The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00124

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
wJewisti Mondial in
Volume 3-Number 40
Off Tampa
Tampa, Florida Friday, November 20,1981
FrMSAoOMf
Price 35 Centa
Lois Older Appointed to
Chair Women's Division
1982 Campaign
Franci Rudolph, president of
I the Tampa Jewish Federation
Women's Division, has an-
nounced the appointment of Lois
Older as chairman of the
Women's Division 1982 Cam-
| paign.
"Lois Older has been working
I hard this summer in setting up
committees, and formulating the
structure of the 1982 Campaign"
reported Rudolph. "I urge every-
one to assist Lois and hope that
this demonstration of our
women's deep concern for our
people's needs will serve as an
inspiration to our entire commu-
nity."
"We are very excited over our
[plans which will be announced
shortly. 1982 will be the most
successful, exciting and eventful
in the history of the Women's Di-
vision!" Older stated. "I am
looking forward to total commu-
nity awareness and involvement
in the Women's Division Cam-
| paign development."
Lois, a native of Maywood,
N.J., is married to Dr. J. Justin
Older, an Ophthalmic-Plastic
surgeon, and is the mother of two
children, Benjamin and Jessica,
both Hillel School students. She
I was chairman of the Federation-
sponsored "Proclaim Liberty"
production at the Tampa
Theatre, as well as co-chairman of
the Women's Division 1980 Es-
I sential Division. She served as
Hillel School Parents Association
Pressure Up Against
Quitting Sinai Salient
Lois Older, Women's Division
Campaign Chairman, Tampa
Jewish Federation.
chairman of the "Gift of Gold"
fundraiser last year and is this
year's fundraising chairman. She
is on the Tampa Jewish Social
Service Frail Elderly Committee,
and is a past vice president in
charge of Education for ORT and
past donor chairman. Lois is a
member of the Tampa Jewish
Federation board of directors; is
a member of Congregation
Schaarai Zedek and Schaarai
Zedek Sisterhood.
Lois is realtor associate with
Mario Polo Realty and is a
member of their One Million
Dollar Club and has won
numerous sales awards, including
Top Salesman Award.
Immediate Response
Sharon Draws Borderline;
Infraction Means War
JERUSALEM (ZINS) Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon said last week in a television interview that Israel
had established "red lines" whose crossing by Arab states
would trigger armed Israeli reaction. These included pro-
duction or possession of nuclear weapons, the movement
of Syrian troops into Southern Lebanon, the movement of
Iraq's troops into Syria or Jordan, or the movement of
Egyptian troops into the Sinai demilitarized zone.
IN THE EVENT of such Syrian or Iraqi movement
Sharon said, "Israel would find itself at war immedi-
ately." Sharon was not specific about Israeli reaction in
the case of Egypt, but he said that "we made it very clear
that we will not be willing to accept any violation of the
agreement large or small."
He said, "that Israel was proceeding with the Sinai
pullout, but had taken precautions to avoid disaster" if
the reading of Egyptian intentions proved erroneous. The
assumption guiding Israel now, however, was that Egypt
sincerely wants peace, he said.
Neo-Nazis Said to Have Clear Base
BONN (JTA) Federal
Justice Minister Juergen Sch-
mude said recant developments
have "definitely refuted" asser-
tions that repeated extreme
nghtwing violent attacks were
just independent cases. On the
[contrary, he observed, it becomes
very clear that neo-Nazi groups
lhaye managed to put on a care-
L&%-planned infra structure with
[branches in all Darts of the coun-
ty and with contacts with
'imilar groups abroad.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) If
proof were needed that the "Stop
the Withdrawal in Sinai Move-
ment" is gaining support and be-
coming more strident in tone, it
was provided when an estimated
30,000 people, most of them reli-
gious-nationalist youngsters,
spent the Simchat Torah holiday
dancing through the streets of
Yam it in symbolic "second
Hakafot" to protest the planned
evacuation of the region by next
April.
llanan Forat, Tehiya Knesset
member, in a fiery speech, de-
plored the "playing down of the
spontaneous joy felt here nation-
wide at the death of (Egyptian
President Anwar) Sadat," ac-
cording to a report in Yedio
Achronot. Porat was quoted in
both Yediot and Moariv as
saying that God had dealt "with
his enemies as they deserve" in
arranging Sadat's assassination.
He recalled the thousands of Is-
raelis killed in the Yom Kippur
Wer which Sadat launched
against Israel.
FORST IS now living in the
Rafah area, as are Geula Cohen of
Tehiya and Rabbi Haim Druck-
man of the National Religious
Party. Druckman moved into
Yamit with his wife and nine chil-
dren two weeks ago. All three
have said that their presence in
the area will strengthen the re-
solve of the residents and other
nationalist elements to resist
government order to evacuate.
In a recent interview, Porat
said the funding fo. the extensive
activities of the Stop the With-
drawal campaign was derived
from private contributions
especially from settlers in Judaea
and Samaria each of whom was
expected to donate one thousand
Shekels.
The campaign includes or-
ganizing bus trips to the Rafah
area each of which ends with
lectures from local anti-with-
SCHMUDE strongly defended
the decision of federal authorities
to take over the investigation in-
to the case of neo-Nazi weapon
depots, which were found in the
state of Lower Saxony.
Schmude's statement,issued by
the press service of the ruling So-
da! Democratic Party (SPD), of
which he is a member, follows a
fierce debate in Bonn over who
was politically responsible for
playing down neo-Nazi activities.
Shalom
ToAllB'naiB'rith
Board of Governors:
SHALOM, and welcome to our
fair City of Tampa. It is a great
honor and privilege, as president
of the local B'nai B'rith Lodge, to
welcome all of you. I hope that,
while you are in Tampa, you will
have a chance to explore our city,
as well as the Bay Area. I also
hope that your board of
governors meeting is productive,
and all of your decisions will be
beneficial to all Ben B'ritha in our
district.
Please call upon us, if there is
anything Tampa Lodge 1044 can
do to make your stay more
beneficial.
Shalom,
BILL HIRSHBERG
drawal residents and exhorta-
tions to the visitors to sign up as
members or supporters of the
movement. The organization
claims to have scores of families'
ready and waiting for the signal
to move to the area as some 20
families have already done (most
of them into abandoned homes in
the Moshav of Talmei Yosef).
MS. COHEN, in a Simchat
Torah interview, stated the
movement's objective in un-
equivocal terms: "Our aim is to
stop the withdrawal at least from
what is left of Sinai. We ourselves
believe that the nation will yet
mourn the earlier withdrawal
from the west of the peninsula.
Cohen and other movement
spokesmen cite the death of
Sadat as a factor that ought to
convince the Israeli pubUc that
the peace treaty with Egypt
"needs revision." She also
stressed the massive arms flow to
Saudi Arabia as a strategic factor
of such significance that was not
so evident when the Camp David
agreements were concluded.
All these, she believes, would
justify, in terms of international
law, Israel's demand for "re-
vision" of the treaty. "Only a
State determined on national
suicide would pursue this (with-
drawal) policy (now)," she says.
COHEN PREDICTS that if
the whole of Sinai is returned as
scheduled, the Egyptians will
immediately embark on a major
diplomatic initiative, strongly
and widely supported in the in-
ternational arena, to pressure Is-
rael over Judaea and Samaria.
Israel will then be bereft of its
main "card" the strategic
chunk of Sinai still in its
possession. Moveover, she says,
the withdrawal will weaken Israel
strategically and morally and
will thus serve as an eventual
"enticement to war."
Says Cohen: "I believe that
non-withdrawal is not only vital
but also possible. If the
government doesn't want it, then
the will of the people must force
the government to change its
stand ... If the government tries
to use its right to force, we shall
use our force of right and I
believe that we can triumph..."
She hints that the movement
still hoped that Defense Minister
_ Ariel Sharon, patron of the Gush
Emunim West Bank settlements,
Continued on Page 10
Tampa Lodge 1044
In 'New Republic'
Embarrassment:
Reagan Aide
Differs With Boss
By DAVID HOROWITZ
UNITED NATIONS In
what appears to be one of the
sharpest condemnations of the
FLO, as well as criticism of lead-
ing Americans within the Ad-
ministration possibly also who
have been flirting with Israel's
enemies, Ambassador Jeane
Kirkpatrick surprised many here
at the UN with a feature story
appearing in the current issue of
The New Republic under the
caption, "Dishonoring Sadat"
and subtitled, "The PLO Is Not a
Peace Partner."
Judging by the revelatory con-
tents of the article and its out-
spokenness, one may wonder
whether or not it had the prior
approval of the President and the
Secretary of State. One thing is
certain: it is something both
Reagan and Haig should ponder
seriously.
"It is shocking, so soon after
his (Sadat's) death," Kirkpatrick
concludes, "influential Ameri-
cana should be proposing solu-
tions (the Saudi Peace plan?) that
would take us down the pathway
Sadat scorned. It is especially
shocking that they should sug-
gest negotiating with the 'deadli-
est enemies of peace in the area.
These individuals should be
aware that the path they propose
Continued on Page 9
Ambassador Kirkpatrick


1
Page 8
Page 2
Tho JmmUM, VI-!-____#~.
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, November 20
1981
9T <\kM
By LESLIE AIDMAN
(Call me about your social news
at 872-4470)
When we heard the terrific news about 11 year old Francie
Linsky, daughter of Michael and Karen Linsky, we just knew
that ypovwoulcrllke to hear about it too. Francie was recently
electba president of the student body at Roland Park Ele-
mentary School, a sixth grade center. Francie's election to this
illustrious.,off ice came about only after she campaigned and
made a speech in front of the entire student body of 460stu-
dents. She was then elected by secret ballot. In addition u<
hefpihg plan and run various school activities, this body of
elected officers is in charge of running the school bookstore.
Francie is also active in softball and plays on a girls Tampa Bay
Little League Team called the "Herons." Well, Francie, we
think your election is simply fantastic and how admirable to be
active and interested in all aspects of your school life. Loads of
congratulations to you.
How do you like the new picture? Thanks to Beverly Simon,
of Village Photographers I have a new look to go along with my
column logo. (Now are you happy Dr. Moe Chardkoff??? Does
this mean you will no longer call me every Friday to say how
awful my picture is ????? Call and say "hi" anyway, okay!!)
Sonja and Alfred Wasserberger recently called us to let us
know the latest news about their son, Abe Davis-Waaaerberger,
(who was formerly the assistant executive director of Tampa
Jewish Federation). Abe is currently residing in St. Louis, where
he is working hard as the director of Leadership Development
and Trades and Professional Division of the Federation Cam-
paign of that city. We are so glad to hear that you are busy and
involved, and we send you our best regards.
Now tell me, who could ever turn down a bargain????? If
you are looking for that perfect Chanukah gift or a trinket for
yourself, then mark your calendar for Monday, Dec. 7, from
.lO:30-r:8 by the Sisterhood of Congregation Schaarai Zedek. Co-chairmen
Gail Perahes and Ann Rudolph have really been working hard.
There will be a myriad of foods for sale from hor d'oeurves to
casseroles, to soups, to fabulous breads and desserts and all
of them homemade, of course! There will be table after table of
wonderful hand-made gifts to buy from hand-painted barrettes
and hair ribbons, and t-shirts, and children's underwear, to
batiks and sculptures and lithographs. Also, as if this were not
already reason enough to come, one may browse among and
purchase items from the Temple's well-stocked Judaica Shop, a
terrific array of plants, a booth filled with costume jewelry, and
much, much more. There will be a delicious box lunch available
^or purchase, and a babysitter will be provided free so Morns' will
Rave time to shop leisurely. Don't miss this fabulous day of
fteBRaWinasiJaWPM* tammfmm*? so- bring'ybuf friends and"
neighbors. See you there! ... ....
Let me take this opportunity to extend my most sincere
wishes for a happy, healthy, peaceful, and deeeee-licious
Thanksgiving to you and all of your loved ones. There is not a
more appropriate time than now for us to pause and reflect.
"Thanksgiving is a time for us to remember our dependence on
one another. Not only should we show our gratitude for the
blessings that are ours, but for the blessings of freedom. In our
world of today, with its constant bickering, slayings, and strife,
it is marvelous to witness the truth that men and women of
goodwill can live together harmoniously. May the spirit of
Thanksgiving be a thanksgiving not only at this season and on
this day, but throughout the entire year.''
We know that a lot of you must have special holiday plans,
possibly, vacations, family coming to visit, or college kids
coming home. Please let us know about all of these fun and ex-
citing things we just love to hear about what is going on.
(Call the office today at 872-4470H
"Women's Wednesday" is just around the corner, and it is
really one f those stimulating, thought provoking days that
every woman should try to attend. Being held from 9 a.m.-l :30
p.m. and from 5:30p.m. -10 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 2 at Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek, Tampa Jewish Federation has
planned a variety of mini-seminars that one may attend: Diana
Winoker, account executive at Dean Witter Reynolds, Inc. will
speak on "Expanding the Boundaries of Your Money"; Joan
Benjamin, Joint Committee For Social Action, Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations, from Clearwater, will speak on
"Stand Op and Be Counted"; Chria Kelaey, MA, Kalashian and
Associates, will speak on "What You Want To Discuss With
Your Children, But Are Afraid They'd Ask"; Dr. Judith
Ochaborn, director of Women's Studies Program at USF, will
speak on "You've Come A Long Way, Bubeleh", Anne Thai,
executive director of Tampa Jewish Social Service, will speak on
"How'jNot To Feel Guilty While Doing Things That Make You
Feel Guilty" and Susanne Brav, guidance counselor at Gorrie
Elementary School will speak on "How To Survive Being Jew-
ish .WhileTrying."
If you want to come and have not received an invitation,
then contact the Tampa Jewish Federation.
Meet Rosb/n and Bob Willis who recently moved to the
Westshore area of town from Worcester, Mass. They both
originally hail from Massachusetts also. Bob manufactured
lighting in Massachusetts and moved down here to open a beau-
tiful new store called "The World of Lighting." The Willises
have two children 26 year old Jamie who is married to Rachel
(and they are expecting their first child any minute). Jamie is a
partner in "The World of Lighting" with his Father. The
Willises younger son, 21 year old Glenn, attends the University
of South Florida. Roslyn enjoys aerobics and bowling and was a
member of many Jewish organizations in Mass. such as ORT,
Hadassah, and B'nai B'rith. We certainly are glad that y'all
have chosen Tampa to move to Bob and Roslyn welcome.
ntil next week .
Towards the Perfect Pine Tree
r
By YEHONATHAN TOMMER
JERUSALEM Scientists
are at work in Israel creating a
perfect pine tree, one that will be
fast-growing, tail and straight,
drought resistant and immune
to common tree diseases. It will
have a thick trunk and will pro-
duce industrial timber that can
compete with the best European
varieties.
Israeli forest researchers be-
lieve the day is fast approaching
when pine trees planted by the
Jewish National Fund will be
raised from properly selected
seeds and will be perfectly suited
to Israel's dry climate and
generally poor soil conditions. It
would be a type of tree that could
also do well in the similar soil
conditions of several Arab coun-
tries.
The break-through in develop-
ing this dream tree came several
years ago when a strange disease
struck large sections of the JNF's
30-year old pine forest along the
road to Jerusalem at a section
called Shaar Hagay.
"We have since identified the
disease and the JNF took appro-
priate action to renew the
damaged parts ot the forests,"
says Dr. Rene Karschon. head of
the research team of eight tree
geneticists at the JNF's Forestry
Division Experimental and Re-
search Station at Ilanot.
For the past year, the Ilanot
station has worked full-time on
relating the pathology findings to
their effort to develop a new pine.
"Israeli foresters have long
known that the so-called Aleppo
pine, which covers much of the
Carmel Range near Haifa,
Galilee, the Judean Hills and the
Hebron foothills down to Beer-
sheba, in large part actually de-
rives from Vienna," Karshon ex-
plains. "The Aleppo pine is con-
sidered the hardiest and best-
suited to the region. Large quan-
tities of pine seeds were also
brought in from Mediterranean
countries, but no record of where
these saplings from Europe and
North Africa were planted were
kept. Over the years, the strains
cross-pollinated, making it im-
possible to identify their origins
and difficult to isolate the Aleppo
pines."
Karschon'8 JNF research team
is investigating 17 characteristics
in the metabolism of the pine
Xuca^^ratortt
^^ SI deL"ing a *tiaS
code to be used in identify^
genuine Aleppo pine fromitw
types and hybrids. The dau*
currently being processed and !
is hoped that the researchers
soon move onto the next ttaa^
cultivating seedlings 0fTw
selected type. *
Over 1.000 foreign type, of
trees are planted at the llano u
^return Most of the"> come
from the dry climates of the Uni
ted States and Australia. Ilanot
has obtained over 200 species of
eucalptus and 60 strains 0f
acacias from these countries
And it is in this arboretum that
the Aleppo pine will be grown ex-
perimentally once it is isolated
from the seed selections that are
now being collected all over I8.
rael.
In addition to the controlled
conditions at Ilanot, the Israeli-
bred variety of Aleppo pine will
be grown in various parts of the
country under natural conditions
With luck, it will take and b*
come a permanent and flourish-
ing member of Israel's flora.
Three MK's Move Near Yam it
Aim to Block Sinai Evacuation Next April
By URI BENZIMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Three members of the 120-mem-
ber Knesset have recently taken
up residence in or near Yamit, the
main township in the Rafah
region of northeast Sinai which
Israel will evacuate next April.
They are Geula Cohen and Hanan
Porat of the Tehiya faction and
Rabbi.Haim Druckman of thaex-
treme fight wing of the 'National
Religious Party. A fourth MK,
Tehiya leaxWr' Ytival Neeman,
says that he too is contemplating
the move.
The declare purpose is to ex-
press in this way their opposition
to the pullout from Yamit and the
rest of the Rafah region, sched-
uled for next April under the
terms of the Israel-Egyptian
peace treaty. As such, these MKs
are breaking no law or violating
no regulation. Nevertheless, their
move raises questions of pub-
licethics and parliamentary
responsibility.
UNDER THE "Members of
Knesset immunities law: Rights
and Duties" enacted in 1951, a
Knesset member "shall not sub-
ject to either civil or criminal
Cranberry-Strawberry
T11 Mil
Gelatin Mold
By NORMA BARACH
(Jewish Telegraphic Agency)
Thanksgiving seems to be
right on the heels of our Jewish
holiday season. A cranberry-
strawberry gelatin mold to ac-
company your holiday turkey
should hit the spot.
CRANBERRY-STRAWBERRY
GELATIN MOLD
1 pkg. strawberry gelatin
1 pkg. lemon gelatin
2 cups boiling water
110-oz. pkg. frozen
strawberries
1 cup cranberry-orange
relish
Vt cup ginger ale
Dissolve the gelatins in boiling
water, 1 cup to each flavor. Com-
bine them and add the frozen
strawberries and the cranberry
orange relish. Stir and let it cool
off. Then add the ginger ale,
slowly mixing with an up and
down motion. Pour into a 6-cup
mold and chill unut farm. Serve*
8.
r11 30 81
process, and will be immune from
any legal action against him, in
regard to his vote, or his opinion,
or any action he has taken
either inside the Knesset or out-
side the Knesset if that vote,
that expression of opinion, or
that action was a part of the way
in which he fulfils his role as a
member of the Knesset.''
This deliberately wide and
catch-all formulation gives effec-
tive protection to MKs against
any. attempt to prosecute or sue
them because of their political ac-
tivities. The legislature intended
and indeed succeeded in
providing its members with well
nigh perfect freedom to function
as representatives of the public.
It enabled them to describe their
political activities even if such
activities would be illegal if done
by others as "part of the way
in which he fulfils his role as a
member of the Knesset.''
So far Cohen, Porat and
Druckman have not violated any
law. The Yamit-Rafah area is
open to free movement and
normal access and the three MKs
followed the normal procedures in
setting up homes there in empty
houses. Moreover, their decision
to leave their homes and take this
symbolic step of resettling them-
selves and their families in Yamit
can most certainly be defined as
" part of the way in which they
fulfil their roles as members of
the Knesset." Their purpose,
after all, is to make a legitimate
demonstration of their political
views.
BUT THE ethical and demo-
cratic problems arise not out of
strict legalism, but out of the fact
that the Knesset itself, by an
overwhelming majority, has
resolved that this area is to be
evacuated as part of the peace
with Egypt. Furthermore, the
anti-withdrawal, anti-peace
treaty views of these three MKs
were very recently put to the ul-
timate democratic test that of
the ballot-box and found to
represent only a very small pro-
portion of Israeli public opinion.
Tehiya won three seats in the last
election.
It is therefore most relevant to
ask of these three MKs: What is
the moral basis of their act of
demonstration against the imple-
mentation of the peace treaty?
But the problem is more
serious and more down-to-
earth than a mere ethical debate.
Though the three MKs have
not broken any law, they have
clearly given inspiration and en-
couragement to others who, it
appears, do intend to break the
law and take illegal actions in
their struggle against the
evacuation.
Kosher Lunch Menu
Kosher lunch menu of the Senior Citixen'a Nutrition and
Activity Program is sponsored by the Hill-borough County
Commission and held at the Jewish Community Center. Marilya
Blakiey, site manager, 872-4451. Menu subject to change.
WEEK OF NOVEMBER 23-27
Monday Baked Fish with Tartar Sauce, Broccoli. Mashed
Potatoes, Red Gelatin with Peaches, Whole Wheat Bread,
Sugar Cookies
Tue^Vr Spaghetti with Meat Sauce, Green Peas, Tossed
baiad with Green Pepper, Thousand Island Dressing,
Italian Bread, Canned Pears
Wednesday Broiled Chicken with Gravy. Rfce, Collard
Oreens, Orange Juice, Whole Wheat Bread, Yellow Cake
with Powdered Sugar Topping
Thursday Close
Friday Closed
I 11 !


Friday, November 20, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 3
Martin
ST. LOUIS Martin E. Citrin
of Detroit has been elected presi-
dent of the Council of Jewish
Federations, the association of
200 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils in the
U.S. and Canada serving 800
communities that embrace 96
percent of North American
Jewry.
Citrin's election to the CJF
presidency came during the 60th
annual CJF General Assembly in
St. Louis, where official delegates
from CJF's member Federations
chose the Detroit leader to head'
CJF during the historic period of
Council's 60th Anniversary Year.
Citrin succeeds Morton L.
Mandel of Cleveland.
Martin Citrin is a member of
the CJF Board and Executive
Committee and a past CJF vice
president. Since 1979, he has
served as chairman of the CJF
Campaign Planning Advisory
Committee, and is the 1981 chair-
man of the CJF-UJA Campaign .
Planning Task Force. He par-
ticipated in the CJF Review
Committee, which supervised the
comprehensive two-year study
of Council's purpose, governance
and function.
A past president of the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Detroit
and the most immediate pest
chairman of its Executive Com-
mittee, Citrin also serves on the
board and Executive Committee
of the Detroit United Founda-
tion. He is a member of the Sinai
Hospital Board of Trustees.
He plays a major role in the
governance of the Jewish Agency
for Israel, where he serves on the
board of governors, co-chairs the
Agency's Commission on Jewish
Education, and is a member of
the Immigration and Absorption
Committee and the Comptroller
Committee. He also holds mem-
bership in the United Jewish Ap-
peal Board of Trustees, the Unit-
ed Israel Appeal Board of Di-
rectors and the Executive Com-
mittee of the American-Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee.
"9m* 9Am&**eUin
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Orson Skorr
Orchestras
Serving All ol florid* Since 1963
u TAMPA 113472-6243 ;
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3508 S MANHATTAN BLVD
At Kanamgtan Swam Anaquaa
TAMPA. FLXMOt (813)831 1703
Martin E. Citrin
Citrin is a partner in the
Detroit firm of J.A. Citrin Sons
Company. He and his wife Myra
have four children.
Established in 1932, the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations serves
as a national instrument to
strengthen the work and impact
of Jewish Federations through
leadership in developing pro-
grams tO meet the changing
needs of the Jewish community;
through the exchange of success-
ful experiences to assure the most
effective community services;
through establishing guidelines
for fund raising and operation,
and through joint national plan-
ning and action on common pur-
poses dealing with local, regional,
national and international needs.
Congregation Rodeph Sholom
has honored two of its long-
standing, hard working, and
devoted members. Prior to Kol
Nidre services, before the full
congregation assembled, Mrs.
A.R. (Lizzie} Berger was mads a
life member of the Congregation
and Nat Shorestein was named
honorary president.
Sam Verkauf, speaking in his
capacity as chairman of the
board, told of Mrs. Berger's
many years of service to the
synagogue, her active participa-
tion in all facets of synagogue life
and her family's involvement in
the founding and development of
Rodeph Sholom almost 80 years
ago.
Mrs. Berger served as presi-
dent of the Rodeph Sholom Sis-
terhood from 1930 to 1936. She is
honorary president of the sister-
hood and is the first lady to re-
ceive honorary synagogue mem-
bership.
Congregation President
Howard Sinsley addressed his re-
marks about Nat Shorestein to
his dedication to synagogue
work, involvement in Jewish
organizations and community
agencies and his continuing to do
so at the age of 86. Daily syna-
gogue tasks continue to be a part
of Nat Shorestein's routine.
The honorees were surprised
and thrilled and the congregation
began the holiday in a very up-
lifted mood.
Who Says I Can't Drink?
Tampa Jewish Social Service
announces the beginning of a new
program entitled "Who Says I
Can't Drink," a drama performed
live about teenage drinking. The
performance is one of many plsys
published by "Plays for Living,"
a division of Family Service
Association of America. Spon-
soring the new program are
Tampa Jewish Social Service,
Family Service Association of
Greater Tampa, Inc., and Alcohol
Community Treatment Services.
The play is intended to give a
dramatic emphasis to the prob-
lem of teenage drinking in the
community, which needs greater
recognition, understanding and
discussion.
The problem of teenage drink-
ing is on the increase. How can
parents cope with this problem?
Where can teenagers go for help?
"Who Says I Can't Drink" helps
to answer many of these
problems through a live dramati-
zation, with group discussion fol-
lowing each performance. This
offers an opportunity to explore
various points of view, which lead
to a new understanding of the
problems presented.
"Who Says I Can't Drink" is
currently available to any group
or organization that may be in-
terested in viewing the perfor-
mance for a small charge. If you
are interested in reserving a date
for a performance or wish to learn
more about this unique program,
please call Joel Brooks at Tampa
Jewish Social Service, Monday
- Friday, 9-6. at 872-4461.
PHONE (813) 837-5874
PAT COLLINS
NURSERY BABYSITTERS
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Schectman Named
TaJF Campaign Director
Marc Schectman has been
named by the Tampa Jewish
Federation to fill the position of
campaign director, it was an-
nounced this week by Hope Bar-
nett, president and Gary Alter,
executive director.
Schectman was the assistant
director of the Commerce and
Profession Division of the United
Jewish Appeal Federation of
Greater Washington and served
previously in campaign positions
with the Fort Lauderdale Federa-
tion and the United Jewish Com-
munity of Bergen County in New
Jersey.
Marc will assume a major re-
sponsibility for the 1982 Cam-
paign, working with campaign,
division leadership and workers.
He will also be involved in public
relations for the Federation as
well as some of the outreach pro-
grams that are being planned.
Schectman received a B.A. de-
gree from George Washington
University in Political Science
and a masters degree from the
University of Miami in Public
Relations.
"Marc brings to the position of
campaign director an excellent
Jewish background, a wide range
of campaign experience, a first-
hand knowledge of Israel, and a
Marc Schectman, Tampa Jewish
Federation campaign director
strong commitment to Jewish
life," Alter stated. "We know he
will be a valuable asset to help us
meet the needs of a growing and
vibrant Tampa Jewish com-
munity."
Schectman replaces Abe
Davis-Wasserberger who is now
with the St. Louis Federation.
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Paws 8
Page 4
The JouiUh VU^J:____j,
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, November:
Jewish-Hispanic Rift
In cities across America where there is signifi-
cant Jewish and Hispanic representation, the public
relations impulse is to suggest that both com-
munities are finding newer and stronger ties between
them every day.
But the truth is, as some American Jewish
Committee research shows, that the ties are few and
far between. For one thing, there is the upcoming
phenomenon in the '80's of what AJC's research pin-
points as group identity vs. individual merit.
Translated, this means the increasing struggle,
on the one hand, between groups in the United States
that regard themselves as minorities and that de-
mand special handicap points to help them make it in
the general culture; and, on the other, individual
Americans who prefer not to be offered such handi-
cap points in the form of, say, equal access-equal
opportunity legislation but rather to compete on the
basis of their individual talents.
Paradoxically, Jews are themselves a minority,
a fact which too many non-Jews seem inclined these
day8 to forget; and, against a backdrop of their
minority experience in America at the end of the 19th
and beginning of the 20th Century, they see their
achievement in the national fabric in individual
terms. In short, nobody helped them because they
were Jews and to the disadvantage of others as a
result. Quite the contrary, they made it in the face of
enormous religious prejudice against them.
The AJCommittee's research shows that ancil-
lary to the phenomenon of individual merit vs. group
identification is the growing Hispanic demand for
quotas to assure the mobility upward of the Hispanic
community as a group. As longtime victims of
American discrimination against them, Jews are
opposed to quotas.
Seen in these terms, Jews must view with in-
creasing alarm both demands of the Hispanic com-
munity as central to their well-being: a) quotas; and
b) acceptance via supportive discriminatory
legislation against the majority of Hispanic group
identity as if it were an individual social force.
None of which helps the public relations view
that things between both communities are all sweet-
ness and light.
% :-: :>:-:. :< '- *
Sharon Has Tough Job *
Wonderland of Political Visions
MIAMI IS the grand bole in
the ground through which Alice
fell in her journey to Wonderland.
In a world of absurdity, it should
therefore not be surprising that
the morning Tageblatt confuses
events in the local news section
with its regular Spanish Edition.
That is why we were told the
other day in a breathless lead
story of the bcal newe section,
which is prone to report little if
any news about anyone or any-
thing else, that Cubans are sud-
denly seeing visions of the
Roman Church Virgin dancing on
the waves surrounding Castro-
land.
For the medieval mind ena-
mored of plaster statues that
weep and even bleed, it is not
>'. ''
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon will be in Wash-
ington on Nov. 30 to speak with the Administration
about the details of the projected strategic relation-
ship between Israel and the United States. In a
sense, those talks are already dead.
Operation Bright Star, the military exercises in-
volving United States and Egyptian forces in
Egypt's desert, does not include Israel as a third
partner to the maneuvers.
In Miami this week, two members of a six-mem-
ber delegation from Israel, Likud MK Sarah Doron
and Labor MK Shlomo Hillel. told us that the Rea-
gan Administration apparently regards their country
as a "stepchild" in the new world of American for-
eign policy in the Middle East.
Doron and Hillel, and the other members of the
delegation headed by Moshe Ahrens, chairman of Is-
rael's Foreign Affairs Committee, are crisscrossing
the United States this week to meet with major Jew-
ish community leaders in order to voice these and
other concerns over the growing tilt by U.S. policy
planners toward Saudi Arabia to the clear disad-
vantage of Israel.
What Doron and Hillel reported to us is what we
have been suspecting all along: Capitol Hill moguls
say the right things about Israel, but they im-
plement few of them. In the clutch, the palm goes to
the Saudis.

Jewish Floridian
of Tampa
.fVlMO*
BuiiaiiiOBkw Si Hlm Blvd, T
MsjaawtlS4N
, Puhbcauoa Office lJONEt St Miami. FU 31113
FREDK SHOCHET SUZANNESHOCHET JUOr.H ROSENKRANZ
Ednar and PuHnaii EucubnEditor flnm Editor
rAFrWShecAer
n.i_mi.j,.nm->--------------*._.,_.-, t
",Tt-M"1 ---'-'- --'-
Pubuahed Friday t Weakly September Ihrauc* May
Bi Weakly June Uuijujti Aufuat by The Jewiah Flondiaa of Taaa^a
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par year a) deducted from liieir i ontributiofu for a lubecnntioa to the paper Anyone <
enrvl O
surprising either that it should
resolve to see visions, certainly
no more surprising than the
contents of the local news section
itself.
BUT WHAT it surprising is
the progress the medieval mind
appears to be making these days
in the direction of recogni^
realistic alternatives to Drwur*
divine apparitions. It ctnvT
way. be. Virgin's visitation tkl
explains everything. Thia S
around, for example, CubaW?
beginning to wonder if
visitations are genuinely in Z
category of say the shroud rf
Turin. And they have conX-t
that no, not likely. wocra Another possibility now prettv
much accepted as the reality \1
bind this late* Castro^
miracle is that the vision of the
Virgin is actually an bMaj
plotted by the CIA to unsSu
the stability of Cuba politically.
The conclusion goes this
a'way: The CIA is projectini
images of the Virgin on the
dancing waves surrounding that
Latin emerald isle. No one by
way of explanation, has yet
talked about the possiblity of
laser beam holography as a tech-
nical consideration. Only that the
purpose, I gather, is to bring the
Godless Marxist Eden back into
the embrace of the true faith.
NO DOUBT, in the recesses of
the medieval mind, if that doesn't
do the trick, nothing else will. At
Alice said of the royal Wonder-
land procession, "Why they're
only a pack of cards, after at I
needn't be afraid of them!" Not
everything is a by-product of tha
divine afflatus.
The Wonderland beneath
Miami's body politic, which these
days meanders leisurely south-
ward to include Havana, doesn't
atop at the Cuban borderline
either. In the case of Miami auto-
mogul Norman Braman, for ex-
ample, there are visions too. Take
tha news item last week that ha
withdrew himself from con-
sideration as President Reagan's
nominee for commissioner of the
Immigration and Naturalization
Service.
After maybe six months of re-
Continued on Page 9
Following is a Middle East Memo
position paper by the Conference of
Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations.
U.S. Compulsion to Approve Saudi Actions
Friday, November 20, 1981
Volume 3
23 HESHVAN 5742
Number 40
From the wonderful folks who brought you the
1973 oil embargo. .
The most alarming result of the Reagan "vic-
tory" in the AWACS fight is not the Saudi deci-
sion to raise its oil prices by $2 a barrel, or its ac-
tion in cutting back oil production to end the oil
glut, or its success in helping OPEC get its act to-
gether, the better > hold up the oil-consuming
nations. (The additional cost to the United
States of the Saudi price increase, and thus to the
U.S. balance of payments, will be approximately
S9 million a day, or $3.28 billion a year, which
means the Saudis will be able to pay for the
largest arms package in history in a little over
two years from their latest oil price hike.)
Nor is it even the so-called "peace" plan of
Prince Fahd. which President Sadat called
"nothing new" and which Prime Minister Begin
described as "a plan how to liquidate Israel in
stages."
What is most troubling is the compulsion of the
Reagan Administration to approve every action
the Saudis take and every statement the Saudis
utter. Having invested every ounce of his prestige
and power to get the handful of votes needed to
win the Senate majority. President Reagan now
feels obliged to justify his action by defending
every move the Saudis make.
THUS, when the price of oil rose to $34 a bar-
rel, the White House comment was that "its ef-
fect will be to moderate the oil bills we might
otherwise have to pay. making oil less expensive
in real terms than it is today." When the Saudis
announced they were cutting back oil production
by 500.000 barrels a day. the Administration was
silent. And when the smoke had cleared after the
AWACS battle, the Administration was able to
announce it had found virtue in a Saudi peace
plan that contradicts the Camp David process in
every detail.
Psychologists call this neurosis "over-identifi-
cation" or "introjection." As far as the Reagan
Administration is concerned, the Royal House of
Saud can do no wrong For if Saudi ARabia
should be perceived as anti-American, it will re-
flect poorly on the President who put so much of
himself into the Saudi position. But there are
political as well as psychological perils in the new
infatuation with the Saudis. The real danger is
that because the Saudis can do no wrong, the
United States must inevitably abandon the Camp
David peace process and support the Saudi plan
instead.
Indeed, this event seems already to have oc-
curred when Secretary Haig "welcomed" the
Fahd plan. (This position did not, of course.
prevent the State Department spokesman from
proclaiming that the U.S. remains "totally com-
mitted" to the Camp David process. The more at-
tractive the White House finds the Saudi plan to
set up a Palestinian state with its capital in East
Jerusalem, the more fervent we may expect the
Administration's vows of loyalty to Camp
David.)
IT SEEMS clear that the Administrations at-
titude toward the Fahd plan can only encourage
the Palestinian Arabs, the Jordanians, the terror-
ist PLO, the Syrians and Iraqis to congratulate
themselves for having the wisdom and patience to
hold out against taking part in the Camp David
process. Why should the Arab rejectionists. still
enjoying the assassination of Sadat, do anything
but sit tight? Washington is moving in their
direction, why move toward Washington?
But if the United States breaks faith, are other
parties to Camp David still bound?
Will Israel return the Sinai to Egypt if the
Camp David agreement calling for that return is
scrapped? Or is it Administration strategy to
wait until after the Sinai is back in Cairo's hands
before embracing the Fahd plan? Is that likely to
encourage Israel to help the American effort to
counter Soviet expansion in the Middle East? Is
the Saudi sheikhdom really fit to be the pillar of
American military strategy in the region? Can
America afford to fall blindly in love with so rich
but so ugly a partner?"
These are only some of the questions that come
to mind in examining the American obsession for
the "moderate" Saudis. Perhaps the best advice
to give the President and his advisers is that next
time they feel like jumping into bad with the
Saudis, they ought to take a cold shower instead.


Friday, .November 2Q, }91
Tk&JetoiahFlbridian 6f Tampa
Page 5
Dr. Hans and Use Juergensen
were invited to attend the In-
ternational Liberators Con-
fernece in Washington, D.C. A
member of the Holocaust Com-
mission and Professor of Hu-
manitites at the University of
South Florida, Dr. Juergensen
agreed, at the request of The
Jewish Floridian, to prepare this
report on the conference.
"Do you know," Mrs. Colston
said to me on Tuesday afternoon,
"that I used to resent it when
John talked about the concentra-
tion camps? Now, I am ashamed
that 1 felt that way after hear-
ing the speakers of yesterday and
today."
Kalichstein-Laredo-Robinson
Trio to Appear in Concert
The acclaimed Kalichstein-
Laredo-Robinson Trio will appear
in concert for one performance
only at the University of South
Florida at 8 p.m. on Nov. 30 in
the University Theatre.
Presented by the USF College
of Fine Arts Artist Series, the K-
L-R Trio brings together three
internationally praised artists,
Joseph Kalichstein, Jaime
Laredo and Sharon Robinson,
who take time from their active
solo careers each season to per-
form the great literature for piano
trio.
The group was formed as a
result of a fortuitous relationship
developed through the ongoing
"Chamber Music at the Y" series
directed by Laredo at New York
City's 92nd Street YM YWHA.
The Trio's debut at the Y re-
ceived high praise from critics;
"At rare intervals some fortunate
grouping turns out to have all the
ingredients in the proper pro-
portions, and we see the birth of a
Budapest, a Julliard, a Guarneri,
a Beaux Arts. Another of these
chancy experiments has resulted
in the formation of the Kalich-
stein-Laredo-Robinson Trio."
Although the Trio originally
began with two national tours,
the increased enthusiasm for this
ensemble necessitated the mem-
bers cutting off even more time
from their solo careers to meet
the escalating demand for their
chamber music concerts. Last
season, following three sold-out
performances at Lincoln Center's
Mostly Mozart Festival, they
made a smashing European di-
but, appearing at the Edinburgh,
South Bank, Harrogate, Granda,
and Highland's Festivals.
After a tour of South America
and a regular schedule of concerts
in a number of major American
cities, the Trio presented a spe-
cial series including the three
Brahms Piano Quartets in New
York at both Alice Tully Hall and
the 92nd Street Y with guest ar-
tists Pinchas Zukerman, Itzhak
Perlman, Eugenia Zukerman and
Michael Tree.
Pianist Joseph Kalichstein
came to New York from Israel at
the age of sixteen to study at the
Julliard School. His successful
debut and first recording of a
Bartok-Prokofiev album for Van-
guard were followed by a CBS
television appearance with
Leonard Bernstein and the New
York Philharmonic.
At eighteen, violinist Jaime
Laredo won first prize in the
Queen Elizabeth of Belgium
Competition. Since then, he has
distinguished himself both here
and abroad as a virtuoso and
musician of the first rank, ap-
pearing regularly with the major
international orchestras and con-
ductors. He serves as artistic Di-
rector of the "Chamber Music at
the Y" series in New York, and he
has directed orchestras including
the Mostly Mozart Orchestra and
the Scottish Chamber Orchestra.
Cellist Sharon Robinson has
been acclaimed by critics and au-
diences as one of the most bril-
liant cellists before the public
today. She has appeared in recital
in many major American cities
and has performed with the
Houston, Pittsburgh, Baltimore-'"* -,e'' -
and New Orleans Symphony Qr*>"
chestras. Robinson has also par-
ticipated in the Marlboro Music
Festival, the Spoleto Festival of
Two Worlds and the Mostly
Mozart Festival.
Robinson and Laredo were
guest artists last season in Tam-
pa for the 1981 Chamber Music
Series, performing with the
Guarneri String Quartet.
Tickets for the K-L-R Trio
Concert go on sale Nov. 16 at
$7.50 and $5.50 for reserved
seats. USF students are admitted
free with valid ID.
For further information and
reservations, call the University
Theatre box office at 974-2323,
noon to 4:40 p.m., weekdays.
Mrs. Colston, of Connecticut,
was the wife of former Captain
Johfl Colston whose outfit
liberated one of the concentration
camps in Germany. She, like
many other wives, had accom-
panied her husband to the con-
ference, hosted by the U.S. State
Department and sponsored by
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council.
Use and I were participants
also and made friends with many
of the former G. I .s who attended.
These men mostly non-Jew-
ish carried the horror with
them into the public panels and
discussions where representa-
tives of the Allied Nations talked
about Ohrdruf, Bergen-Belsen,
Dachau, Buchenwald and Ausch-
witz. Two Russian It. generals
shared their experiences (plus
some hefty propaganda) with
men and women from Great
Britain, France, Holland, Bel-
gium, Czechoslovakia, Poland,
Yugoslavia, Canada, Denmark,
Australia, Norway and New
Zealand. Physicians, rabbis and
lawyers, nurses and historians,
resistance fighters and agents re-
lated their still vivid remem-
brance. At the flag ceremony
before Secretary of State
Alexander Haig's address
three survivors brought in the
Auschwitz Kommandant's flag
and cast it on the floor ... a
highly dramatic moment.
Speaker after speaker white
and black relived his or her
sering experiences. John Eisen-
hower told of how his father had
wired General Marshal to send
political leaders, editors and
journalists to Germany so that
no-one in the future might be able
to say that camps did not exist.
And this was, indeed, the ob-
jective of the Conference to
defuse the explosive books by re-
visionists who have been trying
to tell us that the Holocaust was
a hoax.
For three emotion-filled days,
500 people had their say, either
from a lectern or in private con-
versations. Relevant photo-
graphs were displayed in the
halls; literature was available.
Elie Wiesel, chairman of the
Holocaust Council, remembered
for us the first encounters be-
tween inmates and liberators.
There was not a dry eye in the
auditorium.
The former Polish agent. Pro-
fessor Korski, recounted his
tasks as emissary of the Polish
underground and bore out the
shameful fact of neglect exercised
by the allies concerning the .fate
of the Jews. A former assistant.-
Washington
secretary of the Treasury told us
how the State Department with-
held information of the atrocities
from the Executive until Presi-
dent Roosevelt ordered it to re-
lease the cables.
Although I was not originally
scheduled to be more than a
listener, I was asked, to tape a
film in which.I would moderate
the discussion of some American
liberators. So, for an hour r'fts'ked
four former servicemen about
what they had done, sees 'and
felt. We needed no rehearsal. The
words flowed, and there was, rage
in them. Their honesty ip admit-
ting that,' like others, they had
tried to forget the spring of 1945;
their pledge to speak up in the fu-
ture these were heart-warming
moments for all of us. And they
are on record now, to be in-
corporated into the film archives
of the Memorial Museum.
While the Capital news media
made much of, the Conference,
and white^severa* of the major
papers featured excellent stories,
others ignored these very im-
portant proceedings.
The "Never Again!" was loud
and clear',- but too many govern-
ments and- nations'.AW stfH' -riot
willing to.ljeteiv>c:iv> n.''. ''>
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rage 10
Page 6
The .Tmiiah Wl^miJi------*m
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, November 20,
Rabbi Berger to Speak At
JCC Lunch Bunch
JCC Lunch Bunch Dec. 9
noon, at the Fairway Run Club
House, Christmas Hanukah
Controversy.
The Jewish Community Cen-
ter's December Lunch Bunch will
feature Rabbi Kenneth Berger
from Rodeph Sholom. He will be
discussing "How to Cope with
Christmas in a Tampa Diaspora
Community."
As a conservative Rabbi, he
has been an active member of the
Rabbinical Assembly of America.
He has an extensive teaching
background, was an advisor and
youth director, is an author, and
is currently preparing a paper on
"Creative Jewish Education."
The Jewish Community Center
is proud to have Rabbi Berger
sharing his views as we approach
the Holiday season.
The cost for the lunch is $3 for
members and $5 for non-mem-
bers.
Join us in Carrollwood and en-
joy, learn and most importantly
Rabbi Kenneth Berger
meet with Rabbi Berger.
Call the Center for reservations
(872-4451) no later than Decem-
ber 4. If you would like to attend
and not order lunch, you may
brown-bag-it. However, non-
members must pay $2 for lecture.
JCC Begins Troject Outreach'
Michelle Goldstein hosted a
short course on CPR (Breathing-
Circulation) for infants and small
children on November 10 at her
home. Nine mothers learned how
to respond to different life
threatening emergencies. In ad-
dition to the practice manikins,
Rebecca Sergay, Jeffrey and
Devin Putney let the parents
learn where to find a pulse on an
infant or small child.
Evaluated aa a success by the
participants, other parents or in-
dividuals are encouraged to con-
tact the Center if they want to
take advantage of Project Out-
reach for CPR or other activities
in homes around the area.
the Red Cross also began on the
10th at a home in Temple Ter-
race.
Sue Borod opened her home to
individuals who were interested
in CPR. The Borod children as-
sisted in demonstrating tech-
niques to assist choking victims.
The next planned Outreach
program is at Jerilyn Gold-
smith's home for elementary age
children who will learn how to be
a "Mother's Aide." This babysit-
ting course will last three weeks
starting in late November.
If you are interested in begin-
ning a program in your home or
neighborhood, please contact
your Jewish Community Center,
872-4461.
A Basic Life Support course of
Who Are You Bringing to the Dancemakers?
Saturday, Nov. 21 at 7 p.m.,
the JCC auditorium lights will
dim and the stage will be set for a
dance concert. If you want to
learn about dance forma, enjoy
and are knowledgeable about
dance, you will enjoy the
"Dancemakers" at the Center.
The troop of dancers perform
potpourri of dance including jazz,
ethnic, ballet and modern. The
program will include comedic
dance, "The Song of Isiah," and
a variety to please the whole
family and all ages.
To make this exciting evening
within the price range of large
families, young and old, the cost
for admission is as follows:
General publk-84 (Center mem-
ben with membership cards
S2.50), and under 6 or over 60
$2 (Center members II).
Tickets are available at the
door. Seating is first come, first
seated.
Make this special program a
memorable night for you, your
family and friends.
Camp JCC Accredited
The Tampa Jewish Com-
munity Center and Camp JCC is
proud to announce that the AC A
(American Camping Association)
has once again granted accredita-
tion and site approval to the Cen-
ter's day camp.
Following a visit this summer
to see the camps in action, the
ACA reviewed and evaluated the
Center's site, personnel and the
general camp program. Ratings
were given and the JCC scored
well above average in all categor-
ies.
The American Camping Asso-
ciation is a national organization
whose purpose is to assure the
highest professional practices for
administration and extension of
the unique experiences of
organized camping. Camp JCC is
proud to be a member of the ACA
and strives in their effort to
provide "better camping for
ALL!"
Gala Two Piano Recital
to be Held at USF
A gala two-piano recital will be
presented by the University of
South Florida music department
at 8 p.m. on Nov. 22 in the Fine
Arts Auditorium.
The recital will feature both
piano faculty and students per-
forming together a wide variety
of literature for the piano.
The program includes
"Canons" by Schumann-Debus-
sy, played by students Donnell
Patterson and Katherine Young;
"Linderaja" by Debussy, per-
formed by students Deborah
Little and Michael Maloney;
"Fetes" by Debussy-Ravel, per-
formed by students Gail Ott and
Martha Tallon, and "On Hearing
the First Cuckoo of Spring" by
Delius, which will be performed
by Ott and visiting professor of
music Robert Helps, who served
as the coordinator of this concert.
Music professors Martha Rea-
rick and Jan Khorsandian will
perform Chopin's "Rondo," and
students Cindy Carr and Mary
Volimer will perform a work
entitled "The Poisoned Foun-
tain" by English composer
Arnold Bax. Helps will be joined
by USF Associate Professor
Averiil Summer in Poulenc'a
"Elegy," and Armin and
Gretchen (Dr. and Mrs.) Wat-
kins, of the music faculty, will
play Arensky's "Waltz." The re-
cital will conclude with Helps and
student Sim Broad fie Id per-
forming Milhaud's "Scara-
mouche."
The Nov. 22 recital will be free
and open to the public.
Doosmbor2.1M1
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Judaism recently augmented the University of Florida's Isser and Rae
Price Library of Judaica, the largest of its kind in the Southeast.
Presenting the gift of books on a variety of subjects were 25 members
of the league's Florida branch. Pictured are UF Judaica Librarian Bob
Singerman, Selma Trachtenberg, sitting, Mitzi Weiss, standing left
and Esther Weiner. The women are members of the Gainesville Area
Sisterhood of Congregation B'nai Israel as well at the Florida branch
of the National Women's League for Conservative Judaism. Rochelle
Baltuch is president of the Florida branch.
Wendy Katz
Gretchen Hollander
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everyone is th
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everyone .. Roast Turkey with all the
trimmings, Honey Glazed Ham, Carved
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freshly baked Bread, lots of Fresh Fruit,
freshly brewed coffee and rich
home-made Desserts.
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even got a price you can be thankful
for. $9.95 inclusive for grown ups,
$5.75 for children 6-11 and free for
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Call now for reservations.
When Marnott does it, they do tt right.
Tampa Marriott Hotel
1001 North WcMshore Boulevard, Tampa, Florida 33607 (813) 876-9611


November 20.1981

The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 7
B'nai B'rith Board of
Governors in Tampa
Profile of Grace Day
President, B'nai B'rith Women
District Five Board of
of B'nai B'rith are
, in Tampa this weekend,
pin.22. at the Host Interna-
Vllotel Over 100 Ben Briths
cted i<> attend this mid-
meeeting representing
[than 36,000 members in the
1
jident of District Five is
r Eisenberg, a lawyer from
ington. D.C. The district is
J of the six southeastern
Maryland, Virginia,
' Carolina. South Carolina,
i, Florida and the District
Kimbia.
Lee Day. international presi-
J B'nai B'rith Women will
l at a luncheon at noon Sun-
* Also on the program are
da State President Hank
js, Fort Lauderdale and the
^district past president from
pa, Jay Markowitz. Bill
Jiberg is president of Tampa
11044.
ident Meyer Eisenberg
lost a Shabbat dinner for his
linistrative Committee
y evening, but the meetings
gin Saturday evening with
h service conducted by
of Florida Region
under the direction of
Jeffrey Foust, Hillel
m at the University of
b Florida.
cutive Vice President of
ct Five Arnold Ellison,
will give his report
; the business meeting Sat-
f evening.
Sunday, there will be a
Irfast followed by a business
: and then the luncheon at
which Mrs. Day will
Arnold Ellison, executive vice
president District Five B'nai
B'rith
4t*l
Hank Meyer, president, Florida
State Association of B'nai B'rith
Lodges
speak. The conference is sched-
uled to conclude Sunday after-
noon about 3 p.m.
A practicing attorney in St.
Joseph. Mrs. Day served as As-
sistant Attorney General of the
state of Missouri for two terms.
Active in serveral bar associa-
tions, she was the first woman
elected president of the St. Jo-
seph Bar Association.
A member of BBW since 1951,
she has served as president-elect]
vice-president, a member of
the Executive Board and as
chairman of the Public Affairs
Committee, Planning Committee,
and Regionalization Committee,
among her leadership positions in
the 150,000 member international
women's service organization.
An active and concerned com-
munity leader, Mrs. Day's com-
munity involvement is diverse
and widespread. Among her pro-
fessional, religious and civic ac-
tivities, she is past president of
the Missouri Association of
Women Lawyers and was state
delegate to the National Associ-
ation of Women Lawyers. She is
also active on committees of the
American Bar Association and
the Missouri Bar Association.
Mrs. Day has served two years
as president of the United Jewish
Fund in St. Joseph, the first
woman to hold that position, and
was a past chairman of the Israel
Bond Drive in St. Joseph. She
has also been secretary of Temple
B'nai Sholem for 29 years.
A past chairman of the St. Jo-
seph Human Rights Commission,
Mrs. Day is also a member of the
St. Joseph Citizens Committee
for Progress, a board member of
the St. Joseph State Hospital
Relief Foundation, YWCA and
the first woman elected to serve
on the Board of the St. Joseph
Chamber of Commerce.
She was honored as Woman of
the Year for American Business
Grace Day
Women in St. Joseph and as Out-
standing Woman in a Career by
Midland Empire Girl Scouts.
Mrs. Day holds a BA, Bachelor
of Laws and Juris Doctor degree
from the University of South
Dakota and is listed in Who's
Who in American Colleges and
Universities.
Grace Day is married to Milton
Day, director of Secondary Edu-
cation for the St. Joseph School
District. They have two children,
Douglas, an attorney, and Alli-
son, a junior in college.
Adult Education at Kol Ami
Dr. Steven Schimmel, Congre-
gation Kol Ami's education
chairman, announced that this
year's Adult Education Series is
underway.
Two classes are being offered
every Tuesday evening in the
synagogue.
"Basic Judaism" begins at
7:30 p.m. This class is an intro-
duction and review of the basics
of the Jewish faith. A survey of
Jewish customs, ceremonies,
philosophy, theology, history and
Bible is presented in a lecture-
discussion format. This course is
intended for those whoVwant a
brush up of their religious school
education, potential converts and
interested non-Jews. A bibliogra-
phy and reading list is provided
each student.
"Reading Hebrew" begins at
8:35 p.m. Rudimentary Hebrew
reading skills are introduced and
practiced in class. This course is
aimed at those who wish to
become fluent in reading Hebrew,
particularly as it is used in the
prayer service. A unique -
programmed reader is the text,
which allows students to work
and review at their own speed at
home.
Kol Ami's Rabbi, Leonard
Rosenthal, is instructing both
classes.
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Ph. 962-0299
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Page 8
The Jewish Ku33C ~*m~
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, Novembers
Corporate Executive Pledges $1 Million to
West Point Jewish Chapel Fund |
Marty Silvennan, president.
North American Corporation ol
New York, has pledged $1 million
to the West Point Jewish Chapell
Fund building campaign, it was
announced by Fund President
Herbert M. Ames.
This brings to nearly $4 million
the total raised thus far against
the Fund's $5.5 million goal.
In a statement acknowledging
the Silverman pledge, Mr. Ames
said, "We are most encouraged
by this dramatic development.
Although we have received many
major gifts in the past few
months, this is the largest so far.
It illustrates the tremendous,
growing support of the American
Jewish community for a per-
manent Jewish Chapel at the
United States Military Academy.
It also demonstrates great vision
and a sense of history on the part
of Mr. Silverman."
Marty Silverman, president.
North American Corporation
Silverman, a native of Troy,
N.Y., is the son of a tailor who
had emigrated from Poland. He
worked his way through New
York University, going on to
graduate from Albany Law
School in 1936. During World
War II, he fought in the Infantry
in Germany with Patton's Third
Army. Starting as a private, and
winning battlefield promotions to
the rank of captain during the
war, he retired from the army as a
major.
When the war in Europe ended,
Silverman responded to a call for
lawyers to help with the war
crimes trials. Silvennan
volunteered and assisted in
bringing to justice the German
troops responsible for the in-
famous "Malmedy incident" in
which an American infantry unit
was massacred after surrendering
to the Germans.
A tens Uses Blunt Words
Says Fahd Peace Plan 'Unacceptable'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Moshe Arens,
chairman) of the Knesset
Foreign Affairs and Secur-
ity Committee, declared
here that Saudi Arabia's
eight-point peace plan was
unacceptable because it
was aimed at the "dis-
memberment of Israel."
Arens, who heads a six-mem-
ber Knesset delegation sent to
the U.S. to oppose the plan pro-
posed by Saudi Arabian Crown
Prince Fahd, emerged from.an
hour-long meeting at the White
House to say that the Saudi plan
was not a "little step" forward as
one newspaper headline quoted
him as saying, but a "step
sideward."
HE SAID the plan was a tac-
tical switch by the Saudis which
was in a way more dangerous to
Israel because it gave Riyadh the
appearance of being moderate.
Arens, who conceded that he
spoke by telephone to Premier
Menachem Begin in Jerusalem,
said Begin understood that he
had been misquoted after the
Knesset delegation met for 90
minutes with Secretary of State
Alexander Haig.
At that time, Arens said that
Fahd's seventh point, which calls
for all countries in the region to
live in peace, seemed to go "just a
little way" toward recognition of
Israel. But he stressed that the
Saudis still have a "long way" to
go in order to join the Middle
East peace process.
He said to do this they would
have to show a willingness to
negotiate directly with Israel and
"learn how to pronounce the
name of Israel." Fahd's seventh
point does not mention Israel
directly but speaks of "the
countries of the region."
WHILE MAKING these re-
marks, Arens denied that he was
at odds with Begin who has re-
jected the plan totally, calling it a
means for Israel's liquidation in
stages. Arens said the plan in-
cluded demands and conditions
which are "totally unacceptable
to Israel."
While he did not list them, the
Fahd plan calls for Israel's com-
plete withdrawal to its pre-1967
borders and the establishment of
a Palestinian state with East
Jerusalem as its capital.
After the Knesset group's
meeting with White House
Counsellor Edwin Meese and Na-
tional Security Adviser Richard
Allen, Arens said he rejects the
Fahd plan completely and denied
he had seen some good in it. At
the same time, he stressed that
Israel is willing to have "direct
negotiations" with the Saudis at
any time either in Israel or Saudi
Arabia.
ARENS SAID that in the
group's talks with Administra-
tion officials it was "clear" that
there is a difference between Is-
rael and the U.S. on the Saudi
plan. He said the Knesset group,
which includes three Likud mem-
bers and three members of the
opposition Labor Alignment, ex-
plained Israel's position to the
American officials and expressed
concern about what they per-
ceived as a change in the U.S.
attitude in recent weeks. He did
not elaborate on this.
Arens stressed that the group
also explained Israel's concern
over new armaments to the
Middle East from the Soviet Uni-
TheStar
ion, Western Europe and "now
the U.S." He said Israel feared
this new increase in armaments
to Arab countries may cause Is-
rael to lose its military "edge" in
the region. He noted that when
the 62 F-15 jets the U.S. sold
Saudi Arabia in 1978 receive the
enhancement equipment ap-
proved in the recent $8.5 billion
arms sale, the Saudis will have
military "hardware" equal to Is-
rael's F-168.
Asked about the recent Israeli
overflight of Saudi Arabia, Arena
stressed that Saudi Arabia
fought in every war against Is-
rael and has never signed an arm-
istice with the Jewish State. He
noted that the Saudis have
massed troops and military
equipment only 160 miles from
Israel's border.
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After the war, he and his
wife, Dorothy, started a business
which has grown to be one of the
largest private leasing companies
in the United States. Although
they have leased everything from
fork lifts to machine tools, most
of their business is currently in
computer-related equipment.
Still a family business, North
American Corporation,
headquartered in New York City,
now includes their two daugh-
ters, Carol and Joan, their son,
Lorin, son-in-law, Ben, and
daughter-in-law, Patty.
"A Jewish Chapel at West
Point will be a national symbol of
the patriotism and service to this
country which Jews have demon-
strated since the American
Revolution. In joining the Pro-
testant and Catholic Chapels
there, it will be a symbol, too, of
the religious harmony and liberty
for which this country has always
stood. It is a cause that is close to
my heart," Silverman said.
The Jewish Chapel, which has
been designed by internationally
acclaimed architect Max Abram-
ovitz, will be built on a sit.,
looking the historic West ft
Parade Grounds, between
Protestant and Catholic Ch
West Point has a loi
broken tradition of Jen
volvement. The United
Military Academy's first",
uating class consisted of
officers, one of whom was Ci
Simon Magruder Levy who *
recognized for heroism during t,
Battle of Maumee Rapids <
the late 1700's and, as a i
was selected to attend y
Point. Although Jews have,
ways been an integral part,
Military Academy, they
never had their own, '
House of Worship.
The West Point Jewish Chart
Fund's President Herbert Itl
Amea, a resident of Rock
Centra, L.I., is president of 1
& Process, Inc., located in m
mington, Del. Chairman of toil
West Point Jewish Chapel Funtl
is Edgar M. Bronfman, chairmanI
and chief executive officer of Set-1
gram Company, Ltd., of N*
York.
Festival of Jewish Stories on WUSF
"A Festival Jewish Stories"
will be the feature of a new
WUSF (FM 89.7 program,
"Heartbeat," Thursday, Nov. 26
at 11 a.m.
This new radio documentary
series on human spirituality is
scheduled for 26 weeks, con-
centrating on the personal chal-
lenges of coping, aging anc
healing throughout the life-cycle.
The Jewish Stories segment
will feature Hasidic and other
tales, mostly emulating from
New York.
"What people of different
spiritual backgrounds hold in
common is the focus of these
many dozens of interviews," ex-
plains "Heartbeat's" Executive
Producer David Freudberg. "To
hear such a mixture of people
open up and share their inner-
most search has been, for me,
positively inspiring."
Award-winning Producer!
Freudberg has had nearly
years experience produriiL
stimulating radio programs. He,
has contributed hundreds of seel
merits to National Public Radio si
highly acclaimed nightly newtl
magazine "All Things Con-I
sidered" and has written extcn-J
sively for The Washington Poatj
Freudberg is editor of the n]
tionally distributed publication,!
Journal of Exploratory Radio.
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vember 20,1981
po Mindlin
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

Page 9
ronderland of Political Visions
Cootinu
,ued from Pag* *
jtoriee about Braman in
media that he waa about
led by the celeatial atar
y-inspired election (the
commissioner, a eon of
jots, chosen to set na-
p immigration policy based
hit rack of intuition that the
a were heroic in their
, now suddenly he ia too
to accept the nomination.
S said to the Rabbit:
and curiouaer! .. .
qjjeer everything ia today!
wonder if I've changed in
t... But if I'm not the
ie next question ia 'Who
world am I?' Ah, that's the
puzzle." In fact, that's the
with visions altogether,
r the Virgin or buay
men explaining their
_. ok you" to governmental
ess. They are all so puz-
laser beam-style or other -
[Alice's Wonderland extends
the Cuban borderline of
iami Havana axis, I am
I there's no telling how far
[netherworld of fairy take
all things are possible
i goes. It's frightening to see
i just the other day that
ad has even burrowed
up onto (or more rightly
('Capitol Hill itself.
Richard Allen. President
*i National Security Ad-
who, you would think, has
in enough trouble in the re>
|put with his alleged cam-
to oust Secretary of State
Haig. But no. Only
he was accused of ac-
$1,000 "honorarium"
Japanese journalist to
an interview for him with
Reagan. Talk about
lees visions. .
VAY, Allen acknowl-
the gift all right, but
1 be intended to keep it. But
Ion or no inflation, a Grand
D a heap of dough. Okay,
[what did he do with it?
t FBI, which promptly
a holographic view of
icident, no less effective
lie CIA's around Cuba, this
(the waters of the Potomac,
Tut as promptly blessed
b blameless.
[holographic view, starched
W laundered, showed the
Igut in a safe where he had
I Yes, allowed Allen, that's
1 where had deposited the
i right there in that safe.
| forgot all about it.
that's a divine revelation
there was one. Almost
except for David Stock-
* dreary details of this
'** of reality center on
"in horse, a visionary's
'8 in an interview in the
Monthly on Reagano-
ch has been making the
l8 and the evening news
last ten days or so.
Ihich
,~AT interview, Stock-
plains that President Rea
Iwpply-eide economic
vors the rich and shows
"1 to the poor, a strange
y for a Reagan team-
' Principal architect of
. nics as director of the
[Budget Management.
is social inequity in
|thi
* *"* M*- J 444
'tax load that Stock-
J"*s as a Trojan horse
"wfir interview and to
s'luded again during his
US' .^Py "woodshed"
' th.'nation in which
-And m Which he de-
i lrJan horse as "a
ETk-hout,hMfa-"A
pichild. although un-
doubtedly an apt description of
himself.
But the Trojan hone ia in fact
an effigy of the Palladium, a
symbol of Pallas Athene for wis-
dom in the final chapters of
Homer's Iliad. The horse waa
rolled into Troy, and from its in-
ides swarmed Greek soldiers to
overwhelm the citv and brine it
down after ten years of war. The
Trojan horse may not have been
the CIA'a Virgin on the waves
surrounding the Cuban emerald
isle, but it waa religious withal
and the object of Laocoon's
warning to the Trojans to "Be-
ware of Greeks bearing gifts. "
WHAT THEN waa Stockman
talking about? With political
henchmen with the destroyers
of the English language who
come to talk what Edward T.
Newman calls 'spookspeak,"with
Stockman as much aa with any of
, his ilk it ia hard to say. Except
perhaps to blame Wonderland
again.
The frightening feeling I get ia
that Stockman can't explain
Reaganomica any more ef-
fectively than he can properly
identify the Trojan horse. As the
Eaglet said to the Dodo: "Speak
English! I don't know the mean-
ing of half those long words" Or
aa Alice explained to the Cater-
pillar: "I'm afraid I can't put it
more clearly, for I can't un-
derstand it myself."
KMpatrick May Embarrass Reagan
Continued from Page i.A
will only add to the Soviet
Unions capacity to foment
troubles. Powerful forces hostile
to U.S. interests and Israels sur-
vival are at work today dimin-
ishing Sadat's legacy. .
EXPRESSING some concern
that the death of Sadat may
significantly alter the shape of
the world and lead to the balkani-
zation of the Middle East, the
eloquent and dynamic Ambas-
sador devotes the greater part of
her exposition to the peril which
the Soviet-supported PLO poses
to the region.
Aa for the assumption made by
some that there ia unity among
the Arabs, she says "nothing
could be more mistaken. Arab
nations remain divided among
themselves and frequently within
their own borders aa well: Iraq is
enmeshed in a seemingly endless
war with Iran. Libya's Kaddafy
has stepped up his violent cam-
paign to spread Islamic radical-
ism through North Africa and the
Middle East. Syria, whose 25,000
troops more often disturb the
peace in Lebanon than enforce it,
ia threatened internally by pres-
sures from fundamentalist Sunni
Moslems and also by intense
hostility from Iraq. Lebanon,
meanwhile, has almost suc-
cumbed to the complicated and
violent struggles among
Maronites and Moselms, Syria
and Israel, the PLO and the Had
dad forces protecting the
Christian and Shiite enclave in
the South. The Government of
Morocco is challenged by the
violent demands of the Polisario.
In 1979, the regime in Saudi
Arabia was the object of an at-
tempted coup by an unholy alli-
ance of religious extremists and
political radicals. Even more than
Saudi Arabia, Jordan has felt the
destabilizing effects of radical
policies introduced into the area
under the cover of Palestinian
nationalism. Nearly Iran teeters
on the brink of anarchy And,
of course, the threat of Soviet ex-
pansion hangs over the entire re-
gion ..."
Ambassador Kirkpatrick refers
to the "decades since the
establishment of Israel," noting
that "the Palestine issue has un-
dergone a subtle change. A myth
she charges, "has been built on
the foundation of the genuine
problem of Palestinian refugees:
the myth that the Palestinian
problem is a barrier 'to the inte-
gration of the Arab homeland.'
Alongside this myth has
developed the extraordinary be-
lief that only the presence of
Israel stands in the way of
achieving Arab unity and inte-
gration, and peace and stability
in the Middle East This is
patently false..."
"IN THIS Arab world where
faith and politics are linked," she
continues in her castigation of
Israel's enemies, "traditionalists
and radicals, Saudis and Libyan
can unite in hostility against the
State of Israel whose right to
exist they deny, whose very exis-
tence they refuse even to
acknowledge, whose name they
refuse to utter, calling Israel in-
stead the 'Zionist entity' or the
No thanks. I dent want facts to conflict wHh my views!
OggendtXad
Kirkpatrick serves notice to all
those who seek to bring the PLO
to the negotiating table that
Yasir Arafat "not only declines
to recognize Israel, it ia com-
mitted, aa it reaffirmed in 1960,
'to liquidate the Zionist entity,
politically, economically, mil-
itarily, culturally, ideological-
-iucou uie bvnni enuiy or tne r~T7r j< ~
deformed Zionist entity.' Not only-, #-,,.* j^ / -.,
has Palestinian nationalism be- AJMrwttfpolicy,'' she insists,
' must be based on the fact that
come centrally identified with
Pan-Arab nationalism, but the
PLO, using fair means and foul,
has won wide acceptance as the
spokesman for Palestinian rights
and interests. The PLO preaches
a brand of Palestinian na-
tionalism and radical politics that
links the struggle for the destruc-
tion of Israel to the triumph of
violent, Soviet-sponsored revolu-
tionaries in Nicaragua, El Salva-
dor, Africa, the Middle East
indeed, everywhere. Moreover,
the PLO has linked the destruc-
tion of Israel to the Soviets'
global agenda. No wonder the
Kremlin has now added to its
supply of military hardware for
the PLO the prize of full diplo-
matic status."
the primary obstacle to peace has
been the refusal of the Arab
Governments to recognize the
right of Israel to exist..." None
to date, not even Saudi Arabia
take note, Reagan has publicly
ao declared by mentioning Israel
by name. Egypt remains the sole
nation, and Egyptians are not
real Arabs.
WISP Feature Service
Dutch Won't Withdraw Commission
AMSTERDAM (JTA-
The municiple executive of Eind-
hoven has refused to withdraw its
commission to a Dutch former
Nazi collaborator to compose a
musical tribute to the town on
the occasion of its 760th anni-
versary. The composer, Henk
Badings, 74, was branded a Nazi
collaborator by a Dutch de-
Nazification court after World
War II and his works were
banned in The Netherlands for
ten years. During the war he
composed an anthem for the
Dutch Nazi Party.
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VOLUNTEER


rageiu
The .Toiiu'eh F;nM-J:___xm
The Jewish tlondian of Tampa
Fri^y. Nov.
Strategy Will Fail
Unless U.S. Recaptures Power Credibility
NEW YORK A noted
international strategy ex-
pert argues, in a new
American Jewish Com-
mittee Task Force report,
that unless the United
States regains military
credibility, its foreign poli-
cies are doomed to failure
and the prospects for peace
will diminish.
Prof. Walter Laqueur, chair-
man of the International Re-
search Council of the Georgetown
University Center for Strategic
and International Studies, is the
principal author of "U.S. Defense
Posture," prepared by a Task
Force on U.S. Defense Posture,
one of six Task Forces on the
1980s set up by the American
Jewish Committee during its
76th Anniversary year.
Prof. Laqueur relates in the
booklet that opponents of defense
spending question whether the
billions allocated to armaments
do indeed provide security for the
U.S., maintaining that such ex-
penditures fuel inflation and
waste resources that could be
used for more productive pur-
poses or social welfare.
BUT "the issue is not quite so
straightforward," Prof. Laqueur
counters, pointing out that in an
earlier period when U.S. defense
spending was very high until'
about 1968 the country's in-
flation rate was at its lowest.
He adds that "a liberal, Key
neeian argument" could be made
for heavy arms expenditure since
even socially wasteful invest-
ments be it digging holes in
the ground or building tanks"
xuld revive a slack economy.
Prof. Laqueur also takes up the
arguments of those who do not
oppose a stronger defense in
principle but believe it can be
done more cheaply or who fear
that arms races lead to war, along
with the arguments of those who
believe there is a tendency to
overstate the dangers facing this
country.
But most wars are not caused
by arms races, he asserts, but
rather by changes in the Hjiy^
of power. He offers Iraq as an ex-
ample, pointing out that Iraq had
been hostile to Iran for years but
attacked only when Iran had]
been weakened by domestic tur-
bulence.
THE REAL and crucial issue
now facing America," Prof.
Laqueur continues, is not what
allies spend or do not spend on
armaments but whether we "con-
front real dangers or figments of
the imagination."
There is no doubt, he asserts,
that Soviet military power has
increased, while U.S. military
spending has been declining.
While it is true, he continues,
that the Russians have trouble:
keeping their European empire
under control, he denies the claim
of other scholars that the global
drift toward the Soviet union is a
myth.
The Russians have managed to
expand their sphere of influence,
and their Warsaw Pact is in
better shape than NATO, he in-
sists, as European responses to
Soviet pressures and threats
show.
To the argument that "the
Soviet Union is no longer the
only, probably not even the main
danger facing the U.S.," and that
the main conflicts in the 1980s
are likely to be political rather
than military, Prof. Laqueur
replies that while military capa-
bility can never replace foreign
policy, "it is also true that with-
out this prerequisite no effective
foreign policy can be conducted.''
Thus, he continues, it is hard
even to imagine a Middle East
peace settlement without a credi-
ble American military presence in
the area, and there ia something
"deeply inconsistent" on the part
of those who promise unlimited
support to Israel but deny the
U.S. the capacity to carry out the
promise.
PROF. LAQUEUR contends
that "the national mood is
changing, and there is greater
Pressure Up Against Quitting Sinai Salient
Continued froan Page 1
would finally aide with the move-
ment against withdrawal.
HIGH GOVERNMENT
sources concede that they face an
agonizing dilemma. The anti-
withdrawal movement is gather-
ing strength and adherents from
dat to day; yet the majority feel-
ing in the Cabinet is that the
government should not force a
showdown at this early stage, six
months before the Apr. 26 with-
drawal deadline. That would only
play into the movement's hands,
the sources explain.
Better, than, if there must be a
showdown and a use of force,
to confine it to the immediate
week or two before the with-
drawal deadline. The national
trauma of withdrawal will be
deep enough; there is no' point
extending and deepening it
over a period of many months,
the sources say.
In addition, the government
sources indicate, by April most of
the authentic Rafah Raea resi-
dents will have taken their com-
pensation and left, sadly but
without physical resistance. Thus
the Gush Emunim newcomers
will be isolated and seen by the
wider public as a small group of
Johnny-come-lateliea in the
Rafah area.
THIS LATTER consideration
is now under threat, however, be-
cause the anti-withdrawal move-
ment has made common cause
with dissatisfied Yamit residents
still haggling with the govern-
ment over levels of compensa-
tion. These residents are now
threatening that they will join
the movement, and refuse to
leave, unless the government
agrees to substantially raise their
compensation sums.
The compensation issue is
complex: Rafah area farmers get
more than Yamit urban shop-
keepers, on the grounds that it
costs more to start a new farm in-
land than to open a new shop.
The shopkeepers or some of
the do not accept the justice of
the argument. At any rate, the
"mutual exploitation" (in the
words of one key official) between
anti-withdrawal activists and
disgruntled Yamit residents is
plainly worrying the government
here in Jerusalem.
Cosmo J. Anastasi, O.D., P.A.
OPTOMETRIST
Steven M. Weisbond, O.D.
723 W. Brandon Blvd.
Brandon, Fla. 33611
Office Hours, By Appointment
(813)681-2020
Children's Vision, Examination of the Eyes, Contact Lenses.
Computerized Eye Examination*
r
Obituary
lEDKMAN
Aufuats w 84, died Nov. aha was
native of New York City and had llvad In
Tkmps for X yasra. She was s numtw
of OMsragatlon Schsaral Zed* a Tempi*
OuUd Sisterhood. National Council of
Jewish Women, Hadssaah, Twenty year
ptnk lady volunteer at Tampa Oeneral
Hospital and Certified BraUUat lor the
Library of Consreas. She la survived by
two daughters. Sylvia Zueker, of White
Meadows Lake, New Jersey and Carol
Packet, of Tampa, Fla.; one brother,
frank Wetnstem, of New York City; on*
later, Sarah Miller, of Stamford.
Conn.; atx grandchildren and three
great-grandchildren, funeral sarvless
were held Monday afternoon. Nov. t at
Temple Schaaral Zedek. win Rabbi
frank Sundhalm, officiating Interment
followed at Myrtte HU1 Memorial Park.
Plea* make contribution* to the Brail
Program at Schaaral Zedek Temple
i


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readiness to accept sacriiicee,
but adds there can be no hope lor
even a partial recovery of Arneri-
can power without realistic
assessment of American weak-
ness. He also stresses the need
I for priorities, arguing that the
defense of Western Europe and
access to vital raw materials are I
primary.
On the question of nuclear war,
he believes this to be an unlikely
eventuality, holding political
warfare to be more probable as.
the Soviets or their proxies seek1
to destabilize Third
regimes that support the \
are neutral.
Strata
help, much sntrAnair.i
PP-*r "a. countries J^,'
tnr own best interest.?
Jewish Quix Box
By RABBI
SAMUEL J. FOX
IJTA Feature)
Question: Why is the letter
"Shin" found on both the left
side and on the right side of the
tefilin box which is placed on the
head?
Answer: It is claimed that the
letter "Shin" stands for the first
letter of "Shaddai" which is one
of the names for the Almighty.
One of the main purposes of don-
ning the tefillin on weekdays is to
keep the awareness of the Al-
mighty's presence active in the
mind of the Jew. Thus the "Shin"
of the head piece, the "Daled"
which comes about by the shape
of the ties of the tefillin band
around one's fingers, and the
"Yud" which is represented by
the knot of the tefillin of the arm- '
piece, spell out the name of the
Almighty (i.e. "Shaddai").
Question: Why is it that one of
the "Shin" letters on the head
piece has four strokes while the
other has three strokes?
, Answer: Similar to the letters
of the Ten Commandment
plaques, the Shin of the tefillin is
considered to permeate through
the whole thickness of the tefillin.
This means that it has <
strokes and four breadths. I
contend that the threw
"Shin" refers to the thresc
of holiness which are expo*.
the formula of "Holy, Horj ,
." which ia recited j.1
course of the prayers, whil,
four strokes indicate the
times during the week t
Torah is read publicly
claim that the three stroke)]
resent the three Patrku
Abraham, Isaac and Ji
while the four strokes re
the four Matriarchs _
Rebecca, Rachael and Leah. I
also contended that the two i
represent the numerical vii
600 while the word which
bines the two Shins equal i
numerical value of six
"ShesIT). The three stroh
ne Shin and the four stroU
le other Shin equal seven.
Jtal of the above numbers a
which is the number of Bib,
commandments. Thus, the
Shins might remind us not i.
of the name of the Almighty I
also of his Biblical commi
ments and of the Patriarchs i
Matriarchs of our history,
brings about the character
what a Jew should always I
his mind daily.
JEWISH COMMUNITY DIRECTORY
B'nai B nth 876-4711
Jewish Community Center 872-'
Jewish Floridian of Tampa 872-4471
Jewish National Fund 876-93271
State of Israel Bonds 8794861
Tampa Jewish Federation 872-4451
Tampa Jewish Social Service 872-4451
T.O.P. Jewish Foundation, Inc. 225-2(141
Schools
HiUel School (Grades 18) 839-7*47 |
JCC Pre-School and Kindergarten 872-4451
bMMMB
Chai Dial A Bus (Call 9 a.m. to noon) 872-4451
Jewish Towers 870-1831
Kosher Lunch Program 872-4451
Seniors' Project 8724451
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Moiling*'
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily morning one
evening minyan.
CONGREGATION KOI AMI Cowwrvstive
3919 Moron Road 962-6338 Rabbi Leonard Rosenthcl
Services; Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SH0L0M CMStrrativt
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Kenneth Bsrge.
Hazzan William Hauben Services: Friday, 8p.m.; Saturday, 10
a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Refen.
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundhsim
Services: Fridav. 8o.m.: Saturday. 9a.m.
CHA1ADH0USI
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida UC 217, t
2463. Tampa 33620 (College Park Aprs.) 971-6768 or 985-7v76*
Robbilazor Rivkin Friday, 7 p.m. Shobbat Dinner and Servicti
Saturday Service 10:30 a.m. 'Monday Hebrew Class 8 p.m. .
I'NAI I'tlTH HIUEL FOUNDATION
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida **
Jeffrey Foust 5014 Patricia Court 172 (Villooe Square Apt*)
988-7076 or 988-1234 Friday Services and Dinner 6:30 p.-
Saturday Services 10:30 a.m.
i


November-20. K61
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 11
>
\ V

4 a two-year-old boy, blind from birth, is helped to gain new skills by his teacher, Jackie
uau, during one of her visits to Kibbutz N'tiv HaLamed Hey, Eldad's home. Jackie is a
4uate of the home teacher course for the blind, sponsored by the American Jewish Joint
Jtribution Committee (JDC) in affiliation with Haifa University. The course was given by
\American-Israel Lighthouse Rehabilitation Center in Haifa.
leadlines
217 U.S. Firms Join Isratech '81 Show
total of 217 American companies fa-
ding General Dynamics, General Electric and
tinghouse are taking part in Isratech '81, a
case for Israeli progress in electronics,
dical engineering, solar energy and other high-
hnology areas that opened in Jerusalem.
he exhibition has as its theme "Israel Your
(y to Profitable Business Ventures." Emphasis
the advantages Israel offers to American
other foreign investors a highly-skilled
or force, world-renowned research institutions,
Jyfree entry into the European Common
ket and a generous system of grants, loans
tax incentives. Some 200 Israeli manufac-
i are represented in the exhibition.
I new multinational foundation to combat and
nteract anti-Semitism in Western Europe has
i established by the Anti-Defamation League
I'nai B'rith and two B'nai B'rith European
rids to oversee the activities of ADL's Euro-
i office in Paris.
he agreement, setting up the Anti-
nation League of B'nai B'rith European
dation, was signed by Maxwell E. Green-
ADL's national chairman; Joseph Domber-
|of Munich, president of B'nai B'rith s Con-
ntal District 19; and Werner M. Lash of
on, president of B'nai B'rith Great Britain
|Ireland District 15.
car van Leer of Amstelveen. The Nether-
|s, was named as the first chairman of
W, which will be headquartered in The
Terlands.
rt White, of Springfield, N.J., was reelected
n of the Women's American ORT
onal Executive Committee at the
nation's 26th national biennial convention
I recently in New York. Mrs. White will serve
fne ^.OOO-member organization's second
at officer until October. 1983.
[ra- White is a member of the Executive
uttee of the American ORT Federation and
vorld ORT Union, and serves on the Board of
es of the Bramson ORT Technical Institute
'York.
K^e,mK that, in recent months, attempts
I been made to "still the voices of the Ameri-
Fewish community," as well as to arouse anti-
|m, were expressed at the annual Covenant
ce Awards Dinner of the Synagogue
I of America held in New York.
G- Chaikin, president of the International
* Garment Workers Union, and one of four
Mi receiving the Covenant of Peace Award of
Itk Sa'C'tnat there was "deep resentment"
|the attempts to quiet those who wished to
themselves on the AW ACS issue, an
jwhich he termed as a "matter of vital im-
fce to the peoples of the U.S. and the Middle
1 Rabbi Walter S. Wurzburger, president of
fynagogue Council, called upon "religious
' all denominations" to warn their
against the "menace of resurgent anU-
Semitism, which, unfortunately, can be detected
even in the United States."
Sen. Bob Pack wood (R., Ore.) was honored by
the National Council of Jewish Women at its 1981
Joint Program Institute in Washington this
week. NCJW National President Shirley I. Levit-
on presented the National Council of Jewish
Women's Social ^ction Awand U>:Sen. Packwood;
at the closing luncheon of the four-day advocacy'
training institute on Thursday.
The Action Award was created to honor men
and women "whose dedication and commitment
have brought about social progress through
political channels and legislative action." Former
Award recipients include Hubert H. Humphrey,
Bayard Rustin, Martha Griffiths, and Walter
Mondale.
A course in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation
(CPR) life saving technique is being offered by
Magen David Adorn to the Israeli public, with
special emphasis on families of heart attack
patients, to enable them to cope with sudden
seizures. Statistics show that 70 percent of heart
attack fatalities occur in the first six minutes,
often before the ambulance arrives, and a family
member starting CPR immediately can make the
vital difference between life and death.
The sessions, which are being given in a
number of MDA Emergency Medical Clinics
throughout Israel, include lectures by a physician
as well as films, slides and demonstrations of
closed-chest massage and other methods of resus-
citation. Graduates of the CPR course are able to
assist all victims of cardiac arrest, whether from
heart attack, drowning, accident trauma or other
cause.
At a private briefing of the World Jewish
Congress, Rumania's Chief Rabbi Dr. David
Moses Rosen reported that the anti-Semitic
incidents occurring inRumania last year had come
to an end.
Dr. Rosen, speaking at a meeting in New York
with the American Section of the WJC, referred
to the anti-Semitic phenomena of a year ago,
which included the circulation of an anti-Semitic
tract in Bucharest that, among other things,
accused Rabbi Rosen of being an agent of a uni-
versal Jewish conspiracy.
Those developments were "a terrible shock for
us," he stated. In response to these manifesta-
tions, Rabbi Arthur Schneier, chairman of the
WJC American Section, went to Rumania to meet
with President Nicolae Ceausescu.
A new chair has been developed by Tel Aviv
University scientists Profs. Mircea Arcan and
Maurice Brull which can quantitatively evaluate
sitting and reclining postures to enable diagnosis,
and, if necessary, assess correction.
The chair displays optically some LOOO
sure points and is e&ui^tet^h.Hkia^a
Mdine and the bb of the base of the seat
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And after this, Abraham buried Sarah his wife in the cave
of the field of Machpelah, before Mamre" (Gen. 23.19).
Hoye Sarah
HAYE SARAH Sarah died at the age of 127 in Hebron, and
was buried in the Cave of Machpelah, which Abraham pur-
chased as a family grave yard. Anxious for Isaac to marry one of
his kin-folk rather than an idolatrous Canaanite woman. Abra-
ham sent his trusted servant Eliezer to his former home in _
Mesopoiamia where his brother Nahor lived. Approaching the1'
city, Eliezer prayed for the success of his mission. He deter-'
mined on a procedure: He would ask each girl he met, "Give me
your pitcher and let me drink"; the girl who would reply.
"Drink, and I will give thy camels drink also" should be Isaac's
destined bride (Genesis 24.14). Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel.
the son of Abraham's brother Nahor, came to the well to draw
water, and responded with the correct formula to Eliezer's
request. Thanking God for His kindness, the old family retainer
presented himself to Rebekah's family, explained his mission,
and received permission for Rebekah to accompany him back to
Canaan as Isaac's prospective wife. Isaac loved Rebekah, and
was consoled in her after his mother's death. Abraham took
another wife, Keturah, and she bore him sons whom he dis-
patched to the east. At the age of 175 Abraham died and was
buried next to Sarah in the Cave of Machpelah.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law it extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History ot the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir, SI 5, published by ShengoM. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York, N.Y. 1003a Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)

>
Community Calendar
n
Friday, Nov. 20
(Candlelighimg time 5:16)
not
i .1'
Saturday, Nov. 21
Hillel School Fundraiser "Gift of Gold" 9 p.m. at Beth Israel
Building JCC Community Dancemakers Dance Concert 7
p.m. ORT (Evening Chapter) Bridge 8 p.m. Brandon
Chavurah Regular Meeting 8 p.m.
Sunday, Nov. 22
Congregation Kol Ami Yom lyun Special Activities Day
Congregation Schaarai Zedek SCHZFTY Dinner-Meeting 6-7
p.m. Congregation Rodeph Sholom Israel Bond Dinner-
Members only 7:30 p.m.
Monday, Mev. 23

. .......
Tuesday, Nov. 24
Tampa Jewish Social Service Executive Boar \ ot 6 p.m. and
Regular Board at 7:30 p.m. Jewish Towers Bingo 7:30 p.m.
Congregations Schaarai Zedek and Rodeph Sholom Community
Meeting 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 25
National Council of Jewish Women Board 9:45 a.m.
Congregation Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood Open Board "How
to Kosher Your Home" 10 a.m.
.
Thursday, Nov. 26
JCC Closed Thanksgiving Day Congregation Schaarai Zedek
joint Thanksgiving service with Palma Ceia Methodist Church at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek 10 a.m.
Friday, Nov. 27
(Candlelighting time 5:14)
Certified Surgical Mohel
Rabbi Sherman P. Kirshner
Congregation Bath Chai-Saminole
22 yrs. ot renowned experience
Serving the Wast Coast ft Central Fl.
813-393-5525
813-398-1994
813-398-1995
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>pl>on IJWJM 100



Page 12
The .Teiirieh KVWW.~_ _^i
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, Novemh^
Behind Resurrection of Fahd's Peace
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Saudi Arabian
Crown Prince Fahd's eight-
point plan for a Middle
East peace which lay mori-
bund after it was first pro-
posed in August, now has
emerged as an international
issue which could harm the
Camp David process as well
as United States relations
with both Israel and Saudi
Arabia.
Part of the blame for this de-
velopment is being placed on the
Reagan Administration which,
after rejecting the plan last
August, publicly said in late Oc-
tober that there were positive ele-
ments in the plan although some
of the eight points were items
that should await negotiations.
By the end of last week, the
Administration was refusing all
comment on the Fahd plan ex-
cept to say "we are committed
and will continue to be com-
mitted to Camp David as the
only basis for continued nego-
tiations" toward peace.
BUT THE Administration's
original statements, coming in
the wake of Senate approval of
the sale to the Saudis of five
AWACS surveillance planes and
F-15 enhancement equipment,
added to Israel's belief that there
was a tilt in Washington against
Israel and toward the Arabs.
On the other side, Prince Saud,
the Saudi Foreign Minister, has
announced that the Saudis will
seek United Nations General
Assembly endorsement for the
Fahd plan and then ask die
Security Council to sponsor an
international conference in which
the Soviet Union would be in-
cluded.
The Saudi move adds to
Reagan Administration concern
that the Arabs will box them-
selves into a position where they
will be unable to retreat from
support of the Fahd plan, a situa-
tion similar to what happened a
few years ago when they anointed
the Palestine Liberation
Organization as the only spokes-
man for the Palestinian people.
The Reagan Administration,
which had argued that the $8.5
billion arms side to Saudi Arabia
was need to bring the moderate
Arab states into the peace
process, now faces a major con-
frontation with these states at
the UN.
In addition, the participation
of four West European countries
Britain, France. Italy and The
Netherlands in the force that
will patrol the Sinai after Israel's
final withdrawal next April is in
doubt. Lord Carrington, the Brit-
ish Foreign Secretary, while in
Riyadh, not only praised the
Fahd plan and echoed the Euro-
pean Economic Community
(EEC) position that the PLO
should have an enhanced role in
peace negotiations, but also criti-
cized the Camp David peace
process.
CARRINGTON may tilt
toward the Arabs more than, for
example, does French President
Francois Mitterrand, but as
chairman of the EEC's Council of
Ministers, Carrington was also
representating the Common
Market while in Riyadh. This led
Premier Menachem Begin to de-
clare that Israel would veto the
participation of any country in
the Sinai force that rejected taw
Camp David process.
Begin, meanwhile, was
reportedly gratified by Secretary
of State Alexander Haig's state-
ment last week declaring that the
U.S. considers the Camp David
process the only means of nego-
tiating peace in the area. The Is-
raelis are now expected to preei
for greater U.S. involvement ii
the autonomy negotiations.
Meanwhile, observers here are
still trying to assess why the
Reagan Administration decided
to make a public statement on
the Fahd plan only a few days af-
ter the AWACS sale was ap-
proved. Many believe that the
Administration, which had
argued that the Saudis would be
helpful in the peace process as a
result of the arms sale, wanted to
show that the Fahd plan was
proof of its argument-
OTHERS POINT to the sur-
prise announcement during
Mitterrand's recent visit to the
U.S. that the West Europeans
are considering joining the Sinai
force. Some believe that an ex-
pression of approval for the Fahd
plan may have been the price the
Europeans exacted.
Both the Europeans, who
voiced support of the plan much
earlier, and the Reagan Ad-
ministration, in finding positive
elements, pointed to implied
recognition of Israel. What really
set the Israelis off was President
Reagan's remarks. "We couldn't
agree with all the points, nor
could the Israelis," Reagan said.
"But it was the first time they
had recognized Israel as a nation.
It's a beginning point of nego-
tiations."
What President Reagan and
others were referring to was point
seven of the Fahd plan which said
"confirming the right of coun-
tries of the region to live in
peace." As former Foreign Min-
ister Abba Eban pointed out here
last week, the Fahd proposal does
not recognize the State of Israel,
nor do the Saudis call for nego-
tiations. Rather they rule out
talks with Israel.
BEGIN LABELED the Fahd
proposals a plan for the "liqui-
dation'' of Israel, noting that it
called for a complete withdrawal
to the pre-1967 borders and the
establishment of a Palestinian
state, with Jerusalem as its
capital. The Saudis confirmed
that the PLO would rule this
state.
It is surprising that since the
memory of the late Anwar Sadat
has been brought into recent
debates on the Mideast, par-
ticularly the AWACS sale to the
Saudis, it has not been mentioned
in all the comments on the Fahd
plan.
Fahd made his proposal to an
Arab newspaper at the time
Sadat was completing his suc-
cessful visit to Reagain in Wash-
ington. When Sadat was asked
about the Fahd plan on NBC-
TV's "Meet the Press" Aug. 9, he
said there was "nothing new" in
it.
"It will be the mo,* 1
for me, for instance, Z M ft
Cairo and say, well, u .."P
SUtea had to do ?,53
Begin ought to do so Z
s3;tud.He8aidth,u
of issuing mandates, thai
could "contribute" to tL^j
If the congressional oaffiP
both sides on the AWACSkl
indication, this is "
which most Americans suPp
X
Have you reserved your place for Women's Wedesday? Thit
sponsored by the Women's Division, Tampa Jewish Federation1
be held at Congregation Schaarai Zedek on Wednesday, Dec 2 tL
is a $10 fee per session, with lunch or dinner included. Each m
pant may choose two workshops per session, either morning (9
until 1:30 p.m.) or evening (5:30 p.m. until 10 p.m.) Barbara Wek
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, will be the keynote speaker. Planning for
day long affair are (seated 1 to right) Michelle Goldstein Joan Am
shuler, charman of Women's Wednesday; Nancy Verkauf. IstandinA
to right) Rhoda Davis, administrative director, Women's Duisioi
Ann Rudolph, Jane Sergay, Franci Rudolph, chairman, Womh
Division, Tampa Jewish Federation; Donna Cutler; Valerie Klein
Ellen Crystal.
The Right Time! The Right Gift!
For Yourself, Your Family, Your Friends.
Jewish Book Month
NOVEMBER 20-DECEMBER 20,1981
JWB JEWISH BOOK COUNCIL
JUJB 15 EAST 28th STREET, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10010
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ISSlflilffiRIi
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The story of the most significant
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Braakmrougrt-Moehe Oayan
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Shalom Judaica
"InTha
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Here is a complete book about
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Hanukkah is celebrated, but
discover many new ways to ob-
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The Hanukkah Book,
forages 10-op
(Holldsy House) $3.95
In The Diaspora Story: The Epic
of the Jewish People Among the
Nations. Joan Comay presents a
thorough, colorful, scholarly
and wide-ranging account of
Jewish mlgratlon-and the great
fluctuation In Jewish fortunes-
through-out the world over the
last nineteen centuries.
The Diaspora Story-Joan Comay
(Random House) S1BJ6
JILL AND LEON URIS
SONG OF SONGS
Jin Urte's camera capture* ma wide variety
of cultural and religtone. coatumaa and
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"City of Stone Leon Una. a paaalonata
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Jaoiistsi Sans el Sanaa J1 and Lean Una
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The Book of Modem Jewieh Etiquette la a
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Full Text
Pure 8
Page 2
The Jewish Flprifian of Tampa
r>iday, November 20,
xz
1981
I
9k cuw
By LESLIE AI DM AN
(Call me about your social news
at 872-4470)
When we heard the terrific news about 11 year old Francie
Linsky. daughter of Michael and Karen Linaky. we just knew
that youwould"lJke to hear about it too. Francie was recently
ejected president of the student body at Roland Park Ele-
mentary School, a sixth grade center. Francie's election to this
illustrious,.;office came about only after she campaigned and
itmdv a speech in front of the entire student body of 460 s t u -
dents. She was then elected by secret ballot. In addition to
helping plan and run various school activities, this body of
eJectitt officers is in charge of running the school bookstore.
Francie is also active in Softball and plays on a girls Tampa Bay
Little League Team called the "Herons." Well. Francie. we
think your election is simply fantastic and how admirable to be
active and interested in all aspects of your school life. Loads of
congratulations to you.
How do you like the new picture? Thanks to Beverly Simon,
of Village Photographers I have a new look to go along with my
column logo. (Now are you happy Dr. Moe ChardkofT??? Does
this mean you will no longer call me every Friday to say how
awful my picture is ????? Call and say "hi" anyway, okay!!)
Sonja and Alfred Waaserberger recently called us to let us
know the latest news about their son. Abe Davis-Waaserberger.
(who was formerly -the assistant executive director of Tampa
Jewish Federation). Abe is currently residing in St. Louis, where
he is working hard as the director of Leadership Development
and Trades and Professional Division of the Federation Cam-
paign of that city. We are so glad to hear that you are busy and
involved, and we send you our best regards.
Now tell me, who could ever turn down a bargain????? If
you are looking for that perfect Chanukah gift or a trinket for
yourself, then mark your calendar for Monday. Dec. 7, from
10;30-i:oUnnd come ro the "Maccabiafa Market" being put on
by the Sisterhood of Congregation Schaarai Zedek. Co-chairmen
Gail Pershes and Ann Rudolph have really been working hard.
There will be a myriad of foods for sale from hor d oeurves to
casseroles, to soups, to fabulous breads and desserts and all
of them homemade, of course! There will be table after table of
wonderful handmade gifts to buy from hand-painted barrettes
and hair ribbons, and t-shirts. and children's underwear, to
batiks and sculptures and lithographs. Also, as if this were not
already reason enough to come, one may browse among and
purchase items from the Temple's well-stocked Judaica Shop, a
terrific array of plants, a booth filled with costume jewelry, and
much, much more. There will be a delicious box lunch available
Jor purchase, and a babysitter will be provided free so Moms will
nave time to shop leisurely. Don't miss this fabulous day of
AOjBtalnaE JOWone is-welcome- so- bring ybOf friends an3"
neighbors See you there!
Let me take this opportunity to extend my most sincere
wishes for a happy, healthy, peaceful, and deeeee-licious
Thanksgiving to you and all of your loved ones. There is not a
more appropriate time than now for us to pause and reflect.
"Thanksgiving is a time for us to remember our dependence on
one another. Not only should we show our gratitude for the
blessings that are ours, but for the blessings of freedom. In our
world of today, with its constant bickering, slayings. and strife.
it is marvelous to witness the truth that men and women of
goodwill can live together harmoniously May the spirit of
Thanksgiving be a thanksgiving not only at this season and on
this day. but throughout the entire year."
We know that a lot of you must have special holiday plans,
possibly, vacations, family' coming to visit, or college kids
coming home. Please let us know about all of these fun and ex-
citing things we just love to hear about what is going on.
(Call the office today at 872-44701!
"Women's Wednesday" is just around the corner, and it is
really one at those stimulating, thought provoking days that
even woman should trjr to attend. Being held from 9 a.m.1:30
p.m. and from 5.30 p.m. -10 pjn. on Wednesday, Dec. 2 at Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek. Tampa Jewish 'Federation has
planned a variety of mini seminars that one may attend: Diana
Winoker. account executive at Dean Witter Reynolds. Inc. will
speak on "Expanding the Boundaries of Your Money": Joaa
Benjamin. Joint Committee For Social Action. Union of Ameri-
can Hebrew Congregations, from Clearwater. will speak on
Stand Up and Be Counted": Chris K tasty. MA. Kalashian and
Associates, will speak on "What You Want To Discuss With
Your Children. But Are Afraid They'd Ask": Dr. Jadha
Oihanoia. director of Women's Studies Program at USF will
speak on You ve Come A Long Way. BubeUk Anew Thai,
executive director of Tampa Jewish Social Service, will apeak on
How.Not To Feel Guilty While Doing Things That Make You
Feel GuUty and Snaanaw Brav. guidance counselor at Gorrie
Elementary School will speak on "How To Survive Beirut Jew
ah .While Trying"
If you want to come and have not received an invitation,
then contact the Tampa Jewish Federation.
Meet Rostra and Bob Wane who recently moved to the
Westshore area of town from Worcester. Mass. They both
originally haO from Massachusetts also Bob manufactured
lighting in Massachusetts and moved down here to open a beau-
tiful new store cased "The World of Lighting The Wihses
have two children 26 year old lai who is roamed to!
land they are expecting their first child any minute) Ji
partner in The World of Lighting with his Father The
Willises younger son. 21 year old Ghana, attends the Umvenatv
of So_th Florida Roarrn enjoys aerobics and bowling and was a
member of many Jewish orgsntmrinrn m Mass, such as ORT
Hadassah. and B'nai B nth We certainly are glad that v all
have chosen Tampa to move to Bob and Roafyn
atilnext
Towards the Perfect Pine Tree
By YEHONATHAN TOMMER
JERUSALEM Scientists
are at work in Israel creating a
perfect pine tree, one that will be
fast-growing, tall and straight,
drought resistant and immune
to common tree diseases. It will
have a thick trunk and will pro-
duce industrial timber that can
compete with the best European
varieties.
Israeli forest researchers be-
lieve the day is fast approaching
when pine trees planted by the
Jewish National Fund will be
raised from properly selected
seeds and will be perfectly suited
to Israel's dry climate and
generally poor soil conditions. It
would be a type of tree that could
also do well in the similar soil
conditions of several Arab coun-
tries.
The break-through in develop-
ing this dream tree came several
years ago when a strange disease
struck large sections of the JNF's
30-year old pine forest along the
road to Jerusalem at a section
called Shear Hagay.
"We have since identified the
disease and the JNF took appro-
priate action to renew the
damaged parts ot the forests,"
says Dr. Rene Karschon, head of
the research team of eight tree
geneticists at the JNF's Forestry
Division Experimental and Re-
search Station at Ilanot.
For the past year, the Ilanot
station has worked full-time on
relating the pathology findings to
their effort to develop a new pine.
"Israeli foresters have long
known that the so-called Aleppo
pine, which covers much of the
Carmel Range near Haifa
Galilee, the Judean Hills and the
Hebron foothills down to Beer
sheba. in large part actually de
rives from Vienna," Karshon ex
plains. "The Aleppo pine is con
sidered the hardiest and best
suited to the region. Large quan
tities of pine seeds were also
brought in from Mediterranean
countries, but no record of where
these saplings from Europe and
North Africa were planted were
kept. Over the years, the strains
cross-pollinated, making it im-
possible to identify their origins
and difficult to isolate the Aleppo
pines."
Karschon's JNF research team
is investigating 17 characteristics
in the metabolism of the pine
tree. It recently completed
complicated laboratory \r
aimed at devising a suthS
code to be used in identifying th'
genuine Aleppo pine from tfh.
types and hybrids. The dau h
currently being processed and it
is hoped that the researchers can
soon move onto the next stare
cultivating seedlings of th
selected type. e
Over 1,000 foreign types of
trees are planted at the llano ar
boretum. Most of them come
from the dry climates of the Uni
ted States and Australia. llanot
has obtained over 200 species of
eucalptus and 60 strains of
acacias from these countries
And it is in this arboretum that
the Aleppo pine will be grown ex-
perimentally once it is isolated
from the seed selections that are
now being collected all over Is-
rael.
In addition to the controlled
conditions at Ilanot, the Israeli-
bred variety of Aleppo pine will
be grown in various parts of the
country under natural conditions
With luck, it will take and b*
come a permanent and flourish-
ing member of Israel's flora.
Three MKs Move Near Yam it
Aim to Block Sinai Evacuation Next April
T-n
By URI BENZIMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Three members of the 120-roem-
ber Knesset have recently taken
up residence in or near Yam it. the
main township in the Rafah
region of northeast Sinai which
Israel will evacuate next April.
They are Geula Cohen and Hanan
Porat of the Tehiya faction and
Rabbi Hairo Druckman of the ex-
treme right wing of the National
Religious Party. A fourth MK,
Tehiya leader Yuval Neeman,
says that he too is contemplating
the move
The declare purpose is to ex-
press in this way their opposition
to the pullout from Yamit and the
rest of the Rafah region, sched-
uled for next April under the
terms of the Israel-Egyptian
peace treaty As such, these MKs
are breaking no law or violating
no regulation. Nevertheless, their
move raises questions of pub-
licethics and parliamentary
responsibility
UNDER THE Members of
Knesset immunities law: Rights
and Duties'' enacted in 1961. a
Knesset member "shall not sub-
ject to either civil or criminal
Cranberry-Strawberry
Gelatin Mold
By NORM A BARACH
Jtuxsh Telegraphic Agency/
Thanksgiving seems to be
nght on the heels of our Jewish
holiday season. A cranberry-
strawberry gelatm mold to ac-
company your hobday turkey
should hit the spot.
CRANBERRY-STRAWBERRY
GELATIN MOLD
1 pkg strawberry gelatin
1 pkg lemon gelatin
2 cups boiling water
1 10-oz. pkg. frozen
strawberries
1 cup cranberry-orange
relish
cup ginger ale
Dissolve the pisfim m boiling
water. 1 cup to each flavor Com
bine them and add the frozen
strawberries and the cranberry
orange reush Stir and 1st it cool
off. Then add the ginger ale.
slowly mixing wuh an up and
down motion. Pour into a 6-cun
maid and chnl
iLa,
process, and will be immune from
any legal action against him, in
regard to his vote, or his opinion,
or any action he has taken
either inside the Knesset or out-
side the Knesset if that vote,
that expression of opinion, or
that action was a part of the way
in which he fulfils his role as a
member of the Knesset.
This deliberately wide and
catch-all formulation gives effec-
tive protection to MKs against
any. attempt to prosecute or sue
them because of their political ac-
tivities. The legislature intended
and indeed succeeded in
providing its members with well
nigh perfect freedom to function
as representatives of the public.
It enabled them to describe their
political activities even if such
activities would be illegal if done
by others as "part of the way
in which he fulfils his role as s
member o f t he Knesset.''
So far Cohen. Porat and
Druckman have not violated any
law. The Yamit-Rafah area is
open to free movement and
normal access and the three MKs
followed the normal procedures in
setting up homes there in empty
houses. Moreover, their decision
to leave their homes and take this
symbolic step of resettling them-
selves and their families in Yamit
can most certainly be defined as
" part of the way in which they
fulfil their roles as members of
the Knesset." Their purpose,
after all. is to make a legitimate
demonstration of their political
views.
BUT THE ethical and demo-
cratic problems arise not out of
strict legalism. but out of the fact
that the Knesset itself, by an
overwhelming majority, has
resolved that this area is to be
evacuated as part of the peace
with Egypt. Furthermore, the
anti-withdrawal. anti-peace
treaty views of these three MKs
were very recently put to the ul-
timate democratic test that of
the ballot-box and found to
represent only a very small pro-
portion of Israeli public opinion.
Tehiya won three seats in the last
election.
It is therefore most relevant to
ask of these three MKs: What is
the moral basis of their act of
demonstration against the imple-
mentation of the peace treaty?
But the problem is more
serious and more down-to-
earth than a mere ethical debate.
Though the three MKs have
not broken any law, tney have
clearly given inspiration and en-
couragement to others who, it
appears, do intend to break the
law and take illegal actions in
their struggle against the
evacuation.
Kosher Lunch Menu
Kosher l.nrfa aeeaa of the Senior GUmn' Nutrition and
Activity Proareai la as as mid by the HiUsoorasga County
Commission sad head st the Jewish Coasmnsity Canter. Marirys
Bhuney. eke laieir. 872-4451. Menu subject to
WEEK OP NOVEMBER 23-27
Monday Baked Fish with Tartar Sauce. Broccoli. Mashed
Potatoes. Red Gelatin with Peaches. Whole Wheat Bread.
Sugar Cookies
T""^ r. SP**hetli with Meat Sauce, Green Peas. Tossed
iialsd with Green Pepper. Thousand laland Dressing.
Italian Bread. Canned Pears
Wednesday Broiled Chicken with Grew. Rice. Collard
Greens. Orange Juice. Whole Wheat Bread. Yellow Cake
with Powdered Sugar Topping
Thursday Case*
Friday Closed
it


Friday. November 20,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 3
Martin
ST. LOUIS Martin E. Citrin
of Detroit has been elected presi-
dent of the Council of Jewish
Federations, the association of
200 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils in the
U.S. and Canada serving 800
communities that embrace 06
percent of North American
Jewry.
Citrin's election to the CJF
presidency came during the 60th
annual CJF General Assembly in
St. Louis, where official delegates
from CJF's member Federations
chose the Detroit leader to head'
CJF during the historic period of
Council's 60th Anniversary Year.
Citrin succeeds Morton L.
Mandel of Cleveland.
Martin Citrin is a member of
the CJF Board and Executive
Committee and a past CJF vice
president. Since 1979, he has
served as chairman of the CJF
Campaign Planning Advisory
Committee, and is the 1981 chair-
man of the CJF-UJA Campaign
Planning Task Force. He par-
ticipated in the CJF Review
Committee, which supervised the
comprehensive two-year study
of Council's purpose, governance
and function.
A past president of the Jewish
Welfare Federation of Detroit
and the most immediate past
chairman of its Executive Com-
mittee, Citrin also serves on the
board and Executive Committee
of the Detroit United Founda-
tion. He is a member of the Sinai
Hospital Board of Trustees.
He plays a major role in the
Sivemance of the Jewish Agency
r Israel, where he serves on the
board of governors, co-chairs the
Agency's Commission on Jewish
Education, and is a member of
the Immigration and Absorption
Committee and the Comptroller
Committee. He also holds mem-
bership in the United Jewish Ap-
peal Board of Trustees, the Unit-
ed Israel Appeal Board of Di-
rectors and the Executive Com-
mittee of the American-Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee.
..'""""'nwmri
i rrrfTtr1 rf??M" tttttt^


GfUettUtett+neni "
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Orson Skorr
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Martin E. Citrin
Citrin is a partner in the
Detroit firm of J.A. Citrin Sons
Company. He and his wife Myra
have four children.
a
Established in 1932, the Coun-
cil of Jewish Federations serves
as a national instrument to
strengthen the work and impact
of Jewish Federations through
adership in developing pro-
grams to meet the changing
needs of the Jewish community;
through the exchange of success-
ful experiences to assure the most
effective community services;
through establishing guidelines
for fund raising and operation,
and through joint national plan-
ning and action on common pur-
poses dealing with local, regional,
national and international needs.
\Mr$. A.R ILuzie) Berger,
\honorary member
Rodeph Sholom Honors
Shorestein and Berger
Congregation Rodeph Sholom
has honored two of its long-
standing, hard working, and
devoted members. Prior to Kol
Nidre services, before the full
congregation assembled, Mrs.
A.R. (Lizzie) Berger was made a
life member of the Congregation
and Nat Shorestein was named
honorary president.
Sam Verkauf, speaking in his
capacity as chairman of the
board, told of Mrs. Berger's
many years of service to the
synagogue, her active participa-
tion in all facets of synagogue life
and her family's involvement in
the founding and development of
Rodeph Sholom almost 80 years
ago.
Mrs. Berger served as presi-
dent of the Rodeph Sholom Sis-
terhood from 1930 to 1936. She is
honorary president of the sister-
hood and is the first lady to re-
ceive honorary synagogue mem-
bership.
Congregation Presidsnt
Howard Sinsley addressed his re-
marks about Nat Shorestein to
his dedication to synagogue
work, involvement in Jewish
organizations and community
agencies and his continuing to do
so at the age of 86. Daily syna-
gogue tasks continue to be a part
of Nat Shorestein's routine.
The honorees were surprised
and thrilled and the congregation
began the holiday in a very up-
lifted mood.
Who Says I Can't Drink?
Tampa Jewish Social Service
announces the beatinninR of a new
program entitled "Who Says I
Can't Drink," a drama performed
live about teenage drinking. The
performance is one of many plays
published by "Plays for Living,"
a division of Family Service
Association of America. Spon-
joring the new program are
Tampa Jewish Social Service,
Family Service Association of
Greater Tampa, Inc., and Alcohol
Community Treatment Services.
The play is intended to give a
dramatic emphasis to the prob-
lem of teenage drinking in the
community, which needs greater
recognition, understanding and
discussion.
The problem of teenage drink-
ing is on the increase. How can
parents cope with this problem?
Where can teenagers go for help?
"Who Says I Can't Drink" helps
to answer many of these
problems through a live dramati-
zation, with group discussion fol-
lowing each performance. This
offers an opportunity to explore
various points of view, which lead
to a new understanding of the
problems presented.
"Who Says I Can't Drink" is
currently available to any group
or organization that may be in-
terested in viewing the perfor-
mance for a small charge. If you
are interested in reserving a date
for a performance or wish to learn
more about this unique program,
please call Joel Brooks at Tampa
Jewish Social Service, Monday
- Friday, 9-6, at 872-4461.
PHONE (813)837-5874
PAT COLLINS
NURSERY & BABYSITTERS
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Schectman Named
T.JF Campaign Director
Marc Schectman has been
named by the Tampa Jewish
Federation to fill the position of
campaign director, it was an-
nounced this week by Hope Bar-
nett, president and Gary Alter,
executive director.
Schectman was the assistant
director of the Commerce and
Profession Division of the United
Jewish Appeal Federation of
Greater Washington and served
previously in campaign positions
with the Fort Lauderdale Federa-
tion and the United Jewish Com-
munity of Bergen County in New
Jersey.
Marc will assume a major re-
sponsibility for the 1982 Cam-
paign, working with campaign,
division leadership and workers.
He will also be involved in public
relations for the Federation as
well as some of the outreach pro-
grams that are being planned.
Schectman received a B.A. de-
gree from George Washington
University in Political Science
and a masters degree from the
University of Miami in Public
Relations.
"Marc brings to the position of
campaign director an excellent
Jewish background, a wide range
of campaign experience, a first-
hand knowledge of Israel, and a
Marc Schectman, Tampa Jewish
Federation campaign director
strong commitment to Jewish
life," Alter stated. "We know he
will be a valuable asset to help us
meet the needs of a growing and
vibrant Tampa Jewish com-
munity."
Schectman replaces Abe
Davis-Wasserberger who is now
with the St. Louis Federation.
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