrawal next April.
Britain, France, Italy and The
Netherlands announced in a joint
statement released from their
respective capitals that they will
participate in the Multinational
Force and Observers (MFO).
BUT AT the same time, the
four members of the European
Economic Community (EEC)
stressed that they stOl support
the EEC's Venice Declaration of
1980 which calls for the Palestine
Liberation Organization to be as-
sociated with Middle East peace
negotiations.
d) The Joint Distribution Com-
mittee runs community centers,
mental hopitals and clinics in
France
17 In the social and demographic
survey of the Jewish community
in Tampa completed last year,
respondents were asked how they
would allocate an imaginary $100
to 19 various services and
programs (both existing and pos-
sible) in Tampa. True or False:
The service which had the
highest mean was a Jewish
nursing home, while the service
receiving the lowest mean was
sports and recreational activities
for adults.
18 The purposes of Federations
are:
a) Solely to raise funds and
distribute them to agencies
b) To help enhance the quality of
Jewish life
c) To act as an umbrella agency
for Tampa
d) To be of service to local Jew-
ish agencies
e) To strengthen our under-
standing and position with the
general community and govern-
ment agencies
f) To compete with other Jewish
organizations
g) To coordinate and foster
united efforts among the Jews
and Jewish organizations in
Tampa
19 The national UJA ha* one of
the lowest percentage of expenses
to raise money in the U.S. among
comparative agencies. True or
False?
20 The Tampa Jewish Federation
wants YOU involved. True or
False?
:->-;-
tions based on the framework
agreed to at Camp David can
help realize that goal. The parti-
cipation of four of our European
allies in the MFO will inevitably
strengthen that organization and
will enhance its ability to carry
out its functions as agreed be-
tween Egypt and Israel."
A Department spokesperson
noted that both Israel and
Egypt, which can veto any mem-
ber of the MFO, agreed earlier on
the participation of the European
countries. But she had no com-
ment as to whether Israel may
now bar the Europeans because
of their reaffirmation of the
Venice declaration.
PREMIER Menachem Begin
had warned earlier that Israel
would not accept any member
which joins the MFO on the basis
of anything but the Camp David
accords.
X<'J0X<'X(P"XP'lrq'J(-9I XXI
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The State Department issued a
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bed? toward a broader just and dura-
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rem''- convinced that negotia-
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Greet 1982 at the most splendid party in town Unlimited
cocktails and champagne toast at midnight. A luscious Filet
and Crab Stuffed Shrimp Dinner accented by a festive
holiday atmosphere and live music:
8:30 p.m. Cocktails and Hors D*oeuyres
9-30 p.m. Dinner Filet and Crab Stuffed Shrimp
10:30 p.m. -1:30 a.m. Entertainment/Dancing
11:30-1:30 a.m. Unlimited Champagne
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Unlimited cocktails for the entire evening plus party favors The
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Pg6
The Jewish Ftoridian of Tampa
TAby-D****,,
Federation Pacesetters
to Meet December 9
Israeli Chassidic Festival December 16
At the Jewish Community Center
(What a Bar MrUvah!)
This is the Bar Mitzvah tour
for the Israeli Chassidic Festival
which will appear at 7:30 p.m. on
Wednesday. Dec. 16. in the audi-
torium of the Jewish Community
Center of Tampa.
The troop will perform first
prize winners from the past 13
Festivals, a medley of Sabbath
songs, international versions of
Oseh Shalom, medleys of Shtetl
and Succoth songs, Israeli Hits
and the Best of Past Festivals.
Tickets are S10 for adults. *5
for children under 12 or Seniors
60 or over. Center members may
purchase tickets for S8. Tickets
are available at the Tampa JCC.
Kol Ami. Schaarai Zedek,
Rodeph Mm. Chabad House
and the USF HUiei House.
Because the 1979 performance
sold out. people are advised to
purchase tickets in advance
rather than take a chance that
tickets will still be available at
the door.
Individuals who remember the
previous show have said the Is-
raeli Chassidic Festival is
probably the most exciting pro-
pram ever held for the Tampa
Jewish Community.
Whether it is the Best ever or
simply an excellent evening to be
enjoyed will be decided by each
attendee for themselves.
By RABBI
HERBERT FRIEDMAN
Rabbi Herbert A. Friedman,
former Executive Vice Chairman
of the United Jewish Appeal will
address the Pacesetters Division
on Dec. 9. at the home of
Maril and Kay Jacobs. The din-
ner meeting hosted by the Jacobs
was announced this week by
Mike Levine. Pacesetters
Division Chairman.
The Pacesetters Division
($5,000 and over contributors! of
the Tampa Jewish Federation-
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
has each year met in December to
set the tone and pace" for the
forthcoming year's campaign.
This year, the Pacesetters event
is doubly important." Levine
9tated. "in terms of the 1982
Campaign and in light of the new
tax laws that benefit payment
before the end of 1981.'"
Rabbi Friedman is an eminent
authority on Jewish overseas
needs and Israel's birth, growth
and development. In 1955, he be-
came head of UJA and served
through 1970. Rabbi Friedman
and his family made aliyah in
1971 and settled in Jerusalem.
He is known as an innovative
thinker and doer. He created the
Young Leadership Cabinet,
bringing together young men and
women from all over the country
and instilling within them a phil-
osophy of Judaism and ai
commitment. They returned
their home communities
heightened expectations, g
knowledge and refined!
techniques. '
He established the Israel Edo-
cation Fund, which built
schools and libraries' througt
the country; developed the i
gram of Missions to Israel,
initiated many of the meth
and ideas now in general i
fund-raising throughout thel
world. He has travelled to muni
countries in Europe, as well ul
Australia. South Africa andl
Canada, to help them with theirI
fund-raising.



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the association of
Barrie and Pam Ross
with our office
4343 Gunn Highway
Ph. 962-0299
ami eats
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Friday, December 4,1981
The Jewish Floridign of Tampa
Page 7
Centerfold Program Pullout
CAMP SAFARI WINTER
WONDERTRIPS
DEC. 21, 22, 23, 28. and 29
Grades 6, 7, and 8
Camp Safari makes its winter
debut with an exciting three-
day trip across the state.
Monday we'll be spending at
one of Orlando's "WORLDS'"
with Tuesday seeing Safari
travel to the east coast and a
tour of Cape Canaveral.
Wednesday will again be
spent in the Orlando area. If
you're wondering where we'll
be sleeping the Orlando
,]('(' has asked us to be their
guests on Monday and Tues-
day evenings.
Week II of Safari will be kept
closer to home as we welcome
the Orlando and Sarasota
JCC's To Tampa with a day at
Busch Gardens. Tuesday the
groups will visit Clearwater's
Centre Ice followed by a
special showing of a very
exciting movie.
J.C.C. Winter Camps
For full details and registra-
tion information contact
Danny Thro or Darlene Wolfe
at the Center, 872-4451.
CAMP K'TON TON WINTER DAY CAMP 1981
December 2, 23, 28, 30 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Pre-Schoolers Ages 3-5
General Information
1. Each camp session will meet from 10 a.m. 2 p.m.
2. Additional child care is available before camp from 8
a.m., and after camp until 5:15 p.m. There will be a fee of $2
per hour for this service and advance registration is required.
STAR SOCCER CAMP
AT THE JCC
DECEMBER 28.29, and 30
Grades 1-6
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter, in co-operation with the
Interby Soccer League and
Soccer Enterprises, Inc., is
proud to offer a special 3-day
soccer camp for boys and
girls. Directed by John Bran-
nen, soccer coach of Leto's
state champs, the camp will
work on beginner as well as
advanced skills.
Complete information is avail-
able by contacting Danny
Thro at 872-4451.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
CAMP CHAI WINTER DAY CAMP 1981
December 21, 22, 23, 28 and 30
GRADES 1-5
"Winter Chai" is aU set to take to the road this vacation season with a variety of day tripe with
something for everybody. Check the schedule and sign-up soon! Camp is limited to 30 children.
PLEASE NOTE THE DAILY STARTING AND ENDING TIMES OF CAMP. THE TIMES
DO CHANGE.
WEEK I
Monday, December 219 a.m.-3 p.m.
Timbuktu Safari Day .spend the day at Busch Gardens' Dark Continent.
Tuesday, December 2210 a.m.-2 p.m.
3. Please send a lunch with your child each day. A beverage B*8 Game Day ... at Castle Golf: boating, golf, and video.
and a snack will be provided.
4. Your child may attend one, two, three, or four camp
days.
Monday, December 21 Sports Day
Have fun with ball play, relays and organized games. Play
with streamers, balloons, and a parachute. Bring an old sock to
make your own "smerlitz."
Wednesday, December 23 Movie Day
View the Walt Disney movie, Dumbo, a cartoon feature
about an underdog elephant who becomes a hero. Create your
own slide and tape show. Make popcorn for snacks, of course.
Monday, December 28 Circus Day
fessional clowns. Pretend to be a circus performer through cre-
ative movement activities. Have your own face made up, if you
wish.
Wednesday, December 30 Music Day
Enjoy a brief demonstration and concert presented by
Quintessence, a professional quintet of harpsicord, flute, violin,
recorder and cello. Make your own instruments, draw to music,
and view Peter and the Wolf filmstrip. ___
Wednesday, December 23 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Roller Skating. we'll be rollin' 'n' tumblin'.
WEEK II
Monday, December 28 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Ice Skating at Centre Ice and an afternoon of Bob-o and Bobbino.
Wednesday, December 3010 a.m.-5 pan.
Fantasy and Cruise Day at the Wax Museum and aboard Capt. Anderson.
GENERAL INFORMATION
Food: Each child must bring a lunch each day. The Center will provide a drink and a snack
each day.
Registration: ADVANCE REGISTRATION REQUIRED. DEADLINE DEC. 14. After that
Delight in a live performance by Bob., and Bobbino, pro- J^iM^
The JCC will refund all monies for advance cancellations prior to Dec. 14 except $5 per family
for registration fees.
Fees: All fees are payable at registration. A 10 percent reduction in fees will be made for any
family registering two or more children. It is a policy of the Center that no member will be
excluded from any activity due to a lack of financial resources.
Re-reminded Camp opens and closes at different times please double check each day's
times and activities the bus will leave promptly after opening.
K'TON TON WINTER CAMP REGISTRATION
Childs Name
Address____
.Phone
-Zip.
Childs Age.
Father's Name.
Mother's Name
.Business Phone _
.Business Phone
Please register my child in:
___________ Sports Day (Dec 21)
___________ Movie Day (Dec 23)
___________ Circus Day (Dec. 28)
___________ Music Day (Dec 30)
___________ChildCars
Mastercard or Visa Account No.-----
Signature__________________------
JCC Member
Yes________
No________
Dy, ChMC-eFccthsFoiowmg ^
Dec. 21
Dec. 23
Dec 28
Dec. 30
.Expiration Date.
FEES
Select any ONE day for
Select any TWO days for
Select any THREE days for
ALL FOUR days for
Child Care (per hour)
Member
14
126
Non-member
$20
130
$60
60
S3
32
IN8URANCE
Through the National Jewish Welfare Board, s special sccident 9**%***""*
up tollOOO in medical expenses resulting from Center activity. The $4M jrperson
premium covers youngsterVfor s full year, from September toSeptember, with a $25
deductible per dJm^chudr- au~dy e-rolW ^^^g^A^TStSSSt
.ura.ce and need not perekaee additional coverage THE DEDUCTIBLE AMOUIMI
WILL NOT BE ASSUMED BY THE JCC. included
I hereby agree U> buy the JCC insurance at addiUonal cost of 34.60 (payment included
above).
5^------------------------------------------------------ Signature
I am hereby waiving and reUasing the JCC from.layand eU chums, coettj^^^
pens* or judgements, including *+*LStsisZLT!SSjXWl
gainistanya^aTstt^Clato^ex^rt Claim, proximstely caused by the gross negngenc.
or willful misconduct of the JCC.
Date
Signature
CAMP CHAI WINTER CAMP REGISTRATION
Child's Name .
Address_____
.Phone
.Zip
Father's Name__________
Mother's Name-------------
Please register my child in:
__Child's Age__
..Business Phone
.Business Phone
JCC Member
Yes_______
No_______
Week I
Week II
Weeks I & II
Mastercharge or Visa Account No.
Signature______________________
.Expiration Date
Week I Only
Week II Only
Both Weeks
CHAI WINTER CAMP FEES
Member
336
326
366
Noa-M
362
338
76
INSURANCE
Through the National Jewish Welfare Board, a special accident policy is available covering
up to 31000 in medical expenses resulting from Center activity. The 34.60 per person
premium covers youngster for a full year, from September to September, with a 626 deduc-
tible per chum. AD children ak-eady enrolled in the JCC Pre-Schooi are covered by insurance
and need not purchase additional coverage. THE DEDUCTIBLE AMOUNT WILL NOT
BE ASSUMED BY THE JCC.
I hereby agree to buy the JCC insurance at additional cost of 34.60 (payment included
above).
Date
Signature
I am hereby waiving and releasing the JCC from any and all claims, costs, liabilities, ex-
panses or judgements, including attorney's fees and court costs (herein, collectively
"Claims") arising out of my participation in the JCC's programs or any illness or injury
resulting therefrom, and hereby agree to identify and hold harmless the JCC from and
against any and aU such Claims except Claims proximatery caussd by the gross neghgence
or willful misconduct of the JCC.
Date


. 1
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, December 4.1981

20
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
DECEMBER NOTES
CENTER LUNCH BUNCH: Featuring Rabbi Kenneth Berger. Noon-
Fairway Run Clubhouse. Members: S3., Nonmembers: $5.
COMMUNITY CELEBRATION-THE ISRAELI CHASSIDIC
FESTIVAL: T:30 p.m. General Admission $10., Members $8. Children
(Under 12) and Seniors (Over 60) S5.-JCC
FAMILY KOSHER COOK IN: Led by Mimi Weiss. 12:30. JCC Kitchen.
Center Family $2., Nonmemeber Family $5.
SUZUKI MINI-MUSIC FESTIVAL: Two Days of Music Lessons, Com-
petition, and/or Performance for Suzuki Students of all Ages
j-un-rLn.nj-Li-ii-1--"- *""*^***ww*^^^^^^**'' n
Cent
(Replacing
December 1981
KislevTeveth 5742
V
JLUB
Unfttfl
21-23
28-30
25
27
28
29
COMMUNITY HANUKAH CELEBRATION: 5 p.m.
JCC Free. Come Light the Menorah, Sing and Celebrate.
JCC WINTER CAMPS: Pre-School and Grades 1
Through 8 (DETAILS, EXACT DATES AND PRO-
GRAMS, A REGISTRA TION INFO IN CENTERFOLD)
FAMILY HANUKAH FILM FESTIVAL: Noon til 5 p.m. Muppet
Movie, Galaxy Express, Airplane and More! Center Family: $2., Non-
member Family: $5.
TWEEN MOVIES-SCIENCE FICTION DOUBLE FEATURE: 1 p.m.
7. 8 & 9th Graders Members Free, Other Members SI.. Nonmembers $2.
Buck Rogers and Battle Beyond the Stars.
AND FOR ADULT MOVIE FANS-HORROR AND HORRIBLES!!:
(Members) 7:30 p.m. Alien Followed by Motel Hell. $1. @ Includes Coffee
SENIOR HIGH DOUBLE FEATURE: 1 p.m. (9-12th Grade Members
Free) Other Members $1.. Nonmembers $2. Blazing Saddles and Wizards
Enjoy Your Winter Vacation at the Center and Have a Happy Hanukah!!
a Very happy hanukah and

Sports Shorts
JCC Soccer News
The 1981-82 season has kicked-off and the players are looking better than ever! Under
the direction of Tim Stoker, the JCC soccer program is the largest yet with six teams
playing each Sunday in the interbay Soccer League. This year's coaches include Tim
Stoker in the under 10 division, Tom Weekes, "Scooter*' Pegram, and Danny Thro in the
under eight division, and Jeff Means and Jim McCotter in the under 12 age group.
Games are held each Sunday beginning at 1 p.m. at the JCC soccer field and Ballast
Point Elementary School. Contact Tim Stoker at 872-4451 for schedules.
Soccer Parents Wanted!
As you may know, the JCC soccer club is possible only through the dedication of its
volunteers. However, we lack volunteer help in setting-up the fields each Sunday and are
asking for parents to pitch in a helping hand, If each parent volunteered just two hours
on any given Sunday, we'd be covered. Come on parentscontact Tim at 872-4451 and
give us your fair share!
Tourney Team Try outs
The defending southern champs in the National JWB Basketball Tournament, the
Tampa JCC, will be holding tryouts in early January. Are you in high school and in-
terested in playing basketball, contact Danny Thro at 872-4451.
AdoH Baaketb.il League Newt
Once again the JCC's Adult Basketball League looks like a winner.
With 12 teams playing weekly games at the JCC gym, there is sure to be
some wild action going on around the Center. Games are Sunday after-
noons and Monday evenings contact Danny Thro at 872-4451 for more
L-ffifeSMtfeS.____________________________________________
Wednesdays
6:15-9*0
(Gym is dosed Dec. 16)
December Open Gym Hoars
Sundays
9.30-11:30
1:30-4.00
.
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE
I hope that everyone had a happy Thanksgiving, and
as we look to the New Year coming up, we pray for peace
for mankind around the world and in Israel during the
holiday seasons.
Things are really popping around your Jewish Com-
munity Center, especially in the month of December. Ac-
tivities are planned for people of all ages for both mem-
bers and non-members to enjoy.
The Israeli Chassidic Festival is coming to Tampa on
Wednesday. December 16, at 7:30 p.m. This a touring
group with Israeli songs, dances and music, and from
previous performances here at the Center is truly an out-
standing night.
Winter camp has several exciting programs set from
Dec. 21-23 and 28-30 along with the Hannukah Family
Film Festival on the 25th.
And on December 21 and 22nd, the Suzuki Music
Festival will be held at the Center. A concert is planned
for Tuesday night with music being taught throughout
the two days.
For an added convenience, all the registration forms
and further information about our events can be found in
this month's expanded version of the CENTERFOLD.
Also look for the December JCC Notes.
The Center is also looking forward to our major fund
raiser for this year. We hope to make the big announ-
cement soon, and if everything goes as planned, will be
the most exciting and enjoyable fund raiser ever.
This is our second month of including the CENTER-
FOLD in the Floridian, and with anything new, we are
learning as we go along. We hope that anyone who has
suggestions or advice will please step foward.
This is YOUR Center and we want you to enjoy all of
our activities. Happy Hanukah and a very Happy,
Healthy 1982!
SEE YOU NEXT YEAR!
Sharon H. Mock
PRE-SCHOOL HAPPENINGS
A lovely equipment brunch was held on November 4th at the JCC library.
CeUna Forrester coordinated the food, a delicious spread which everyone
thoroughly enjoyed. Barbara Richman demonstrated and explained the
purposes of the equipment such as:
Parents attending made contributions which will help cover the cost of
this equipment We would like to thank the following people for their
donations:
LINDA DAVIS, THELMA KARP. KAREN LINSKY. LEAH DAVID-
SON. NANCY VERKAUF. LYNN REIBER LAURA KREITZER.
NANCY LINSKY. JUDY BAACH. ROCK MARCUS.
Whiter Camp
Four days of fun are planned for this year's Winter Camp for pre-,
schoolers, ages 3-5.
Of special interest are the clowns, Bob-o and Bobbino who will perform-
on Circus Day, Dec 28. Bob-o and Bobbino have been featured comedy
performers for the past twenty years. From TV talk shows, fairs, and the
center rings of America's greatest circuses. Bob-o and Bobbino have a
wealth of experience!
On Music Day, Dec. 30, a quintet known as Quintessence will perform for
pre-school campers. This group is composed of members of the Gulf
Coast Symphony Orchestra who are also faculty in the JCC School of
Music.
The group which specializes in Renaissance music of the late Baroque
era, consists of harpsichord, flute, violin, recorder, and chello. This quin-
tet frequently presents workshops in the public schools to familiarize
area youngsters with the instruments and with Renaissance music. We
are truly fortunate to be able to offer this experience to our pre-
schoolers.
JCC Pre-School Two Year Old Program
The JCC Pre-School currently offers a two day program from 9dX> a.m.-
11:00 a.m. for two year olds and a three day program for 2V4 year olds
from 9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon. We are currently reevaluating our programs
with the possibility of making a change in January, 1982. If you have a
two year old child, please take a minute to complete this questionairre.
Your preferences will be helpful in making a determination.
Jewish Community Center
2806 Horatio Street
Tampa, Florida 33609
Child's Date of Birth______________________
I would enroll in a 5 day 940 a.m.-12:00 noon program if it
Yea
I would prefer the 2 day program to meet from 9:00 a.m. 12:00
.Yes
I would prefer the 2 day program to meet 3 days a week from 900 a.m.-
12.-00 noon.
I am happy with the present offerings.
Additional Comments and Suggestions:___
N,
Address
Telephone!.
available
______No
.No
_No
.No


December 4,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 9
^^^***********M^MWMMMMMM
Id
&porter)
oibw

V
2808 Horatio Street,
Tampa, Florida 33609
Sharon Mock, President
Ed Finkelstein, Executive Director
Darlene Wolfe, Program Director
u'ii-i~ ^ m m m m^^^^^^^^^m IMWW '^"v-u-u-uxrLn
2)1 HEALTHY EXCITING
PROGRAMS FOR
WHOM? WHERE?
-"It's too far to drive." "My kids get out of school at
three different times." "I'd like to take the course but..."
There are numerous reasons why some classes and
special events planned by the Center staff fail to get the
registration to make them successful. However, there
hould not be a reason for groups and programs co-
developed by you and Center staff not to succeed.
On recent approach to Center programming has been
Project Outreach. Center members (and occasional non-
members) make a request for a specific program at their
home or a nearby location. The person! s) wanting this
event help plan and recruit participants. In this manner,
Center staff can be more available to more people; more
communities can become an extension of the Jewish
Community Center; more people can participate, more
programs can be offered; and most importantlythe ac-
tivities can all be held. Not one of the newly developed
Project Outreach programs have been cancelled.
'If you are interested in hosting a one time or short
series program, please contact Darlene Wolfe at the JCC.
Explain what type of activity you are interested in, for
what age range, how many you would like to include, and
other pertinent information about the special program
you are interested in codeveloping and planning. Center
staff will work on any feasible program which will in-
crease the resources the Jewish Community Center can
offer our community.
riends of the Center
M Allan Albert
it \l Manuel Aronovitz
iM Marvin Aronovitz
)r.;M Gene Balis
1 M Marvin Barkin
IM Sam Blum
)r. M Gordon Brunhild
IM Douglas Cohn
I'M Lawrence Falk
I'M Karl S.Fantle
In. Julia Flom
)r./M Arthur Forman
l/M Michael J. Freedman
IM Charles Funk
)rM Burton Goldstein
)r./M Robert J. Goldstein
l/M Ben Greenbaum
I'M Howard Greenberg
Ir. Sam Greenberg
. H/M Lester Hirach
BM MelJacobeon
H/M George Karpay
l/M Joel Karpay
VJM Stephen KreiUer
fM Bernard Lexer .
M/M Edward LeibowiU
)r'M Joseph Levine
I'M Marshall E. Leviaaon
l/M Jamea Linick
l/M Marshall Lineky
IM Samuel Mack
H/M Jay MarkowiU
l/M Albert Mayer
k /M Don Mailman
*M Roger Mock
H/M John Osterwell
VM Morton Richter
fc.'M SUnley Roeenthal
Dr-'M Michael Rothburd
Or M Alan Rudolph
U/M Richard Rudolph
DrJM Stephen Sergey
ttM Sheldon Shalatt
M/M MandeU (Hicks) Shimberg
Pitricia Shires k Family
Or-M Mitchell Silverman
M/M Martin Solomon
'dgWM Ralph Steinberg
M/M Herbert Swertman
Tunpa Crown Distributors
^Elbott Tapper
r.LeeTobin
Mr GlenTobin
Mr Sol Walker
M/M Irwin (Welly) Wallace
Mrs. Miriam Wallace
M/M Joseph Warahaw
P"M Samuel Weinetein
Mrs J.B. Weiseman
Dr/MGrayZeinore
D"M Carl Ziekmka
Anonymoua
"HOW TO COPE WITH
CHRISTMAS IN A
TAMPA DIASPORA
COMMUNITY"
This will be the topic Rabbi
Kenneth Berger will be dis-
cussing at the Jewish Com-
munity Center's Lunch Bunch
on December 9 at noon in
CarroUwood at the Fairway
Run Club House.
This December Lunch
Bunch continues the series of
successful events. You are en-
couraged as Center members
to participate actively in the
Center, learn, have fun and be
entertained on various sub-
jects throughout the year both
at the Center and at outreach
locations like this event in
CarroUwood.
The JCC is proud to have
Rabbi Berger sharing his
views as we approach the
holiday season. The cost of the
Buffet lunch will be $3 for
members and $5 for non-mem-
bers. Call the Center for reser-
vations 872-4461 no later than
Decembers.
For those who would like to
attend and not order lunch
you may brown-bag-it. How-
ever, non-members will have to
pay a $2 fee for the lecture.
See you-on December 9 -
you will be glad you came.
FAMILY KOSHER COOK-IN!
Mimi Weiss, reknown locally for her culinary acumen, is
teaching kosher cooking to Center families on Sunday,
December 20th at 12:30 p.m.
Registered families will learn to make chopped liver and
chicken soup with matzoh balls. At the end of the cooking
lesson, the families will eat their prepared food.
If the class is as successful as predicted, other kosher
cooking for families and adult gourmet cooking classes
will be offered. Mimi Weiss will lead several programs if
there is a demand.
The first family Kosher Cook-In will be $2 per Center family. If room is
available, non-member families may participate for $5. Please register at the
Jewish Community Center. There is a limit to the number of people for the fir-
st family Kosher Cook-In. Please register by December 16th. The class will be
at the JCC in the kitchen beginning 12:30 on December 20th.
1982ftf
... The next issue of the CENTERFOLD will again be a PROGRAM PULLOUT
which includes the WINTER PROGRAM BROCHURE AND REGISTRATION
FORMS. Look for the issue to appear in the January 1,1982 Floridian.
1
1981 Israeli Chassidic Festival
As you can see in this month's special
Centerfold Program Pullout, numerous events are
happening at your JCC. Judging from the stand-
ing room only crowd of two years ago and the
numerous inquiries thus far, the Israeli Chassidic
Festival will again be a community celebration.
Your Center is proud to sponsor this award win-
ning group. Refreshments will be available and
family attendance is encouraged on Wednesday,
Dec. 16 when the show starts at 7:30 p.m. How-
ever, you need to make sure you have purchased
your tickets. Don't miss this entertaining evening
because you waited too long to buy your tickets
($10 general admission, $8 Center Members, $5
Children under 12 and Seniors 60 and over).
Reminders of upcoming December activities
can be found in the Jewish Community Center
Notes. The Music School is attempting our first
Mini-Muf'c Festival. Indications are that this
program will become a semi-annual or annual
program at the Center. Details are in this Pullout.
After last year's success, the Tampa Rab-
binic Association has joined with the Jewish
Community Center to have another Menorah
lighting as part of the Community Hanukah
Festival on Monday, Dec. 21 at 5. Children who
have been participating in the Winter Camps or
Mini-Music Festival can enjoy a film and other
activities from 4 to 5 when the program begins.
Movie time comes to the Center as a variety
of films will be shown. Parents should note that
different programs may not be as appropriate for
different age groups.
Get your tickets now at the Center, USF
HilleL, or your synagogue for the Chassidic
Festival on Wed., Dec. 16. The program
begins at 7:30p.m. at the JCC auditorium.
COMMUNITY HANUKAH 19811 tl
___As everyone fondly remembers last year's great Hanukah program at the JCC, you may
begin to look forward to this year's Community Hanukah Celebration on Monday, December 21
at 5 p.m. at the JCC. Dreydla will be distributed by the Center; there will be singing and enter-
tainment; latkes and refreshments will again be available; the large Menorah shall again be lit;
and Rabbi Rivkin (coordinating the program for the Tampa Rabbinic Association) has other
surprises to make the celebration an enjoyable community event
Joining this year's fun day will be our new Tampa residents from Russia. Please plan bow
to attend and-or volunteer to help with the preplanning and the Latke preparations. Finns or
cartoons will be shown for those children waiting from the Music Festival or Camp Chai for
their parents before participating in the Hanukah program at 6. For additional information,
watch future issues of the Floridian and synagogue i

Everyone learned a great
deal from Dr. Jim Strange in
his discussion on Israel at a
recent Center Lunch Bunch,
This month the speaker is
Rabbi Ken Berger as the
Lunch Bunch joins Project
Outreach. Make reser-
vations today to participate
Wednesday, Dec. 9 at noon
in the Fairway Run
Clubhouse in CarroUwood.
Call 872-4451 for details.
CENTER TRIBUTES
To Steve and Linda Klein in honor of
the birth of EUssa
by Mike Brunhild
In honor of the birth of
Alex Goldstein
by Marge and Frank Brumback
To Beck Setzer in memory of her sister, Lillian
by Sharon and Roger Mock
To Violet Malevan in memory of her mother
by Sandra Dreier
In honor of his wife, Florence
by Abe Silver
To the Jewish Community Center
by Edith and Robert F. Stengel


*"%e 10
"The Jewish Floridian ofTampa
K,1S
Centerfold Program Pullout
JCC MINI-MUSIC FESTIVAL
Suzuki Mini-Music Festival December 21 & 22,1981
"Children Should be Allowed to Discover Music For Themselves."
(Z. Kodaly/c. Orf f)
The Center Music School is proud to announce our first Mini-Music Festival featuring Suzuki,
advanced violin and rhythmics. The faculty will be Cheri D. Earle. Evelyn Polasky and
Demaris Klafs. The piano accompanist for the Concerto competition is Ildiko Vadas.
You, too can use your hands to applaud or play your musical in
strument in this year's Suzuki MINI-MUSIC FESTIVAL on Dec. 21
and 22. Fees and registration information are in the accopanying artirU
in this special CENTERFOLD Pullout
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER MUSIC SCHOOL
SUZUKI MINI-MUSIC FESTIVAL
DECEMBER 21,22
(Please Print)
(name of student)
(name of home teacher
(address)
(city)
(rip)
(phone)
number of years playing
name of private teacher
POLISHED PIECE (if none, please list pre-twinkle) (see the attached music repertoire)
name of piece presently working on
PLEASE ENCLOSE CHECK OR MONEY ORDER PAYABLE TO THE JEWISH COMMUNITY CEN-
TER. PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU COMPLETE THE ENTIRE APPLICATION AND MAIL BEFORE
12/10/81.
Registration for the Mini-Music
Festival includes group lessons,
play-in and the concert
Additional Festival Options:
2 semi-private lessons
1 semi-private lesson
by Dec. 10
S10
*6
S3
after Dec. 10
$15
$7.50
J4.50
(check)
Rhythmics
(note: your lesson time will te confirmed 9:30 Dec 21 at the JCC)
$3 $2 ---------------------
Concerto Competition Only
(December 21 at 4 p.m.)
Sightreading Orchestra
(December 21,1 to 2 pan.)
(Dec 22, 3 to 4 p.m.)
Teacher Observers
S3
16
$20
for one day
$5
$7.50
$30
for both days
TOTAL ENCLOSED.__________________________________________________________________________
INFORMATION ABOUT THE WINTER CAMP PROGRAMS AND BABYSITTING AVAILABLE FOR
SIBLINGS OF THE FESTIVAL PARTICIPANTS MAY BE OBTAINED BY CONTACTING THE
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER (872-4451) OR COMPLETING THE APPLICATION IN THIS CEN-
TERFOLD PROGRAM PULLOUT.
WINTER MINI MUSIC FESTIVAL
MUSIC REPERTOIRE
PLEASE NOTE THAT THE ARRANGEMENTS FOR LESSONS
ARE BY LEVEL OF SKILL AT THIS TIME NOT BY AGE.
Pre-Twinkk
These students have not yet learned all the variations for "Twii
Twinkle Little Star."
Twinkle Variations
Lightly Row
Song of the Wind
Go Tell Aunt Rhody
O Come Little Children
May Song
Long Long Ago
Allegro
Perpetual Motion
Allegretto
Minuet 1
Minuet 2
Minuet 3
The Happy Farmer
Book II
Chorus
Musettee
Hunter's Chorus
Long, Long Ago
Bourree
The Two Grenadiers
Book I
G. F. Handel
J.S. Bach
CM. von Weber
T. H. Bayly
G.F. Handel
R. Schumann
Gavotte
Gavotte in G minor
Humoresque
Gavotte in D major
Bourree
FolkSong
FolkSong
FolkSong
FolkSong
FolkSong
T.H.Bayly
Shinichi Suzuki
S. Suzuki
S. Suzuki
J. S. Bach
J. S. Bach
J. S. Bach
R. Schuman
Book III
P.Martini
J.S. Bach
A. Dvorak
J.S. Back
J.S. Bach
Minuet
L. Boccherini
Book IV
Concerto No. 2, 3rd Mvt. F. Seitz
Concerto No. 6,1st Mvt. F. Seitz
Concerton in A minor,
1st Mvt. A.Vivaldi
Concerto for Two Violins,
1st Mvt.. Violins I and II J.S.Bach

DECEMBER 21.1981
TIME
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
LUNCH
1:00
SCHEDULE DAY I
JCC WINTER MINI
MUSIC FESTIVAL
CHERI D. EAK1.K EVELYN POLA8KY
REGISTRATION REGISTRATION
Book I Group Book IV-Group
(Lightly Row-Perpetual Motion) (Seitz #112 13)
SCHEDULE DAY II
MONDAY
DAMARIS KLAFS
REGISTRATION
1:30
2:00
2:30
3.00
3 30
4:00
TwinkW-Group
{Variation! I Tbemel
Pre-Twinkie-Group
(Gavotte; Becker-Bourree)
Book I Group
lAUeeretto-Givotte]
LUNCH
Play-la Booka III I
Play In Book. 1 111
Book ll-Group
(Chonia-Walul
Book ll-Group
iBouree-Minuet, Boochanoi)
Book IV Group
IVivaldi /I #21
Book III Group
Book Ill-Group
fkmm Marta^Hunantwaoual
LUNCH
Sif hi Readinf Orchaatra
Rahaaraal
Rahaaraal
Book V Group
BooklVaV-Qruup
(Back Doub*. Violin Concerto)
Rhythmics-Book I
Rhythmic.- Prt Twinkla k
Twinkia
Coacarto Coeapetitioo
Audition
Sik.dutodLaaaon.
Concerto Competition
Audition
Rhythmic.-Book 11 IV
Rhythrmc-Book ll-IV
Concerto Compatition
DECEMBER 22.1981 JCC WINTER MINI TUESDAY
MUSIC FESTIVAL
TIME CHERI D. EARLE EVELYN POLA8KY DAMARIS KLA PS
10:00 Book 1 Group Book 1V Group
lUghUy How IVpatual Motion)
10-30 Twinkle-Group Book IV-Group
11:00 Pre-Twinkle-Group Book Ill-Group Rhythmic*-Book 1
11:30 Book 1 Group Book Ill-Group RhyUirnke-Pre-Twinlu. 4 Twinkla
LUNCH LUNCH LUNCH
1:00 Play-In Booka 1 VI Play-In Booka 1 VI
fraai Rahaaraal roor Dree. Rahaaraal lor
1:30 Concert Concert
240 G.mee-PreTwinkle Book! Dree. Rahaaraal For Concert Rhythmic*Book ll-IV
2:30 Book ll-Group Book V Group Rhythmic. Book II IV
3:00 Book II Group Sicht Raaduw Orcheatra Rahaaraal
3:30 Scheduled Leeeor. Rahaaraal
4:00 Scheduled Leeaon. Scheduled Laeeon.
4:30 Scheduled Leeeona Sfhe^M 1 111 h ii
5 00 Dinner Break Dinner* Break Dinner a Break
6:30 Concert In Auditorium Concert In Auebtornia. Concert In Auditorium
HCC AT JCC NEXT MONTH1
HCCATJCC
Starting January 26, 1982 the HCC through its Com-
munity Services Program will offer adult classes at the Center.
If you are interested in any of the listed courses, either complete
the enclosed registration form and mail it directly do HCC
(address on form) and-or call the Community Services' office at
HCC for details and to request a brochure.
By hosting the HCC classes at the JCC, we hope to expand
the resources available to our members and local community.
Please remember that the JCC will not be taking registration.
All monies and forms should go directly to HCC. If you have
specific questions, call Fred Webb in the Communtiy Services
office at HCC (879-7222). Ask him about "HCC at JCC."
Register now so you won't be left out of these new adult
programs which are part of the expanding Center services.
Remember: FEE Information can be obtained by contact-
ing Fred Webb, 879-7222 extension 306 in the Community
Service office, Dale Mabry Campus of the Hillsborough Com-
munity College.
Course)
Prefix
ACC
001
D50
Title
ECO
002
FAD
001
SPA
006
60.
How to Save on'Your
Personal Income Tax
financial and
Estate Planning
DM
D6Q_
D60
SOC
Oil
;srjc~
iil6_
Dfi0_
CML
D60
Computer Crazy
Where is the
Money Going?
Enriched Parenthood ,
Spanish for Travelers T. Weaver
Relationships Between J, Roeeu
Men and Women Qmnrlffn
Understanding the
Older Person
Aging with Optimiain
Instructor
rime
Staff
Staff
Staff
Staff
M
Rodriguez I
J-Pric. ,
Staff
6-8p
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6-8p(
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30
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Date
1-26-82
1-28-82
1-28-82
1-26-82
3-22-82
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4-16-82
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Friday, December 4,1981


The.
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 11
South Pacific at Plant High
"South Pacific," Rogers and
Hammerstein's classic play
based on Michner's "Tales of the
South Pacific" will come to
:W#sS&wS5wSflft:SWaWS#:W:
Tampa again December 11 and 12
at HB. Plant High School.
Curtain time is 8 p.m. and tickets
are available at the door as well
as from anv cast member.
::::::::::.:.;.
Kol Ami Dedication Highlights
Ensign Nellie Forbush (Leigh
Logan), Emile deBeckque (David
Pomerantz), Luther Billis (Jack
Rosenkranz), Lt. Joseph Cable
(John Tiffin), Bloody Mary
(Kathy Mills) and Liat (Mary
Frances Holmes) will once more
wind their way into your hearts.
Lila Polur is State Manger;
Robin Rosenberg, publicity
chairman; Michael Tavlor, scenic
designer and Richard Raymondo,
lighting techniccan.
Cast members in addiition to
the above are Karen Gianan,
Andy Anderson, Pat McCoy,
Ron Taylor, Stan Pezley, Matt
Hammel. Scott Hill, Robert
Lantry. Helene Wallace, Muff
Davidson, Tom Roberts, Robert
Law, Larry Reid, Regina Dobro-
vitsky, Amy Nutter, Donna
Rickets and Margaret Penning-
ton.
John Hillick and Betty Nelson
are directing and conducting the
show. Edith Randolph is choreo-
grapher and Carol Dickson is the
accompanist.
It guarantees to be a lot of
entertainment for just $2.

Sam I'incus, representing United Synagogues of America, presents
the charter to Dr. Steven Field, president of Congregation Kol Ami.
Doru Field assists Samuel Isaak as he chants Havdalah at the
beginning of the dedication ceremony.
The proud president and the beaming rabbi. Dr. Steven Field and
Rabbi Leonard Rosenthal display their charter.
(Photos courtesey of Village Photographer)
K
815 s.Rome Helen Chavez
w
Ph. 251-8783
Open 11 to 2:30 Mon. thfjl.Frl.
MA
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
'A DELIGHTFUL
FILM-
beautifully
made:1
-The
New York
Times
"AN
ABSOLUTE
MUST!"
NY Post
ISAAC STERN'IN CHINA
EXCLUSIVE
SHOWING!
* *".
UMVERSIHSQ.
CINEMA
O77-M10
UNIVttMTY SO,MAU .
JJOOI fOWl*<*1
Rabh
Lauren
Women's and Children's
Clothing and Accessories
Collections
Active Wear
Rough Weor leather Goods
The Village Center 13238 N. Dale Mabry Highway Tompa, Florida 962-8482 Belts fragrance Cosmetics luggage
V < 1 v- -.. <


* > 1U
The JeU>i*h Flnrirlipm *.t T~-*-~
Medicine Kit
Big Deal: U.S. to Store Bandaids in Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan Ad
ministration's two chief na-
tional security Cabinet'
members indicated that the
United States is not pre-
pared to go beyond the
storing of medical supplies
in Israel and joint planning t^way^tode,g^-fi
Sharansky Sentence To
Harshest Prisoner Camp
For 'Dangerous Criminals'
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Prisoner of Conscience Anatoly
Sharansky has been sentenced by
a labor camp court to three years
of strict regime in Chistipol
Prison, one of the harshest such
institutions in the Soviet Gulag,
and has already been transferred
there, his wife Avital told the
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry and the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews. Chistipol is some
550 miles east of Moscow.
The internal "trial" took place
upon Sharansky's release from 10
months in solitary confinement in
the Perm labor camp where his
health had deteriorated to a point
where he collapsed early last
summer. The authorities con-
cealed the trial from his aged
mother in Moscow for a month
until they notified her a few day;
ago, the SSSJ and UCSJ
reported.
Y06EF MENDELEVICH,
the recently released POC who
had been with Sharansky in
Chistipol before both were moved
to Perm in 1980, told SSSJ and
UCSJ that "for three years
Anatoly will be completely iso-
lated from the outside world,
with no meetings with his family,
and able to write only one letter
every two months. His food ra-
tion will be diminished to 1,700
calories a day."
Mendelevich said that Chis-
tipol "houses what the Soviets
call the 'most dangerous' in-
mates, those who demand to be
acknowledged as political
prisoners. Every prisoner is com-
pelled to work the whole day and
is punished if he refuses. Perm by
comparison was better than
Chistipol. There Anatoly could
meet with his friends, when he
was not in solitary, and could
write letters. Now he will be
punished for every small in-
fraction of the regulations, for the
regime in Chistipol is especially
severe."
!*
BEN GUTKIN, PA.
ACCOUNTANT
FEDERAL INCOME TAXATION
Enrolled to Represent Taxpayers Before the Internal Revenue Service
^Accounting data and income tax returns prepared by computer
Accredited by the Accreditation Council for Accountancy

1220 S. Dale Mabry, Suite 206
Tampa. Fla 33609
Office (813) 256 3781
Residence (813) 835 9331
* *. ^ *^^^*^^^^^**^^^^^^^^^^^**^^^^^*.^*.^fc^^ .*.*
implementing the
strategic cooperation
agreement worked out by
President Reagan and
Premier Menachem Begin
last September.
Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger, appearing on NBC-
TV's "Meet the Press" program,
said that he expected a
"memorandum of under-
standing" to be signed following
his talks with Israeli Defense
Minister Arid Sharon last
Monday.
But when Weinberger was
asked if the talks could result in
the stockpiling of arms in Israel.
he said he did not know if the
talks would get into that How-
ever, he specifically said that the
talks would include the need for
having hospital and medical sup-
plies available in Israel should a
conflict in the Mideast break out.
SECRETARY of State Alex-
ander Haig. also made this point
on his appearance on ABC-TV's
"This Week With David Brink-
ley." Haig noted that when he
outlined the cooperation agree-
ment at the end of Begin's visit
to Washington, he specifically
mentioned the stockpiling of
some medical supplies in Israel, a
possible joint U.S. Israeli naval
maneuver in the eastern
Mediterranean and joint plan-
ning against threats to the
Middle East.
The Israelis reportedly want
the U.S. to stockpile weapons in
Israel and want a satellite so they
can monitor activities of Arab
countries themselves. They now
receive information from U.S.
"'spy "satellites.
"We've got to deal with the
frealities of what American stra-
tegic plans in the area require,
Haig said. "We've got to deal
with the political constraints
associated with our relationship
with Israel and the maintenance
of good relations with a number
of moderate Arab regimes."
WEINBERGER stressed that
strategic cooperation with Israel
is not something new but part of
i a longtime ongoing process about
few weeks, and, above all m,
negotiations to achieve autJr
my with the Palestinian Arih.,,.
the West Bank and Gaza Strip
Haig reiterated what, he *u
was the President's positimi
Jerusalem. "The future of jJ?
salem is to be decided by >t
parties," he said. He said thj
it should
President also believes
have a "united regime in
all the holy places would be aval
able."
When columnist Georae Win
ked Haiir whv in the JlJl
fOR FULL DETAILS
CALL OR WRITE TODAY'
I'm interested, please contact me
personally or by mail
Of
z
*---------P*on
MOOEM C HOCK, CJ_0.
65 and
going
strong?
Eligible for
Medicare?
You still need
the NEW
B'NAI B'RITH
MEDICARE
SUPPLEMENT
Pys many of the bill*
-| Medicare doe* not!
SPECIAL BENEFIT INCLUDES
PRIVATE DUTY NURSING
IN HOSPITAL.'
Doctor's office Hospital visits
I High lifetime maximum
benefit?
Pre-existing conditions not
covered for the first year.
For manon S9 and war.
ACCEPTANCE GUARANTEED
We enrol rmm members, tool
I Bnai B nth Group Insurance
Mutual itt mauranca Company n Hem ro*
Soviet Union.
In his television appearance,
Haig stressed that the U.S. is
wedded to the Camp David
peace process." He rejected the
suggestion that the process
would be over when Israe asked Haig why in the meanti^
completes its final withdrawal the U.S. could not move its Z
from the Sinai next Apr. 26. He bassy from Tel Aviv to Jenj.
said the Camp David agreements salem, which is Israel's capital
call for a continued normalization Haig replied that such a move
of relations between Israel and would "infringe on the freeoW
Ejrypt which he said has been the negotiators. I think it is that
progressing very well in the last simple."
W;:.%:::#::::ft%^
/

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Cniei /run me- n /
* *
Orson Skorr
Orchestras
| Serving All ol Florid. Sime 1962
I <* TAMPA 81 J-72-fc24J
: MIAMI >i AC H UIVMS-iSSI
.......................................................
Antique and Estate Jewelry
O

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TAMPA Fl 33609 1*131 S31 1703
Kosher Lunch Menu
Kosher lunch menu of the Senior Citizen's Nutrition and
Activity Program is sponsored by the HUlaborough County
Commission and held at the Jewish Community Center. Marilyn
Blakley. site manaaer, 872-4451. Menu subject to change.
WEEK OF DECEMBER 711
a Monday Beef-a-Roni, Broccoli, Fruit Cocktail, Whole Wheat
x Bread, Oatmeal and Raisin Cookies
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riday, December 4,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 13
Chief Rabbi Moses Rosen of Rumania (right) is shown with Ralph I. Goldman, executive
vice president of the American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, during Rabbi Rosen's
, during ,._
recent visit to JDC headquarters in New York. Over 350,000 of Rumania's Jews have
emigrated to Israel, but of the remaining 34,000, it is estimated that some 60 percent are
over 65 years of age.
Headlines
Immigrant Housing Plan Unveiled
A new concept designed to increase rental
housing in Israel for new immigrants was pre-
sented this week by Charles Weinberg, senior
adviser to the chairman of the Jewish Agency s
Immigration and Absorption Department.
The program, which is still in the planning
stages, would encourage American Jews to
purchase apartments in Israel and then offer
them to the Jewish Agency for a ten-year period.
The Agency, acting as an intermediary for the
American owner, would in turn offer the apart-
ments to new settlers on a rental basis, with rent
returning to the owner.
Kabbi Weinberg believes "the program
provides an outstanding opportunity for Jews
still undecided about Aliyah to help those already
committed to living in Israel."
The United Jewish Appeal 1981 regular cam-
paign, still in progress, recorded a total of S511
million in pledges as of mid-November, a new
peacetime high. The previous record for a year
without open war involving Israel was the $508.5
registered by the total 1980 campaign.
According to the report released by national
UJA headquarters, the milestone achievement
represents a card-for-card increase of 11.8 percent
over the previous year. Final returns for 1981 will
be announced shortly after the end of the year.
The report also indicated that prospects are
bright for the new record to be surpassed again by
the 1982 regular campaign, launched two and a
half months ago. The new drive, showing a pledge
total of $81.9 million to date, is running 24 per-
cent ahead of 1981.
The president of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews has wired President Reagan
and Attorney General William French Smith cal-
ling for the "immediate release" of Haitian
refugees currently being held in detention camps
in four states and Puerto Rico.
Dr. David Hyatt, president of the nationwide
non-profit human relations organization, termed
it "unconscionable" for the United States to force
the refugees "to languish in detention camps
while concerned and caring people in America
have expressed willingness to provide them with
homes and jobs."
Hyatt said that religious organizations, in-
dividuals and other responsible groups which
have provided housing and sustenance for other
refugees in the past, are willing to offer similar
services to the Haitian refugees "who have risked
their lives to escape political tyranny in their
homeland."
An intergroup relations expert has called on the
television industry to "deliver more authentic
dramas that accurately reflect" ethnic life, and to
put an end to shows that mock and defame ethnic
gTOUp8.
Joseph Giordano, director of the American
li'wish Committee's Louis Caplan Center on
that programs containing ethnic stereotypes can
be particularly harmful to children.
Writing in the December issue of Atteruione
magazine, Giordano stresses that television has
an "obligation to resist censorship," and that
"ethnics who are disgruntled with television don't
want to impose a set of moral values."
Nevertheless, Giordano argues, television
must "accept responsibility" for the impact its
programs have, especially on young people.
Dr. Eli J. Tavin, head of the World Zionist Or-
ganization's Department of Education, has hailed
"the determined efforts of Latin American Jewry
to achieve a robust and creative Jewish life based
upon Jewish knowledge and understanding, a
positive Jewish identity and strong personal and
communal ties to and identification with the
State of Israel."
Tavin, who has just returned from a Congress
on Jewish Education in Latin America in Rio de
Janeiro, said that "the Jewish vigor and deter-
mination displayed by the record number of 224
educators from 11 countries who traveled long
distances in order to participate, expressed a
dedicated commitment to Jewish education as the
instrument to create a Jewish renaissance in
Latin America."
Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D., N.Y.) has
urged that procedures used by the Democratic
Party in selecting its presidential nominee be
designed so that those who observe the Sabbath
on Saturday are allowed to participate fully.
Sen. Moynihan this week released a letter he
wrote recently to North Carolina Gov. James B.
Hunt, Jr., who is serving as chairman of a Demo-
cratic Party commission examining the methods
used to select delegates to the Party's presiden-
tial nominating convention.
Sen. Moynihan noted that delegate selection
caucuses, state caucuses and primaries were held
in some cases on Saturdays during the 1980 presi-
dential primary campaign and thus "effectively
closed out of the selection process several million
religious Jews, Seventh Day Acventists and
members of other groups that observe Saturday
as the Sabbath."
Gov. Edmund G. Brown, Jr. of California is
urging President Reagan to officially ask Leonid
Brezhnev for a report on Swedish diplomat Raoul
Wallenberg, who saved a hundred thousand Jews
from the Holocaust and then disappeared in 1946
behind the Iron Curtain.
Brown spoke at a meeting of the board of direc-
tors of the Simon Wiesenthal Holocaust Center at
the Los Angeles Room of the Century Plaza
Hotel, commemorating Wallenberg and his role
during the Nazi persecution of the Jews during
World War II.
President Reagan awarded Wallenberg
nonorary U.S. citizenship for his heroic actions in
issuing counterfeit Swedish passports to Jews in
Hungary, allowing them to escape Nazi death
chambers.
Wallenberg disappeared in Budapest in 1945
where he had been a representative of the
American War Refugee Board attached to the
Swedish Embassy.
Blum Cites Virulent
Anti-Semitism at UN
NEW YORK (JTA| Am-
bassador Yehuda Blum of Israel
and Rabbi Joseph Sternstein,
president of the American Zionist
Federation, told the National
Board of the AZF that Jews
throughout the world are
"aware" and "aroused" by the
emergence of international anti-
Semitism.
Referring to the recent debate
on the sale of AWACS to Saudi
Arabia and attacks on Israel,
Sternstein said that the assess-
ment and appraisal that Ameri-
can Jews are "angered and
aroused" is necessary, "lest there
spread the notion that actions
and decisions adverse to Israel
can be conceived and im-
plemented with the false confi-
dence that they will be unre-
buffed by an alleged supine and
pliant American Jewish com-
munity." Continuing, Stern-
stein declared:
"OUR WORDS are thus ad-
dressed to President Reagan.
Permit us to see you as a friend.
You offered assurances that the
U.S. would stand by Israel. Let
not this assurance be eroded by
the gnawing teeth of burrowing
enemies of Israel. We look for
specific acts and deeds, rather
than words, as a test of American
policy. And sir, once and for all
reject and repudiate the insidious
and scurrilous sniping at Israel's
friends and supporters in the
U.S."
Noting that Israel and Premier
Menachem Begin himself are tar-
gets of anti-Semitism and that
A m bassodor Blum
international anti-Semitism is on
the rise, Blum said that "many of
us find it hard to accept that anti-
Semitism has not been banished
from the earth and we are not
suitably prepared for change in
the international climate," a
change which he stressed has oc-
cured.
Blum cited "crude anti-Semitic
jokes" not only in United Na-
tions committees, but through-
out the world. He pointed to
"crude anti-Semitic statements"
in the UN debates, and violent
attacks on Jewish institutions in
Antwerp, Vienna, Paris and the
U.S.
Investigation Urged Into Charges
Customs Changed Rules
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Two leaders of the in-
ternational Young Israel
movement, Harold Jacobs,
president of the National
Council of Young Israel,
and Martin Lasher, chair-
man of the National Coun-
cil of Young Israel public
affairs committee, have
called for a Congressional
investigation of an Oct. 27
U.S. Customs Service
ruling changing the iden-
tification of goods made in
Judaea and Samaria from
"made in Israel" to "made
in Israeli-occupied West
Bank."
Jacobs and Lasher described
the designation change as "sym-
bolic of a clear shift of American
foreign policy away from its tra-
ditional support of Israel and the
Camp David peace process.
WHILE OFFICIAL Adminis-
tration spokesmen pay lip service
to the Camp David process and
the security of Israel, actual
American foreign policy con-
tinues to tilt toward the so-called
'Saudi peace plan,' which de-
mands that Israel withdraw from
Judaea and Samaria."
The two Young Israel leaders
stated that "This shift in U.S.
Customs. regulations would
seem to substantiate such a shift
in the American attitude away
from the administrative solution
proposed by the Camp David
treaty and closer to the 're-
jectionist' demands for the par-
tition and eventual dissolution of
the State of Israel."
They added that actions such
as the Customs Service ruling
"which unilaterally and im-
plicitly" deny "Israel's legi-
timate claim to sovereinty" over
Judaea and Samaria "hurt the
peace process and Israel's con-
fidence in the good will of this
country in the pursuit of peace."


i age it
-... Tbi JflHtob.EkriffynQf.&v"n"
Congregations / Organizations Events [com^ Calendar
SCHAARA1 ZEDEK
Crafts Bazaar
Handmade and personalized
items as well as baked goods, art
work, plants and unique gifts are
among the things to be on sale at
the annual Sisterhood Bazaar at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek,
3303 Swann Ave., from 10:30-
1:30 p.m. The community is
invited.
JEWISH SINGLES
Bay Area
Come Munch-A-Brunch at the
Diplomat 11 a.m. Sunday.
Brunch on the Bayshore for only
$3.50. It is a good deal. Program
plans for the new year will be
made and your ideas are impor-
tant.
Singles Memberships are pay-
able now, $10 (if paid after Jan. 1,
it will be $12. Mail your check to
the JCC.
SCHAARAI ZEDEK
Thanksgiving
The annual joint Thanksgiving
service between Congregation
Schaarai Zedek and Palma Ceia
United Methodist Church was
hosted this year by Schaarai
Zedek on Thanksgiving morning.
Continuing the almost 30 year'
old tradition instituted by Rabbi
David Zielonka and Rev. Paul
Wagner, Rev. Pat W. McBride,
senior minister of Palma Ceia
United Methodist Church, de-
livered the sermon, "The
Growing Edge of Poverty."
Participating in the Service
from Congregation Schaarai
Zedek were Stanley W. Rosen-
kranz. Dr. Carl Zielonka and
Rabbi Frank N. Sundheim from
Palma Ceia, Participants were
Don Stichter, Dr. Lawrence W.
Coles and Rev. McBride.
Ushers were Gary Alter, Wil-
liam Davidson, Gerald Eckstein,
Alfred Haubenstock, Dr. FredL,
Lebos, Fred Rodgers, Ronald
Varn and William Stair. Follow-
ing the service The Temple hos-
pitality committee hosted the
reception.
DANCEMAKER DAZZLING!
The Dancemakers premiered
two works for their November
performance at the Jewish Com-
munity Canter of Tampa. The
Israeli Suite, choreographed
by Barton Mumaw, was created
for the Jewish Community and
was danced and sung bv the
company and guest vocalists.
The Dancemakers concluded
their performance by inviting
members of the audience to join
them in dancing "Mayeem."
The premiere of "DANCE-
DECO" was equally well received
as danced by Maggie Cortez,
Victoria D'Angelo, Nancy Fee-
gans, Elizabeth Gallagher and
Cynthia Pike. Barton Mumaw
was ill and could not appear. In
his place Florida Folk artist Will
McClain performed his original
poem and sang composition to
which Lais mimed and danced.
The comedic motif of "Flic-
kers" reflected the style of early
. silent movies danced to the music
of Scott Joplin. Leanne Rose
charged the mood effectively
with her solo in "Summer Mad-
ness." The men and women of the
company dance easily from style
to style. Colors and movement to
musk made the "Bach Suite-
memorable. From the opening
number "Alarippu," an invoca-
tion dance done in attractive
costumes and bells resounding
with each movement through the
Jewish folk dancing with the
audience. the Dancemakers
captivated the audience.
Robert Segal
Bad Penny Nixon Rolls On and On...
Richard Nixon's moat recant
disparagement of Jews, his anti-
Jewish slur in connection with
America's debate over the sale of
AW ACS to Saudi Arabia, came
soon after new Nixon tape revela-
tions. A simultaneous look at
both Nixon capers is educational.
In the course of the steaming
AW ACS debate, the dehorsed ex-
President put forth the crude
opinion that "if it were not for the
intense opposition of Prime
Minister Begin and parts of the
American Jewish community, the
AW ACS sale would go through."
The tapes of a May 5, 1971,
talk between Mr. Nixon and his
White House Chief of Staff H.R.
Haldeman, newly accessible, dis-
close that Mr. Nixon wanted to
know if "the Chicago Seven." a
group of anti-Vietnam War pro-
testers were "all Jews."
Haldeman said half were. Tickled
with the proposal set forth in the
tape to engage thugs "to knock
the heads off' the protesters, the
President wondered out loud "if
Congress will really gat a bellyful
of these people."
SURELY, we are justified in
wondering ourselves if the great
majority of Americans have by.
now had a bellyful of Mr. Nixon.
His latest effort to elbow his way
back to the center of American
policy-making in a critical hour
has to make some of his diehard
supporters a little nauseous.
When they compare the Nixon,
attack on Jews on the AWACS
matter with Senator Charles H
Percy's rebuttal, they might
start to rethink their view.
For in the judgment of the
chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee (Mr. Percy I
the criticism of the Ameri-
can Jewish community for lobby
ing against the AWACS deal is
"patently unfair." Jews, alonf
with all other Americans. Mr.
Percy opines, have not only the
right bat the responsibility to
make their views known.
The history of Mr. Nixon's
hate affair with Jaws is well doc-
umented. It surfaced in his sue
cassful effort to defeat Helen
Gahagan Douglas in the I960
California Senatorial battle. Al-
though ha rejected Rev Gerald
L.K Smith's endorsement, am-
bracing the offer to harp him "get
rid of the Jew-Communist," the
final days of the Nixon drive in-
ended the work of* tafephone
thai
YEARS LATER, the man who
gave America the hijinx of
Watergate, which Sen. Percy has
termed "the darkest scandal in
American political history," at-
tributed his smear campaign
against Helen Douglas to the in-
nocence of youth.
Now his denigration of Jews
may well take a sordid place in
history alongside Charles A.
Lindbergh's 1941 brazen and dis-
astrous Des Moines indictment of
American Jews as players of a
lead role in forcing America into
war against the Nazis.
The new Nixon tapes also will
recall for many his boorish advice
to escorts of his daughters not to
let the Nixon children frequent
art museums inasmuch as Father
Nixon linked museums in his
mind with Jews. Henry
Kissinger, who prayed with and
for Mr. Nixon in the dark Water-
gate and impeachment times,
concluded that the 37th Presi-
dent of the United States fos-
tered "a dangerous brand of anti-
Jewish prejudice born of ig-
norance."
The man who was twice elected
President got to that high office
with the help of many questiona-
ble artifices. Remember the
Checkers speech? "Pat's not a
quitter," he said of his wife. "Her
name was Patricia Ryan, and she
was born on St. Patrick's Day."
TRUTH to tell, Mrs. Nixon's
first name was Thelma, her birth-
day March 16. But the man who
showed up at Anwar Sadat's
funeral, then rode on to dine with
leaders of Arab nations arrayed
against Israel, is now admired by
some of the new functionaries in
the White House, one of them has
said that "a lot of people are im-
pressed that he took this oppor-
tunity to rehabilitate himself."
So begins a new chapter in the
biography of the man who once
went to the trouble of declaring
"I am not a crook" but did not
take pains expected of any Presi-
dent to read and absorb what
Article II of our Constitution has
to say to the occupant of the
highest office in the land: that he
has the duty to "take care that
the laws be faithfully executed."
1



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When a member of your family is disabled or
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Friday, Dtc. 4
(Candlelighting time 5:24)
Saturday, Dae. 3
Hillel School Shabbat ot Beth Israel Building afternoon t
Congregation Kol Ami Sisterhood Bowling 8 p.m.
Sunday, Dae. 6
Brandon Chavurah Board Meeting 10 a.m. Congregation Kol
Ami Israel Bond Brunch 10 a.m. Congregation Rodeph
Sholom Flea Market 10a.m. Congregation Kol Ami Gift Fair t
Tune In: "The Jewish Sound" 88.5 FM 9-11 a.m. Singles -
Brunch Diplomat 11 a.m. ($3.50)
Monday, Dae. 7
Hillel School Hanukkah Sale Hillel School Education Com-
mittee 3:30 p.m. Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Bazaar 10:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. Jewish Towers Residents Association 7:30
p.m. B'nai B'rilh Women Open Board 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. I
Hodossah Donor "Kidk Off" 10 a.m. Hillel School Parents
Association Open Board 10 a.m. Hillel School Book and Craft
Fair 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Congregation Schaarai Zedek
Brotherhood Meeting 6:30 p.m. Jewish Towers Bingo 7:30
p.m. Congregation Kol Ami Men's Club Board 8 p.m. ORT
(evening chapter) General Membership Meeting 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Dae. 9
National Council of Jewish Women General Meeting 9:45 a.m.
JCC Lunch Bunch noon Women's Pleo for Soviet Jewry oi
JCC 7:30 p.m. Hadassah-Brandon Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Congregation Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood Executive Board 8
p.m. Pacesetters Division of Tampa Jewish Federation dinner
at Kay and Marie Jacobs.
Thursday, Dec. 10
$ Tampa Jewish Social Service Industrial Employment Committee
i? noon.
\ Friday, Dec. 11
& (Candlelighting time 5:16)
8
TJF Womens Division Executive Board at 9:15 a.m. and Regular
Board at 10 a.m.-12 noon. ORT (evening chapter) Gift
.V
>: Wrapping at Wilsons-Fundraiser through Dec. 24.
Bswa&ssas&^aa*^^ :?
JEWISH COMMUNITY DIRECTORY
B'nai B'rith 876-4711
Jewish Community Center 872-4451
Jewish Floridian of Tampa 872-4470
Jewish National Fund 876-9327
State of Israel Bonds 879-8850
Tampa Jewish Federation 872-4451
Tampa Jewish Social Service 872-4451
T.O.P. Jewish Foundation, Inc. 225-2614
Schools
Hillel School (Grades 1 8, 839-7047
JCC Pre School sod Kindergarten 872-4451
Seniors
Chai Dial-A-Bus (Call 9 a.m. to noon) 872-4451
Jewish Towers 870-1830
Kosher Lunch Program 872-4451
Seniors' Project 872-4451
/-3S67


StP-t#rburg
541-36011
I
i
Religious Directory
TEMPI! DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning and
evening minyan.
CONGREGATION KOL AMI CoMtrvativ*-
3919 Moron Road 962-6338 Rabbi Leonard Rosenthol
Services; Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONG* EG AT ION RODEPH SHOLOM CNNntlN
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Berger,
Hozzan William Hauben Services: Friday, 8p.m.; Saturday, 10
a.m. Doily: AAinyan, 7:15
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDtt Refer.
3303 Swonn Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim
Serv ices: Friday. Bern.; Saturday. 9 a.m.
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida UC 217, Box
2463, Tampa 33620 (College Pork Apts.) 971 -6766 or 965-7926
Robbi lazar Rivkin Friday, 7 p.m. Shabbat Dinner and Services
Soturday Service 10:30 a.m. Monday Hebrew Chm 8 p.m. .
rNAI m It fONNMATION
Jewish Student Center, University of Sooth Florida <*'
Jeffrey Foost 5014 Patricia Court 172 (Village) Square Apt*)*
966-7076 or 966-1234 Friday Services and Dinner 6:30 p." *
Soturday Services 10:30a.m.



Decembers 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 15
EC Countries in Force
[.S., Israel Agree on Strategic Memo
JERUSALEM -Although neither side will talk very
about it, the United States has apparently sue-
j in coercing Israel into accepting Britain, France,
and The Netherlands for participation in the Mul- k ?nberger on Miay. There
ution Force and Observers (MFO) in the Sinai follow- ..1-T^ e*rBer threat8 by the
[Israeli withdrawal next April.
Ariel Sharon arrived in Washing-
ton as scheduled for talks with
Secretary of Defense Caspar
arlier, Prime Minister
hem Begin cate-
Uy rejected their par-
ation on the basis that
EEC countries are
the Fahd peace
i over the Camp David
brd.
jean sources were ap-
upset by Begin's stand.
by Foreign Minister Yitzhak
came to Washington to
i Secretary of State Alex-
Tuaig about the differences
bo the two countries.
; DIFFERENCES were in
central theme of a Cab-
meeting in Hadassah
Hospital Sunday, where the
Prime Minister was resting
following emergency surgery to
repair the damage to his hip he
sustained late last week when he
slipped and fell on the wet floor of
his bathroom.
The result of that Cabinet
meeting was an Israeli demand
Monday for "cosmetic changes"
in the U.S.Israeli statement
designed to bring the four EEC
countries into the MFO, to which
the Reagan Administration has
given high priority. Haig ap-
parently indicated that the
changes the Cabinet asked for
have already been approved.
On the strength of this agree-
ment, Israel Defense Minister
[U.S. Would Veto Fahd
Plan at UNations
W YORK (JTA) -
Kirk pa trick, the
States Ambassador
United Nations, in-
that should the
s introduce Prince
lid's eight-point plan to
United Nations, the
*d States will vote
st it.
pointed out that President
n "made it quite clear that
lire fully committed to the
ff David accords," and said
President's view will be
ted" at the UN should the
s seek a UN involvement in
)lan.
upatrick, addressing some
people at the Dialogue
er here as guest of the Dia-
Forum Series, repeatedly
1 the Reagan Administra-
commitment to the Camp
i accords. She claimed that
nued accusations that the
nistration is not fully be-
i Camp David process can
[do harm to the process itself
| may originate with the ene-
fCamp David.
IE SAID that the U.S. is
nitted to Israel "as an ally as
las a friend." Israel's security
i survival, she contended, is
on the development
bility in the region, and this
> goal of American policy in
lideast.
American envoy, who
tered questions by the pro-
n's moderator. Rabbi William
owitz, spiritual leader of
rogation B'nai Jeshurun
president of the Jewish
> Fund, said that the U .S.
i" in "cultivating" good
with Saudi Arabia for
of "^enforcing and
a regional stability in
Mid the U.S. views the
"moderate" in the
it of their relations to the
Union. "The Saudis are
idly to our enemies," the
. she said, pointing to the
interests of Saudi Arabia
sU.S.
IKPATRICK also said that
m a "very important
to freedom and demo-
She said there is "an inter-
network of terrorism,"
includes the Soviet Union,
and the Palestine Libera-
on. The purpose of
[international network," aha
' to destroy the free demo-
ocieties through revo-
faces
the
She said that Israel
"terrorist provocations in
West Bank," which make life
virtually "unbearable," and
therefore forces the Israeli
government to apply strict
measures in dealing with the
population there.
Asked to assess the U.S. re-
lations with the UN, Kirkpatrick
termed them "a big problem."
She contended the relations are
"so unsatisfactory, it simply has
to change." She said the U.S.
pays about 25 percent of the UN
budget about $1 billion a year.
In addition, she said, the U.S.
agencies. This support will be
curtailed in cases of "waste, or
when the agency violates funda-
mental values and commit-
ments," she said. She did not
elaborate.
Israel government that Sharon's
visa would be canceled if no
JESSES" cou,d ^ ""died on
the EEC's complement of forces
in the MFO.
FOLLOWING five hours of in-
tensive talks between the two,
there was an apparent slight up-
grading of the proposed memo-
randum on strategic cooperation
between the U.S. and Israel.
On his visit to Washington in
September, Prime Minister Begin
and President Reagan had
reached some understandings on
the extent of the cooperation
arrangement, although they were
not nearly as extensive as the Is-
raelis initially envisioned.
Over the weekend, the State
Department indicated that the
arrangement would primarily in-
clude some joint but clearly "cos-
metic" U.S. naval maneuvers
with Israeli naval forces and a
decision to stockpile U.S. medical
supplies in Israel. The State De-
partment was specific in indi-
cating that there would be no
stockpiling of weapons or
maneuvers with Israeli ground
troops, for which the Israel
government had pressed.
JUST AS in the case of the
agreement reached between the
U.S. and Israel on the EEC,
sources here were no more clear
on the details involving the slight
U.S. concessions on the strategic
cooperation memorandum, and
why it was that Sharon said after
his meeting with Secretary Haig
that "It (the memorandum) was
what we sought."
Meanwhile, U.S. special envoy
to the Middle East Philip Habib
was back in Lebanon Monday,
where he conferred with Lebanese
officials on means il restoring
civilian authority to the govern-
ment. Habib was due for
meetings with officials in Syria
on Tuesday and in Saudi Arabia
on Wednesday.
Jewish Quiz Box
By RABBI
SAMUEL J. FOX
(A JTA Feature)
Question: Why is the main body
of prayer (i.e., the Sh'Moneh
Esreh) shorter on the Sabbath
then it is during the rest of the
days of the week?
Answer: The main body of prayer
consists of three blessings of
praise at the beginning, three
blessings of thanks and peace at
the end and is intermediate
blessings that spell out our needs
and requests during the middle.
On the Sabbath the three at the
beginning and the three at the
end are recited; but only one
blessing which denotes the holi-
ness of the day is chanted in the
middle. This is because the
middle blessings indicate our
needs because we feel the lack of
certain things. On the Sabbath,
one is supposed to feel satisfied
and fulfilled. If we were to recite
the intermediate blessings on the
Sabbath it would disturb the
spirit of tranquility which is
required for the Sabbath day
Uerushalmi Shabbat 15:31 Wabti
Berachot21a).
Question: Why is an extra serv-
ice added to the liturgy of the
Sabbath morning prayer?
Answer: This added service is
called "Musaf (ie. additional).
In the days of the ancient temple
in Jerusalem and extra sacrifice
was added to the ritual procedure
of the day on the Sabbath. This
was so because there is an added
^im,tn of holiness that per-
vades the atmosphere of the Sab-
bath day. Thus, an added service
is recited in the morning liturgy.
Lower Taxes Help
Push Israel's
Living Index Up
JERUSALEM Living
standards in Israel rose by a near
record 12 percent during the first
six months of this year, accord-
ing to figures released by the
Central Bureau of Statistics in
connection with the publication
of the government's annual
statistical report.
The rise was attributed to
lower taxes on a variety of con-
sumer goods instituted by Fi-
nance Minister Yoram Aridor
and larger individual income
resulting from lowered income
tax. Those factors triggered pur-
chases of expensive items such as
color television and private cars.
Expenditures on consumer goods
were 25 percent higher than in
the same period last year.
The only similar rise in living
standards was recorded in 1967
when an economic boom replaced
the slump that preceded the Six-
Day War.
BUT ISRAELIS received less
assuring news on the demo-
graphic front. According to the
statistical annual, population
growth in 1981 was the slowest
for any year since the State was
founded in 1948. The increase in
the Jewish population was only
one percent compared to a 2.8
percent growth in the non-Jewish
population. In past years, the
Jewish population grew at an an-
nual rate of two percent, com-
pared to a 3.5 percent rate in the
non-Jewish population.
The figures showed that
natural increase was smaller this
year then in previous years. Most
troubling was the excess of
emigration over immigration. Is-
raelis leaving the country ex-
ceeded immigrants arriving by
more than 9,000. About 20,000
emigrated this year while only
11,000 new settlers arrived.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And he dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth,
and the top of it reached to heaven; and behold the angels of
God ascending and descending on it" (Gen. 28.12).
Vayetze
Question: Why is it that during
one of the hymns that is recited
on Friday night in the synagogue
the congregation turns around
and faces the rear of the sanc-
tuary?
Answer: This is the hymn
"Lecha Dodi" which express our
anxiety to receive the Sabbath as
one greets the bride at a wedding.
In the final stanza, of this hymn
the congregation turns around as
if to greet the Sabbath which has
finally arrived, just as one turns
towards the rear to greet the
bride who comes walking down
the aisle. This shows our anxiety
to observe the Sabbath and to
enjoy it as welcome guest whose
presence is long awaited.
Obituaries
SILVERMAN
Funeral eervloea tor Al SUv.rman. ware
held Tuesday aRernoon. November M
.7 Cong gaUon Schaaral ZMtok. Rabbi
Frank NBundhelm officiated. Inter-
ment follow*! in Schaaral WCm-
tary Mr. SUvennan was Praetdam of
Alrit. Air Conditioning. Inc. He was
bom In Providence, R.I. and had Brad
In Tampa tor eight yearr HcJJJJr
Stodok and (fee BroUWrhood of Schaaral
Zedak. He la survived by hU wife. Janet
K. SUverman; Br^a-8Uvrman.
both of Tampa; four daughtora, Margie
SUverman of Tampa, Joan Na. *amn
OrUlot, Nancy BUverman. all of Iaraal.
four frandcluldran. >aya Namr^Saltt
rfaVNaoml drtUot Navah Orfoo*. an
ofTarael; hta paranU, Mr. and Mr..
HarmaaB. SllVinnaa. of Wast Palm
Sicn; a brothar. MaMn SUverman of
Ergo and a atoUr, Helen itarrtson of
rtmVa Frlende who wtah may make
SSorlal Utt. to ConjrwsattoB
aehaaral Badek or tfco ehartty of matr
chotea.
VAYETZE On his way to Haran, Jacob lay down to rest at a
place where God appeared to him in a dream, promising to be
with him and to give the land to him and his seed after him.
Rising the next morning, Jacob lifted the stone on which he had
slept, and set it up as a pillar. He called the place Beth-el, mean-
ing 'house of God," and vowed to serve God there when .
returned to his father's house. The Lord would be his God.
In Haran Jacob worked twenty years as a shepherd for
Laban seven years for his first wife, Leah, seven years for his
second wife, Rachel, and six years for the sheep. His wives gave
him their maid servants Bilhah and Zilpah as wives. Jacob's
four wives bore him 11 sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan,
Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebuhin, and Joseph: he also
had one daughter named Dinah. At God's direction. Jacob
returned home to his father's house. On the way he met the
angels of God.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law it extracted and baaed
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, $15. published by Shongold. The volume is available at 75 MaMen
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10036. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
EHTiitton
Robert A Levin
Andy Lewis
EF Hulton & Company Inc
315 Easl Madison Si mi
Tampa Fl 3360?
Telephone (Si 3) 2?3-49*6
SERVING TAMPA'S JEWISH FAMILIES
SINCE 1916
FUNCRAL HOMC
258 PLANT AVENUE AT PLATT STREET *
Jmm E Lawhon Truman H Thomas


*e iv
Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of Tamp*
ftida
y.
Israel's Next War
Generals Hard at Work Planning Strategy
Center for
By GEOFFREY PAUL
London Chronicle Syndicate
If there is to be a next
war with the Arabs, and
the Israeli military estab-
lishment has little reason
for doubting there will be,
THE TEL AVIV
Strategic Studies, in a report pre-
pared by Brig-Gen. (Rea.) Yeho-
shua Raviv. baa concluded that,
even without the Egyptiana, the
Arabs within the next twelve
Una is why we signed the
treaty, ia that no matter what is
happening with the other Arab
countries, they will keep to the
agreement and not be involved.
This may be wishful thinking. It
is what we pray for.
will be won by Israel only if sume' that they are in every intel
she succeeds in inventing
an "invisible aircraft."
This is probably the
greatest challenge ever
posed to Israel's scientists
and flows directly from the
United States decision to
sell to Saudi Arabia a
package containing
AW ACS which are, effec-
tively, flying command
posts capable of watching
over all of Israel's air space
and directing counter-
measures from multiple
points, and F-15 fighter
aircraft with long-range
capabilities which will un-
doubtedly act as escorts to
the AWACS.
If Israel proves herself unable
to invent counter-measures capa-
ble of making her aircraft "invisi-
ble" to the probing eyes of the
AWACS, her vulnerability in-
creases from the present ratio of
about three-to-one in the Arabs'
favor to a point where she is vir-
tually a sitting duck.
JUST WHAT the AWACS
deal means for Israel was spelled
out for me by Mordecai Zippori,
at present Israel's Communica-
tions Minister and previously hei
Deputy Defense Minister.
"Once the Saudis have theii
AWACS, we will have no secrets.
Every takeoff by every one of our
aircraft will be known, and that
information will be instantane-
ously available to every Arab
country, as well as the direction
in which they are flying. Even
during peace time, they will be
able to monitor how we train our
pilots.
"And the dangers we have to
contemplate do not arise only if
the Saudis participate directly in
a war. What if they stay 'neu-
tral,' as they claim they have
been in other wars, but neverthe-
less are flying within their own
territory (or miles out over the
Mediterranean, he might have
added) and delivering informa-
tion to our enemies?
grunts of Israel's own ministers
whose public statements are
more frequently prompted by
politics than strategy.
ONE OF the most influential
of all strategists, Prof. (ret. Gen.)
ve^^LnTguidt ^o^oTinV^rious military ~wer, f pec^y the ^ fo^, on
operations designed to secure a one or two fronta, is worth tne
settlement desirable to them, price we paid for peace,
even though they will not be able
months will possess the capabili-
"The next one ia that they may
wait a day, or even four, to see
how things are going before join-
ing in. For us, even one day that
allows us to concentrate all our
been in the Israel -*_.,
taona room" Someom7LiI
tolls me that the **
change since the Yom
War is the tact that;?
map was once split
separate fronts, there bZl
front,
lines, and it is reasonable to aa-
one eastern
hundreds
Hanikra on thelsraeT
border, up and over th*,
Heighta. down the lentrtk !?
River Jordan and?0*
southern tip of the
peninsula.
[ miw fS*1
to
"HOW ARE we going to go in
md beat the hell out of them
he country on whose charity the
Veetern world is so dependent
they didn't formally join the
ar? How will the free world re-
ct? They'll say 'but the Saudis
idn't move any units.'
"Mind you," Zippori leans for-
ward across his desk in the
ieneral Post Office building in
1 he heart of Jerusalem, "if our
lives are in danger, we will do it.
"But the decision the United
States and other Western coun-
tries have taken to put no limits
on the delivery of sophisticated
arms to the Arabs is a big danger
to us. We know exactly that
France and Italy went to Iraq to
assist in the building of atomic
weapons. We have no doubts
about this. They did it in full
knowledge of what they were do-
ing. So we jumped in, taking the
risk of being denounced hi our
best friends because of thi /fearful
danger."
The implication of his words
was left hanging in the air.
Elsewhere in Israel, men
skilled in the arts of war are con
1 a ntly assessing the extent of
danger and setting it against
their reading of the mood of the
,b world. Their sophisticated
ulation of Aral) options and
ntions must allow always for
unpredictable or for situs-
iis created by the growls and.
ligence officer's Iritbag. What
Prof. Harkaby did was to refine
all the known Arab positions into
three identifiable schools of
thought.
The first is the school of "ero-
sion": this regards Israel as dis
integrating from within and
favors political pressure from the
West to hasten this process, sup-
ported by economic and military
measures likely to inflict loss and
undermine morale.
The second is the school of
"natural borders": this does not
believe in the possibility of total
Arab military victory in this
generation and favors political
means, furthered by military
operations, to reduce Israel's
borders to those of 1949 or even
the UN partition border of 1947.
THE THIRD is the school of
"continuous struggle": this ac-
cepts "erosion" and "natural
borders" as only short, tem-
porary phases in the process of
destroying Israel, regarding mili-
tary means, including full-scale
wars, as the best option.
Sometimes, one of these
schools is in the ascendant,
*>metimes another and, occa-
sionally, two co-exist, as now
that is "natural borders" which
is the Saudi view, and "continu-
ous struggle" favored by the
Syrian-Libyan-led Rejection
Front).
What they all have in common,
clearly, is the use of military
means either as primary or as
supportive to political action.
And these means are being
gathered at a startling rate.
One man who watches the
Arab military buildup with ex-
pert concern is Gen. "Arela"
Yariv, former military intelli-
gence chief and now head of the
internationally-admired Center
for Strategic Studies based at Tel
Aviv University, in a beautiful
garden setting from which the
horrors of war seem so distant
until a young soldier-student
strolls across campus, automatic
weapon over one shoulder,
schoolbag on the other.
AS FAR as Gen. Yariv is con-
cerned, the arms being garnered
by the Arabs from East and West
in huge quantities have only one
target: Israel. But it is not so
much their quantity as their
quality that concerns him and,
specifically, the fact that, to-
gether with sophistication, there
is a new simplicity in application
which reduces the advantage of
superior training and education
which have always been Israel's
best safeguard. Scant intelligence
is required to cross two lines on a
radar screen and press a button.
Aircraft against aircraft, tank
against tank or warship against
warship, even with the Arab ad-
vantage of a three-to-one (or
more) capability, Israel still has
little doubt about her battlefront
superiority in set-piece confron-
tations.
But the scenario is changing
rapidly with the amassing of anti-
aircraft missiles capable of
neutralizing the deterrent power
of the Israeli Air Force (Jordan,
for example, is about to put her
static American Hawk anti-air-
craft missiles on Russian-made
transporters, giving her much
more flexibility), the acquisition
of long-range missiles (the
Syrians have the capability of
hitting Tel Aviv from their rocket
bases), and the introduction of
self-seeking air-to-air missiles
which mean that aircraft do not
have to come into close combat in
order to engage each other.
to engage in an all-out war aimed
at her liquidation.
There are certain pre-condi-
tions: military cooperation be-
tween Syria and Iraq, and
preferably Jordan as well; politi-
cal and economic assistance and
cooperation from the rest of the
Arab world and, possibly, mili-
tary as well; surprise at least on
the tactical level, and the con-
tinuation of Soviet military and
political aid.
There are certain safeguards
with which Israel can meet the
challenge: a high state of alert
and a commensurate warning
system; maintenance of her mili-
tary capability; an adequate
deterrence to strikes against Is-
rael's rear (in which are her major
centers of population); defenses
against "special forces" raids;
and the abUity to withstand the
ounting threat to Israel's free-
dom of navigation from, for
example, the expanding Libyan
Navy in the Mediterranean and
the Saudi Navy in the Red Sea.
. IF, AS SOME Israelis still
fear, the Egyptians, after Israel's
final pullback from Sinai, rejoin
the Arab camp and eventually
the Rejection Front, will the
balance against Israel be even
more drastically altered? Zippori
has his answer.
"There are three possibilities
with Egypt. The first one, and
This, today, is the fro.
over which Israel watch*
"The worst possibUity ia that. Murder, "financial and
asm the Yom Kippur War, they J^nXinE*-*
will decide no more peace, we are *"* >urveuiance
going to war,' and they start _^ runway m,
Sinai
moving their units into
well, I hope we give the right
answer. Meeting the Egyptians
in the desert of Sinai, without the
Suez Canal dividing the forces,
without fortifications and on
open terrain, we can deal with
them much better than if we have
to cross minefields and obstacles.
"We took this into considera-
tion. The risk for peace was pos-
sible because there are over 200
mile* of desert dividing us. That
is why we keep saying there is no
camparison between Sinai and
any other part of our country, not
the Golan Heights,
and Samaria.
not Judea
"Some people say that if we
have managed it in Sinai, we can
manage somewhere else. No. As a
Jew, as a politician and as some-
one whose main preoccupation
has been defense for the past 44
years, I tell you that any govern-
ment of Israel which will sign an
agreement enabling the estab-
lishment of another Arab State,
to change the situation as it
exists now, has signed the death
warrant of the State of Israel. It
will be only a question of time.
From a military point of view.
Arabian desert, a new m
some deserted coast, then
ment of a unit from Syria I
position in Lebanon, the trra
of an Iraqi general in JornWj
these tiny pieces havetobefij
into the complex calculation]
which one day might de
whether Israel lives or dies.
The argument rages as I
among Israeli strati
among any other group aboi"
merits or otherwise of Jewisai
tlement on the West Bank. fl
is scarcely among them one i
would ever yield the Jordan L
positions held by the Israel I
fense Forces or the Golan 1
not even, as one senior l
colorfully put it, "if the Ma_
himself descended and offeradl
guarantee their
tion."
AT THE END of the day, j
course, the generals bow to |
politicians. Even Moshe
gave up Sharm el Sheikh*
peace with Egypt. But it is cult, looking at the huge pilal
military material piling up I
hind the Arab frontline (401
cent of all military orders awi
ing delivery from the Un
States to overseas customer! j
more than $20 billion wortal
are destined for Saudi Arabia! I
B'nai B'rlth Women and the Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division
INVITE
The Tampa Jewish community to participate
and |oln In solidarity to
PLEA FOR SOVIET JEWRY
In recognition of the 11th Annual Women's Plea
For Soviet Jewry
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9,1981
7:30 P.M.
Library of the Jewish Community Center
2808 Horatio Street
Quest Speaker
Faina Tsukerman, wife of Soviet Refutenik
Vladimir Tsukerman


Full Text
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