The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00110

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
wJewisFi Floridiar
Volume 3- Number 26
Off Tampa
Tampa, Florida Friday, July 24,1981
f'tdShocnti
Price 35 Cent*
F16 Jets Ha/ted
West Anxious, U.S.
Unexpectedly Calm
OTTAWA Secretary
of State Alexander Haig
this week announced Presi-
dent Reagan's decision to
delay indefinitely a ship-
ment of U.S. built F16 jet
fighters contracted for by
the Israeli government.
Reagan, here to meet with
the leaders of the world's
major industrial
democracies, was set back
by Israel's uombing of Pal-
estinian enclaves in Beirut
twil f over the weekend.
II iic announced the decision al
I'liairuu MontebeDo. lie said
tliui ihf shipment would be under
luii her review and added:
Clearly, ll future level of vio-
lence hi i he area will have a very
special impact when the re-
view will be completed ami ihe
ultimate decision that's made."
HAIG ALSO emphasized that
the resumption of shipment of
Ihe jets would not depend on
whether or not U.S. envoy Philip
llubib is successful in attaining a
ceasefire in Ix.>banon, but he em-
phasized that President Keagan
was worried by "the escalating
cycle of violence in the Middle
Baal "
There was overall anxiety ex
pressed here by the western
democracies and Japan as to the
implications of Israel's three-
prong attacks involving air, sea
and lai forces. In effect, the
representatives here anticipated
sli rn American reaction and the
plui ing ol pressure on Prime
Minister Mt nuchem Begin to put
an end to the attacks.
The Reagan decision to halt
the shipment of the planes,
Continued on Page 6
Campaign Readies Record High
Still Short of GoalEfforts to Continue
.
The 1981 Tampa Jewish Federation -
United Jewish Appeal Campaign
remains short of its goal of $1,015,000
according to Federation leadership.
Efforts will continue to make up a
deficit of over $100,000. Campaign of-
ficials estimate that the campaign will
close with $900,000 pledged to the 1981
drive the highest amount ever raised in
the city of Tampa and a 25 percent in-
crease over the 1980 campaign. "This is
a record high for Tampa and one of the
largest percentage increases of any
community in the country," according to
Mike Levins, Campaign Chairman.
I lowever, we are starting at such a low
base," Levins continues, "that the
$900,000, as good as it is, will not be
enough! to meet the current needs in
Israel and our Tampa community. The
short fall will result in serious cutbacks
in services at a time when our agencies
should Ih' able to expand services."
Lev ine urged anyone who has not
made their 1981 commitment to do so
immediately so that their pledge will be
included in the budgeting process that
will take place in the next few weeks.
Federation leadership had high praise
for the many volunteers who answered
the call to assist in thecemergency
campaign. "We had tremendous help
from the community volunteers, agency
board members, community leadership
and our professional employees," Hope
Barnett, President of the Tampa Jewish
Federation stated. "We were most
gratified by the response from hundreds
of individuals who heard our call and re-
sponded with new pledges and increased
commitments. We are only disappointed
that we are still short of a very realistic
and reachable goal and will continue as
long as we can in order to prevent a
reduction of services to the community,"
Barnett concluded.
The Berkmans Win
Monroe, Suzette and Kirsten Berkman were the lucky family
to win the Jewish Community Center's "2nd year free member-
ship'' announced during the July 4th activities. Every new
member of the JCC during May was eligible for the special
s prize.
What a thrill," Suzette beamed. "We've never won any-
: We will definitely use our membership for school and for
I unity activities."
Suiette is Public Relations Chairman for the JCC and Kirsten
ids the pro-school. JCC Membership Vice President Sara
nted the membership cards for next year to the
Berkman
Last year's lucky family was Richard and Judy Noriega. Judy
said. It has been the best thing that has happened for the whole
family.
AJCommittee's Changing Image
Is It Back to Elitism and
Reagonomics Applause?
By MICHAEL WEINSTOCK
The recent annual conference
of the American Jewish Com-
mittee in Washington was no
ordinary meeting of just one of
the many Jewish organizations.
This was the American Jewish
Committee celebrating its 75th
annivesary. AJC, which is head-
quartered in New York, convened
tor its anniversary in Wash-
ington, to deal with no less an
issue than the change in the po-
litical and social order heralded
by the Reagan Administration.
The passing of a liberal, Demo-
cratic era was mourned by some,
but the general tenor of the con-
ference was one of celebration. By
the end of the five-day meeting,
there was little doubt that, in
coming to Reagan's Washington,
the AJC had come home.
SOUNDING WHAT became
the keynote of the meeting,
CUNY Prof. Henry Feingold
attributed the survival of the
AJC to its "intellectual savvy"
and to its self-proclaimed elitism.
Describing AJC's role in the
Jewish community as that of a
think tank, Feingold recalled that
the AJC was originally estab-
lished by upper class Jews to
raise the deliberate voice of
reason over the "unseemly"
clamor for democracy coming
from the congested quarters of
East European immigrants. In
foreign and domestic affairs, the
AJC exercised a style of "quiet
diplomacy" to maintain and
further Jewish gains in legal and
social status.
Over the past 30 years,
"elitism" has not enjoyed good
press. The snobbery and narrow
class interests once associated
with the AJC was less in evidence
since World War II, and while
the Committee was never in the
vanguard of radical social
change, it did sponsor work
which was instrumental in the
Brown \ s Board of Education
anti-segregation decision. And it
did come around to the Demo-
cratic tradition of Hubert
Humphrey, testifying as recently
as 1978 in favor of such issues as
the Humphrey-Hawkins Full
Continued on Page 9-
Tampa Singles To 'Shine'
1
&
*&<
Sparing to see Israel with over 400 Singles from around ^^^^^f^J^ShfS^.
the 18 who will be Tampa s delegation on the Hat^va ""f"* *^ J* lfSt) Brian Abeles,
^United Jewish Appeal^^'^J^^^^^^K^SRla. Belle AbramsSn,
lampa Mission Chairman; Jean Plowden and ur uavia ""'* '. d c Alter Executive
Sanford Roth, Linda Davis, Terry Ferguson, Gail Ironson, " "rector. Tampa Jewish Federation. Participating ^^S!CEV Audrey
lirunhild, Sophie
llaubenstock)
Glasco, Victoria Gold, Simmone
17 members of the Tampa Jew-
ish community will arrive in
Israel on August 2 to join over
400 men and women participat-
ing in the United Jewish Appeal
National Singles Mission,
"Hatikvah."
The Tampa group has been
meeting since the beginning of
June and will have participated
in four workshops prior to their
departure. The workshops have
included, "The History of Israel
Prior to 1948", presented by Dr.
Chad Luxenberg; "The Holo-
caust and the Establishment of
the State of Israel", presented by
Abe Davis-Wasserberger; "Israel
Today: The Promises and the
Problems of Modern Israel", pre-
sented by Dr. Carl Zielonka. On
Sunday, July 26, Hope Barnett,
President of the Tampa Jewish
Federation, and Gary Alter, Ex-
ecutive Director, will discuss the
"Federation, Tampa, UJA, and
Its Responsibilities To Israel."
Also partticipating will be Mike
and Diane I.evine, and Mike and
Janet Kass, recent mission mem-
bers.
The National Singles Missions,
entitled, "Hatikvah" will be the
largest Singles Mission ever
assembled by the UJA. Mission
participants will be staying in Tel
Aviv, the Galilee, and Jerusalem.
Some of the hiKhlijihts of the
Mission will be "Exploring our
Roots and Cost of Peace";
"UJA's Role in Israel," "Nation-
al Security and the Kibbutz Way
i Life, and "Jerusalem, the
internal Capital of Israel." There
will be opportunities for home
hospitality and meetings with
singles from the Israeli com-
munities.
In addition to the tours,
mission participants will have an
opportunity to meet with and
hear from some of the top Israeli
government and political leaders.


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
:-^> -m.TSt
Escalation Warfare
Habib Attempting Impossible
U.S.
fiercely
border,
By GIL SEDAN
special envoy Philip Habib, seeking to end the
escalating warfare across the Israeli-Lebanese
conferred with Premier Menachem Begin and
other Israeli leaders as terrorist rockets claimed another
life-and injured 23 persons in renewed attacks Sunday oni
Kiryat Shemona and Nahariya.
Thp Utoot fc*t-. ,o= i c THE ROCKET attacks, which
lhe latest victim was 16- wounded nine people in northern
i^u*J bmmon Da>'an | Israel Friday and six more
killed in the streets of; Saturday, were launched in the
Kiryat Shemona as he and
his family were leaving on a
trip. His mother, Miriam,
was severely wounded.
Another of the 23 injured in
Kiryat Shemona was
reported in serious con-
dition. Two women
aftermath of a massive Israeli air
raid on Palestine Liberation
Organization headquarters in
Beirut Friday which caused
heavy civilian casualties. That
raid in turn was Israel's response
to Katyusha rocket attacks the
previous Wednesday which killed
jthree people in Nahariya and
were I wounded 25 there and in Kiryat
slightly injured lnjshemona.
Nahariya. Habib whose mi88ioni begun
in May, was aimed at persuading
Syria to remove the SAM-6 anti-
aircraft missiles it has placed in
Lebanon, which Israel threatens (
to destroy, was ordered by
President Reagan Friday to]
return to Israel to try to affect a'
ceasefire over Lebanon. The
American diplomat has been in
Saudi Arabia, a country the U.S.
has enlised in its efforts to restore
peace in Lebanon.
He met with Begin for 75
minutes, a meeting attended by
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
and Gen. Yehoshua Saguy, chief
of military intelligence. Habib
reportedly demanded that Israel
call for an immediate ceasefire in
the north, but political circles
here doubt this is feasible under
lhe present circumstances.
HABIB is said to have en-
countered an angry Begin who
strongly justified Israel's con-
inuing air raids over Lebanon as
legitimate self-defense and ex-|
pressed displeasure over the
delay in delivering 10 F16 fighter
planes which the U.S. had been
axpected to ship to Israel on
Friday.
At his meeting with Begin and
his aides Habib reportedly was
told that Syria was the key to the
terrorist attacks on Israel from
Lebanon and was urged to
convey the message to Damascus
that Israel reserved the right to
take whatever action it thought
necessary to protect the lives of
its citizens and that it was up to
Syria to keep the terrorists under
firm control.
The Israelis also reportedly
told Habib that the terrorists
were constantly being supplied
with more and better weapons
from Libya, Syria and the
Communist bloc countries.
ISRAEL HELD all those
countries that supplied the
terrorists responsible for the
attacks on its northern border
towns, the American envoy was
told. Israel demanded that the
Lebanese government
terrorii activity from
end
its
SS^J^?*^ that the
Beirut government
lacked
9fo qjUttfi
Jkbout lToum
By LESLIE AIDMAN
(Call me about your social news
at 872-4470)'
Loads of good wishes to Dr. Daniel and Jo Anne Sugannan
on the birth of their third child, a son, Jonathan Aaron. This new
Tampan was born on June 24 at Worsens Hospital. He weighed
in at seven pounds four ounces. He joins an excited older brother
and sister, six year old Joel and four year old Amy. We are so
happy for all of you on this joyous occaasion.
Our special friend, Morris Weiaman, is glowing over his
recent writeup in a senior paper, highlighting his dancing ac-
tivities (two afternoons and three nights a week and
demonstrations whenever asked) plus his VISTA (Volunteers in
Service to America) job at Tampa General, five days a week, as a
bilingual interpreter at the admissions and discharge desks.
Weisman who says he's retired, claims all this activity keeps a
smile on his face and is keeping him young besides. Morris, we
have written so much about you, you truly are an inspiration to
many who are half your age of 83.
We just heard about a fun vacation and thought you'd like
to hear about it too. Elliott, Iris, Todd, and Jarrod Buchman
and Elliott's Mother, Ruth Buchman, recently rented a camper
and drove all over the eastern seaboard. First, the Buchmans
traveled to Reston, Va. where 11 year old Todd was in the
Reston International Soccer Tournament-1981, as part of the
Town and Country's Under 12 Rowdies Soccer Team, (Elliott is
the coach). This is an unusual tournament held in a different
state, and often times, a different country. The players are
housed by the home team, which makes it an extra special ex-
perience for these young soccer players. Todd played three
different positions during their four games; they won two and
lost two. After the tournament, the Buchmans went on to visit
Williamsburg, Washington, D.C., Savannah, Hilton Head, and
Jeckel Island. Glad y all had such a good time.
Virginia and Dick Gordimer just returned from a two week
trip to Israel with their 13 year old son Andy and their daughter
Laura, who is 10. This first trip to Israel for the family was
taken in honor of Andy's Bar Mitzvah, which took place in
January. The Gordimers left New York with American Jewish,
Congress Tours. The highlights of their trip were their stops in
Tel Aviv, Haifa, Jerusalem, and the northern parts of Israel.
They all had a marvelous time and said they were tremendously
impressed with the country and especially with the people and
what a feeling of peacefulness they gave, despite the fact that
Israel it certainly not allowed to be at peace for any lengthy
amount of time. Sounds like a really special memory, Dick,
Virginia, Andy, and Laura, we are so glad that you shared it
with us.
The Sisterhood of Congregation Kol Ami is planning a
marvelous fashion show and dessert for the paid-up membership
August 12 at the home of Mimi Aaron. Co-chairwomen for this
. lovely event are Sheryl Yudis and Elaine Broverman. While
. enjoying a mouth-watering array of yummy desserts, Sisterhood
members will enjoy viewing the new fall fashions being supplied
and modeled by "Nouveau Riche." So get those checks in the
naail ladies so you won't miss this really special social event. Call
Sheryl at 962-4338 or Elaine at 962-2306 for further information.
The Jewish Sound," the Sunday morning radio program on
WMNF 88.5 FM with host Oded Salpeter, becomes a two hour
program Sunday, Augst 2. That morning an Open House invita-
tion to the radio studio is being extended to everyone from 9-11
a-m There will be singing accomjpanied by Yaron Galony, the
shaliach for the summer at the JCC, and you can be on the radio,
live. The station is located in the back wing second floor of the
Nebraska Avenue United Methodist Church, 3838 Nebraska
Avenue, at the comer of Selma.
This week, July 26, The Jewish Sound will present Francie
Rudolph, co-chairman of Tampa Jewish Federation's Women's
Division campaign. This week it's 11 a.m., next week and there-
After it is 9-11 a.m.
A number of women who are both enthusiastic bowlers and
enthusiastic members of Womens American ORT (both the
morning and evening chapters) join together every Thursday
morning, throughout a good portion of the year, to bow' > few
games and just enjoy socializing for a couple of hours. R itly,
the award winners of this Winter ORT Bowling League were an-
nounced at an end of the year luncheon. We thought we would
pass on the names of these "jocks" to you:
1st place team: Patti Kalish, Leonore Stein, and Harriet
Seehg:
2nd place team: Sheila Feldman, Susan Marenus, and
Ten-ill Hameroff;
3rd place team: Shelly Appleblatt, Linda Blum, and Nina
Leopold.
High Game, Handicap: Sharon Lancz
High Game, Scratch: Sandra Brack
High Series, Handicap: Linda Blum and Trudy Harris
High Series, Scratch: Susan Marenus
Most Improved Bowler: Rarbel Rabinowrtz
and All Events: Karen Mawengill.
Also, a pat on the back is.:ae to three women who kept the
league organized and running smoothly throughout the year:
League president, Lynne Goldstein: League Secretary. Rachel
Rabinowitz; and League Treasurer. Brenda Mack.
Michele Goldstein and Marilyn Burke will be co-chairing a
very clever fundraiser for the new north branch of the Jewish
Community Center Pre-School. Tuesday morning, August 4 at
10 a.m. a brunch will be held at Micheles home in Carrollwood
Village (13345 Golf Crest Circlel for all of the parents of north
branch students and any other interested persons. Mothers will
each be bringing a covered dish brunch food to contribute to the
delirious part of the morning and Barbara Rirhman (director of
the JCC Pre-School) and Janice Heustis (head teacher for the
north branch) will provide the intellectual stimulation of the
morning. They will be bringing with them an array of equipment
needed for the new branch and will demonstrate and explain its
use. Those in attendance can purchase pieces of equipment in
family members' names (i.e. in honor of my daughter Susie)
thus providing the new branch with much needed funds for
purchasing. There wUl be items to purchase ranging in price
from $5.95 $150, so you can see, everyone will be able to par-
ticipate in this most clever sale. Anyone who is interested be
sure to put this important date on your calendar. It's a great
oppurtunity to meet the other parents and set up carpools, too!
As always, we send love and good wishes of health and
happiness with our Happy Birthday sentiments, to our friends
at the Jewish Towers who celebrate their special day during the
month of July. These people include:
Weinberg, Harry Gemberg, Sarah Newman, Clara Applebaum
Rose Rosenberg. Edith Blumberg, Ellis Chernoff. EElE
*fr.V S?*- Sdi Wahnon. Edith Simpson. Rebecca
Hocfaberg, and manager of the Towers. Juliet Rodriguez.
Also, celebrating their anniversaries this month are Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Biegelberg, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Rumore. Mr. and
51? JgeBfteS**!?? and M Monro* Ro-enbaum. and
Mr. and Mrs. Wdham Kriahner.
r.rJU^tS'' SuPhen "d J Setfcwjr who moved to the
Carro lwood area about a year ago from Boston, where they had
*&&** ^ years. Jane is originally from New Jersey
and Stephen is originally from Johannesburg. South Africa
When he was 17 years old. Stephen was an AFS1 American FMd
Service) exchange student m Tampa for a vear nnH ,IIj
Plant High School. The Sergays ha one dau^te? tSTH
old Amanda, who attends the JCC Pre-School, and are Sect.
their second chud any moment. Jane and Stephen rn^ K22
when Stephen was a resident in neurology at Harvard and hZ
was a graduate student in child development *SiH Jan.
went on te teach special education and chad devefopmenVat
Until the next edition .
T 7 24 11
T 7 24 81
T -7 2481
authority anT^er"^'? ^
susceptible to Syrian influence*""
According to the Israeli vie*
it was therefore Syria and The
other countries supp|ying Z
terrorists with weapons that wer!
responsible for the civUJ
casualties in Beirut.
Deputy Defense Minister
Mordechai Zipon said in 1
radior interview that I8raei
would welcome diplomatic efforts
to restore calm to the Israeli
Lebanese border But he warned
that if the Palestinians continued
their shelling of Israeli towns the
Israel army would escalated its
counter-measures.
"Even the presence of gooa
friends in the area (an apparent
reference to Habib) will not halt
Israel army action if the shelling
continues or if preparations for
further attacks continue.'' Zipori
said. "We will certainly help the
U.S. in its efforts to restore quiet
but we will not sid idly by if the
attacks on us continue."
Meanwhile, former Premier
Yitzhak Rabin, a leader of the
opposition Labor Party, sharply
criticized the Begin government's
military policy in Lebanon in an
article in Yediot Achnnot.
Terrorist operations from
Lebanon cannot be stopped by
military means, he said.
"EVEN IF the Israeli air force
were to operate in Lebanon for i
whole month ... the terrorists
would not cease to act against us.
There is no military solution to
this problem because there is no
intention to occupy I^banon."
Rabin wrote. He also maintained
that passive defense measures
against terrorists were more
effective than the preemptive
raids that have been the policy of
the Begin regime for many
months He suggested that this
policy was OOUOtei productive
inasmuch as the terrorita have
bean strengthened militarily
despite the raids and. il anything,
have rallied mo- Vrab ipport
'ban they enjoyed originally.
The solution oi the i.rronsts
problem is not military but rather
political." Rabin wrote.
Moshe Arens. a Herat har
dliner and chairman of the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Commeittee. defended
tlio air rakl on Berut as necessary
but agreed with Rabin that there
w Bfl no effective way to stop the
terrorist attacks. He contended
that it was difficult to speak of a
political solution because the
tcrrorits would never slop
fighting Israel. "If they did they
would lose their raison d' etre."
be said on a Kol Israel Radio
interview.
Former Foreign Minister
Moshe Day an also appeared to
have reservations about Israels
air raid on Beirut. Nevertheless,
he said on a radio interview that
Israel was confronted with the
choice of halting the attacks to
allow dipolmatic efforts to work,
knowing that the terrorists would
utilize the hiatus to regroup and
prepare for future assaults, or to
continue the attacks while the
former guerrilla forces of the PL0
gradually attain the status of an
army w"ith their acquistion of
tanks and heavy artillery.
A MILITARY spokesman said
that the attacks on Beirut were
aimed at PLO installations
throughout the city. The targets
included PLO camps and con-
centrations, among them the
Berut sports stadium. The
spokesman said offices of the El
Fatah and the Democratic Front
for the Liberation of Palestine
were destroyed. The attack was
the first heavy Israeli raid on the
Lebanese capital.
It was followed by a special
announcement from the Pnnw
Minister's Office that the
terrorists can no longer expectw
hide amid civilian population
centers in Lebanon. >n
statement said: "We will *
intentionally direct our "*
Continued on Page 5


Friday. July 24,1981
Trie Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 3
Endowment
Enlightenment
Jol BreltsUIn
Endowment Consultant
Executive Director
T.O.P. Jewish Foundation
LIKE FATHER
LIKE SON
Hypothetical: Sam and Sarah
|l)onorwitz have a son, Benjamin.
Vhen Sam and Sarah were young
nd Ben was growing up, Sam
urchased a considerable amount
life insurance so that the
oily could be adequately pro-
wled in the event of Sam's-
Jilimely death. Sam is now 65
and Sarah is 60. Ben is an execu-
ve vice president of Chai corpo-
Iration and earns a substantial
Isalary plus corporated benefits
Ivvhich include a group term life
Insurance policy in the amount of
|>75,(XX>. Hen. like his father be-
|on him. has purchased addition-
| life insurance to protect his
roung family.
limn Sam anu Ben are com-
knitted Jews and each would like
ke an endowment gift to the
Foundation for the benefit of his
n Ml hough their
, circumstances and the
i state differ, they
lain have u common asset which
[an be i!i<' basis "i an endowment
l-iii.
Question: Hou can Sum and
i'ien make a present gijt to the
^Foundation while leaving their
, urrent assets intact and nut nut-
ting their family in a financial
find at the time of their death/
Answer: The value of life m-
Burance as a means of charitable
riving is often overlooked. Life
Insurance is initially purchased
llur many reasons. Some purchase
]n purely as a means of protection
llur ilie lamily while children are
Iwiung. Others purchase it as a
lincaiis of forced saving, since life
[insurance, other than pure term
[insurance, builds cash value
[which may be used in time of
[cash need. Still others purchase it
las a vehicle for funding various
Jbusiness obligations, such as a
Ibuy-sell agreement between busi-
Iness partners. Many business
[unities provide group term in-
surance to their key executives as
[part of a non-taxable income
Ibenefit.
Regardless of the purpose for
Ins initial purchase, there may
Icome a time when retaining all of
[ones life insurance is unnecsesary
land unfeasible from an estate and
I u.\ planning point of view. In the
[above hypothetical situation
[Sam, Ben and the Foundation
[would benefit by Sam and Ben
I making an endowment gift of a
Iportion of their life insurance.
In Sam's situation there is no
[longer the need for substantial
[amounts of insurance. Over the
[years he has built an estate con-
sisting of a modest portfolio of
[securities, a home with substan-
tial equity and other cash invest-
ments. Certainly, Sam may have
I a need to retain a portion of his
[insurance to augment his estate
[and provide a means of support
[to his widow, if he should prede-
cease her. If sam chooses to make
[an endowment gift by using some
[of his life insurance, he has two
[options, either of which, depend-
ing on his estate plan objective
[and current income tax deduction
|needs, would be feasible.
Assuming Sam has a policy
[with cash value, he could make
Ian outright gift of the policy to
[the Foundation. naming the
rrounuution both as owner and
|beneficiary of the policy and
giving up all rights that he may
Save in the policy This will yield
un imi ediate charitable income
ion lor Sam for i he re-
lent value of the pa
wimini paid up policy.)
ms remain to be paid on
licy, the i heritable
polated terminal reserve value of
the policy (an amount slightly in
excess of cash surrender value on
the date the policy is given).
In the event that premiums
remain to be paid on the policy,
Sam's annual premium payment
would also qualify for an annual
charitable income tax deduction.
Making a gift in this fashion
achieves two tax objectives an
immediate income tax deduction
and a reduction in the adjusted
gross estate.
Sam's other choice is not to
give up total control of the policy,
but merely name the Foundation
;is beneficiary. This does not
yield an income tax Charitable
deduction, but it may result in
significant estate tax savings.
Using this method of making a
life insurance charitable gift the
value of the policy is included in
Sam's estate, but it is offset by a
haritable estate tax deduction.
At first blush there appears to
lathing more than a wash,
however, the inclusion ot the
\ulue ot the policy in Sam's
i state will swell the value of the
adjusted gross estate and will
therefore increase the amount ot
the estate that passes tax free to
Sam's surviving spouse, i.e., the
marital deduction wherein the
decadent may pass tax free to the
surviving spouse the greater of
8250.000, or one-half of the ad-
justed gross estate.
Hen's situation is somewhat
different from Sam's. Ben is still
in the process of building his
estate and he has a young family.
However, in the hypothetical
example, it was indicated that
Ben's employer, as part of the
compensation package, is provid-
ing Ben with $75,000 of group
term life insurance.
The IRS has ruled that an em-
ployer may provide group term
life insurance of up to $50,000
without any income tax conse-
quences to the employee. The
premium payments are tax de-
ductible to the employer and non-
taxable to the employee. How-
ever, to the extent that an em-
ployer provides group term life
insurance in excess of $50,000 to
the employee, the employee must
recognize taxable income
measured by the premium cost of
the excess coverage.
However, to all rules there are
exceptions. If the employee
names a Charity as beneficiary of
the excess portion (the amount
over $50,000), the premium cost
of said excess is not taxable as
additional income to the em-
ployee. Ben could name the
Foundation as beneficiary of the
additional $25,000. Although he
does not get a charitable income
tux deduction, he does achieve
his objective of making a gift to
the Foundation at no cost to him-
self. Assuming he can spare this
amount of protection and still
adequately provide for his
family's future in the event of an
untimely death, he like his
Father, can use life insurance to
achieve his Philanthropic objec-
! l\ 08.
Life insurance can provide an
inexpensive means of not only in-
suring the value of yourself for
the benelit of your famdy, but of
insuring that the quality of
Jewish life will be maintained and
enhanced for years to come.
As with any charitable gift,
you should consult vour attor-
ney, accountant or other tax
advisor before implementing
your decision. The Federation's
Endowment Consultant is at
your disposal for a confidential
conversation with you and-or
your legal and tax advisors and
insurance agent to discuss an en-
dowment gift through life insur-
ance.
For further information about
this and other tax-wise charitable
Wundohl To Direct
JWB Communications
Frank F. Wundohl, editor of
the JEWISH EXPONENT of
Philadelphia and outgoing presi-
dent of the American Jewish
Press Association, has joined
JWB in the newly-created execu-
tive staff role of director of
communications.
Announcement of Wundohl's
appointment was made by
Arthur Rotman, JWB executive
vice-president, at the or-
ganization's quarterly Board
meeting at New York's Grand
Hyatt Hotel, where Wundohl and
his wife Harriet were introduced.
The idea of creating the post
and the search to fill it developed
as JWB realized the ever-in-
creasing need to provide ex-
ecutive leadership to conceive,
develop, put into practice, and
then evaluate its many and
varied public interpretation
programs.
In his new JWB post. Wun-
dohl will supervise all of JWB s
communications and pub-
lications. He will work closely
with the JWB Public In-
terpretation and Commu-
nications Committee, chaired by
Harry C. Isaacs of Rye, N.Y.,
Rotman said.
His responsibilities include
developing a close liaison with
agency executives and commu-
nications professionals at the
more than 300 JWB-affihated
Jewish Community Centers and
Vs. branches and camps in the
U.S.
Lionel 'Tex' Koppman
veteran Jewish journalist and
longtime JWB staff member, will
continue in his dual roll
editor ot the bi-monthly
,nd as
I pi;i,lic- interpretation.
Wundol "n m ,)e*'
giving plans you may contact the
T.O.P. Jewish Foundation, 100
Twiggs Street, Suite 4444,
Tampa, Florida 33602. (813) 225-
2614. All inquiries will be held
confidential.
NOTE: This column is written
as a service to provide general in-
formation to the Public about the
Endowment Program. Informa-
tion contained herein is not
I designed as legal or tax advice.
Maryland Racial Incidents
Aimed at Jews, Blacks
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
spate of racial incidents, aimed at
Jews and Blacks in suburban
Montgomery County, Md., has
aroused County Executive
Charles Gilchrist.
He has urged the prosecuter's
office to transmit the "unmistak-
able message that this kind of
conduct will not be tolerated in
Montgomery County."
Gov. Harry Hughes of Mary-
land has also called on state
prosecutors to crack down on
misguided hatemongers who
seem to emerge during times of
economic stress and emotional
strain."
UNTIL RECENTLY, many
local officials were reluctant to
s the issue publicly for lear
thai tins sort ol ugly news'"
could engender even more
rouble. But the list ot racially
motivated vandalism and provo-
i iii ion has grown in recent
months to a point where they
annot be ignored.
On June 26, five white teen-
agers sprayed a caustic material
troin a lire extinguisher on a
, roup ol Blacks in Wheaton. On
June 7, a Itockville man found his
car tarred and daubed with anti-
Semitic graffiti. Less than two
weeks earlier, anti-Semitic slo-
gans were written on the door of a
llockville school, and a day
earlier a swastika was painted on
the sidewalk in front of a local
synagogue.
Leaflets urging youngsters to
join the "Klan Youth Corps"
have been distributed openly at
county schools. In all, 39 inci-
JEWISH EXPONENT since
May, 1973. He became editor
after serving as director of in-
formation of the Albert Einstein
Medical Center of Philadelphia,
the largest health care facility a-
mong the constituents of the
Federation ot Jewish Agencies of
Greater Philadelphia.
A veteran journalist and public
relations professional, he has
served in various editorial and
communications roles since
receiving his bachelor's degree
from Temple University in 1951.
Among his news appointments
are service with the WCAU-TV
news department, the CBS affi-
liate in Philadelphia; the
Philadelphia Daily News; the
Courier-Post (the Gannett Group
daily in South Jersey); and the
Daily Intelligencer iTJoylestown,
Pa).
He also has a number of credits
as a P.R. specialist with com-
merce and industry, the most
notable with IBM and the
Masswchusetts Mutual Life
Insurance Co.
In 1977, Wundohl received the
Boris Smolar "Award fro Ex-
cellence in North American Jew-
ish Journalism" from the Council
of Jewish Federations in the
"feature category" for two series
of articles on the Jews of South
Africa and on "Israel from the
Golan to the Negev."
In May he completed his third
consecutive one-year term as
president of the American Jewish
I'nss Association at the AJPA's
1981 annual meeting in Houston,
Tex, He is a member of the board
of the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
tndohl anu his wile, both
Iphia natives, pian to re-
in
TH! r'-E
?81
dents of cross-burning, Harass-
ment, vandalism and assaults
have been reported to the police
during the first six months of this
year compared to fewer than 25
during all of last year and less
than a dozen the year before.
According to Gilchrist, "These
are not pranks These are sav-
age assaults on the sensibility of
our fellow citizens."
POLICE REPORT that the
pattern of racial incidents varies
from one locale to another. In
Wheaton it is usually whites a-
guinst Blacks; in Silver Springs.
Blacks against Hispanics; and in
llockville and Potomac, Jews are
the principal targets. Many ot the
incidents seem l o be the work of
teenagers, police sav.
Welcome to Tampa
Recently moved to tamp
Oo you Know someone mat re-
cently moved to Tampa or w ill be
QOVing this summer.'
Cull the Tampa Jewish Feder-
ation. TSF would like to put all
Jewish families in Tampa on the
inading list for The Jewish
Floridian, compliments of the
Tampa Jewish Federation.
The Shalom-Tampa Newcomer
Committee, of the TJF Women's
Division, would also like to per-
sonally welcome all new Jewish
families to Tampa, with a direct-
ory of Jewish services, organi-
zations, agencies, synagogues, as
well as to invite newcomers to
get-togethers to meet other Jew-
ish newcomers.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, July 24,
1981
| The Half-Truth Respoken
ig One fact is dear: The half-truth of the Palestinians be-
S witches the western nations more and more so that they
g do not understand the reality of PLO and Middle East
:: maneuvering.
What the west sees are Israeli planes that bombed Bei-
5 rut twice lust weekend and into Monday. It sees civilian
y. casualties and is outraged although there never does
6 appear to be an equivalent brand of outrage voiced in the
8 west or, indeed anywhere else, when it is Israeli civilians
:: who are the casualties of the unrelenting Palestinian war
:* against the Jewish State.
What the west does not see is the PLO's deliberate
:|:| decision to set up its headquarters and many of its ancil-
: lary military operations smack in the middle of Lebanon's
:> most crowded civilian population centers and to seek
:S immunity from attack there by a revolting kind of camou-
| "age
In this sense, the west shows no concern that Yasir
Arafat is conducting his campaign against the existence of
Israel from the very same centers he declares he is pro-
tecting, but about which he has no real concern at all.
In all of this, the repeated Arab propensity for calling
S Israel the new source of Nazi practice and Prime Minister
I Begin a Hitler is unspeakable. The history of the Arab
:: world's alliances with Hitler during the Nazi era sets the
g lie to their unrelenting reconstruction of the past. To what
1 extent does the west fall for this? We would bet fairly ex-
:: tensively.
Having made these observations, we are pressed to
:j:j emphasize that the Israeli attacks on Beirut, while under-
P standable from a military point of view, are less under-
g standable otherwise. No doubt, Prime Minister Begin be-
:j:j lieves with profound conviction that knocking out the
a PLO centers is as important to Israel's survival as
:* knocking out the Iraqi Osirak reactor was outside of
I Baghdad.
On the other hand, such reservoir of good-will that
:: Israel had prior to that June 7 operation is long since
S spent. There wasn't much of it to begin with either, and so
:: the raids on Beirut should have been weighed against that
:: perilously diminishing reserve.
This is especially true in light of the election results on
8 June 30, which Begin can in no way interpret as a mandate
g to rule his country another four years. The stinging critic-
5 ism of the Beirut bombings already voiced in several
g major Israeli newspapers suggests that there is hardly a
g unanimous feeling about them.
Met with divided opinion at home and with the kind of
: reaction abroad that brought a halt to the delivery of 10
1 American-built F-16's last Friday, can the Begin decision
g to continue with the campaign in the name of self-defense
8 be justified at this time?
We are not in a position to judge, but we certainly can
S wonder.
1
1
v.
I
y.-
I

''
Young and Old in Same Boat
ASSESSMENTS are correct
lhat the current spate of violence
in western nations is largely
youth-centered. It takes no
sophisticated observation to note
lhat the burning, the looting, the
attacks on police are being
carried out by gangs of young
people, not by their parents or
grandparents.
Bui the conclusions are in-
correct that young people are
acting this way to show their dis-
affeclion, their alienation from a
social Older lhat does not help
ili.m with their needs or even pay
attention lo their complaints.
iheii Btatemente of dissent
inst the established order
THE FACT is that older peo-
ple suffer irom precisely the same
disuffuction. No one helps them
: or listen- LO their complaints.
either. Vnd so, they are just as
inuih a victim of the social order
j ,i- ,.i, their children and grand-
| thildrun who have been staging
: riots ui ihe principal cities of
No Real Love
What seems like a mild Reagan Administration reaction
to the Beirut bombings on its face is probably less so in
fact. Still, Secretary of State Haig, speaking for President
Reagan, in announcing that the 10 F-16's would not go to
Israel as scheduled last Friday, noted that this did not
mean that they would not go at all.
In fact, it was Edwin Meese, the White House counsel-
or, who more than mildly observed that sending the planes
off as scheduled would only make things worse at this
time, and so the shipment would have to wait some more.
How much more, he did not say. But we would wager
not for long. As we say, this is not sheer love of Israel we
are talking about in the corridors of Capitol Hill.
There is the Reagan economic retrenchment plan that
still needs passing. There is the Reagan defense budget
that is staggering in size not only by contrast with
economic retrenchment elsewhere but by its own right.
There is the coming Reagan assault on the Social Security
| system in the name of saving it. There is the Reagan justi-
5 fication to the world's democratic leaders in Ottawa this
>: week of high U.S. interest rates about which the Adminis-
I tration is doing precisely nothing. There is the Reagan de-
:;l:' termination to sell AWACS to Saudi Arabia come what
% nwy.
6 All of these Reagan gambits need support on Capitol
:>: Hill. Israel's dwindling reserve of good-will abroad not-
withstanding, there is still a good bit of it left in the Con-
:: gress of the United States.
Jewish Floridian
.< of Tampa
Butaaaa Of&OK MM Hantem Blvd Times. Fk. 3M09
Talapfcooa 871-4470
MfjMfea Offk* 130 NE 6 St. Miami. Pk.33131
PUDK SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET JUDITH R08ENKRANZ
EdttoraodPubiiahar Eucau*. Editor Aaaooata Editor
rVadSAoeAar
TW Jrwtaa Fl.Haii. Daaa Sm Gnmtm TW l nfia-M..,t. *.....-"--
PublMtad Fndaya-Waakly Saptambar through May
Bi-WaakJjn Juna through Aufuat by Tha Jawiah Floridian of Tampa
-SaooddCUaa Poataf* Paid at Miami. Fla U8PS47I 910
Plaaa* aaad aaUKratioa UTaYwi 3673I r^araUa, aa.i.. u.4 > u TWa Jawiah -,rlJaa an
ax 12f73. Miaati. PU. 33IM "
SUBSCRIPTION RATES (Local Anal 2 Yaax Minimum Subacnptwo-37 00 (Annuai-33 60fOat of
Taarn Upon Raquaat.
Tha Jawiah Flondian maiotatna ajo "fcaa liat. Paapla rapavincU>a papar who hav. not aubaenhad
dirartlv ara aubacribara through arraiuti mam with tha Jawiah Faderation of Tamp* wharaSr 3?5) '
par yaar la daductad from lhair contributiona for a aubacrtpUoe to tba paper Ara/aa# wiatiinaita
eaarai aurh a aubacnptioa ahoald an notify Tha Jawiah Floridian or Tha Faderation
Hindi...
'>-,- ......: S
England. And who are with in-
i reasing ominousness these days
pamphleteering in West Ger-
many and Italy. And even in
such centera of bourgeois com-
plucvnc) as Switzerland and
I ramf
Why, then, do their elders not
also lake to the streets? After all.
n was the older population of
Germany that rallied behind the
Nazi thugs and brought them to
l,.r in the early 1930s. Ditto
1
Tt^NQVERyHAKp
-OT7V
for the Fascists in Italy before
that. And for the Bolsheviks in
czarist Russia before that.
The answer to this question
explains the rise of youth-
oriented violence in the west in
the first place. Only a decade ago
the very same sociologists who
deplore this latest phenomenon of
unrest were busy observing the
rise to coronation of the cult of
youth. In motion pictures and
television, plays and commercials
emphasized the desirability of
being young in the frankest
sexual terms And booka and
magazines anointed them as the
new wave of human excellence.
BUT THE sociologists did not.
al the same time, crown the wis-
dom of age with a still greater
diadem. In glorifying golden
thighs and deep bosoms, they did
not exalt as the ultimate foun-
lainhead of respect those who
had grown older and deserved
adoration for that very reason.
Thay merely made the aging look
like clowns as objects of
humor or derision. The result was
llie unleashing of a competi-
tiveness between the generations
lhat seriously damaged the old
and left the young with the un-
lullilled promises lhat the medii
had proposed as a sociological
imperative but were not obliged
lo help satisfy.
On the contrary, the hucksters
made ever more daring promises.
For example, there were movies
exhorting the young never to
trust anyone over 30 as if
youth guarantees innocence or,
indeed, anything else. Especially,
there was one motion picture of
that era that portrayed the de-
sirability of consigning everyone
over the age of 25 to a con-
centration camp, where the vic-
tims would come to a quick and
tragic death, thus vaccinating
society against the disease of age
and, what is more, against its
tyranny.
The contribution of the
minions of Madison Avenue to
llus deplorable development was
and, to a great extent, remains
legion today. It repeats itself in
London and Paris, West Berlin
Continued on Page 9-.
Maidanek Memories
Are Nazi War Crimes Trials Absurd?
Friday, July 24, 19K1
Volume 3
22 TAMUZ 5741
Number 26
By MICHAEL MAY
London Chronicle Syndicate
With the verdicts on the Mai-
danek trial finally decided,
probably the last of the major
proceedings against concentra-
tion camps crimes in Germany
has come to a sad and bewilder-
ing end. How far has justice been
done?
The Nazi criminals sentenced
so far can be divided into three
categories. First, the 24 principal
was criminals who stood trial be-
fore the International Military
Tribunal in Nuremberg. Twelve
were sentenced to death, and ten
of these were executed. Hermann
Goering committed suicide.
Of the others, Rudolf Hess is
still in Spandau prison, and three
were released in 1966, two of
whom are also still alive (Baldur
von Schirach and Albert Speer).
INTO THE same category fall
the trials by the American
Military Tribunals who tried 184
persons in i2 major proceedings.
OT24 sentenced to death, 12 were
executed; another 20 received life
sentences, and 98 were sentenced
to terms of imprisonment of up to
20 years.
Other trials conducted by the
American, British and French
Military Tribunals produced a
farther-668 death sentences, 462
of which were carried out.
During the period of the Cold
War, in a move linked to the
Western Allies' decision to rearm
Hildegard Laechert, senten-
ced to 12 years at the
Maidanek trial
Germany, pardons were granted
beginning in 1951 (by the Ameri-
can High Commissioner) and all
prisoners convicted by Military
Tribunals were released by 1958.
Hardly any of them served their
full sentences.
NO RELIABLE data is avail-
able on the volume of trials insti-
tuted by Soviet courts. Various
sources quote the figure of 24,000
convictions.
In Poland a total of 5,358 Ger-
man nationals were sentenced for
thair involvement in Nazi crimes.
Of the four most notorious who
succeeded in escaping (Kich-
"*" Mw>gele, Barbie and
\Hreller), the first was captured,
tried in Israel and executed.
The major crimes the exter-
mination and concentration
camps, and the mass shootings
have been investigated and
the main culprits identified and
in most cases convicted.
Of the 40 commandants of the
21 concentration camps (not
including the four extermination
camps), 11 were executed by the
Allied Forces after the war, two
were executed by the Nazis
themselves (like the first com-
mandant of Maidanek, Koch, oi
corruption charges), five commit-
ted suicide, six died in war action,
four died in prison, seven died in
freedom after serving complete or
partial prison sentences, two
were still alive in 1978 after
having been released from prison.
one was shot by American sol-
diers while attempting to escape,
one is serving a life sentence, and
preliminary proceedings against
another were aborted by the
public prosecutor.
OF THE 46 commanders of
security police and security serv-
ice operational groups and units.
15 were condemned to death at
Nuremberg. Six of them were
executed and nine later pardoned
and released; five commitW"
suicide, five were sentence- t
various periods of imprisonment.
Some died during preliminary
proceedings and against *0?*
proceedings were terminated di*
lo incapacity to stand trial.
The second category of Nafl
criminals covers the 6.449 p'
Continued on Page 9


[priday. July U, 1981
Stress Workshop
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
PageS
The Hay D. Wolfe Centre for
the Study <>f Psychological Stress
, thr University of Haifa, head-
,,,, by Lady Davis Professor,
ghlomo Breznitz. last May held a
workshop and a series of meet-
op between internationally re-
I Downed psychologist and top
Israeli administrators from
[industry, health, education and
the |>r.li Defense- Forces, for the
purpus- >>l inelentifying problems
and suggesting possible solutions
for reducing tension and pres-
Mresonkey personnel.
Pour world famous experts in
psychological stress from the
United Slates and Canada, in-
cluding Prof. Charles Spielberg of
the University of South Florida,
Tampa. Prof. Joel Elkes of
MiMasters University in Can-
ada, and an Adjunct Professor at
the Kay D. Wolfe Centre; Prof.
I'erry London from the U.S.;
Prof. Donald Meichenbaum of
the University of Waterloo in
Canada; converged on the Ray D.
Wolfe Centre for four days to
pool their varied and rich ex-
periences in the field.
Two days of discussions were
held between the four experts and
representatives from Israeli in-
dustry, health professions, edu-
cational systems and defense for-
ces. The four teamed up to clarifv
the various problems and to pin-
point the special Israeli needs in
order to find appropriate meth-
ods lor efficient treatment ol this
complex subject.
It was decided that the Ray D.
Wolfe Centre will organize, in
stages, a program to provide
assistance and training for top
administrators in Israel, will
develop a model appropriate to
various needs, and train experts
to deal with these complex pro-
blems.
One interesting issue raised as
typical in the meetings was the
inability of the "average Israeli"
to relax and to unwind from
tension. This results in an irri-
tability which infects all around.
People who are under constant
stress within the framework of
their work or their responsi-
bilities pay a high price for this in
the wear and tear on their phy-
sical and mental health. They
need to relax, but they usually do
not know how. The Ray D. Wolfe
Centre will explore ways to aid
and train various bodies in deal-
ing with this subject for the
benefit of all.
Offices of the Florida Chapter
of the American Friends of Haifa
University are in Miami Beach.
Gerald Schwartz is Regional
Director.
Letter to the Editor
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian:
The .Jewish War Veterans,
IW 'ATA, Tampa is fast becoming
une ol the best known Posts on
tin West Coast of Florida. At the
su.ii convention for the first time
tin- Wrest ('oast was recognized.
Thanks to our Post
Judge Ralph Steinberg was re-
elecled judge advocate for the
Stale Department Cy Woolf was
ruclecied action chairman for the
Stale ol Florida and Co-chairman
lor the National Department. Cy
"us also elected national
executive committeeman, De-
IMiiin.ni ol Florida. Again a first
l"i tin West Coast
Out I'osi received a plaque for
iis work against the destructive
culls When al the Jewish Center
slop in the Aronovitz Room and
sue n proudly hanging on the
wall. Itut lo continue our work we
need new members, male and fe-
male. II you are a veteran, please
join us at our meetings at the
JCC We meet the last Sunday
morning of each month at 10.
Come and join us for "coffee
and Don't think about it do
it. You are needed. If you want
more information please phone:
962.1466.
MARY SURASKY
Commander
Jewish War Veterans
Poet 373
EDITORS NOTE: This letter is
to correct the misprints in our
last issue for which we apologize.
EDITOR: The Jewish Floridian:
In the few days I have been in
Tampa, 1 have been impressed
with the warmth, hospitality and
friendship shared with me. As the
new Program Director of the
Jewish Community Center I look
forward to meeting and working
with our entire Jewish communi-
ty.
Since 1 know it will take some
lime for me to discover the re-
sources and ask the right ques-
tions, please feel free to call me
(872-4451). I am anxious to meet
as many people as possible and
learn what you want and think
we need through the JCC.
See you at the Center or out-
: ii it I about!
DARLENE WOLFE
Program Director
Jewish Community Center
^^^^g^^^^^S?SS:^:::S^
?:::::::::::
WANTED
PART TIME SECRETARY TO RABBI
Secretarial skills needed
Average 15 hours per week
: Send Resume To: Personnel Committee
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
3303 Swann Avenue
Tampa, Fl. 33609
I
Pictured (from left to right): The four world famous experts in psychological stress from the United
States and Canada Prof. Perry London from the U.S.; Prof. Charles Spielberger of the University of
South Florida, Tampa; Prof. Joel Elkes of McMasters University of Canada, and an Adjunct Professor at
the Ray D. Wolfe Centre; and Prof. Donald Meichenbaum of the University of Waterloo in Canada
listen to Prof. Shlomo Breznitz, head of the Ray D. Wolfe Centre.
Bombings Seen Fruitless
Continued from Page 2-
againsl the civilians population.
We shall, however, continue to
attack terrorist bases and
headquarters, even if they are
purposefully located in the
vicinity of or within civilian
concentrations. Responsibility
shall fall on those who seek
immunity for themselves by
knowingly endangering
civilians."
Zipori said Friday on Israel
Radio: "We decided to attack the
problem by attacking the head,
which is situated in Beirut. And
so we attacked the commands ol
tin two well-known organizations
ol murderers (El Fatah and the
Democratic Front). We have
decided lo attack them wherever
they are until they decide to
change their ways."
UNITED NATIONS
Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim condemned Israel for
the Beirut bombing Friday. He
expressed shock and dismay at
the "heavy escalation of
violence" in the region. His
statement was issued following
Lebanon's request for an urgent
meeting of the Security Council
to discuss the "deteriorating
situation in south Lebanon" and
Israel's attack on civilian targets
in Beirut.
Israel's Ambassador to the
Un. Yehuda Blu, told the
Council that Israel had acted in
self-defense to stop the massive
buildup bv the PLO. He said
Israel had "reliable information"
that the PLO was planning to
"set up itugperations against
Israel." He also drew attention to
the "indiscriminate shelling of
civilian centers in the north ,f
Israel on July 15 and 16 by PLO
terrorists operating from
Lebanon" during which three
Israelis were killed and 25 were
wounded.
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*m*
Fit
Fnfcri*
Both sides initial Smai U.S. Rebukes Israel
Peace-Keeping Force
DAVID KJMCHE. Cjncur psjsrL nyiuf Laraet 'jot US sb
of tie State I>epar^3ece
*r.*oe- aad Egypt icpraMHcd by Aaabaasaador Ai-
?*r^*s*ici*rT Vader-ecr*Cft.*7 5or Foruga Af-
fax-t Dipiemmu aay Lcodoc was eroswc >': ion it a -.as
: pooc betwtcs tbe ckrce f ^z.
Under the Cd- I/*-.-*: *&**szjuza a Uemc N*
lore* m to have repiacec IsraeL troopa m Snal
as oupoaed by the Roaaatn*. and after ~M*fc* of
Egypt and Israel agieeid to a mni-'y
force bat also Jwraariwig soot Cocnrxcrweaj: -
troops. The force wil mnfaai 2.000 hghtiy armed troops
oacked by 1/J00 i innii Blknn and
Lr James r ~ts%zjp- a prr*
'w/ 'X reJapou* Urfi* at the
Cnr.ers* of South Florida baa
>**r. named deaa of tea Cotieg* of
Arts and Latter* at L
s*r President Jobs Lou Br/rc
aad bj Lrr Gaajary M St L
'.tot pwsadent far
affairs Tike appoaat-
will vak* effect alauAa-
83 cnasaaeiioa waa the be-
rofthefaJfiiMHiir.
Strange. *'i. a currently a proud
Israel on a ma/.
e*pe2*t*>a m which he
lidaatai earhaj Iks
months far *er-.*ral ye
H* a ar. NEH Fellow w*h the W
F AJbnght Iaatatute for Arehee-
oiogicaJ FUatarch is Jerusalem.
ser-.ea 'xi u* advotory encamsttee
> Her.vage Commission of
las World Jewish Congress. *
the curator of the BabbeaJ and
Archa*ofag>caJ Museum and
Study Caatar, and hat written
numerous book*, papers reports
.'search artadea and reviews in
iba f^Id of rd4pou studs*
Dr. Strange Selected As USF
Arts and Letters Dean
ha MA. from i
' rxaool as 14
>h.L Baa T
trvm Drew Uamuwty m 19V0L
Accordmg to CTBnea,
as selected from a field of i
than oaa hemdrsd caacxiav-
frnalaas as a aatani" n'
earth that began so March
Said 0 Bnen Jan Strange >
a rtrngaswd faculty leader smh a
rrvty rrmay can be
proad to have oae of
sestcted for that |
h slaaa laaai
rVesO
Daa
ashai
aaaaaaai
I Brown stated
fags' la.--* ps>
word of scholar-
Strange. who terved a* acting
chairman of C'SF's Department
of Religious Studies and aa grad-
ual* director of that department
during the IttMl academic
year, haa taught at USF for the
past nuifc rasn- A 159 graduate:
cd Kaca Lniverwty, he received
JCC School Dates
Taa Karly Childhood Coro-
fiuiu* of the JCC ha* set the JCC
IY> Bcfcod Calendar for the 1981-
yi^Al year The tame
all ivlar applies to both the
Nortli FJraw.h and Main Pre-
-Kbuvf.
VMating day wjj be August 26.
C*n that day children visit with
their parenu U, see then- dass-
roorna and meat thetr teachers
The first day of school will be
August 27
Registration is currently being
taken for all pre-school programs
at both branches Many classes
are hiiing up. so parents should
not daisy in registering their chil-
dren Knrollmenl at the North
Branari li particularly limited, so
early Segistratir/n is advised
THE MYSTERIOUS
POWERS OF THE
MEZUZAH
NOW EXPLAINED!
Send for revealing, interesting
Report, its FREE!
EVERYTHING JEWISH,
Dpt MZ- 6 PO Box 497.
Piermont, NY 10968
who ia hv
ifHgisued in his
fasd The high regard u> which he
a held by has cafiaaKBea here at
confirms the vabtuty of that
reputation.
In apph/ing for the posaioa of
"Jean Strange told university
officials. I believe that human
Bttic education is at the core of a
general university education and
that, indeed no one ia in fact ed-
ucated' in human values, vision,
and understanding without a
bassc grounding in the human-
tsts."
Strange will replace the current
Arts and Letters dean. Dr David
H Smith, who announced his
resignation from that post in
March to work with faculty in the
Colleges of Medicine and Arts
and Letters in the areas of coro-
municaton and liberal arts for
health care professionals.
Strange and his wife Carolyn
live in Tampa. They have four
children.
to pax aa ead u> the
Sejpas re-
do
1st* satee" boa. acroas the
baaha ^ -r? 1 .a*
that the Preasdeat bed troahie
xh has Begsa si
i was aresared ta
-^ mamA haaTafaut aa M, Ihi hal Ihi ihfaaaal aj zz*
at -ae Vr M a baaarh a ia jet funsters caase oa the I
Begin Vows to Keep
Lebanon Action Going
JERUSALEM 0TA]
Prune Minister
Menachem Begin is
reportedly determined to
iteep up Israeli attacks on
the terrorists despite
requests by Presidential
Envoy Philip Habib to de-
escalate the situation.
Begin and Habib met twice
Sunday.
Sources at the Premier s offre
Israeli an* strikes
oa the terrorist
if they are intent oo-
afly set ap near or aside popu-
lated ceuterv The sources said
Begin rejected American
cntkatan of the air raids, stres-
sing that the terrorists continued
hitsag of Israeli civilians over a
bag ^r/<;
THE CABINET was
scheduled to meet Tuesday for a
special session to discuss the
situation and the .American
deaaands. Begin was expected to
send President Keagan a personal
letter explaining the reawjns lor
Israel's offensive in Lebanon
Habib in the meant one would go
to Lebanon and was expected
back here by midweek.
Begin reportedly believes that
there is no more room for com-
promises, and that the current
crisis should be used to reach a
definite solution of the continued
fighting with the terrorists in
Lebanon. Israel h unlikely to
agree to a ceasefire which would
be used, in its view, by the terror-
ists to prepare themselves for
future hostile actions against
Israel
In his meeting Sunday with
llabib. Begin reportedly referred
several limes to the moral con-
A rauu target ** tfc
bivw>>atdaed 12U Ceaurt
CaaUe high ahosTi
oserlnmaiag the Laaai
Kner. which Israebs have re-
peatedly tried to knock out for
the baa lew yean without any
also m-
PLO strongholds u,
Nabatryeh aad a Lebaneat
gaanline refiaery. srhxh re-
portedly produces about a third
of Lebanon's gaaobae needs.
Landed on
across the border, he reportedly
asked Hah*
BEGIN ASKED Habab to
(.ontey to Reagan that Israel
shuukl not be puniaherl for ah
raais by the ooataaaed postpcoe-
meut of the shipment of the F-16
aapbuses- I srael does not deserve
thts treatment just Iwi ana the
rjntnt fulfiUed as duty to
protect the cittaens of Israel
However, several media here
reported Monday that there was
nticism inside the govern-
ment against the tough line po-
-J-.'xated by Gen Rafael
-. and supported by Begin.
I'LO Chief Yaair Araiat has
talnd the latest attacks an un-
huasanaanaa war of anni-
hitaar-n featuring barbark
roais against Chilians He
accused Prune Msaner Begin of
attempting a final solutnn to
the rabilinia.il problem akin to
1 laler s attempt of a final solo-
to the Jewish problem."
- per-
suns were killed in the fra raid
on Beirut Last Friday, and 700
van uunded. Arafat warned
that be had a mutual respoasi-
bdity to defend his peopie We
on. human beings, too. They itbe
lameasl have to rememoer the
Uuud of our women and children
is precious, too."
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L.July24.1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 7
USF Drops Holocaust
I JUDITH ROSENKRANZ
Holocaust will not be
_j as a course ast the Uni-
fy of South Florida during
|l981-82 academic year ac-
Lg to Dr Charles Arnade,
Ihas uught the course since
eption.
Arnade will be on Sab-
w\ leave the first semester
no member of the faculty has
, forward to teach the Holo-
1 course. Arnade says he is
[so much a teacher of the
L, but rather a co-ordinator.
Krmat has been to have peo-
from the community par-
lit,, in panel discussions
bghout the term. He has had
jres from survivors, children
[rvivors and teachers who in-
die Holocaust in their
ulum at the high school
He has also used movies
xtensive outside reading.
i the coordinator, he is very
Lointed that the course will
be given in his absence. "I
very little support from the
fcnistration for this pro-
gram," said Arnade. "This year I
had the help of Prof. John E.
Hofman, an Israeli visiting
profeesor in the Departent of
Psychology." (Prof. Hoffman has
since returned to his position at
the University of Haifa).
"From our local faculty, there
is a little help when I ask them.
But from the administration
there is just no support," Arnade
continued. "Even the local news-
papers don't want to have much
to do with the Holocaust. A
Tampa Times reporter I 'd invited
to hear Lili Kopecky at one of our
classes told me later that the rea-
son he had not attended was
My editor said the Holocaust is
not newsworthy anymore.' "
The course is under the in-
terdisciplinary studies heading
because, as Arnade puts it, "This
is the only place it really fit in. It
is not only political science or
history or psychology. It is a
combination of all of those and
more." Students take the course
for elective credit which may be
applied to one of many areas
within the university.
During his sabbatical. Dr.
Arnade will travel and study in
the South Pacific, one of the few
parts of the globe he has not
visited. His plans include
Australia, New Zealand, the
Solomon Islands (where his son is
in the Peace Corps), Fiji, Nauru
(the world's smallest country)
and Kiribati (whose capital is
Tarawa).
Arnade's disappointment at
the faculty and administration
response to his course covers
many areas. "How can we
continue to ask speakers to come
to the campus, leaving their jobs,
on a gratis basis?" he asks. "We
have no budget to work with and
we ask the same people to come
over and over... for nothing. He
states repeatedly, that he is not
so much the "teacher" of the
course as he is the "organizer"
and he thinks that there are
many other professors who could
handle the job in his absence,
"But they just aren't interested."
Comments from the students
who have taken the course con-
restern Leaders Leaning
fore Toward PLO Role
OTTAWA In a separate session of "Issues and
Lwers," West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt, in-
Eiewed in Ottawa, said he believed the increased
lence in Lebanon "is proof of the necessity to broaden
1 Camp David process." He said this applied to both
issues and the participants.
j Schmidt said that in order to achieve a com-
hensive peace in the Middle East, the negotiations
hot be left just to Israel and Egypt but should include
\r Arab states, such as Lebanon and Saudi Arabia, as
as the Palestinians. Schmidt refused to comment
[n asked what affect a U.S. decision to resume delivery
16s to Israel would have on the situation.
BRITISH FOREIGN Secretary Lord Carrington
knwhile said in a television interview that the Euro-
. Economic Community's (EEC) Middle East ini-
live is based on the Arab recognition of Israel's right to
It within secure borders and "in exactly equal
^sure" Israel's recognition of Palestinian rights.
Appearing on NBC's "Today" program, Carrington
bssed that any peace initiative in the Mideast must in-
Jie the Palestine Liberation Organization. The PLO
Is represent the Palestinians," he asserted. "If you
at who represents the Palestinian people and try to
anybody but the PLO, you will be absolutely un-
cessful. If you to go the West Bank, if you go any-
pre, they are all people who belong to the PLO."
ptending the EEC peace initiative does not undermine
JU.S. peace efforts in the Mideast, Carrington claimed
It the European initiative was based on the rights of
-i Israel and the Palestinians.
IN WASHINGTON, Secretary of State Alexander
kg reiterated the Reagan Administration's position
It there is no link between Israel's air raid on Beirut and
I U.S. decision to delay the resumption of deliveries of
i warplanes to Israel.
It "serves no useful purpose *Jg"^Jfi5
Ig said in reply to questions on the ABC-.v *J"
I Answers" program. At the same tune, he jcknowl
ted that the decision does have an effect on U.8. mm
a "responsible moderating influence in the Middle
JTA Report
Envoy Says Egypt Sent Only
Medical Supplies to Lebanon
the first official contact between
Egypt and the PLO since the
Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty
was signed two years ago.
MORTADA SAID the fight
ing now going on in Lebanon
would not have occurred if the
Arab states had followed Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat's lead and
made peace with Israel.
The economies of towns and
villages in northern Israel have
been hard hit by the continuing
shelling and rocket fire from ter-
rorist positions in Lebanon.
Factories in the north have
been forced to cut back on pro-
duction because workers are re-
maining at home in bomb shel-
ters.
|TEL AVIV Egypt's
ibassador to Israel Saad
>rtada said on an Israel
lio interview Monday
t the aid Egypt has
fcred to the Palestine
sration Organization
isists only of medical
Ipplies and does not sig-
Jy any change of Egypt's
attitude toward the
.0.
Reports from Cairo said Egypt
accepted a Palestinian re-
Im for medical aid to treat vic-
P 'I Israel's air raid on Beirut
' and Monilav It was
Wedding
Mrs. Jamie Spitolnick
COHEN SPITNICK
Mona Helene Cohen and
Jamie Seth Spitolnick were
married Sunday, June 28, at
Host International Hotel.
Rabbi Kenneth Berger offici-
ated and was assisted by Cantor
William Hauben. Maid of Honor
was Leane Bennati. Best man
was Scott Spitolnick.
The bride is the daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cohen. She
is a graduate of Plant High
School and received an associate I
of arts degree from Hillsborough
Community College. She is
employed by Tampa Novelty
Company.
The groom is the son of Mr.'
and Mrs. Harold Spitolnick. He
is self-employed.
SAVE ENERGY
mini & vertical
cerning its not being offered on
whole academic year range from
"The course is a necessity, but
not just for Jews" to "The cost of
education is nothing compared to
the price of ignorance." One
middleaged male student said
"Jewish parents inpart some
knowledge to their children in the
home, but what about the
others?"
One student pointed out the
importance of studying the Holo-
caust as an historical event with
legitimate place in the curriculum
and questioned, "Is there a
German side of us which will
break out of us to find a scape-
goat for our failures?"
The final class session was a
panel discussion on the teaching
of the Holocaust in schools below
the college level. Participants in
the panel were Sister Jerome
Levy, Prioress of the Holy
Names Priory at St. Leo; Renny
Connell a Social Science teacher
at Pasco Comprehensive High
School, Dr. Delos Carroll, Jr.
from USF College of Education
and Kathleen Weaver an In-
ternational Studies student.
Sister Jerome Levy, whose
grandparents were Jewish, spoke
about her experience at the junior
high level. "Throughout history
students see savagery and
brutality as coming from people
with red, brown, yellow skin.
They form the idea that white
people would never do anything
like that."
"When such a system begins,
it can not stop, we all get caught
up. That is what we have to
teach." She also elaborated on
recent changes in the Catholic
liturgy regarding Jews and the
ways that effected teaching.
Mr. Conne! described his Holo-
caust teaching techniques stating
that it should definitely be a part
of every high school curriculum.
"In lower grades it becomes un-
real like cops and robbers'. I'm
not sure it should be taught lower
than high school but in the high
school it should be taugh all the
way," he said.
Dr. Carroll discussed the
teaching of facts, not values, but
through this, values are the
underlying item which are really
transmitted.
Miss Weaver, told of studying
German in high school by being
required to read anti-Semitic
literature of the late 30's and
40's. "Not until later did I realize
that we were being taught anti-
Semitism. I think it is a shame
that the Holocaust is not offered
in high school," she said.
One student from Zephyrhills .
said the Holocaust is not even
mentioned in history courses 'i
taught in her high school. An-
other student said the absence
from the university of such a
course would certainly be felt,
but he blamed the lack on the
changeover from the quarter to
semester system. Ken Rkhter,
president of the USF student
government, said "I think the
course should be offered. We
have a lot of lazy professors
here."
One student said she had be-
come so immersed in Arab
studies and Arab opinion that
she took the course to learn the
history of anti-Semitism and hear
a Jewish opinion.
Dr. Mark Orr, chairman of the
Department of Interdisciplinary
Studies, is not disturbed over the
course absence. "It is not a
required course, it is an elective
and often electives are not given
in a particular year. It offers no
hardship when it is not required
for graduation."
The final class concluded that
the Holocaust should be taught
at the high school level, ab-
solutely. However, first, it must
be made an important and
permanent part of the university
curriculum. For now, it will not
even be offered on the campus of
11 it- university at which this
dialogue took place.
On a campus with a track
record of anti-Semetic acts which
include vandalism, destruction
and death threats, the loss of a
course which includes not just
that six million Jews died but
also why it happened and how it
can be prevented from recurring
is going to leave significant void.
BOB LEITMAN, CLU
14902 N. Florida Ave.
Tampa, Fla. 33612
Office. 961-1849
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Page*
The Jeuish Floridian of Tampa
Fr'<^>.Iul.W4
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.July 24,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 9
o Maudlin
Young and Old in Same Boat
ntinued from Page *
Stockholm, Rome and Tel
jv in levels of insidious growth
I development. The elderly are
L|(,rs to Ix; tolerated at best
Ymade fun of or even mugged
norsl. They are the enemy who
ni understand" youth
Lh iv after all. easy to under-
|1KI Youth is beauty, and
luiy is truth.
k'OK ABE Madiaon Avenue
[j iheir equivalents elsewhere
Jin- west entirely to blame. The
tls | ihis cancer began with
ipermissiveneM of post-World
,, II and the phony Freudian-
of the doctrine of equality
wirn children and their
Tents. And it later extended
L ilu schools, with the equally
Lv Deweyism of the doctrine
Equality between students and
|ir teachers.
j|i,m doctrinal were, and still
nioted in the notion that the
old dictums defining the status
and the privileges characteristic
of the generations are outmoted
excuses to repress the energies of
the young and that the re-
pressions they suffer in the name
of these dictums are deliberately
designed to rob them of their
youth, leaving them frustrated
and neurotic later in their lives as
adults, leaving them prisoners of
a bourgeois social order that
heals them into passive sub-
missiveness at the hands of cor-
porate slavery rather than to
freedom and personal self-ex-
pression.
Worst of all, the old dictums
defining the status and the pri-
vileges of the generations is un-
democratic. Or so the reasoning
of these corruptions of the
philosophies of two important
20th Century thinkers goes.
Then is no doubt that the
post-World War II period saw a
Are Nazi War Crimes
Trials Really Absurd?
ontinued from Page 4-
6s sentenced by the Federal
rman authorities. Before the
Uition of the death penalty, 12
ppk* were condemned to death
1158 were sentenced to life im-
sonmenl.
However, these figures must
compared with the 78,605 per-
ns against whom proceedings
tt- initialed by German courts
|l did not result in convictions.
THOUSANDS of members of
SS apparatus were freed be-
iise they were acting under
lers.from "higher up" (the so-
iled Befehlsnotstand). Others
bided trial on the medical
bunds that they were unable to
kiicl ilie tensions of court pro-
lings. Further reasons for not
eluding trials were the death
I the accused, acquittals, and
pshiiuj of cases.
jl'he third and largest category
kiminal consists of those who
lier managed to conceal their
liiics or conceal themselves.
exact number of potential
Iminal Nazi personnel can only
I guessed at. Estimates put the
uri at anywhere between
U.(KH) and 240,000.
Figures cannot tell the whole
|>r\ The trials were supposed
serve a three-pronged purpose:
I punish the guilty, to reveal the
uih about the Nazi period, and
Shane New
mting Chief
[RVING.Tax Marshall M.
Jane, president of Century
Ink and Trust Co., Somerville,
188., has been elected chairman
Ithe National Jewish Commit-
f of Scouting.
Sloane will help serve as a
dge between the 4.3 million-
piber Scouting organization
1 the Jewish community.
[Sloane is a graduate of Boston
TJiversity's College of Business
dministration.l A former presi-
|nt of the Boston Council of the
W Scouts of America, he also
pves on the National BSA
uncil.
man
WHBO
Phe Spirit Of Tampa Bay
to show the German attitude to-
wards their past.
Concepts like punishment or
utonement verge on the absurd
when accessory to murder in an
unspecified number of cases
carries the same sentence, as in
the case of an ordinary burglary
and when convicted murderers
are set free immediately after
trial because periods in custody
pending investigation (where
conditions are less harsh than
i hose of convicts) are offset
against the prison sentences.
POSSIBLY MORE reassuring
that the trials have become a
major source of contemporary
history. The mountains of
testimonies and documents
which emerged in the German
courts constitute a giant body of
knowledge about the Holocaust.
The length of the trials and the
relatively intense press and
media coverage exposed the
public to such names as Ausch-
witz and Maidanek. names it will
not forget.
Court evidence on the horrors
ol the past is a unique tool for
combating ignorance and the evil
assertion of the contemporary
extreme Right falsifiers of histo-
ry.
The degree to which Germany
continues to accept responsibility
for its Nazi past will tell us a
great deal about the future.
Many comments in the German
press referred to the legal
procedural complications which
held up the process of justice, and
Ihe price the State must pay
when dealing with scarcely be-
lievable atrocities committed 40
years ago using legal principles
concerned with "ordinary crime
committed yesterday.
BUT THERE seems to be a
consensus that the past was only
touched on with the utmost
timidity and that too little was
done too late. Of the 87,300
formally investigated cases,
6,449 ended with convictions.
After 1965 the rate of conviction
fell to 1.5 percent while before
1965 at least one in every 10 ac-
cused was found guilty. At the
beginning of 1981 another 2,251
investigations were still in prog-
ress.
Trials of Nazi criminals remain
imperative because they touch on
fundamental issues which are
crucial to the moral fibre and
democratic character of the Fed-
eral Republic.
Maidanek is evidence that the
general climate in the country
may to a certain extent have been
cleansed of the causes but cer-
tainly not of the consequences of
the Nazi period.
lot of genuine youthful rebellion,
rebellion rooted in political and
social unrest, notably among the
French under the leadership of
Henri Cohn-Bendit and among
the Germans under Red Rudi
Dutschke. Hardly did this re-
belliousness die down in Europe,
when it reappeared in America
during the Vietnam era, only to
Ik- murdered on the campus of
Kent State.
BUT LARGELY, the legacy of
that era has since focused on a lot
of myths about the young. And
about the old. The young have
gone about the business of en-
trenching themselves in a culture
of hedonistic nihilism best ex-
emplified by a beer company
commercial's rationale that "you
only go around once" and a soft
drink's film footage exhorting the
cadaverous corps of Vic Tanny-
ism to join the vanguard elite of
the "Pepsi Generation."
What thislhad done is to leave
the young with no intellectual re-
sources to change course mid-
stream when the hedonism and
the nihilism lose their compelling
attractiveness when it be-
comes their turn to be incar-
cerated in a concentration camp
because they have now reached
the talisman age of 25 and must
lie exterminated. When the
weight of years kicks them out of
the "Pepsi Generation," and the
doors of the nearest slimnastics
emporium slam in their faces.
As for the old, they have
contented themselves to wring
their hands before this messianic
mythology of the young and to be
victimized by it. Or else, to
preach and warn of coming social
Armageddons that the new
mythology will surely bring.
THERE IS perhaps no point
now in observing that the young
plunderers of Britain are not
really protesting their economic
plight of political and social
alienation from the mainstream.
What is more important is to
recognize that their plunder is yet
another form of hedonism and
nihilism essentially no different
from our own sense of helpless-
ness in the face of vast global
forces that are depressing our
lives and over which we have no
more control than the young.
In lashing out at their elders,
the young may think that they
are attacking the source of their
despair. Hut that self-deception
comes simply from the fact that
their hedonism has helped make
them so poorly educated.
IF THEY can not understand
that young und old these days are
in the same boat, we must not
contribute to their further folly
by ill-conceived conclusions that
their violence is pre-revo-
lulionary. It is not; it is mere
tantrum.
If their elders are not violent
also in response to these very
same pressures, it is simply the
wisdom of age that tells them it is
useless. Besides, the ultimate
beauty of age is contemplation,
which abhors violence. The ul-
timate beauty of youth is phy-
sical beauty itself, which is
transitory and leads to a sense of
having been betrayed once it is
gone. And to a need for
vengeance against the estab-
lished order that assured them in
the first place that it would never
be gone.
None of either of these condi-
tions, not youth nor age, has a
blessed thing to do with the
social condition, but only with
the human condition. That we
think in terms of the social con-
dition against which all of us
rebel rather than the human con-
dition which only few of us ever
come to understand is the
greatest myth of all about young
arid old alike
In the end, it is also the most
destructive. As, for example, in
Britain.
Mr Botha. General Haig and President Reagan What blacklist''"
Sunday Times
1 AJComm.'s New Image:
Back to Elitism?
Continued from Page 1
session devoted to this issue was
U N Ambassador Jeane Kirk-
patrick, a formulator of the policy
that distinguishes between com-
munist totalitarian and right-
wing authoritarian regimes.
The clearest evidence-of AJC's
position in this area is its in-
volvement in the campaign to
discredit Jacobo Timerman. At
the Washington meeting, the
AJC sponsored a press con-
ference for Mario Gorenstein,
president of the Delegation of
Jewish Associations of Argen-
tina. Gorenstein rejects Timer-
man's claim that the Argentine
government is involved in a
campaign of anti-Semitism.
Employment Act.
In 1981, however, the leading
descendants of the troublesome
East European Jews find them-
selves in the same socio-economic
position as the turn-of-the-
century German Jewish founders
of the AJC. With the new
political climate, the streets or
rather the proper channels
have once again been made safe
for elitism. The emphasis on
social justice, while still nagging
at the conscience of the annual
meeting, was muted in favor of
reaching an accomodation with
the Reagan Administration.
IN A HEATED discussion on
the proposed federal budget, one
comment from the floor promp-
ted enthusiastic applause: "The
roots of the American Jewish
Committee are not social justice
roots, but Jewish defense roots
. Let's not rupture our rela-
tionship with government over
one aspect of our agenda."
Two major aspects of govern-
ment policy have elicited AJC
support: federal budget
reduction and the human rights
aspect of U.S. foreign policy.
After much agonizing, the
assembly softened a resolution
that was somewhat critical of the
proposed budget cuts and
adopted a version that basically
endorses the intent of the ad-
ministration's proposal, while
calling attention to the undue
hardships that the cuts may
cause for the poor and the elderly.
The resolution does not call into
question the shift toward local
and private responsibility em-
bodied in the government's social
policy, or the reordering of prior-
ities symbolized by the proposed
cuts.
Other Jewish organizations,
such as the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, have
questioned the necessity and the
humaneness of a program that
combines cuts in social services
with massive increases in federal
military spending. The Council of
Jewish Federations has ex-
pressed grave concern for the
continued existence of many
Jewish social service programs in
light of the proposed cuts in
federal spending.
THE AJC also came out
strongly in favor of the Reagan
Administration's "quiet diplo-
macy" approach- to human
rights. The keynote speaker in a
Timerman's reports of his
treatment in Argentina threaten
the credibility of the totalitarian -
authoritarian distinction. While
on tour in the U.S. recently,
Timerman was outspokenly
critical of the administration's
nomination of Ernest Lefever for
the human rights post at the
State Department.
"THESE PEOPLE are 99 per-
cent Republican," complained
one long-time member of the AJC
and a loyal Democrat. She is from
a German Jewish family that
settled in the United States in the
1840's a heritage that, one
would assume, makes her a n>>
resentative of the heart and soul
of her organization. She grew up
outside of the Socialist and Zion-
ist circles of East European
immigrants. She has an aristo-
cratic bearing, has remained true
to classical Reform Judaism,
does not believe in wearing Juda-
ism "on one's sleeve," and has
the enlightened attitude on civil
rights typical of patrician social
reformers.
The American Jewish Com-
mittee she has known was
molded in the New Deal, and was
basically identified with the
Humphrey Democrat camp. But
the AJC she saw at the 1981 an-
nual meeting was quite different.
The actual number of Repub-
licans must fall well below 99 per-
cent. But the source of her ex-
aggeration was clear: the general
thrust of the conference, in atti-
tude and in its policy decisions,
showed an AJC that is quite
comfortable with the new politics
of the Reagan Administration.
Manny Qarclai
IROLLWi
POOLS'
xxccccccc,
DESIGNeCONSTRUCTIONTI^IalOOEUNO
SCREEN ENCLOSURES
4010 W. WATERS
TAMPA. FLA. 33614
884-7665


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
""day. July 2
COUPLES POOL
PARTY AT JCC
The Jewish Community Center
Couples Club will hold a swim-
ming, volleyball and bar-b-que at
the JCC Saturday evening, Au-
gust 1.
The JCC Couples Club is open
to all couples who are interested
in meeting new people and en-
joying a variety of social, recrea-
tional and cultural activities.
Reservations will be accepted
through July 29 at 872-4451. For
JCC members the cost of the eve-
ning is $8. For non-members, it is
$10.
RODEPH SHOLOM
Teacher's Wanted
Congregation Rodeph Sholoni
is currently interviewing
prospective teachers for positions
in the Sunday school program,
grades K 6. Anyone with a
Imckground in education, par-
(icularly in the teaching of He-
brew of Judaic studies, should
intact the Synagogue office
437-19111 regarding teaching
r KOLAMI
MEMBERSHIP
:nber!iip Committee of
rregation kol Ami is having
series >t coffees to acquaint
ople 'van congregation Kol
ii ind whai it has to offer.
. will be held in the North
unpa area .ii rhe homes of
inous Kol Ami members on me
liowing nights; Tuesday, Aug-
.l .: Thursday, \ugust 13;
eUnesday, August 19.
The ( hairman of the Member-
ship Committee, Lisa Teblum,
said. Anyone interested in
attending one of the coffees, or
anyone who knows of someone
else who would be, should select
the date that is most convenient
for them and should call the Kol
Ami office at 962-6338 or 962-
6339."
JCC "SUNDAE"
SINGLES
The Singles "Sundae" is July
26 at 11 a.m. at the JCC. The cost
is S3 which includes the Brunch.
Don't forget your swim suits. If
you need a ride or more informa-
tion, please call Janine (Tampa)
962-6264 or Eileen (Pinellas) 541-
4791.
KOLAMI
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Dr. Steven Schimmel, chair-
man of Kol Ami's School Board,
announced the appointment of
Mary Kanter as the new Admin-
istrative Assistant of the Con-
gregation's Religious School.
"Our school has grown to the
point where additional
professional assistance is
needed," said Schimmel. "Mrs.
Kanter is extremely well qualified
for this position. She has an ex-
tensive educational and teaching
background. With her assistance
we expect our students learning
experience to be enhanced con-
siderably.''
Kanter"s responsibilities will
include registration and at-
tendance procedures, calendar
execution, planning of special ac-
tivities and communicating with
parents. She will assist Rabbi
Leonard Rosenthal. the school s
principal, in the day to day oper-
ation of the school. Rabbi Rosen-
thai will remain in charge of cur-
riculum design and teacher su-
pervision and academic policy.
Kanter has a BA degree from
the State University of New York
at Stony Brook with a major in
Sociology and a minor in Educa-
tion. She also holds an MA
degree from Temple University in
Philadelphia in Educational
Media. She did her student
teaching in Oldfield, New York
and served as a Social Studies
teacher for two years in Ridles
Park, Pennsylvania. She has
been a substitute teacher in the
Florida Public Schools and a Vol-
unteer Librarian for Carrollwood
Elementary School. She has
taught Sunday School at Congre-
gation Kol Ami for three years.
Ms. Kanter and her husband, Dr.
Richard Kanter. live in Carroll-
wood Village with their three
children.
Kanter said. "1 have been in-
. dived with Congregation Kol
Arm's Religious School since its
inception. I have gained a lot oi
useful information that wiil help
Religion in Today's World
Anne E. Thai. Executive Director ol Tampa Jewish
Sen-ice will appear (for the third time th, "LA,
Channel 8, TV program "Religion in Todays World" sponsored
by the National Council of Christians and Jews.
The program to be aired on Sunday, August 2, at 7:30 a.m.,
will be a panel discussion on What it Means to be Pro-Family
in Modern Society."
EEC Chief Says Europe Was
Ready to Wait and See
WASHINGTON Gas-
ton Thorn, president of the
commission of the Euro-
pean Community, said that
Community Calendar
Friday, Jury 24
(Candlelighting time 8:05) Congregation Rodeph Sholom
services conducted by Doled Chavurah -8 p.m.
Soturooy, July 25
Jewish Towers Monthly Birthday Party 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, July 26
Tune in "The Jewish Sound" 88.5 FM 11 a.m.-noon Guest:
Francie Rudolph JCC Singles "Sundae" poolside 11 a.m.
Jewish War Veterans and Auxiliary Regular Meeting 10 a.m.
Congregation Schaarai Zedek Adult Education Program 7:30
p.m. "Coppers and Oils" Jewish Artifacts through the Ages by
Rabbi Susan Berman; Home of Karen and Mitch Bentley.
Monday, July 27
Congregation Rodeph Sholom membership Committee Meeting
- 8 p.m.
Tuesday, July 28
Tampa Jewish Social Service Executive Board at 6 p.m. and
Regular Board at 7:30 p.m. Congregation Rodeph Sholom
Men's Club Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, July 29
Temple David Board 11:30 a.m. and Regular Meeting noon.
Thursday, July 30
-JCC Food Co-op -10a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Friday, Ju4y 31
(Candlelighting time 8:01)
Saturday, Aug. 1
Congregation Rodeph Sholom Chavurot Social -8 p.m.
Sunday, Aug. 2
Tune in "The Jewish Sound" 88.5 FM 9-11 a.m. Guest: Yaron
Galony "Religion in Today's World" Channel 8, WFLA TV -
7:30 a.m. Guest: Anne Thai, Executive Director, Tampa Jewish
Social Service.
Thursday,Aug.6
JCC i ood Co-op IOa.m.-l2:30D.m.
Friday, Aug. 7
(Can<. slighttng 'mo 7:56) onareaation Rodeph Sholom
welcomes Rabbi Kenneth Berge it 8 d. m. Services.
the West European coun-
tries will wait to see what
direction the government
being formed by Israeli
Premier Menachem Begin
will take before pushing the
"Europpean initiative" for
a Middle East peace.
Even though the Israeli
government will be run by the
same people, the Europeans want
to give them time to offer their
own policy and see the response
of their neighbors," Thorn told a
press conference ending a five-
day visit to Washington.
HE SAID the European initia-
tive was not discussed in his
talks with President Reagan,
Secretary of State Alexander
I hug and other members of the
Administration. The discussion
concentrated on economic issues
dealt with at the economic sum-
mit in Ottawa.
Thorn said the European
initiative is not an attempt "to
find an alternative to Camp
David" or the "American initia-
tive" but to take part in Mideast
peace efforts and be "helpful
He said the EEC was not trying
to compete with the U.S.
Thorn noted that the EEC's
Venice declaration in June 1980,
which called for associating the
Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation with the Middle East
Peace Process, was a decision by
the West Europeans "to take a
greater responsibilty" in the
Mideast peace effort.
HE SAID that with British
Foreign Secretary Lord Carring-
ton having become president of
the EEC Council of Ministers
July 1, contacts with Mideast
countries will increase. Carring-
ton is believed to DC th. leading
Kuropean leader pressing for rec-
ognition of the PLO.
But Thorn pointed out that
when he. as Luxembourg s Fore
ign Mini!
'
was begun to
>ns.
with the smooth functioning of
the educational program. I took
forward to this exciting chal-
lenge."
JEWISH SOCIAL
SERVICE
Tampa Jewish Social Service
will welcome four ,
members to their fi N
meeting, July 28. Jeremy rffl
man Barbara GoldS?^!
Haubenatock and Nancy' &1
attended a new boarJ^E
orientation earlier in theTU
to prepare for their new ooS
Kosher Lunch Menu
Kosher lunch menu of the Senior China's Nutria* J
Activity Proaram hi sponsored by the HiUsborough Csafal
Commission and held st the Jewish Community Center. Ma%
Blskley, site manaaer, 872-4451. Menu subject to chaegt.
WEEK OF JULY 27 31
Monday: Turkey Chop Suey with Crisp Noodles, TumipGreat
Applesauce, Whole Wheat Bread, Sugar Cookie
Tuesday: Beef Pattie with Gravy, Whipped Irish Potato*
Ranch Type Beans, Carrot Salad with Pineapple, Rye
Bread. Canned Peaches
Wednesday: Chicken Shake and Bake, Green Beans. Sw
Potatoes, Orange Juice. Whole Wheat Bread. Fran!
Cocktail
Thursday: Roast Beef with Gravy, Baked Potato Tossed Salad
rith Tomatoes French Dressing, Roll. Applesauce
Friday Fish with Tartar Sauce. Cooked Carrots GnU. Sin.
.".hole Wheat Bread. Fresh Fruit
WEEK OF AUGUST 9 -7
Monday: Beef-e-Roni, Broccoli, Fruit Cocktail. Whole Whs*
.. Oatmeal and Raisin Cookies
Tuesua>: Meat Balls with Gravy. Parsley N'oodka Grea
Beans. Carrot Salad with Pineapple, Roll, Apple Juice
Wednesday: Turkey Chop Suey, Yellow Squash. 1'ossea SalM
with Green Pepper and Tomato Wedges. Thousand Island
Dressing, Whole Wheat Bread, Orange Juice
Thursday: Fish with Tartar Sauce, Whipped Irish Potatoes,
Spinach, Red Gelatin with Peaches, Whole Wheat Brad,
Old Fashioned Carrot Cake
Friday: Chicken with Gravy, Yellow Rice, Mixed Vegeubk
Chilled Tomato Juice, Whole Wheat Bread, Canned
Peaches
839-7047
872-4461
872-4461
?schools Jewish Community Directory
* Hillel School (grades 1-8)
* Jewish Community Center
* Pre-School and Kindergarten
?Seniors
4 Chai Dial- A- Bus (call 9a. m. to noon)
* Jewish Towers
* Kosher lunch program
? Seniors' Project
* B'naiB'rith
,j. Jewish Community Center
* Jewish Floridian of Tampa
^ Jewish National Fund
*> State of Israel Bonds
870-1830
872-4451
872-4461
876-4711
872-4461
872-4470 >
876-9327
879-8850
Tampa Jewish Federation
? Tampa Jewish Social Service
a. TOF. Jewish Foundation, Inc.
872-4461
872-4451 *
225-2614
%>.*?*. .*4^ ... 4^ 4M*****************"1
Religious Directory
TEMPI! DAVID
2001 Swonn Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Moiling*'*
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Soturday, 9a.m. Daily: morningond
evening mlnyan
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Conservative
962-6338/9 Rabb. Leonard Rosenthal Rabbi's Study, 12101N.
Dale Mabry f 1312 Service.: Friday, 8 p.m., July 3. ]7'^l
only at the Community Lodge, Waters and Ola Saturday,
a.m. at Private Homes
COMGtIGATION RODEPH SHOLOM CMMavwIto
2713 Bayshors Boulevard 837-1911 Hazian William Haub* |
Services: Fr.doy, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10a.m. Daily: Minyon,7:l5
a.m.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim ori
Rabbi Susan Berger Services: Friday, 8 p. m ; Saturday, '<
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewish Student Center (USF). 3645 Fletcher Avenue Ce>tl9
Park Aots 971-6768 or 985 7926 Rabb. Lazar Rivk.n **>,
Yakov Werde Services: Fr.day, 7 30 p.m. Saturday '0*"
B'NAI B'RITM HILLEL FOUNDATION
University of South FIc


L July 24. 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 11

Tennis News
j Lansing, president of 20th Century Fox, chats with Sidney E. Cohn, at the New York
Ue Theatre prior to the annual American Jewish Congress Festival Evening at which
in, a Manhattan attorney, presented Lansing with the AJCongress'Artistic Achievement
tard Lansing hailed AJCongress for being in the vanguard of the fight against prejudice
l for freedom.
Install New JWV Memorial at Pearl
Iris Goldwasser, special projects chairman of
i National Ladies Auxiliary, Jewish War Ve-
ins of the United States, is announcing the de-
ation of a memorial plaque immortalizing the
who lost their lives at Pearl Harbor aboard
i USS Arizona on December 7,1941.
The dedication announcement was made in
^junction with JWVA National President
i'lyn Mermonstein. Lt. Cmdr. Fred Natkin, of
U.S. Navy Chaplain Corps, and a member of
Jewish War Veterans in Hawaii, placed the
^que in the shoreside memorial at Pearl Harbor.
new memorial is under the supervision of
Cummins, superintendent of the USS
inn Visitors Center, a project of the National
rk Service.
Some 500 participants in the World
thering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors in Je-
tlem witnessed the unveiling of plaques in
nory of three young Jewish men who were
cuted in 1944 in the notorious Buna Camp of
chwitz..
The brother of one of the three, Fred Dia-
in of Los Angeles, established the memorial at
brew University to promote the study of the
jacaoat.
University President Avraham Herman
eted the gathering in the Wise Auditorium on
(Givat Ram campus.
The three, Nathan Weisaman, Janek Gross-
and Yehuda Leo Diament, were arrested,
lured and hanged for leading a resistance
vement among the inmates of the extermina-
icamp.
The ceremony was opened in Hebrew and
jlish by Fred Diament, who witnessed the ex-
tion. Another brother, Rabbi Shaul Diament,
pted a chapter of Psalms in memory of the de-
1. A close friend of the young men, Arthur
^nanski, also delivered a tribute.
Sephardic Jewish texts once used by Georgi-
in Atlanta are now in the hands of other
frrgians Jews from the Soviet Union's Re-
pic of Georgia fianks to the Sephardic
nmunity Activities Program at Yeahiva Uni-
ity in New York City. .
>ne of the programs' projects is the develop
Dt of new Sephardic communities and
jregations in the United States, according to
pb i M. Mitchell Serels, associate director of the
gram. Sephardic Jews are of Spanish, Portu-
se or Oriental descent.
Congregation Or ve Shalom in Atlanta was
(of the groups that donated books. That con-
cation is comprised mainly of Sephardic Jews
i the Island of Rhodes. Rabbi S. Robert Ichay
piritual leader.
[Texts from Atlanta were given to the Assori-
n of Jews from Russian Georgia, in Forest
B. NY, Rabbi Serels said.
I J'rof. Allen Pollack, president of the Labor
pt Alliance, will lead delegates from across
Ration in an ideological conference to be held
^rael Aug. 25 to Sept. 4 in celebration of the
\ anniversary of the Labor Zionist Alliance in
irica.
Joining with delegates from Labor Zionist
Alliance will be Pioneer Women, Habonim and
other organizations related to Labor 7.i/Miin
In addition to sessions in Jerusalem and Tel
Aviv, a day is planned at Kibbutz Ginosar by the
Sea of Galilee to honor the memory of Yigal
Allon, late chairman of the World Labor Zionist
Movement, as well as visits to Labor Zionist In-
stitutions.
A vastly expanded force of pro-Arab lob-
byists and government officials has been singled
out as the main reason for Israel's increased diffi-
culty in obtaining political support in Washing-
ton.
Speaking before the convention of the
National Council of Young Israel at Spring Glen,
N.Y., Leonard Davis, director of Information and
Research of the American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee based in Washington, urged con-
cerned friends of Israel to counter the efforts of
"an army of Arab lobbyists, backed by millions of
dollars of oil money" to turn American support
away from Israel. He said that Israel's friends are
outnumbered 10-1.
Davis cautioned against speculation about
the internal workings of the Reagan Administra-
tion and against allowing the American Jewish
community to get caught up in the personality
politics and in-fighting within the executive
branch.
The number of Jews who arrived in Vienna
from the Soviet Union in the month of June was
866, bringing the total for the first six months of
1981 to 6,668. In reporting these figures, Char-
lotte Jacobson, chairman of the Soviet Jewry Re-
search Bureau of the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, emphasized the steady decline in
emigration by comparing the first six months of
1979,1980 and 1981.
In the January through June period of 1979,
a total of 24,794 Jews left the Soviet Union, while
15,087 left in the same months in 1980. These
figures represent a 40 percent decrease from the
first half of 1979 to that of 1980, and a 55 percent
decrease during the same periods from 1980 to
1981.
The Mel and Sheila Jaffee Chair in Intema-
tional Trade has been inaugurated at Tel Aviv i
University to promote research and teaching of I
international trade, with particular emphasis oni
prospects of economic cooperation and peace ml
the Middle East, and examination of conditions
which enhance integration into the world
economy.
The incumbent of the Chair," Prof. Se'ev
Hirsch, is an expert in the field, a former dean of
Tel Aviv University's Faculty of Management,
who has served as visiting lecturer at Oxford Uni-
versity, and at the Economic Development
I Institute of the World Bank.
Donor of the Chair, Mel Jaffee, of Orange
County, Calif., is a member of the Council for
Economic Development and has been a longtime
supporter of Jewish and Israeli causes, particu-
larly in the fields of health and higher education.
By LOU MONTELEONE
On Sunday, June 7, 1981, two
men in different parts of the
world and indeed worlds apart in
every respect had one thing in
common the tranquility of
sweet victory under trying cir-
cumstances. Bjorn Borg had just
won his sixth French Open and
Bernie Stein had captured his
first Palma Ceia Golf and
Country' Club Tennis Champion-
ship. Stein advanced to the finals
without a loss of a set.
The finals were billed as a
classic confrontation between the
young slugger and the mild
mannered radiologist. The match
at first appeared a rout with Tray
Baldwin sweeping the first two
games. Then Stein went to work
as he had done in all his previous
matches. Methodically and with-
out fanfare he took the next six
games. Baldwin was letting Stein
play his own game and could dc
nothing about it that day. Th
second set was more of the same
Tray later told me that his game
that Sundav could best be de-
scribed only by a good proc-
tologist. To be fair it was not one
of Baldwin's best days. However.
, on the other side it was vintage
Dr. Bernard D. Stein
Bernie STein. A lob here, a drop-
shot there, deep looping fore-
hands down the middle of the
court and otherwise constantly
breaking up his opponents rhyth-
m and consequently his plan of
attack. Stein 6-2; 6-3.
Palma Ceia has a new
champion and he is every bit the
gentleman and scholar as our
previous champion. It is indeed a
sincere pleasure to be associated
with Dr. Bernard D. Stein
1981 Tennis Singles Champion.
Staff Changes
Staff changes at Tampa Jewish
Social Service-or-The Resettle-
ment Department Resettles Its
Staff
_ Christy Reddish, Tampa Jew-
is'h Social Service Resettlement
Coordinator since June 1979 will
be leaving the agency on
August 7. Christy and her
husband Stan will be "resettling"
in Palatka, Fla. where Stan will
be an engineer with Florida
Power and Light, and where they
will both eagerly await the birth
of their first child in early Octo-
ber.
Blossom Leibowitz, Chairman
of Soviet Resettlement said.
"Christy's commitment to the
program over the last two years
has been of the very highest
quality. Her work with Soviets,
Iranian Jews, Cubans and others
as well as her development of our
Volunteer program, leaves us
with one of the smoothest and
most successful Resettlement
programs in the country."
Anne Thai, Executive
Director, Tampa Jewish Social
Service is pleased to announce
the appointment of Joel Brooks
as Social Worker-Resettlement
Coordinator. Joel, who will be
joining staff the week of July
27th is moving to Tampa from
Omaha, Nebraska, where he re-
ceived his Masters in Social
Work (MSW) degree from the
University of Nebraska. He has
his B.S. degree from the Univer-
sity of Iowa.
Joel has worked at Jewish
Family Service in Omaha, the
Nebraska Psychiatric Institute
and Father Flanagan's Boys
Home. Joel and his wife, Naomi,
are looking forward to leaving
Nebraska winters behind.
"Joel's background and train-
ing are excellent and we are ex-
cited about the addition of his
skills and expertise to our staff,"
siated Thai. "In addition to co-
ordinating the Resettlement Pro-
gram Joel will be offering
counseling services to families
and individuals and developing
our Jewish Family Life Educa-
tion programs."
Dr. Jacob Wolfowitz Passes
Dr. Jacob Wolfowitz, professor
at the University of South Flor-
ida and noted researcher in
mathematical statistics and
probability theory, died Thurs-
day, July 16 in Tampa. He was
71.
Wolfowitz had taught at USF
three years, and was named dis-
tinguished scholar of the USF
College of Natural Sciences in
1980.
He was a member of the Na-
tional Academy of Sciences of
U.S.A., and fellow of the Ameri-
can Academy of Arts and
Sciences.
A native of Poland, Wolfowitz
formerly did research or taught
at Columbia, Cornell, University
of North Carolina, University of
Illinois, UCLA, University of
Paris and University of Heidel-
berg, Germany.
In 1975 he received an honor-
ary degree from the Israel Insti-
tute of Technology.
He is survived by his wife, Lil-
lian; one daughter, Laura M.
Sachs; and one son, Paul D.
Wolfowitz.
A memorial service for Wolfo-
witz was held Sunday, July 19 at
the USF University Center.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the Hadassah Medical
Organization c-o Mrs. Nina Ber-
slein, 208 Treasure Dr. Tampa,
Fla.
WOLFOWITZ
Manorial Services for Jacob Wolfowlta,
71, of Tampa, was held on Sunday. July
U at the University or South Florida.
University Center. He la survived by his
wife Lillian, a ion. Paul D. Wolfowlta of
Washington. DC, a daughter, Laura
Mary Wolfowitz Sachs of Jerusalem,
Israel, a sister. Mary W Blumen of
Ithaca, NY.; and five grandchildren.
MAY
Mr. Clifford B. May Sr., 71, of Tampa,
passed away July 10. Funeral Services
were conducted from the chapel of Oar-
den of memories Funeral Home with
Sam P. Moore, officiating. Interment
followed In Garden of Memories
Cemetery. Mr. May was a retired
steamfltter. a member of local Union
No. 624 Pipefitters and Plumbers, a
former member of Congregation
Schaaral Zedek Synagogue, a veteran of
World War II and a resident of Tampa
for TO years. Survivors Include his wife,
Nlla E. May. three sons; Clifford B.
May Jr., Lloyd Leven May, Bradenton,
and Eugene Samuel May. Masaryk-
town; a daughter, WUma E Roebuck,
18 grandchUdren, six great grandchil-
dren and numerous nieces and nephews.
LEVY
Marilyn M. Levy of BalUmore. Md.,
died Tuesday, July 7. Memorial Serv-
ices were held Thursday, July 9. Rabbi
Susan Berman of Temple Schaaral
Zedek officiated. She was born In Den-
ver, Colo, and came to Tampa at the age
of six months. She was a graduate of
Plant High School and the University of
Tampa where she was selected to Who's
Who In American UnlverslUes and Col-
leges. A resident of BalUmore for the
past 23 years, (or the past 20 years she
had been affiliated with the BalUmore
Public School System Counseling Serv-
ices. Prior to that she had been with
Charity Hospital In New Orleans, Na-
tional Polio Foundation at Warm
i Springs, G, and the Bear School for
i Crippled Children In Baltimore. Survi-
vors are brothers, George A. Levy and
J. Leonard Levy, both of Tampa, nine
nieces and nephews. '


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Reagan Sends Congress
N-Agreement With Egypt,
'Other Interests'
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan has sent to
Congress the nuclear agreement
with Egypt which, he said, will
"further the non-proliferation
and other foreign policy interests
of the United States."
The agreement, signed at the
State Department on June 29,
could provide Egypt with up to
two nuclear reactors for energy
production purposes. Congress
has 60 days in which to accept or
reject the accord.
'The proposed bilateral agree-
ment reflects the desire of the
governments of the U.S. and
Egypt to establish a framework
for peaceful nuclear cooperation
in u manner which will recognize
our shared non-proliferation ob-
jectives, the economic and energy
development needs of Egypt and
the friendly and harmonious rela-
tions between the U.S. and
Egypt," Reagan said in his mes-
sage accompanying the nuclear
cooperation agreement.
THE PRESIDENT noted that
Egypt ratified the Nuclear Non-
Proliferation Treaty last
February. "This is an important
step toward controlling the
dangers of the spread of nuclear
weapons," Reagan said, "and is a
reaffirmation of Egypt's long
standing commitment to the ob-
jectives of this (non-proliferation)
treaty and its commitment to
peace and stability in the Middle
East and Africa."
Meanwhile, White House
Deputy Press Secretary Larry
Speakes had no comment on a
report in the Los Angeles Times
that the U.S. has been main-
taining secret contacts with the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization since the Nixon Ad-
ministration and up to the
present. He also had no comment
>n reports of joint Soviet-Syrian
naval maneuvers off Syrian
coast.
That issue was raised by a
minister at Israel's Cabinet
meeting but was promptly
quashed by Prime Minister
Menachem Begin. Cabinet Sec-
retary Arye Naor explained later
that "This is not a matter for '.he
government of Israel "
URI PORAT, Begins press
spokesman, was quoted by Israel
Radio as saying that Israel
expects the U.S. to "react" to
such Soviet moves wherever they
are made, but especially in the
Middle East.
At the State Department,
spokesman Dean Fischer also re-
frained irom ommentingj
on the Los A nuele-. Timn
He merely repeated that t
will not hold talks with I
until it recognizes Israeli
to exist and accepts UnJ
tions Security Council
lutions 242 and 338.
I've just gone over last month's
financial statement, John.
Our move to Jan/is
saved us 25% on
telephone expenses."
YOUTH LOOKING ATTHE BUSMESSEND
0FAJARV1SPH0NESY5TEM.
Since 1963, over 4,000 businesses have converted to Jarvis Dhone svstems
The reason? Strictly business. --.
They could get the same(or better) telephone service for 20%to30% less with Jarvis
If you re interested in reducing your current phone system costs call us
Our phone numbers in Florida are Ft. Lauderdale 791 -8172 %
Miami 947-5357 and Tampa 247-4422.
When it comes to the business end of phone systems
we hasfe some numbers with a very nice ring to them. Tne other phone conpany


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* schools Jewish Community Directory
839-7047
Hillel School (grades 1-8)
Jewish Community Center
Pre-School and Kindergarten
Seaiora
Chai Dial- A-Bus (call 9a.m. to noon)
Jewish Towers
Kosher kinch program
Seniors Project
B naiB'nth
Jewish Community Center
Jewish Flondian of Tampa
Jewish National Fund
State of I srael Bonds
Tampa Jewish Federation
Tampa Jewish Social Servace
f OF Jri*k KcMtadaiiow lar
872-4451
872-4451
870-1830
872-4461
872-4461
876-4711
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872-4470
876-9327*
879-8850*
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y, July 24, 191
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 11
S
terry Lansing, president of 20th Century Fox, chats with Sidney E. Cohn, at the New York
late Theatre prior to the annual American Jewish Congress Festival Evening at which
^hn, a Manhattan attorney, presented Lansing with the AJCongress'Artistic Achievement
vard Lansing hailed AJCongress for being in the vanguard of the fight against prejudice
I for freedom. ___________________________________________
Install New JWV Memorial at Pearl
Iris Goldwasser, special projects chairman of
be National Ladies Auxiliary, Jewish War Ve-
ins of the United States, is announcing the de-
cation of a memorial plaque immortalizing the
en who lost their lives at Pearl Harbor aboard
be USS Arizona on December 7,1941.
The dedication announcement was made in
[injunction with JWVA National President
velyn Mermonstein. Lt. Cmdr. Fred Natkin, of
be U.S. Navy Chaplain Corps, and a member of
Jewish War Veterans in Hawaii, placed the
jque in the shoreside memorial at Pearl Harbor,
new memorial is under the supervision of
|ary Cummins, superintendent of the USS
rizona Visitors Center, a project of the National
rk Service.
Some 500 participants in the World
inhering of Jewish Holocaust Survivors in Je-
ksalem witnessed the unveiling of plaques in
emory of three young Jewish men who were
^ecuted in 1944 in the notorious Buna Camp of
uschwitz..
The brother of one of the three, Fred Dia-
ent of Los Angeles, established the memorial at
ebrew University to promote the study of the
olocaust.
University President Avraham Harman
eted the gathering in the Wise Auditorium on
! Givat Ram campus.
The three, Nathan Weissman, Janek Gross-
Id and Yehuda Leo Diament, were arrested,
tured and hanged for leading a resistance
Dvement among the inmates of the extermina-
Dn camp.
The ceremony was opened in Hebrew and
bglish by Fred Diament, who witnessed the ex-,
ution. Another brother, Rabbi Shaul Diament,
Cited a chapter of Psalms in memory of the de-
A close friend of the young men, Arthur
snanski, also delivered a tribute.
Sephardic Jewish texts once used by Georgi-
an Atlanta are now in the hands of other
orgians Jews from the Soviet Union's Re-
t>lic of Georgia thanks to the Sephardic
?mmunity Activities Program at Yeshiva Uni-
^ity in New York City. ,
)ne of the programs' projects is the develop-
>"t of new Sephardic communities and
ngregations in the United States, according to
^bbi M. Mitchell Serais, associate director of the
ogram. Sephardic Jews are of Spanish, Portu-
ese or Oriental descent.
Congregation Or ve Shalom in Atlanta was
of the groups that donated books. That con-
^gation is comprised mainly of Sephardic Jews
i the Island of Rhodes. Rabbi S. Robert Ichay
Spiritual leader.
Texts from Atlanta were given to the Associ-
Jn of Jews from Russian Georgia, in Forest,
M.N.Y., Rabbi Serais said.
Prof. Allen Pollack, president of the Labor
list Alliance, will lead delegates from across
l nation in an ideological conference to be held
Israel Aug. 26 to Sept. 4 in celebration of the
P anniversary of the Labor Zionist Alliance in
Perica.
Joining with delegates from Labor Zionist
Alliance will be Pioneer Women, Habonim and
other organizations related to Labor Zionism.
In addition to sessions in Jerusalem and Tel
Aviv, a day is planned at Kibbutz Ginosar by the
Sea of Galilee to honor the memory of Yigal
Allon, late chairman of the World Labor Zionist
Movement, as well as visits to Labor Zionist In-
stitutions.
A vastly expanded force of pro-Arab lob-
byists and government officials has been singled
out as the main reason for Israel's increased diffi-
culty in obtaining political support in Washing-
ton.
Speaking before the convention of the
National Council of Young Israel at Spring Glen,
N.Y., Leonard Davis, director of Information and
Research of the American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee based in Washington, urged con-
cerned friends of Israel to counter the efforts of
"an army of Arab lobbyists, backed by millions of
dollars of oil money" to turn American support
away from Israel. He said that Israel's friends are
outnumbered 10-1.
Davis cautioned against speculation about
the internal workings of the Reagan Administra-
tion and against allowing the American Jewish
community to get caught up in the personality
politics and in-fighting within the executive
branch.
The number of Jews who arrived in Vienna
from the Soviet Union in the month of June was
866, bringing the total for the first six months of
1981 to 6,668. In reporting these figures, Char-
lotte Jacobson, chairman of the Soviet Jewry Re-
search Bureau of the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry, emphasized the steady decline in
emigration by comparing the first six months of
1979,1980 and 1981.
In the January through June period of 1979,
a total of 24,794 Jews left the Soviet Union, while
15,087 left in the same months in 1980. These
figures represent a 40 percent decrease from the
first half of 1979 to that of 1980, and a 56 percent
decrease during the same periods from 1980 to
1981.
Tennis News
The Mel and Sheila Jaffee Chair in Intern*-,
tional Trade has been inaugurated at Tel Aviv
University to promote research and teaching of
international trade, with particular emphasis on,
prospects of economic cooperation and peace in I
the Middle East, and examination of conditions:
which enhance integration into the world
economy.
The incumbent of the Chair," Prof. Se'ev
Hirsch, is an expert in the field, a former dean of
Tel Aviv University's Faculty of Management,
who has served as visiting lecturer at Oxford Uni-
versity, and at the Economic Development
j Institute of the World Bank.
Donor of the Chair, Mel Jaffee, of Orange'
County, Calif., is a member of the Council for
Economic Development and has been a longtime
supporter of Jewish and Israeli causes, particu-
larly in the fields of health and higher education.
By LOU MONTELEONE
On Sunday. Juno 7, 1981, two
men in different parts of the
world and indeed worlds apart in
every respect had one thing in
common the tranquility of
sweet victory under trying cir-
cumstances. Bjorn Borg had just
won his sixth French Open and
Bernie Stein had captured his
first Palma Ceia Golf and
Country' Club Tennis Champion-
ship. Stein advanced to the finals
without a loss of a set.
The finals were billed as a
classic confrontation between the
young slugger and the mild
mannered radiologist. The match
at first appeared a rout with Tray
Baldwin sweeping the first two
games. Then Stein went to work
as he had done in all his previous
matches. Methodically and with-
out fanfare he took the next six
games. Baldwin was letting Stein
play his own game and could dc
nothing about it that day. The
second set was more of the same
Tray later told me that his game
that Sunday could best be de-
scribed only by a good proc-
tologist. To be fair it was not one
of Baldwin's best days. However,
on the other side it was vintage
Dr. Bernard D. Stein
Bernie STein. A lob here, a drop-
shot there, deep looping fore-
hands down the middle of the
court and otherwise constantly
breaking up his opponents rhyth-
m and consequently his plan of
attack. Stein 6-2; 6-3.
Palma Ceia has a new
champion and he is every bit the
gentleman and scholar as our
previous champion. It is indeed a
sincere pleasure to be associated
with Dr. Bernard D. Stein
1981 Tennis Singles Champion.
Staff Changes
Staff changes at Tampa Jewish
Social Service-or-The Resettle-
ment Department Resettles Its
Staff
_ Christy Reddish, Tampa Jew-
ish Social Service Resettlement
Coordinator since June 1979 will
be leaving the agency on
August 7. Christy and her
husband Stan will be "resettling"
in Palatka, Fla. where Stan will
be an engineer with Floride
Power and Light, and where they
will both eagerly await the birth
of their first child in early Octo-
ber.
Blossom Leibowitz, Chairman
of Soviet Resettlement said.
"Christy's commitment to the
program over the last two years
has been of the very highest
quality. Her work with Soviets,
Iranian Jews, Cubans and others
as well as her development of our
Volunteer program, leaves us
with one of the smoothest and
most successful Resettlement
programs in the country."
Anne Thai, Executive I
Director, Tampa Jewish Social
Service is pleased to announce
the appointment of Joel Brooks
as Social Worker-Resettlement
Coordinator. Joel, who will be
joining staff the week of July
27th is moving to Tampa from
Omaha, Nebraska, where he re-
ceived his Masters in Social
Work (MSW) degree from the
University of Nebraska. He has
his B.S. degree from the Univer-
sity of Iowa.
Joel has worked at Jewish
Family Service in Omaha, the
Nebraska Psychiatric Institute
and Father Flanagan's Boys
Home. Joel and his wife, Naomi,
are looking forward to leaving
Nebraska winters behind.
"Joel's background and train-
ing are excellent and we are ex-
cited about the addition of his
skills and expertise to our staff,"
stated Thai. "In addition to co-
ordinating the Resettlement Pro-
gram Joel will be offering
counseling services to families
and individuals and developing
our Jewish Family Life Educa-
tion programs."
Dr. Jacob Wolfowitz Passes
Dr. Jacob Wolfowitz, professor
at the University of South Flor-
ida and noted researcher in
mathematical statistics and
probability theory, died Thurs-
day, July 16 in Tampa. He was
71.
Wolfowitz had taught at USF
three years, and was named dis-
tinguished scholar of the USF
College of Natural Sciences in
1980.
He was a member of the Na-
tional Academy of Sciences of
U.S.A., and fellow of the Ameri-
can Academy of Arts and
Sciences.
A native of Poland, Wolfowitz
formerly did research or taught
at Columbia, Cornell, University
of North Carolina, University of
Illinois, UCLA, University of
Paris and University of Heidel-
berg, Germany.
In 1975 he received an honor-
ary degree from the Israel Insti-
tute of Technology.
He is survived by his wife, Lil-
lian; one daughter, Laura M.
Sachs; and one son, Paul D.
Wolfowitz.
A memorial service for Wolfo-
witz was held Sunday, July 19 at
the USF University Center.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the Hadassah Medical
Organization c-o Mrs. Nina Ber-
stein, 208 Treasure Dr. Tampa,
Fla.
WOLFOWITZ
Manorial Service* for Jacob Woltowlta,
71, of Tamp*, was held on Sunday. Jury
19 at the University of South Florida,
University Center. He la survived by his
wife Lillian, a ion. Paul D. WolfowlU of
Washington, DC. a daughter, Laura
Mary WolfowlU Sacha of Jerusalem,
Israel, a sister. Mary W Blumen of
Ithaca, N.T.; and five grandchildren.
MAY
Mr. Clifford B. May Sr., 71. of Tampa,
paaaed away July 10. Funeral Servlcea
were conducted from the chapel of Oar-
den of memories Funeral Home with
Sam P. Moore, offlclaUng. Interment
followed In Garden of Memories
Cemetery. Mr. May was a reUred
steamfltter. a member of local Union
No. S24 Pipefitters and Plumbers, a
former member of Congregation
Schaaral Zedek Synagogue, a veteran of
World War II and a resident of Tampa
for 70 years. Survivors Include his wife,
NUa E. May. three sons: Clifford B.
May Jr., Lloyd Leven May, Bradenton.
and Eugene Samuel May, Masaryk-
town. a daughter, WUma E. Roebuck,
IS grandchildren, six great grandchil-
dren and numerous nieces and nephews.
LEVY
Marilyn M. Levy of Baltimore, Md..
died Tuesday, July 7. Memorial Serv-
ices were held Thursday, July 9. Rabbi
Susan Berman of Temple Schaaral
Zedek officiated. She was born In Den-
ver, Colo, and came to Tampa at the age
of six months. She was a graduate of
Plant High School and the University of
Tampa where she was selected to Who's
Who In American UnlverslUes and Col-
leges. A resident of BalUmore for the
past 23 years, for the past 20 years she
had been affiliated with the BalUmore
Public School System Counseling Serv-
ices. Prior to that she had been with
Charity Hospital In New Orleans, Na-
Uonal Polio Foundation at Warm
| Springs, lia and the Bear School for
! Crippled Children In Baltimore. Survl-
< vors are brothers. George A. Levy and
' J. Leonard Levy, both of Tampa, nine
nieces and nephew*. #