The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00085

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Price 35 Cents
Women's Wednesday
Here Jan. 7
\uda Blum, Israel's Ambassador to the United Nations, is pictured with Tampa Jewish
ration leadership prior to his speech at the Jewish Community Center Dec. 21. Left to
t: Michael L. Levine, 1981 Campaign Chairman; Goldie Shear, Campaign Vice Chairman;
wssador Blum and Hope Barnett, President of Tampa Jewish Federation.
Blum Says;
Israel is the Whipping Boy9
Israel is ihe whipping boy' of
lUnitrd Nations, according
lehuda Mum. Israel's UN
kssador. and the world had
\i realize that when blasting
[I. these iountries are really
ping Western democracies
pously." That was the point
repeated in so many ways
le speech given before more
1200 people at the Jewish
nunity ("enter.
n, appearing on behalf of
rampa Jewish Federation,
Nine and one-half percent
he worlds population is
nled by two thirds of the
of the United Nations."
^fore, he said he does not feel
he world has spoken when
Ming passes the General
nbly.
|Di often told not to take
things so seriously by
hentatives of other
Icratic countries. They say
do not take these things
sly. so I shouldn't either."
lanswered that by saying
^ thought it was high time
countries once again
I seriously what is going on
1 United Nations, even
it was certainly not the
s the UN created in 1945,
fin make up or in strength.
Pe is an unholy alliance of
punan regimes and dk-
MP8. Only 30 of 154
can be regarded as
Otic countries.
Ambassador dwelt at
P on h.s point that "anti-
I. rt ^me a code word
[Mi-Semitic." "The United
1 ^ay has become the
or world anti-
has been a Palestinian State for
the past 33 years and its name is
Jordan. A Palestinian Arab state
and a Palestinian Jewish state
were created at the same time
Jordan and Israel."
The Ambassador's small
stature belies a very powerful
speaking voice with a most ar-
ticulate English vocabulary. His
years of schooling in London
come through when he speaks.
Ambassador Blum began his
speech by pointing out what
issues were too "insignificant"
for the United Nations to deal
with while it dealt with 'The
Palestinian Question.'' These
undiscussed items were Soviet
Aggression in Afghanistan; The
American Hostages in Iran;
The war between Iraq and Iran;
The Tension between Syria and
Jordan; The Plight of the Boat
People and The Cuban Forced
Exodus,
Murder of Jewish Leader
Shocks Bavaria Police
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The
murder of a prominent
Jewish leader in Erlangen,
Bavaria, has shocked West
Germany's Jewish com-
munity because of its ap-
parent racial and political
motivation.
The victim, Shlomo
Levin, 69, chairman of the
Association for Christian-
Jewish Cooperation, was
shot to death along with a
friend, Frida Poeschke, 57,
in the latter's home.
Poeschke, who is not Jew-
ish, was the widow of a
Social Democratic anti-
Nazi activist.
POLICE HAVE assigned a 20-
member homicide squad to inves-
tigate the crime and have offered
a 20,000 Mark reward for in-
formation leading to an arrest
and conviction. Immediately
Continued on Page 11
B'nai B'rith Men
Operation Brotherhood
that
*ent on to show once
*t the PLO has nothing
r to do with a Palestinian
, "" 'ls real aim. First, the
, Hi, orKnized when the
"ank an<* the Gaza Strip
0 > Jordan and Egypt
8 was no mention what-
bki ,there bing a
fgn.SUta. The plo's
oojectwe was and remains
7J; of the State of
^"'um explained, there
B'nai B'rith Men, Tampa
Lodge No. 1044, have just com-
pleted their annual Operation
Brotherhood program. This is the
project where B'nai B'rith Men
fill in for other workers on Christ-
mas Day, permitting them to
have the day off to spend with
their families. Dr. Jeffrey Miller
once again served as chairman of
this true community spirit
project of the local lodge.
Last Thursday, Christmas
Day, Joe Kerstein, Jim Stillman,
Steve Zimbler and Dr. Ron Pross
were acting nurses aides and
receptionists at John Knox
Village. Bridget Quigley was the
supervisor making the arrange-
ments with Dr. Miller.
Working at the Veteran's
Administration Hospital, in co-
operation with Duane Zellmer,
were Bill Hirshberg and Gene
Sweed. The desk of the Jewish
Towers was manned by David
Steinberg, with the blessings of
Juliet Rodriguez, manager.
Charlie Gellis was at Senior
Meadows thanks to the help of
Ruby Wright and Marc Perkins
and Gil Weisman were at
Memorial Hospital through the
efforts of Annette James.
Those who were able to enjoy a
day with their families, even
though working in positions
which do not allow for days off,
were truly appreciative of the
volunteer spirit demonstrated by
B'nai B'rith Men of Tampa.
Ann Rudolph, chairman of the
"Women's Wednesday" work-
shop scheduled for Wednesday,
Jan. 7, urges all women to send in
their reservation for this
dynamic, informative day!
Sponsored by the Women's
Division of Tampa Jewish Feder-
ation. Rudolph's committee of
Donna Cutler, Marsha Sherman,
Joan Altchuler, Ellen Crystal,
and Nancy Verkauf has been
working for months on this
highlight. The day is geared for
"All Women". the housewife,
mother, single, married, working,
and the career woman.
Workshops will run 9:15 a.m. to
1:30 p.m. and again from 6 to
9:30p.m.
Eight top-notch experts will
conduct workshops moderated by
members of the Women's
Division. Everyone will have a
choice of 2 of the 6 workshops (3
per hourl: a delightful lunch or
dinner, and a presentation by
keynote speaker, Barbara Shul-
man, TV commentator, and
Ann Htidolph
chairman of National CIA
Women's Division executive
committee on Public Profile.
The program will be held at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek. Be
sure to get your reservations to
the Federation office today. Call
872-4451.
Elaine I'elricoff
Misha liaitzm
Additional Stars
Join Cast Of
'Proclaim Liberty'
Joining Herschel Bernardi and
Lou Jacobi for the performance of
"Proclaim Liberty" are a host of
additional talents that will
"Assure the success of this
exciting event," according to
Lois Older, "Proclaim Liberty"
chairman. The one-performance-
only musical drama will be held
at the Tampa Theatre, Sunday,
Jan. 18, at 7:30 p.m.
Described as one of the great
voices to come out of Russia,
Misha Raitzin is a tenor with the
Metropolitan Opera Company.
To pursue his ideals of artistic
and religious freedom, Misha
went to Israel with his family in
1972. He was soon recognized as
the leading tenor with the Tel
Aviv Opera, and appeared as
soloist with the Israel Philhar-
monic under Zubin Mehta. He
has toured extensively through-
out North America in addition to
his busy schedule with the Met.
Elaine Petricoff, born in Cin-
cinnati, Ohio, has extensive per-
formance credits including three
Broadway plays, "Grease, "The
Me Nobody Knows," and "Ride
The Winds." She has also ap-
peared in a number of off-Broad-
way shows, as well as several
Columbia feature films.
The "Proclaim Liberty" cast
will also include Belle Kaufmann,
the granddaughter of the great
Yiddish humorist, Sholom Alei-
chem. She is also the dis-
tinguished author of the best
seller, "Up The Down Staircase."
A hit in every show he has
appeared in, Kenny Karen is best
known in show business as the
"King of Jingles." He is known
to millions of radio listteners and
TV viewers not by his image, but
by his voice. He has been
featured in commercials for
McDonald's, Pepsi Cola, Eastern
Air Lines, Budweiser, etc.
A special added attraction to
the cast of "Proclaim Liberty" is
Geula Gill, Israel's official good-
will ambassadress of song. Born
in Israel, Gill began her career as
a singer in the Israeli Army,
where she entertained the troops.
She is considered an international
star, winning many awards and
one twenty-record album.
"Proclaim Liberty" is being
sponsored by the Tampa Jewish
Federation in cooperation with
the Jewish community organiza-
tions and synagogues in the
Tampa area. Tickets are available
by mail from the Tampa Jewish
Federation, 2808 Horatio St.,
Tampa, Fla. 33609. Prices range
from $18 to $5.


\aniv.
fend timmtt .Vfr AC (Mmurn
jgtj- tar
mmm r.i -r "*

Plaam
niiitU! rt
-. -- |
I HI.
....
*i:nam. r
surras am -l.i;k *
- n ham
- auMr
-
'.:: a
" ST
:-
"1: -J
J
J
jj



Jhe Jewish Floridian of Tampa
*
Page 3
Behind Iranian's Execution
[Failure to Know Farzami Was Jewish
Jewish Towers Tea
By MORTON YARMON
NEW YORK The case
Simon Farzami, the
inian Jew executed Dec.
5, differed in one respect
3m that of other Jews
liled or executed by the
inian regime.
Usually, word of an
rest in Iran filters out
lirly rapidly as friends and
Uatives there contact
lose in other lands,
eking outside aid and
Itervention or, sometimes,
|nds for ransoms de-
cided by the Iranian
khorities.
| In this instance, the only word
arrest came via a monitored
bnunt in the Iranian press and
vs nl the execution via an
abiclanguage radio broadcast.
ME REASON seems to be
H Farzami had no connection
all with other members of
kp's Jewish community. Other
>lf members ot the newspaper
jth which he was connected, the
fheran Journal, apparently did
even know he was Jewish.
fr. insofar as can be deter-
nwl. did any relatives or
pirns approach either Jewish
animations or the Interna-
nal Red Cross, which has
ervined in the cases of other
vs at the request of kin.
The American Jewish Com-
jittt'i own telephone inquiries
out Karzami of Jews coming
Dm Iran, both in the United
ates and in other lands, proved
|mless Farzami is the seventh
to die at the hands of Islamic
krolutionary tribunals since the
pent regime came to power in
kn. Reports from Iran indicate
it there may be as many as
Br hundred Jews in jail
ently, but accurate figures
I hard to come by.
rarzami's execution apparent-
jwas earned out in Teheran's
lin Prison, where his trial also
pk place, beginning November
An account of his trial ap-
~red in the local news service of
Teheran newspaper Keyhan
[that date under the headline,'
trial ot American Spy Begins."
He denied the charges. Keyhan
said.
WHILE newspaper accounts
describe Farzami as an editor, for
the Teheran court he was a
"Jewish doctor of law. domiciled
in Switzerland and resident in
Teheran, aged 67. by profession
an unofficial Persian-French
translator" that is, not ac-
credited by the Justice Ministry
as a translator.
The court indictment alleged
that Farzami was in contact with
the American embassy and
giving U.S. personnel infor-
mation they required including
material "on the identification of
PLO members."
Prosecution charges, the in-
dictment declared, were based on
material in shredded documents
found at the occupied Untied
States embassy and sub-
sequently put together by the
students there "with much dif-
ficulty and great care."
The kind of activities cited in
the idictment would seem to be
those normal to any working cor-
respondent: correspondence with
state personages, letters of invi-
tations to various foreign em-
bassies, and frequent travel
abroad.
Empaffsis was put in the in-
dictment on meetings with U.S.
embassy staff. With regard to
these, the prosecution alleged,
Farzami used codes, aliases, and
precautions to prevent in-
terception.
THE PROSECUTION also
charged that Farzami had sent
his wife a draft for a million rials
($150,000) "to make good his
escape," according to the
indictment.
The last Jews put to death
prior to Karzami were Ibrahim
Beroukhim, executed in July on
trumped-up charges, and Albert
Danielpour. summarily executed
by a local court in the city of
Ha ma clan last June 5 in violation
of established Iranian juridical
procedures. His summary trial
was ordered by Ayatollah Sadegh
Khalkhali, known as the
" hanging judge."
There were fears for the life of
another member of the Daniel-
pour family in prison. Amir, but
he was released toward the end of
November.
Crippled Mayor Gets
A Hero % Welcome
By GIL SEDAN
iAMALLAH (JTA) -
>V>r K.inm Khalaf. crippled in
pr bombing last June, has
urntii to this West Bank town
lh n \ow to "increase my ef-
\* t" establish a Palestinian
|t< headed by the PLO." The
ror, who underwent medical
itment in the U.S. for the past
I months, received a hero's wel-
Pe from the townspeople.
|aeii torces kept a low profile
did not interfere with the
mnstration despite its
It'cal nature. Although the
Jtary Government did not
mt anybody but his im-
P'ate family to greet Khalaf
ln he crossed the Allenby
|gc from Jordan, no attempt
made to disperse the nun-
P <>* Ramallah residents.
fl|y high school and univer-
students, who massed
We the town hall singing
"tinian songs, waving
*fs with nationalist slogans
forming the V for victory
for television and press
eras in anticipation of the
ror s arrival.
fHEN HIS car drove up, it
I surrounded by masses of
[|* cheering, "In the spirit of
we shall redeem you
h" Khalaf." The crowd
"d into the building foltow-
fhe mavor who blew kisses at
them. He made a point of stress-
ing that the attempt on his life
did not change his views and
would not halt his activities.
" I am returning to my office as
Mayor.' he told reporters after
settling down at his desk. "I
promise, and I swear that I shall
increase my efforts to establish a
Palestinian state headed by the
PLO." He also expressed con-
fidence that American policy
would change in the future and
the U.S. would support a Pales-
tinian state.
Khalaf was severly injured
when a bomb exploded under his
car last June 2, exactly one
month after six yeshiva students
were murdered in a terrorist
ambush in Hebron. On the same
day. Mayor Bassam Shaka of
Nablus was mangled in a car
bomb attack that cost him both
his legs.
A THIRD bomb, intended for
the Mayor of El Bireh, blinded an
Israeli Druze police sapper who
was trying to dismantle it when it
exploded. The attacks have been
widely attributed to Jewish
extremists. Those responsible
have not yet been traced.
Khalaf had one foot am-
putated. He was treated at
Ramallah Hospital and left for
Houston, Texas in July for
further medical treatment.
Even the other Iranian
authorities have found
Khalkhali s excesses too much to
stomach. He first was removed as
a head of the revolutionary tri-
bunals earlier in the year and
more recently, as head of the
special drug tribunal. The
Iranian parliament has launched
an investigation into charges of
u?1IZ .'" the P"*"1' "nder
Khalkhali s direction. Khalkhali
had laid a drug charge against
Danielpour just prior to having
him executed, so that he could
claim Danielpour came under his
court's aegis.
THE LIST of the seven Jews
executed by the Iranian regime
prior to Farzami include:
Ibrahim Beroukhim
executed on July 31, 1980 in
Teheran on trumped-up charges
of "spying for Israel;"
Albert Danielpour.
executed by a local court in the
city of Hamadan last June 5 on
false charges of being a U.S. and
Israeli spy and drug-dealing;
Nosrat Guwell. executed on
July 3. 1980 on drug and prosti-
tution charges:
Jalal lYIassarrat, executed
in Teheran on June 26. 1980 for
alleged drug dealing and
corruption;"
Jamshid Yadegar. con-
victed of drug charges and "cor-
ruption on earth," executed in
Hamadan last June; and
Habib Elghanian, executed
in May, 1979 for "connections
with Israel" and "treason."
Barbara Seaman
to Speak Jan. 8
Barbara Seaman, author of
Women and the Crisis in Sex
Hormones and The Doctors' Case
Against the Pill, will address the
Jan. 8 meeting of the Athena,
Society, slated for noon at the
Holiday Inn Central, downtown
Tampa.
She is the daughter-in-law of
long-time author and feminist
Sylvia Seaman, whose humorous
books include How to be a Jewish
Crandmother.
Barbara is a news features con-
sultant to ABC-TV. has authored
hundreds of articles and reviews
in Cosmopolitan and The
Washington Post and has
testified before congressional
committees on such topics as
birth control and the abuse of
psychiatric druirs.
Reservations for the Jan. 8
luncheon are available on a
limited basis at $8 each and may
be obtained by telephoning 251-
3697.
Mental Health
Center
Hillsborough Community
Mental Health Center's Aging
and Consultation and Education
Departments will conduct Every-
day Stress Management work-
shops each Tuesday in January
lieginning Jan. 6 from 7-8 p.m. at
the center at 5707 N. 22 St.
The four sessions will discuss
how to cope with income tax
stress and other problems. The
titles of the sessions are: 11 Do
You Find Income Tax Taxing? on
Jan. 6; 2) Do You Bite Your
Nails a Lot? on Jan. 13; 3) Don't
Make a Mountain Out of Mole-
hill, on Jan. 20; and 41 Getting It
All Together, on Jan. 27.
The cost is $10 for all four ses-
sions or $3 for a single session.
For further information call 238-
7977.
Held Dec 18
A combined Chanukah and
Christmas tea was held at the
Jewish Towers on the afternoon
of Dec. 18 for residents, manage-
ment volunteers and heroes of the
recent building fire.
Jewish Towers manager, Juliet
Rodriguez, emceed the affair and
presented small gifts to staff
members, board members,
directors, volunteer workers and
the Residents Association board.
Special recognition was given to
the Tampa Fire Department and
the neighbors of the Towers.
Residents supplied all refresh-
ments.
Officers of the Residents
Association are: William Nichol-
son, president: Sara Pullara and
Leon Levine, vice presidents; Mo
Backman, treasurer; Betty
Rosenblatt, recording secretary;
Bert Green, corresponding secre-
tary; Florence Gordon, social
chairman; Darthy Doliton, co-
social chairman; Ann Spector,
entertainment chairman: Rosa-
mond Uretsky, sunshine lady;
and Freda Waller, publicity
chairman.
Special meritorious service
awards went to: the Jewish Com-
munity Center and Ed Finkel-
stein; Jewish Towers staff
member, Ruben Siano; UPS
deliverymen, Tony Buggica and
Ken Wood; Neighbors, Susi
Welsh, Michael Fales. Al Gon-
zalez, Ron Shuman and Jeff
Tipton, and of course, the Tampa
Fire Department.
Members of the Jewish Towers
staff receiving awards were: Eda
Ginn. Carole Bernado. Mario
Prieto. Tony Rosario, Jose
Pinero, Frank Almedia, Charlie
Brown. Steve Callarik, Wayne
Rose, Ruben Siano, and Alan
Sole i wit/.
Receiving volunteer awards
were: Dorothy Argintar. Lee
Kessler, Harriet Krentzman.
Clara Pressner, Florence Segall.
Bobbie Eisen, Lena Coolik.
Sylvia Gertzman. Gerry Linsky.
Bobbie Levin. Eleanor Feldman.
Jean Bennett. Cela Wlodawskv.
Ruth Zack and Eunice ( operand

Hs always DID want to try hia hand al directing"
The Arqos
&o .Minify metA &<*#:
Poppy and Grandma Kuth Berg wish you a very happy 7th birthday.
Our precious granddaughter.
With all oar love always and forever.
I want to wish you Health and Happiness
On your 7th birthday,
January 5th, Now and Forever.
With all my love that's in my heart for you.
Love you very much.
Daddy

SERVING TAMPA'S JEWISH FAMILIES
SINCE 1916
/^yyiaA^H.^^
rUNCNAi. MOM*
258 PLANT AVENUE AT PLATT STREET
James E Lawhon Truman H Thomas


Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, J
anuaiy2
The Power Broker Returns
Is it good? Is it bad?
Henry Kissinger is back, and there is no way of
telling. If we are to judge by his past performance,
then the answer must be that it's bad. Dr. Kissinger
is a power broker in the best Machiavellian tradition
in which power has its own morality. And it is un-
related to human affairs.
Only the most shortsighted will see Dr.
Kissingers role in the post-Yom Kippur War era as a
positive contribution to Israel's destiny. His was an
approach that was crude, ugly, a violent bludgeoning
of facts to recreate them. He threatened Israel's
march toward victory by saying he'd let the Russians
enter the struggle if Israel continued to carry out its
military campaign in the manner prescribed by
Israel's top officers if Israel did not lay down its
arms.
He forced the Israelis, under threat of cutting
off their supplies, to feed and medicate Egypt's army
encircled and isolated in the Sinai desert. In the end,
in the name of preserving Egypt's 'honor" an
absurd word for a nation that launched a sneak
attack on Yom Kippur he helped Anwar Sadat re-
write the history of the war and to cast Sadat as hero
and victor.
Kissinger's ultimate contribution was to re-
create the Middle Eastern Realpolitik with Israel as
odd man out.
This is the man now in the Middle East about to
take up a second time the kind of power politics for
which he was a broker in those bleak days. This is the
man in the Middle East who insists that he is there in
a "private" capacity, although President-Elect
Reagan's appointee as National Security Council
Chief Richard Allen has long since announced that
Kissinger will be a foreign policy consultant to Mr.
Reagan when the new administration takes over on
Jan.20.
This is the man who said after his meeting with
President Sadat in Mit Abul Kom on Monday that "I
did not come here with any messages" for Sadat from
Mr. Reagan, although Sadat later told newsmen that
Kissinger had carried a message to him from Mr.
Reagan.
It is this kind of duplicity for which the
Machiavellian is noted. It is characteristic of Henry
Kissinger's power-brokering.
It's 1981
It's 1981.
If January is an indication of the tone for the
new year. 1981 will be a notable year for Jewish
culture in Tampa. Maybe all the progress taking
place in the redeveloping of our downtown is making
us think of redeveloping our heritage. Or is it
developing? For one cannot RE-do that which was
not there in the first place.
Anyway, this month will have a Jewish musical
production of the highest caliber taking place at the
Tampa Theatre (Proclaim Liberty" on Jan. 18) and
in that very same week, Elie Wiesel will speak at the
University of South Florida.
Coming on the heels of a Fall which had Moshe
Da. an. Ambassador Yehuda Blum and Leon Dulzin
dll speaking in Tampa, it really makes our com-
munity take its rightful place on the Jewish cultural
map.
Here's to 1981, to Jewish culture and to Tampa.
May they continue a very successful merger in the
new year.
Jewish Floridian
3M0U
Smorgasbord at Jewish Affairs
An observant New York
Jewish attorney, assailing the
traditional immense smorgas-
bord, six-course meal and ob-
scene Viennese dessert table
widelv offered at Jewish affairs,
has proposed that overeating be
added to the practice- forbidden
by the Jewish dietary laws.
Joseph Kaplan raised the Issw
of Jewish gluttony in an article in
Sh'ma titled 'For ihe Sin Ol
Overeating. He asked whethe.
.lews have lived in accordant
with the inextricable link in
Jewish lore between kashrut and
holiness and thereby been
sanctified.
Kaplan asked. Have we
transformed our tables into
altars? Have we restrained our-
selves Of shown self-discipline"at
11>. dining table? Have we taken
the hygienic and health aspects
ol eating seriously?'
IN DECLARING the answers
to those questions for American
of Tampa
HuMtlMM Office 31*00 M*niieriion Blvd.. Tampa. Fla
Telephone 872 4470
I-u.l.cal.onOffUe 120 N.E 6St Miami. Fla. 3S1S2____________
FREDK SHOCHET 8UJJANNB 8H0CHET JUDriT* ROipiCTLAWZ
lUHIor M1 PubltaMr Bxecutlv. Editor Aa.ociatt Editor
TW JewUkmart-! Dm* WtOwfMlaTte Kaaanrtfc
PubultZTrrtiw -'weekly 'jtap&Sbr ^SjlTamp.
J. WMfct): June through Au.t by The tort* "orMhtn rfTnmpi
s*mt tMmm P-to* !."
a4 MttflcstMa !K*r SSTS) ragaralms u*llvrd paper* to The Jawlal
M, r.O BAxSlim. Miami. Fla SSI Si.
SUBSCRIPTION fc..- II (LocalAr..) 7 Year M.nimum Subscr.pt.on V 00
, Anruil SJ.iOi Oi' ol Town Upon Reqoes'
r.v. rioraaiw. ''ainuina n- in* lit'
- *..Mrr.a-i ton*!* /To#me: "
n ji|.cjn'rlbuUolul>ulw
touM m Trfi'r 1> Jewlan rwr- e*upa rcelvln# U* *' *er1 *. J.-l* rt-nSmT* Tmmp. w*.rby :.-
til* DAP"
An van* wimtnng te c arrw, aucn a
26TKVI
Ben
Gallob
Jews generally should be "no.
Kaplan described the -enor-
mous food offerings at wed-
dings. Bar Mitzvahs, and "to a
lesser extant," Jewish communal
affairs He recalled "after shul-
Kiddush" events where the
scene resembles Tom Jones
rather than the Garden of Eden."
He asked "Do any of these cele-
brations of Jewish life exemplify
restraint, holiness, sensitivity or
sanctity'.''
Kaplan declared that "the
problem ol irluttony" should

N
PERCY SCREJJAPe
j 90 P*
vira
itself be part of the frame,,,
kashrut and asked wh?
"who enforce slandJJ
kashrut on caterers. bJ
dining establishments'1;Z
also "endorse standards ,1
would limit the amount of
that is served and wasted.
Kaplan argued that if j,
community leaders set
eating norms for Jewish cel2
lions such norms c7
possibly be used to offset
alleviate peer pressure, wheh
major cause ol the Q
( olumbus syndrome." Got
( olumbus was one of the
stories by Philip Ron, w
described American Jewish
styles in a manner that bro
him sharp criticism from
Jews
KAPLAN ALSO conu
that such norms should be
tuted by all Jewish commun
including thus, which do
observe kashrut since all
these are guilty ol these
apart from nonobservanceel
dietary law
Haaaidki 'bahaja,
or perhap ,
up impenetrable mechi;
(devices which separate ma {
women ; ip| heM
lews, aapaciall)
pride themse i on hoi m
homes >>t .lew- he) cannot
ui
Aaeerting thi in sun
seams Ir
onlj imach an
spirit ol '' Ka
declared it hat not mad
better and more sensitives
lieings. w hose SCI' 111
the table dfffi i ".111 those
others
CONCEDING there
many other changes that had.
pactad on li ffecting tj
Biblical Imenl on
to Im' hoi)
nun. one wo
hoped that k would htv
served 1 .nnepr1
lem of Jewisl r which
descritx
w 110 are SO SCI
ing ever)
( oniinuiil on Pass
WB
thad
Terrorism: The French Embarrassment
Until the ()ct i bombing of th<
Paris synagogue in Hue < opernii
President Giscard d'Estaing 'it
France hail been bus) 1 r> ng U
build pro-Arab sentiment. His
repeated championship ol what
he calledt hi Palestinian right t<
self-determination,' intensified
tiller a trip to the Middle I
delighted i.>- inb chenis. PL0
ringmaster V ..sir Arafat
ecstatic.
Than 120 serious anti-Semitic
incidents recorded in Prance
since 1976 were climaxeil by the
blast that shook the Jewish
house ol worship, killing four
people and injuring 12 How was
the French President, who shared
the chilly views toward Israel
held by his predecessors, Charles
de Gaulle and Georges Pom-
pidou, going to react?
THE ANSWER, a bit slow in
coming, was to assure the French
Jewish community fourth
largest in the world that
henceforth it will be treated with
the same respect as are all other
segments of the French
population. French universities,
Giscard promised, will be urged
to "discuss the pluralist
tolerant, and fraternal character
of French society ."
May the President be blessed
in such goinu forth. Along the
way, may hi- mind and heart be
opened to ominoi.
he heads a nation which ha
shocking treatment
hounded Jews b)
iu. nil
Robert
^:X::::::r:xX::::;:::::::::xyS&::y:Safcy8i^
humbling in its handling of
rightwing terrorists that Paris
become the center of
Europe's network ol ihose fiends.
It is a nation wherein the French
Police I nion itself is reported to
have acknowledged that some 30
confirmed neo-Fascists have
infiltrated the police force.
Yet French Interior Minister
Christian Bonnet s reaction to
the Paris wave of anti-Jewish
incidents was, We shouldn't
give these incidents more im-
portance than they deserve."
FRANCE, a nation of
tascinating contradictions, was
the first country in Europe to
accord Jews full citizenship.
r ranee also martyrized Captain
red Dreyfus, who made the
take of proving his military
It) against Kids as an ar-
Liiier) offio he was
charged win, ugh treason A
iment i,, .edged a
gery, wa> rument
wnent-
after moo-
rranrn had witi ;he
royalists, the 1 arch, and ta
army united 1
degrade and h victim:
.lewiiutcr as fouB
innocent
In the course >f :hat tunw
he-centur> drama Oeor,
( lemenceau hl5
irvmen wil
words, We let hii
five veai ,
very well Know why.
because we hate w nh a sur
hate, the chose- ..-..pleofGod.
Those Frenchmen H
trampled bv Hitler stwotshaflT
recognize the measure of irsgs"
attending the itispatrholWW
French Jews U> Ni
centration camps ^ijtwssjj
the Nazi monsters but rr-
police who rounded up
innocents murKed lor
termination
ALL THE more reason th<
believe that Frances prsa-
listless handling of members
the Baader-Meinhof gang
their companions m
lands underscore th. J*J
taking seriously the report
infiltration of Pv"Voto*!*
bv neo-Fascists V\nat an
reversal: intelbgence agen
police are supposec to bore
gangster circles: buttj"
Ground it appe^a th. n-J.
black hats are
among gendarn..
ung into .
Paris ay nag '" *'
Ltard lt,0n

C VA


January 2, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 5
Spotlight on Rhoda Karpay
; this paper began in
[pa Khoda L. Karpay has
, rt-gular advertiser. Many
you have asked about the
;nin^ of the initials "GUI"
(|{S following her Yid-
[ikcii expressions.
-lil and ('Its stand for
Iduate Realtor's Institute and
IjliiKi Residential Specialist.
^v represent achievement in
additional courses Karpay
taken in her pursuit of ad-
bnal knowledge in the field of
estate.
k, ORI is designation held
l,.ss than 3 percent of licensees
londa. Attendance at several
Ik-long classes followed by
Irs <>l testing are the ways in
fcli one achieves this category.
Eges are held infrequently;
Itions are varied throughout
I stale and |>assing grades are
easy to attain. Principal
acts lor these courses are
Imial investments, ap-
HHHLaHMf
Hhoda L. Karpay. ORI, CHS
praising. syndication, tax
shelters and other aspects of
commercial properties.
Before trying for the CRS, one
must have the ORI. Awarded by
the Moanl of (iovernors of the
Hie Wiesel to Speak
|ie Wiesel will speak at the
Lenity of South Florida on
i 22 under the sponsorship of
IB'nai B'rith Ifillel Founda-
le is creating a lot of in-
^ in Tampa.
most prolific author with
15 books to his credit.
is now chairman of the
. ( 'nmmission on the
Icausl He is often called
fct ill the Holocalust," which
ubject ol most of his
s. \\ iest 1 currently occupies
endowed chair at Boston
ersitj
lecture, "The Writers and
i mil Their Kcsponsi
ps." will be in the BSN Busi
Auditorium at the Univer-
I South Florida Student
tickets are tree, all other tickets
are S3 each.
__
Engagements
GiveLWooff
nirairement ol Susie
daughter of Sherwin and
lUivel, Miami, to Eric Woolf,
I Dr Walter and Millie
I mi pa. has been an-
Jcni by their parents.
'dilated this month
the University of Florida
a degree in Speech Com-
cation. He is opening an
\ir Animal, a pet travel
|< in Atlanta. He is a
bar ot Tau Epsilon Phi
Inity.
ie, a Finance major at the
prsity ol Florida, will receive
Begree in March. She is a
He Sister" of Tau Epsilon
faternity.
< Ictober wedding is planned
Jiami. with Rabbi Frank
Iheirrj of Congregation
irai Zedek officiating.
Secretary Needed
iRodeph Sholom Synagogue
|5 days'week
f> office skills & Judaic
Jkground required.
11837-1911 for appointment
Weber-Kaplan
Dick and Paula Weber an-
nounce the engagement of their
daughter, Mona F.lise, to Harry
Kaplan, son of Hoy and I.ida
Kaplan.
The bride-to-be attended the
University of Florida and has
transferred to the University of
South Florida to complete her
degree in advertising.
The future groom, a graduate
of the University of Tampa, is
continuing in school at the
University of South Florida.
The wedding is planned for
June. 1982.
Klein-Otiphant
The engagement of Sheri
Klein, daughter of Jackie and
Jerry Klein of Nashville. Tenn..
to David Oliphant. son of Frayda
and Elmer Oliphant. Tampa, is
announced by their parents.
Sheri and David are students at
the University of Florida.
The couple will be married in
| Nashville in August and plan to
live in that city.
Bernard's tujs
"'Kosher Butchery
209M: DREW ST CLEARWATER. FLORIDA 33615
tBttwmn BUetm H*c*m)
Realtors National Marketing
Institute in Chicago, CRS or
Certified Residential Specialist is
held by less than 1 percent of
realtors in the United States.
Besides demonstrating ability
in the academic area, this level is
also an indication ol extensive
experience. In applying for this
certification, Rhoda Karpay was
able to document over 200
closings in support of her ap-
plication.
To meet the growing needs of
her clients, Khoda is now shifting
her emphasis from residential to
commercial and investment
properties. "I'm looking forward
to this change because it presents
a stimulating challenge. It
demands more sophisticated
comprehension of financing and
the opportunity to deal with
clients who are also more astute
about investments, tax shelters
and such."
Khoda is married to Joel L.
Karpay. Assistant Vice President
and Associate Manager of F. F.
11 ut ion. They are the parents of
three daughters: Honnie. a junior
at Tulane: Lori, a freshman at
Santa Fe Junior College; and
Bevie, a junior at Plant High
School,
Khoda has held many leader-
ship positions in the community,
most recently as Women's
Division Campaign Chairman
and President of the Women's
Division of Tampa Jewish Fed-
eration. Presently she is a mem-
ber of the Women's Division
National Board. She is a very
strong proponent of combining
career and volunteer efforts. This
has been seen clearly in her past
achievements. Khoda is a Magna
Cum I.aude graduate of Queens
College. N.Y.. with a degree in
Industrial Psychology.
One thing is certain, whatever
Khoda attempts, it will be care-
fully thought out and approached
with the highest degree of pro-
fessionalism and integrity.
<*>
^
*>
**
a*
\*
*
f*
^v.
*fe
<*S
WOMEN'S WEDNESDAY
*>.
'*
**1
*0*
WEDNESDAY -- JANUARY 7, 1981
DID YOU SEND IN YOUR RESERVATION ????
CLASSES ARE FILLING UP!
SEND IN YOUR RESERVATION TODAY .
OR CALL THE TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION, 872-4451
%
*'
*****>
*>*,
*o
00*
*e<
nrf*
i0*
&**
00
DON'T BE
^HOODWINKED
If YOURE Paying For a Fresh Kosher
Chicken, Make Sure its Number 1.
tVMirnr*
S*
KOSHER
iaroPB
y-N
Empire
*ie18
Webe-K*
dorothy
PLAN
POULTRY
KZf
JgBKMN&
W
LOOK for Empires Famous:
Red. White and Blue Metal;
Identification Wing Tan -"'
KOSHER
It Certifies that you
Empire ] are getting a Genuine
Empire Kosher Product
EmpireTaste and Quality above the Rest
Tropic Ice Co.
attributed* 624-5750
IRVIM61
rruuET
*HONE <13) 4C19VOZ
MMMAAO MARKS


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
_Friday.JanuMvt|
New Organization
Jews Reminded 'Liberal View' is Not the Only One
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Prof. Seymour Siegel of
New York, widely-known
among politically-sophisti-
cated Jews as a staunch po-
litical conservative, said
here that the recently-
formed American Jewish
Forum (AJF) hopes to be-
come a national action cen-
ter for Jews with conserva-
tive views.
Siegel. Ralph Simon Professor
at the Jewish Theological Semi-
nary of America, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
initial meeting which led to
formation and incorporation of
the AJF as a non-profit, tax-
exempt organization was held
last June in Washington at his
initiative at the headquarters of
the Heritage Foundation, a con-
servative think-tank, which made
facilities available for that
meeting.
Siegel said plans called for an
office in Washington, a paid
staff, sponsorship of conferences
and seminars, and a campaign for
a "substantial" membership. He
said several fund-raising events
were planned in an effort to raise
a $100,000 budget.
Citing the election victory of
Ronald Reagan, Siegel said he
hoped American Jews would
realize that there is now "a new
conservative reality" and that
"they cannot continue to po-
litically be tied to just one
party," the Democrats, and to
"the once fashionable liberal'
view exclusively."
HE DECLARED that "a nice
group of younger Jews" had been
attracted by the AJF in
Washington, including some
Congressional aides, adding that,
even in its present "embryonic"
form, the AJF members "have
very good contacts" with the in-
coming Reagan Administration.
This means, he said, that AJF
members "can speak to key
people in the Reagan Adminis-
tration and in the new Congress."
Those present at the meeting
included Siegel, Michael Kubinoff
of the Heritage Foundation, and
David Meiselbaum, economics
professor at Virginia Polytechnic.
Siegel said Meiselbaum had been
named acting chairman of the
AJF Board of Trustees.
He said he was acting
president, adding that permanent
officers would be named at the
first formal conference of the
AJF. scheduled for Washington
sometime next spring. Elliott
Abrams. a former aide to Sen.
Henry Jackson (I).. Wash), had
been named chairman of a com-
mittee to organize that con-
ference.
SIEGEL SAID the AJF cur-
rently has about 50 members,
most of them men. He said they
include Maxwell Raab. former
secretary of President Eisen-
howers Cabinet and currently
president of Temple Fmanu-FI of
New York; Abrams and his
recent bride. Naomi; and Ger-
trude Himmelfarb.
He said the AJF had three
aims: to investigate "in an aca-
demic way" the relationship be-
tween Jewish traditional thought
and conservative political ideolo-
gies; to publish materials to dis-
seminate findings to the Jewish
community; and to serve as a
political education center on con-
servative ideology for Jews.
Siegel said the AJF plans to
sponsor academic conferences, at
which papers will be presented
Bosch witz Declares
Israel Strategic Asset to U.S.
NEW YORK The
newly appointed chairman
of the Middle East Sub-
committee of the Senate
Foreign Relations Commit-
tee has told the Zionist Or-
ganization of America that
the State of Israel "is in-
deed a strategic asset to the
U.S."
And, added Republican
Sen. Rudy Boschwitz, who
has been appointed chair-
man of the Middle East
Subcommittee, "While
Israel can not exist without
U.S. aid the U.S., if it is
to continue to grow
stronger can not exist
without Israel."
SOME 200 ZOA leaders who
were attending a two-day Na-
tional Executive Committee
meeting here, were told by both
Sea Boschwitz and Ivan J.
Novick, president of the ZOA,
thai the Jewish vote was now a
swing vote," which made it
more valuable politically
I n en address in what probably
was hie first talk before a Jewish
organization as the new chairman
Sen. Bonchwitz
of the Subcommittee, Sen.
Boschwitz of Minnesota firmly
asserted that "peace in the
Middle East is not going to come
by establishing a Palestinian
slate."
Calling any proposal of a
Palestinian stale as "un-
settling." he said that if Sen.
Charles Percy of Illinois feels
that creating a l'I.<) state would
end tensions in the Middle East.
Sen. Percy should "look to" the
conflicts today among the Arab
states themselves.
IN HIS address to the NEC
meeting at ZOA headquarters
and then published for dis-
semination to the general Jewish
public. A regular periodical also
Ls being planned, he said.
HE TOLD the JTA that while
the A.IF will be aligned philo-
sophically with conservatives in
both major parties, it will not
endorse parties or candidates in
order to protect its tax-exempt
status and that similar con-
straints would apply to lobbying
for conservative legislation.
Siegel commented that the
recently-announced "New Jewish
Agenda for the 1980s" INJA)
was a good sign." because it
meant that the Jewish com-
munity "is reconsidering its
political status." He said he
understood that Prof. Eugene
Horowitz, a liberal Reform rabbi
and editor of "Sh'ma," was
associated with NJA.
Asked for comment, Borowitz
told the JTA he was not formally
associated with the NJA. but
that he agreed with the liberal
goals of the NJA and had sent "a
bit of money and allowed^
usemv name."
Borowitz said he did not
with descriptions of th,.
genceoftheNJAasrenJsI?*
a. ibera. response to 3gjJ|
dence of growing conserv-3
among American Jews i2
Americans generally. He Ji
that the NJA indicated "hit 5'
teftin%Jerhcommi^
not dead. On the other hand !
quite clear that until now we hi I
had very few efforts u> baai
through what the Con*rv,Z
position is.
HE SAID.
"What is
servative Jews
as example, L
s position of coil
' on a constitn. I
tional amendment on abortic,
and where can Jews "an au.|
with the Christian evenS
movement and where do wed,
the line?
Borowitz added that "nowtsJ
the right is in power" asarestj
of the election of Keagan andil
conservative-controlled Senate!
"it is very important for tl|
Jewish right to define what tl
stands for. They have told a|
what they are against: now |
them tell us what they are for."
TJF Leadership Program
**&'
V
Dip Vaderiand
lure. Novick said he "looked with
anticipation to ihe possibility
that the new administration will
examine the Stale Department
and decide, once and for all. that
tin) lung-entrenched pro-Arabists
no longer will determine policy.
We will carefully observe what
action is taken as an indicator of
the direction the Keagan Ad-
ministration will take."
Declaring thai ihe ZOA, "con-
sistent with its tradition and
sense of responsibility will con-
tinue to address issues." Novick
said:
"1 do believe we can accept at
face value the firm declaration
made by both President Flee t
Keagan and Vice President Fleet
Hush that Jerusalem belongs to
Israel and to the Jewish people. I
believe that the incoming ad-
ministration means what it has
said in its rejection of the IM.O
that it will not deal with it or
recognize it. Mr. Percy notwith-
standing.
"I look lot-ward to this new
administration in the hope that it
will work towards making
American military strong, ami
that urgent international and
domestic issues confronting the
security and lb-- welfare ol the
American people will be ad-
dressed forlhrighlly and 81
pediliouslv
SEN. BOSCHWITZ. a Berlin
born Jew whose parents fled Nazi
Germany for America when he
was three years old, told the ZOA
that "over and over again. Israel
has tried to achieve peace in the
Middle East."
He said that since the be-
ginning of the century. "Jews
have sought peace with the
Arabs and yet have been
frustrated in every desire for-
peaceful coexistence with th
Arabs."
In introducing Sen. Boschwitz,
Gordon B. Zacks, prominent
Jewish leader in the Republican
Party, made the announcement
of Sen. Boschwitz' appointment
as chairman of the Middle East
Subcommittee of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee.
Alleck A. Resnick. chairman of
the National Executive Com
roittee, presided, at the NEC
meeting of the ZOA.
The Tampa Jewish Federation
Leadership Development
Program will hold its third major
event on Tampa Jewish Com-
munity Services, Saturday. Jan.
Id. s p.m.
The program will focus on a
Beriea of discussions with the
Leadership of the Tampa Jewish
Federation, Tampa Jewish Social
Service, Jewish Community
Center, and the Hillel School of
Tampa. Facilitating group
discussions will be members of
t he Steering Committee.
This progiam will lake place at
the home ol Norman and Jane
Kosenthal. Co-Chairmen overall
Leadership Development Project.
Planning programs of this nature
is the responsibility of the
Steering Committee which in-
cludes Joan and Bob Goldstein.
Co-Chairman; Lili and Barry
Kaulmann. Brian Abeles,
Barbara and Bruce Goldstein I
Jan and Jeff Bloom. Harriet and I
Larry Cyment, Sydell and David|
Vogel.
Much Food
At Affairs
Continued from Page 4
who perhaps eat only glattl
because just plain kosher is not!
good enough' are not necessarirjl
more sensitive to lheseissu|
He disclosed iliat the (iensl
Kebbe publicly and sawn
others personally' are takingl
action lo combat t hese problem!
Neverthek'ss. he concluded."Mil
rule, we seem to be like all othn
nations, rather than a light unu|
the nations, people whose I
standard of sanctity that
serve as a In.nun (or all
follow."
sun cove realty
IB
otAuoir
commercial residential
investments
ALUITTIR, REALTOR
5216 i DaieMaDry
837-S545
I 251-5471
(Over 15 Year* European Experience)
Personalized Facials and Correction of Skin ProbleJls
Waxing Make-up Lessons and Porcelain Nam
Gift CvtlflcafM Aailabl9!U
Business 253-6026 **8ldenC< SS
2213 S. Dale Mabry ..^ah
tL.t,Gt,Mam.d, Bella Dob<*>
iifl
*
*




|[ 2315 w uneoaugh Ave
Millers seafood center
Fish Market
now has
Lox Chub* Htrrlng
Nbw York Bg*l$ Bialys
Barrol Plcke-lt Smoked king
*
*
5-4795 i



January 2,1981
he Magic-Maker
The Jewish Flpridian of Tampa
Page 7
issinger Back in Power Circles
[iddle East Tour Poses Questions;
jiswers Unveil No Major Surprises
URO What former Secretary of State Henry
jers trip to the Middle East portends is hard to
ius far, there are two patterns to be observed.
ne is that Kissinger went to Egypt first, and his
[scheduled to last at least through the week. On the
I hand, he plans to hold meetings with Prime
er Menachem Begin over little more than a two-day
[when he finally leaves here and arrives in Israel,
is next on his itinerary.
DOWNGRADING of
hot only diplomatically,
militarily, begun by the
administration thus con-
In the eve of the takeover
Ttsident-Elect Ronald
Reagan. The question is whether
the latest slight to Israel is part
of the last sputterings of the
Carter administration or whether
the slight has the tactif approval
of the Reairan tim when it takes
Foreign Affairs
lien Says Kissinger
111 be Reagan Aide
>EPH POLAKOFF
1HINGTON -
- Richard Allen,
Int- Elect Reagan's
ee to head the
Security Council
| White House, said
it Reagan "accepts"
lp David formula as
Bequate framework
^inuation of the pur-
peace" in the Middle
id that Former Sec-
)f State Henry Kis-
. ill be assisting the
|nt on foreign policy
i conference following
|al announcement of his
Hit Allen said, "Should
lions ever be required in
\p David process, they
made with the consent
fho participate."
APPEARED to be an
his previous state-
^t change! would occur
the consent of Egypt
lei However, since the
lav id iormula itself en-
iroadsning the base of
ions to include the West
|a/a inhabitants and
len's statement is not
|as a policy change.
that he and Kissinger
^i friends for nearly 20
len said that Kissinger
iportant and valuable
Id contributions in terms
ke and strategy" to
election campaign and
Igan, his Secretary of
pgnate Alexander Haig
use Secretary-designate
feinberger "respect his
dded, "I anticipate he
I will be called upon
for a range of under-
erhaps beginning with
[lvice, perhaps under
avel on behalf of the
Ition" at Reagan's
|DENT CARTER'S
Ambassador to the
kst, Sol Linowitz, said
that he thought Kis-
|>iuld take over im-
3n of the .Camp David
over on Jan. 20.
This question can be answered
only if there is a clear under-
standing of the nature of Dr.
Kissinger's trip in the first place
and therefore a clear under-
standing of the second pattern
that his trip has been taking. It is
arguable whether the question
can be answered at all.
President Anwar Sadat gave
Dr. Kissinger a warm three-hour
welcome at Mit Abul Kom in his
home village on Monday. Kissin-
ger carried secret messages with
him to Sadat from President-
Elect Reagan. Sadat obliged with
a message of his own, also secret,
which Kissinger is to carry back
to the U.S.
THUS FAR, it is insisted that
Kissinger is visiting Egypt as a
"private citizen," albeit with the
approval of the Reagan team's
Dr. Kissinger
Carter's departure from office.
Allen said he had "no
recommendations at the present
time" with regard to "perma-
nent" U.S. bases in the Middle
East. But he stressed that "It is
clear" that Reagan has "in-
dicated the U.S. is going to be
increasingly concerned about its
presence in the Middle East for
the purpose of contributing to the
security of the oil routes." He
added that bases would be
"among early options" to be pur-
sued within the National Security
Council system.
foreign advisers. But there is
clear skepticism being expressed
over the "private" nature of the
visit.
Kissinger achieved prominence
for his shuttle dipolmacy between
Israel and Egypt following the
1973 Yom Kippur War, which
presumably led to the Camp
David accords, but these have
been lagging, and in the final
days of the Carter administra-
tion, it is clear that little progress
is being made over such thorny
issues as the West Bank, Gaza
and the Golan Heights.
Kissinger told reporters on his
arrival here that I did not come
here to negotiate. I did not come
here with any messages. I did not
come with any ideas to speed up
the (peace) process." But the fact
that he did bring a message from
President-Elect Reagan belied his
statement, which is traditional
for Kissinger's method of
operation.
FOR HIS PART. Sadat de-
clared that "I asked him
(Kissinger) to convey certain
messages to the new ad-
ministration."
Both men poured over a world
map later in Sadat's housing
compound and Sadat later de-
clared that "we discussed not
only the current situation in our
area, but all the world positions
around us."
Sadat and Kissinger have long
gotten along famously, and
Sadat's latest praise of the
former Secretary of State was in
accord with that friendship. "As
usual, our ideas have always been
identical," he said.
After his map meeting with
Sadat, Kissinger noted that "It
would not be appropriate to go
into the details of the analysis he
(Sadat) put forward and which I
must say, as always, I shared."
AS FOR his official or un-
official status so far as the next
Reagan administration is con-
cerned, Kissinger said, "I am
available for advice and special
assignments of limited duration.
I do not think I would be most
useful in the detailed working out
of the autonomy negotiations."
What is one to believe at this
point? You pay your money, and
you take your choice.
Pope Says No Nation
Has Jerusalem Claim
Id rleons
MOTEL
Aim To
Stop Yerida
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Council for the Prevention of
Yerida has been established here
following the publication of a
report prepared by the Jewish
Agency that between 300,000 and
500,000 Israelis are now living in
the United States.
The Council was formed by the
Zionist Council in Israel and the
founding session was attended by
Absorption Minister David Levy,
Jewish Agency Director General
Shmuel Lahis, Knesset members
and other public figures.
Ephraim Urbach, professor of
Talmud and Midrash at Hebrew
University, blamed the govern-
ment and the Jewish Agency for
having failed to take action to
prevent yerida. He called for
public action to implement the
. values nd^omsvn^essarj(i lq
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Cairo newspaper, Al
Ahram, has quoted Pope
John Paul II as declaring in
an interview that "No one
nation can claim exclusive
ownership" of Jerusalem.
According to the semi-
official daily, he was re-
sponding to a question on
the Vatican's view of
Israel's law declaring un-
divided Jerusalem its
capital.
The Pontiff was quoted as
saying further, "The Vatican
categorically rejects the view
that it is enough to protect the
right to visit the holy places
while leaving Jerusalem a united
Jewish city under Jewish rule."
He reportedly urged Israel not
to obstruct attempts to bring
peace to the Middle East. He said
Moslems and Christians had a
duty to work together "to
achieve freedom for Jerusalem
and restore the Holy City to all
religious groups." Al Ahram
reported.
THE POPE also discussed the
status of Jerusalem and the
problem of the Palestinian people
with Prince Saud al-Faisal, the
Foreign Minister of Saudi
Arabia, during a private 45-
minute meeting in the Vatican
last week
The Pope "reaffirmed the well-
known position of the Holy See
that it is against any unilateral
initiative to modify the political
status' of Jerusalem and the
hope that the Holy City may
become a meeting place for faith-
ful of the three monotheistic
religions, Christianity, Islam and
Judaism," a Vatican com-
munique said.
It added that the Pontiff "also
expressed the urgency of an
action to resolve with imparti-
ality the problem of the Pales-
tinian people and to preserve the
independence, territorial in-
tegrity and unity of Lebanon."
According to the communique,
the meeting between the Pope
and Faisal "took place in an
atmosphere of deep cordiality
and understanding." It was the
first time that a Pope met with a
member of the Saudi royal
family.
JUDAIC DESIGNS at
HuetUpUHt Met Smfaotdvty
Over
150 items
Tallis Cases and Yarmutkes
Specialty items for children
Traditional and contemporary
Challah Cloths & Matzoh Covers
Tablecloths and Napkins
The finest from Israel. France & U.S.
Write for your copy today!
zS
STITCHERY BY HENYI
5710 W. Mariposs St.. FLI
Phoenix. Arixona 85031
32
What's new?
rhe Old Orleans Motel is the
newest talk in Tampa. Well
plunrred renovation is really
making the motel relive it's dis-
tinctive past! Not to mention,
[the Mardi Gras Lounge is now
booking some spectacular show
groups from around the. coun-
rry. So bring in the free drink
coupon below and come see
why the new Old Orleans Motel
is the talk of the town!
k 135 beautifully decorated
rooms
5 newly furnished suites
En|oy excellent dining in
Glaros' Steak House
Show Groups nightly in the
Mardi Grai Lounge
Private meeting rooms
Reel limousine service for
Airport transportation
Tvo minutes from Tanipc
Stadium
COCKTAIL in the
Mardi Gras lounge
'.*
Ftm Drink with this coupon I
305S NOUN OAU MASSY
TAMPA, KOejCA*07
(I J)7T-7 .
V-U/


Ps*e8
The Jewish Floridian ofTampa_
> "day. Janu
News in Brief
Kollek Opposes Another Settlement
JERUSALEM Mayor
Teddy Kollek has sharply criti-
cized plans by the Israel Lands
\uthority to build a new resi-
dential settlement on the West
Hank near the Arab village of
Nabi Samwil, just beyond the
northern outskirts of Jerusalem.
Me said the money required to
develop the 125-acre site for
private homes and condominiums
would be better spent improving
iMsting Jewish neighborhoods
inside Jerusalem.
The Mayor also warned that
whoever invests money in the
purchase of land in Nabi Samwil
will not see the color of his
money." He expressed concern
that while the new settlement
would be outside of Jerusalem's
boundaries, it would still depend
on municipal services from the
city which can hardly cope with
existing demands. Kollek also
I old reporters that the new
settlement would add more
Arabs to Jerusalem's population,
meaning those who live between
the city and proposed Jewish
residential settlement.
Mayor Kollek
PARIS Npam Chomsky, the
American writer who is interna-
tionally famous for his works on
linguistics, philosophy, history
and contemporary issues, has
written a preface to a book by a
French historian who claims that
the Nazi gas chambers never
existed and that the facts about
the Holocaust and the number of
victims of the Holocaust have
been grossly exaggerated.
The French writer. Robert
Kosher Lunch Menu
Kosher lunch menu of the Senior Citizen Nutrition and
Activity Program is sponsored by the Hillsborough County
Commission and held at the Jewish Community Center. Marilyn
Blakley. site manaaer, 872-4451. Menu subject to change.
WEEK OF J WIAKV
9
U heal
Green
.hllie
Monday: Beef-a-Roni, Broccoli, Fruil Cocktail, Whole
Bread, Peanut Butter Cookies. Coffei or Tea.
Tuesdaj Meat Hulls with Gravy, Parsley Noodles,
I leans, Carrot Sal.id with Pineapple, Roll, Appli
Coffei or I i ,1
Wednesday Sliced Turkej withdraw. Yellow Squash, Green
Lima Bean: Tossed Salad with Green Pepper, Tomato
Wedges, Thousand Island Dressing Whole Wheat Broad
Fashioned Carrol Take i effee o\ Tea
I'hursduj Meat I ivy, Whipped Irish Potal
Sp w nli Peaches Italian Bread, Orai
.In,, i ( olfei oi !
I'nila;, Chicken with Gravy, Yellow Kin Mixed Vegetables,
Chilled Canned Tomatoes Whole Wheat Bread, Canned
IV.u -. Coffei "i !'';!
* mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmKmmmmmmmmmm
vi
I
Community Calendar
Friday, Jan. 2
Candlehghting time 5:27)
Saturday, Jan. 3
Voong Leadership Group II 8 p.m. Congregation Kol Ami
Sisterhood Couples Bowling 8 p.m.
Sunday,Jan.4
Brandon Jewish Chavurah Board Meeting 9:30 a.m.
Monday, Jan. 5
Congregation Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Open Board Meeting
10:30 a.m. and luncheon at noon Hillel USF Area Board
Meeting 7:30 p.m. Jewish Women for Jewish Survival
General Meeting 7:45 p.m. B'nai B'nth Women Simcha Board
8 p.m.
Tuesday, Jan.6
Congregation Rodeph Sholom "Lunch and Learn" noon
Hadassah Board Meeting 10:30 a.m. Tampa Jewish
Federation Executive Board Meeting 7:30 p.m.
Hadassoh/Ameel Board Meeting 8 p.m. ORT (evening
chapter) Board Meeting 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 7
Congregation Schaarai Zedek Brotherhood Board'Meeting 7:30
p m Congregation Kol Ami Sisterhood Board Meeting 7:45
p m Congregation Rodeph Sholom Board Meeting 8 p.m.
Women's Wednesday, sponsored by Women's Division of
Tampa Jewish Federation to be held at Congregation Schaarai
Zedek. Morning Session 9:15 a.m. Evening Session -6pm.
Thursday, Jan. t
ORT (daytime and evening chapters) Bowling 9:30 a.m.
*,sh Towers Residents/Management Meeting- 1:30 p.m.
i May, Jon. 9
jndlehgbting time 5 32>
Flaurisson. was dismissed from
his post as professor at I,nous
i niveraity in the wake ol the
scandal caused by 0M of his pre-
vious books on the same theme
Chomsky states in his preface
that he does not share Mauris
ion's Mews but that he favors
freedom ol opinion and ei
ion Heclaima thai thecon-
troversj over this subject will
help reveal the real truth and the
extent ,,! Nazi atrocities in
countries which were not sub-
i.i led to Nazi occupation.
UNITED NATIONS
United Nations Secretary-Gen
eral Kurt Waldhcim has
responded t<> criticism from an
international group of scholars
and world figures charging that
the UN was in danger ol be-
coming a tone against peace it-
self' because it has been 'per-
\ erted" by anti-Israel forces
Waldhcim has rejected charges
assailing the UN by the Com-
mittee lor I \ Integrity, an
independent group The Com-
mittee's criticism was made
public last week at an inter-
national convocation at the City
I niversit) ol New York and pub-
lished a- an advertisement in The
\, ) ork I mes
li is disappointing to see a
group ol eminent mdi\ iduals lend
themselves to indiscriminate and
wholesale criticism ol the j \
liecauae ol their apparent dis-
satisfaction with its position on
one particular subject, the I \
poke-man said, ailili:
We will not dignif) the ad-
'. erl isemi nl b) a det ai led
on ment
NEW >OUh bK
la\ it- ol \i w > ork has bi en
d recipient ol th< Tiaym
on \ward ol th< \nti-
ii.' ol B'nai
itribu-
tions lei smerica demo* ratic

Senator will accept the
according t" Maxwell K.
1 In nberg, VDL's nal
chairman, at a Leagui
Breakers Hotel in Palm
Beach in Febru
urrently the ranking
Kepublican membei ol the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
and the Joint Economic Com-
mittee .lavits will have sen ed in
the I S Senate longer than any
New Yorker in history, \uthorol
the War Powers Ad and Pension
Reform, among other landmark
lulls, he is honored also lor legis-
lative accomplishments in such
areas as health. education,
housing, civil rights, small busi-
ness, labor, fiscal policy, the arts
and humanities, and foreign
poliej
VIKNNA Prime Minister
Bulend Ulusu. head of the
Turkish military government,
said here that his country's
historic links between Turkey
and the Arab countries. But the
daily Arbeiterzeitunn. which
covered Ulusu s press conference,
suggested that there were more
specific reasons for the diplo-
matic break.
According to the newspaper,
Dr.Barry D.Shapiro
( hiropracticPhysician
Suite4
13940 North DaleMabry
Tampa, Florida
24 Hour
Emergency Service
813-962-3608
lowering of diplomatic relations
with Israel was prompted by
Israel's intransigent policies to-
ward the Palestinians and the
one could have been the activities
ol the Mossed, the Israeli secret
service which was allegedly in-
volved in terrorist activities in
Turkey. But there has been no
substantiating evidence for this.
Another reason could be the
Iraqi-Iranian war which has
drawn Turkey closer to the more
conservative trab States
The 1 rbi iti rieitung noted that
Turkey announced its lowering of
diplomatic relations with Israel
shortly alter the Turkish Foreign
Minister visited Saudi Arabia.
earlier this month.
MONTREAL A r
Jewish leader, just ..^
the H.,.iBki reviJl*
Madrid, said the a|?1
crease in the nunC?]
allowed to leave, he SovjJJ
is the result of m^
W hat we are talking jkZS
st.tut.onahzed ajgj
sa.dlrwinCotU.r.p^
C anadian Jewish ConKre
(''tier told the j^
graphic Agenq that Jl
t >sk in August, I9h0cfm:
to '(XK) who left mAueuZ
"Increasing anti-SemkaW,,
s|Mnsible for the jm
'lecrease in the number^
allowed U> emigrate." he,
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
Vaera
VAERA Vliraham, Isaac, and Jacob as El Shuddui. and had madej
covenant with the patriarchs to give them the land of Canasal
Now, hearing the unhappy cry of the children of Israel, twl
Vlinight) was reminded of his covenant.
Pharaoh refused to let t he children of Israel depart from:r*|
laud ill ICgypI God brought Sevan plagues on the Kg\'ptians,J
an aitempi lo force I'haraoh's hand: blood, frogs, gnats, fljJ
nun i,mi. boils, and hail. At first Pharaoh conceded to Moses,"H
and mj people are wicked Kntreat the Lord, and let therebt]
. imugli ol i hem' mighty thunderings and hail, and I will letvoal
go" tExodui liut. when the plagues stopped.!
Pharaoh's heart was hardened again, and he refused to let thtl
I i.i. In.- go
(The recounting ol the Weakly Portion of the Law ,s eitractttf Mkal
upon The Gr.ph.c History ol the Jtwith Hent.g,. ed.teflI byP m2\
Tsamir,115. published by Shengold The volume ,s Jva.liwVit ;HSI
Distributing the volume.) *"!|

*

Jewish Community Directory
Schools
Hillel School (grade* i-*i
* Jewish Community Center
Pre-School and Kindergarten
* Seniors
* I haiDial A-Bus(call9a.m. tonoool
,j Jew ish lowers
Kosher lunch program
* Seniors' Project
* B'nai B'rith
839-70411
872-44511
*

*
*
*

*
*
Jewish ( ommunity I enter
Jew ish Floridian of Tampa
State of Israel Monds
Tampa Jewish Federation
Tampa Jew ish Social Service
Religious Directory
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swonn Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mollir.gj
Services Friday. 8 p m.; Saturday. 9 a.m. Doily: morning
evening minyan
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Conservative
962-6338 9 Rabbi Leonard Rosenthal Rabbi j Study, I*'0'
Dale Mabry *1312 (Countrywood Apt*.) Services Friday. PJ
at the Community Lodge, Waters and Ola Saturday, 10
Independent Day School. 12015 Orange Grove Dr
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM Conservative
2713 Bayshore Boulevord 837-1911 Rabbi Mort.n SardbergJ
Hazzan William Hauben Service*: Friday. 8 p.m.; Soturw
am Doily: Minyan, 7:15a.m.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Rsform
3303 Swonn Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundhsim'.
vice*: Friday, 8 p.m. Saturday, 9a.m.
CHABAD HOUSE
Cm
Jew.sh Student Center (Ulf\ 36-5 _Fletcher Aveno* ^
, 10 o"
-84J5FM
jewnn iiuaent e_.nter (Uy), J043 rieitn*. ----
Park Apt* 971-6768 or 985-7926 Rabbi 1"" "' ,fl0,
Yakov Werde Services: Friday, 7 30 p m Saturdo
Tune in The Jewish Sound, Sunday -11 a.m. to noon -
R'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida, 50 .
Court #172 (Village Square Apts.) 988-7076 or w J
Jeremy Brochin, director |(0i|:|
Services: Friday, 630 p.m followed by Shabbot t'""^^
p.m. (please make dinner reservations by 5 p ^ | .3Qa wi.,
Saturday, 10 am Sunday morning Bagei Brunch.



1
January 2,1981
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 9
Expert Pinpoints Two
Oil Sites in Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
;i. AVIV (JTA) An American geologist who
[to have been right 22 times out of 22 when advising
ictors where to drill for oil has picked two sites in
ihere he is confident oil will be found.
Hex Peterson, 48, president of the Satellite Oil
en and Development Corporation and lecturer at
jversity of Nebraska, spent 12 years developing his
^ of interpreting satellite pictures of the earth's
[re, mainly structural faults.
|pTER EXTENSIVE work in Israel, including
worK on the basis of his satellite data inter-
n. h- has now told the Harav Investment and
kpment Company to drill at two spots in the Kiryat
rea. The company, established by Dr. Robert
I Ontario, has been granted a drilling concession
[3,000 square mile area. It will be joined in the
i' by the Overland Dome Petroleum Company and
jbal Oil Company in searching for oil and gas in
frae i the first country outside the U.S. where
y used his new technique.
icceeds Amitay
rmer Kennedy Aide
t Helm of AIPAC
lo Foster Love
Proposals for Passion Plays
WOLFBLITZER
jn ChronicU Syndicate
ISHINGTON The
ly-reHr!stered pro-
lobbying organiza-
|n Capitol Hill has a
tecutive director.
nas \. Dine, 40, has
chosen to replace
J. Amitay. who
six years' sen-ice as
. t of the Amer-
Israel Public Affairs
Sttee (AIPAC).
I nnis; recently served as
policy adviser to
fl Sen. Edward
| Massachusetts. He
- responsible for
Kennedy's Middle East
Hits dt.-ing his recent
essful bid for the
)l>! ;mng the Kennedy
served as a
lelio* at the Brookings
I Washington
'" we adviser on the
Arms Limitation
to democratic Sen.
Muskie of Maine, now
p of State
pas also director of the
" Security Staff of the
pudget Committee which
chaired. His ten-year
the Senate began as a
assistant on foreign
affairs to Democratic Sen. Frank
Church of Idaho.
At Brookings last year. Dine
co-authored the chapter on the
U.S. Defense Budget in the
institution's prestigious "Setting
National Priorities."
In 1974-75. Dine was a fellow
at Harvard University's Kennedy
Institute of Politics, the center
tor international affairs and the
programme for science and in-
ternational affairs.
BEFORE coming to Capitol
Hill, he served as persona!
assistant to Ambassador Chester
Bowles at the U.S. Embassy in
New Delhi. India. He served as a
U.S. Peace Corps congressional
liaison and before that a Peaco
Corps volunteer in the Philip-
pines from 1962 to 1964
Dine, who has visited Israel
twite, was born in Cincinnati,
where he received his religious
education at the Isaac M. Wise
Temple, a Reform congregation
He earned a BA degree from
Colgate university and an MA
trom the University of California
in South Asian history He and
his wife. Joan, have two
daughters.
Amitay. who came from the
staff of Democratic Sen.
Abraham Ribicoff of Connecticut
in 1974 to succeed I.L. Kenen as
executive director of AIPAC, is
planning to open his own con-
sulting office in Washington.
NEW YORK
Proposals for transforming
passion plays from vehicles
of anti-Semitism to dramas
that help "foster love, not
hate, between Jews and
Christians" highlight a
publication written by two
Roman Catholic scholars
and issued by the Anti-
Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
Entitled "The Oberammergau
Passionspiel 1984," it suggests
28 revisions in the text of the
West German pageant to make
its next performance in 1984, "an
example of a philo-Semitic Pas-
sion Play."
ACCORDING to Theodore
Freedman, director of ADL's
national Program Division, who
has been active in facilitating
some of the changes in the text,
more than 300,000 Americans
60 percent of the total attendance
witnessed the 1980 per-
formance of the spectacle The
oldest, most influential and best
attended ot all crucifixion
dramatizations, it is staged each
decade by the Oberammergau
villagers in fulfillment of a vow
made by their ancestors after the
town was spared the ravages of
the 17th Century plague The
play will be put on in 1984 to
celebrate its 350th anniversary.
The ADL publication, written
in English and German, also
contains guidelines for other
passion plays staged in this
country and abroad. The pro-
posals and guidelines were
written by Dr. Leonard Swidler,
professor of Catholic Thougnt
and Interreligious Dialogue at
Temple University. Philadelphia,
and Father Gerard Sloyan, pro-
lessor of New Testament at
Temple, after years of research,
attendance at the Oberammergau
spectacle and consultations with
theologians at the Vatican, in
Germany and in the United
States.
Through distribution to church
groups, the authors hope to alert
Christians "to the problems
inherent in all Passion Plays
and their possible solutions
and be instructive about that
most profound and pervasive of
relationships for Christianity, its
relationship with Judaism."
THE PROPOSALS have been
sent to Oberammergau Mayor
Ernest Zwink and Pater Gregor
Ruemmelein of the nearby Ettal
Monastery, the village and ec-
clesiastical authorities with the
greatest responsibility for the
scripting and staging of the 1984
performance, and Joseph Car-
dinal Ratzinger, the highest-
ranking Catholic Prelate in
Bavaria, and Auxiliary Bishop
Karl Flugel of Regensburg.
With the appropriate revisions,
the authors project an Oberam-
mergau dramatization that will
be "a religious, dramatic and
nusical production totally free
rom anti-Semitic and anti-Judaic
lements. and will show the
lewishness of Yeshua (Jesus)
ind his followers and exhibit a
tensitivity to and love for the
Judaism that was the lifelong
religion of Yeshua and all his
followers, and thereby foster
love, not hate, between Jews and
Christians."
The proposals, which fall into
three major categories, call for:
Changing character names
which "unwarrantedly" impart
negative qualities to Jews:
9 Emphasizing the Jewishnees
of Jesus, his family, his disciples
and his followers:
9 Depicting Pontius Pilate as
the "self-centered, brutal tyrant
he in fact was" instead of as a
good" foil against the "evil"
Jews as in the current portrayal.
ACCORDING to Freedman.
the recommendations build upon
improvements previously incor-
porated into the 1980 production
at ADL's suggestions, which, to
some extent reduced the play's
potential for anti-Semitism. The
new suggestions, he said, are
designed to solve factors which
were left unresolved
For example, he went on to
say. "The practice of giving un-
mistakably Hebrew or Old Test-
ament names to opponents of
Jesus automatically sets up in
the minds of the audience an
opposition between the Old and
the New Testaments "
He added that textual changes
underscoring the Jewishness of
Christianity's "founders" would
constitute "a giant step toward
the elimination of Christian anti-
Semitism."
IN THIS vein, the proposals
suggest that in the pageant Jesus
be addressed with historical
accuracy as "rabbi'' and
Yeshua' instead of "master"
and Christ." the two appel-
ations which have been used
interchangeably.
The proposals also recommend
that scenes in which Pilate ap-
pears be rewritten to encompass
the following principles in accord
with New Testament accounts
and the historical record:
Pilate's ambitions and
jpportunism often resulted "in
he shedding of much innocent
lood";
"The high priests exercised
power at the sufferance of the
Romans and were not greatly
loved by the people":
Thank You
The Hillel School Parents Association thanks the
following businesses for their contribution to our
successful fundraiser.
ONE
I ^-klatxlcian
(-aUtxs
tORIDA S 0LD6ST
ANn FINEST
KOSHER CATERERS
44M**
_:.
Action Printtog
Admiral Bendow inn
Air Animal, inc.
Bartkes Dinner Theatre
Hillel Bingo Association
Hough Exterminating
island Food service, inc.
Jacquelvns
Louisas Health spa
Loungerie
Mr. and Mrs. Ben Lynn -
Asblo Theatre
Sals Place Restaurant
Swiss House Restaurant
The Cheese Shop
TneCoic ^snops
t Yeshua, as reported in Mark
(14:2), Matthew and Luke
(23:27) (26.5), "did have sup-
porters in Jerusalem," whom the
high priests feared to arouse;
0 The Gospels were written as
polemics during the great Jewish
resistance to Roman political
power at a time when the Jewish
community was divided between
those who followed "the way" of
Yeshua and those who did not.
FREEDMAN said he is
confident that the ADL pro-
posals will be seriously con-
sidered by the producers of the
Oberammergau spectacle because
they have already demonstrated
"a sincere willingness to heed
criticism and make constructive
changes in keeping with the en-
lightened spirit, principles and
guidelines of Vatican II."
Anti-Semitism
In Soccer Clubs
By HENRIETTE BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
The traditional rivalry- between
two leading Dutch soccer clubs.
>ne of them Jewish, has taken on
anti-Semitic overtones, it was
charged here by the recently
iormed Foundation for Com-
oating Anti-Semitism in Holland
ISTIBA). Richard Stein, the Chi-
cago-born chairman of STIBA
*ho lives in Rotterdam, raised
.he issue in a letter to the director
to the Feyenoord soccer club in
that city
Feyenoord's most formidable
jpponent has been the Ajax
occer club of Amsterdam which
s Jewish-owned and has many
l-wish supporters. Both teams
lave been national champions a
number of times.
STEIN POINTED out in his
letter that Feyenoord fans lately
have been singing a song. "Ajax
> the gas chambers." and similar
slogans. He also charged that the
Feyenoord fans are notorious for
their unruly behavior at the
games
Meanwhile, in an unrelated
development. the clubhouse
recently evacuated by the Ortho-
dox Br.ei Akiva soccer club in
Amsterdam has been taken over
by squatters. The team moved to
)ther premises recently in walk-
ing distance of the homes of its
members.
Rhoda L Karpay
CRI, CRS
Specializing in
Commercial and
Investment
Properties
Weurgetnecommnn.' to support
who have supported us.
SUN BAY CORP.
Realtors
877-3004
Out of state Toll Free
1 (800) 237-2022


Inflation: The Diminishing Pledge
The Pledge
Value
$1,000.00
Paid
1 year late
Paid
2 years late
DETROIT. Mich.-Reprwen.
tatives of the 14 largest Jewish
communities in the nation met
here recently with United Jewish
Appeal National Cash chairman
Edgar L. Cadden to explore ways
to improve the now of cash which
supports programs and services
through the Jewish agency in
Israel.
"It is absolutely essential,"
said Cadden. "that we do every,
thing possible to encourage the
payment of uncollected pledges.
The efficiency of a federation
cash collection program is still at
the core of everything we do.''
The National Cash chairmar
pointed out that the continuing
uneven flow of cash from com-
munities in 1980 has once again
created the need for a record level
of cash transmittals to UJA in
December. While calling on all
communities to respond to this
immediate critical need, he urged THE INFLATION FACTOR: Israeli inflation, coupled with the weakening value of the dollar, affects
a basic revision in community our pledges. This graph shows how paying a pledge late can severely reduce its purchasing power.
collection procedures in 1981 and-------------------------------------------------'-----------------------------------'--------------------------------------~~~"""
thereafter, to produce the vitally Irving Kessler. executive vice Appeal IU1AI. the UJA consti- to the Jewish agency, outlined
needed steady flow. president of the United Israel tuent agency transmitting cash cuts in the agency staff, possible
Paid
3 years late
Valuable View of Walter Lippmann
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Ronald Steel's comprehensive
new work. "Walter Lippmann.
and the American Century," is in
a sense three books in one: it ;s a
superb biography of the most
influential journalist-scholar of
our rimes; it is a valuable review
of our nation's domestic
upheavals and international
involvements; it is a stunning
study of an assimilated Jew's
lifetime quarrel with his religious
roots.
On all three counts, Ronald
Steel, categorized by some as a
revisionist, has made a masterful
record. The sensitive reader may
even be reminded of the praise
John Keats accorded Chapman's
Homer when he wrote:
"Oft of one wide expanse had I
been told/ That deep-brow d
Homer ruled as his demesne: /
Yet did I never breathe its pure
serene/ Till I heard Chapman
speak out loud and bold."
SPEAKING out loud and bold
on the tender issue of Jewish self-
hatred calls for diplomacy
combined with candor. Steel has
walked that tightrope with care.
It has been reported that when
Richard Rovere took on the
assignment of producing Lipp-
mann 's life story, he abandoned
the task because the second Mrs.
Lippmann drew the strings too
tight for Rovere on the sore
subject of the severed Jewish
umbilical cord.
And inasmuch as Steel's
eventual treatment of this
dramatic aspect of Lippmann s
life is drawing so much attention.
this observer intends to give it
more complete consideration in a
subsequent article.
Lippmann entered the world
with a silver spoon and a golden
pen. The only child of Jacob and
Daisy Baum Lippmann of New
York, he was born in September.
1889, when the wave of
emigration from European op-
pression was running high.
FINANCIALLY secure from
babyhood, handsomely educated
at Dr. Julius Sachs' School for
Boys in midtown Manhattan and
at Harvard, and blessed with the
privilege of frequent enriching
experiences through Europe, he
proved such a brilliant student at
Harvard that William James
sought him out and George
Santayana enlisted him as an
assistant instructor when Lipp-
mann had met all requirements
for graduation in three years.
The young man's social
conscience was stirred in 1908
when he volunteered with other
Harvard students to help scores
of poor families made homeless
by a fire that tore throught the
slums of Chelsea, Mass. Soon his
penetrating essays were beating
the drums for a socialist state.
Obituaries
He was on close terms with the
makers and shakers of the
financial world, high on the totem
pole of the conservative Herald-
Tribune, and a warm admirer of
Ogden Mills and the Mellon*. In
a biting critique of Lippmann s
long joumey over America's
economic and political terrain,
Amos Pinchot worte: "Once a
votary in the house of Marx, our
Elucidator now worships in the
house of Morgan.
TO HIS great credit, he was a
fiery activist. Admired by Teddy
Roosevelt, he gravitated to the
Woodrow Wilson orbit, served as
an army captain in the war that
was intended to make the world
safe for democracy (a democracy
with which he had a love-hate
relationship throughout his life),
and fashioned the groundwork
for Wilson's 14 Points.
He wrote speeches and key
memoranda for Presidents, found
the doors of Churchill and
Mussolini opened wide to his
inquiring mind and engaging
personality, swayed voters,
lobbied for legislation compatible
with his constant search for a
balanced role between business
and government.
additional reducSS
services, and a KeS?'
settlement pr "^
. K until they
collected and
Israel.
tran
are i
Israel, he said, "iswikl
than it, value two *2
terms of what it waibj
UIA comptroller Himi
berg added that the d2
^ting arid transmut^!
forced the Jewish a?
umits of its borrowing
order to continue
services.
"The indebtedness
Jewish agency is now
million." Mr. Goldbenr.
That is $50 million nxwd
was just two years ago.'
According to Cadden i
ceived by the National I
November. Decembel
January now accounts I
than 70 percent of tail
received annually. Thar
overseas agencies which I
on cash during the leu i
to borrow in order to
penses. The interest ratei,
short term loans can got
as 30 percent annually.
The most effective i
to this situation. Ca
gested, would be for a|
munities to follow the L
several of the 'Big 14'bjl
mitting annual allocs
UJA in proportionate
amounts, rather than in)
two lump sum payri
would greatly alleviatt]
Jewish agency's cub
position.
Another problem
was the timing of the i
ment of pledges by cool
to the local federations.
"On the average, 601
all pledges are normally c
in the year they an
Cadden reported. Thei
balance usually comes i
the following year, if wee
cekerate the pledge-year I
70 percent, we will add i
$50 million annually aval
allocation. That's a lot of I
that won't havetobebon
Cadden also asked
ties with substantial put|
accounts to carry out i
programs for collecting
pledges.
The Detroit delegation.sj
community, closed the
by resolving to recommeaJ|
their federation jointkei
numlier sending cash to N
UJA in even monthly!
French
Dilemma
Continued from Page 4-
promised to ban neo-Nazi
meetings and to dissolve racist
organizations. If it does, if it
really makes a vigorous effort to
destroy the web of international
terrorism spun in France, the free
world shall be much in its debt.
And if, by miracle, the French
tendency in recent years to stack
the deck against French Jews
should be reversed, if French
honor achieves higher standing
than Arab oil. if de Gaulle's'
sneering remark that Jews "are
an elite people, sure of itself and
domineering" fades from
memory, civil peace and mutual
respect may return to a nation in
turmoil. They might bring out
that old banner again and wave it
proudly the French the
banner proclaiming liberty,
equality, fraternity.
ANTON
Mrv us k an 77 Punaraj service.
were nelrt last Friday morning. MR-
V"\,"l ,Ubb' Mar,,n I SaSrtbrrK
w.th RabE4l K T Bred, l.eonard
Kosenthal andCantortWllham Hauben
[ntennant toUowed Myr.ie mil
Memorial Park Mrs Anton died Dec
m Jacksonville. A resident of Tampa
.nce ism. Mrs Anlon was a fe mem
E.i Am J^"^1- RtMleph Sholom and
Kol Ami Sisterhoods and the National
(ouruil of Jewish Women Survivors
include her husband Barney Anton, son
and daughter in law Leonard and Diana
Anton Tampa; grandchildren Hobin
David, Jonathan and Rebecca of
rampu. and Mark of Los Angeles Calif
Irepai-atlon hy Chened Shell Ernes
I n. lamily requests that contribution*
r;;(Ls;ahn"delo,heTamp"ch-'t"0'
Volunteering
is reaching out your hand
into the darkness
and pulling another's hand[
into the light
then finding out
it's your own.
Iderly gentleman
esires to rent a furnished
rivate room in home or
pertinent. Meals and
laundry service must be
provided. Gentleman uses
walker, but little attention
required. Home moat have
a telephone. References
required. Sandra Gould at
Tampa Jewish Community
Center (872-4451).
Aac Immm
Call today
Tampa Jewish Social Service
S7244SI
.-. laaBsasasasswst"


January 2,1961
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 11


Daytona Beach symposium, noted Hialeah ophthalmologists Dr. Dale G. Davis (right}
br. Neil M. Koreman (left) met with Dr. Svyatoslav Fyodorov, the Russian discoverer
\ revolutionary 15-minute procedure that actually corrects nearsightedness. Davis and
nan are two of five South Florida doctors, and only in 100 in the United States, who
erform radial keratotomy, which recently gained the acceptance of the Florida Society
hthalmology and other area medical institutions.
Urge U.S. Cutback in Aid to UN
|.\ Defamation League ol B'nai B'rith is
President Carter i<> consider a cutback in
(.in financial support of the United Nations
ke ii is the world forum for anti-
I
[ hand delivered to the White HoUM,
I! Greenberg, ADL s national chair-
rial i speech made bj Jordanian UN
In llazen Nuselbeh was the latest in an
|k.u campaign ol slander against Israel and
lople, usin^i imectne and calumnies
Bceni ol Ihr Stuenner
runs; that "there could be no greater
el I he recession of the UN from the
kinciples enunciated in its charter than this
fiii.uu< ol Nazi canards and slogans in the
Assembly," Greanberg said: "The time
iiw lor America to demonstrate in the most
le. lushion lhat we will not continue to sub-
Lii i urns which violate our sense of decency.
I- mil luslice."
inert University archeological team.
;ii Lower Herodion, has unearthed a
ime church built of reused Herodian
ihe third Byzantine church found at the
fact of great historical interest because
Km Ims not been known previously from
line sources
krchcologists have not yet unraveled the
|>I King Herod's burial place, but the
Ihiv remains that it is nearby.
ion. south of Jerusalem, was the site of
inn Herod's fortress palaces.
community leaders, including New York
Touncil President Carol Bellamy, have
methods to end discrimination in social
|i ;i workshop sponsored by the American
Committee at its national headquarters in
|rk,
Bsion heard varied approaches for meeting
I'lem from Ms. Bellamy: Jack Greenberg,
' "I the National Association for the
lenient of Colored People Legal Defense
licational Fund: Judith Lichtman, execu-
fitorof the Women's Legal Defense Fund;
Id Kifas, Florida attorney.
d Davimos, chairman of the American
Committee's National Committee on
Discrimination, presided.
M Krueger, managing director of Leh-
pthera Kuhn Loeb, Inc., has been elected
president of the American Friends of the
University of Jerusalem.
> ear-old investment banker said, follow-
fjection during the annual board meeting
J that he considers working for the
l niversity "the most important activity
' can undertake for the State of Israel."
erican Friends of the Hebrew University
the development and maintenance of the
University, Israel's oldest and largest
pn of higher education and one of the
loremost centers of scholarship and
itch.
succeed* Stanley M. Bogen as presi-
|^FHU. Bogen, of New York City, who
president for the test three years, was
i l mittee.
Shmuel Pragur has been named the new general
counsel and executive secretary of the Com-
mission on Legislation and Civic Action of
Agudath Israel of America it is announced by
the Commission chairman, Prof. Aaron Twerski.
Prof. Twerski said the appointment of a full-time
at tome} marks a major expansion of the services
provided by the legislative commission to the
veshivos and to the Orthodox .Jewish community
m general,
I'rager. who has pre\ iously been involved in
various community endeavors, is a graduate of
I he Mcsivtfl Etubbi Samson Kaphael Hirsch, as
well as ol Carduzo Law School.
In addition to I'rager. the Commission on Legis-
lation and Civic Action consists of a large number
ol young attorneys and other professionals who
volunteer for the various legislative activities of
the Agudath Israel movement. The Commission
is part of Agudath Israel's Office of Government
and Public Affairs which is headed by Rabbi
Menachem Lubinsky.
Women s American ORT has received one of two
B80 American Vocational Association Out-
standing Merit Awards, according to Beverly
Minkoff, national president of Women's
American OUT.
In a ceremony held at the American Vocational
Association Guidance Division luncheon in New
Orleans, the award was accepted for the 140,000
members of Women's American ORT by Bea
Forrest, of Evanston. III., National Community
Affairs Sub-committee chairman. Also repre-
senting Women's American ORT. was Ruth
Taffel. of Brooklyn. N.Y., national American
Affairs chairman.
The International Red Cross does not recognize
the Magen David Adorn (Red Shield of David)
Society of Israel, and Operation Recognition
intends to let the world know about "this out-
rageous example of discrimination against
Israel." according to Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin.
international chairman.
He explains that "even though Israel's MDA
fulfills nine of the ten criteria for admission, it is
kept out because Israel insists that it must use its
own Red Shield of David emblem. Fair-minded
people everywhere very well understand that
Israel should not be forced to use the Christian
Red Cross, the Arab Red Crescent or the Red
Lion of Sun of Iran."
A nine nation working group is trying to find a
solution to the Red Cross emblem problem and
will bring in its report at the next international
Red Cross conference scheduled for Manila in
November, 1981.
Rabbi Israel Mowshowitz, chairman of The New
York Board of Rabbis centennial dinner, has
invited President of Israel Yitzhak Navon to
attend the 100th anniversary dinner of the Board
in May 1981.
President Navon has expressed his desire to
.participate in the festivities as one of the guests
of honor President Jimmy Carter has already
accepted an invitation to attend and an invitaiton
to President-Elect Ronald Reagan will also be
extended. Member of the Knesset, Abba Eban,
will deliver the major address.
Waldheim Nixes Permit to
Stage Hunger Strike
NEW YORK (JTA) -
United Nations Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim
has rejected a request by
three rabbis and two nuns
to permit them to stage a
hunger strike at the UN on
behalf of the American hos-
tages in Iran and four
Catholic women murdered
in El Salvador.
The request had been made in a
telegram to the Secretary
General'earlier in light of the fact
that he granted permission to
Mayors Fahd Kawasme of
Hebron and Mohammed Milhim
of Halhoul to hold a hunger strike
on UN premises to protest their
expulsion by Israeli authorities.
ONE OF the rabbis. Avraham
Weiss of the Hebrew Institute of
Riverdale, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that Waldheim s
response was hand-delivered to
him by a UN messenger while he
was attending a wedding in
Brooklyn. It was contained in a
letter signed by Clayton Tim-
brel!, Assistant Secretary
General for General Services, and
stated in part:
"As you are no doubt aware,
t he explusion of these mayors has
been the expressed subject of
three separate resolutions of the
Security Council which con-
sidered it imperative that the
mayors I* enabled to return to
their homes and resume their
responsibilities."
Weiss said "1 categorically
reject" Waldheim's arguement.
He told the JTA that his group,
the newly formed Ad Hoc Com-
mittee of Clergy Opposed to
Terrorism, will continue to
pursue the matter vigorously
with the UN. He said it has not
been decided yet what form of
action would be taken but that it
may include further representa-
tions to secretary General's
Office and approaches to the U.S.
Mission to the UN.
RESPONDING to Timbrell s
letter, Weiss pointed out, "The
American hostages have also
been the subject of numerous
resolutions in the UN. The
reaction of the Secretary General
points to the hypocrisy and
double standard of the UN."
Weiss charged that "Two
mayors who have encouraged
terrorism and are guilty of insti-
gating the murders of two Jews
from New York in the attack in
Hebron (last Mayl where six were
murdered have been granted
unique treatment in the UN while
expression of concern for the
American hostages has been
denied. We will not tolerate nor
accept any decision which allows
the freedom of demonstration for
the two PLO supporters while
denying the same right of
demonstration for the American
hostages and Jews murdered in
Hebron," Weiss sa.id.
In addition to Weiss, the Ad
Hoc Committee consists of
Rabbis Kenneth Hain of Congre-
gation Orach Chaim of Man-
hattan and Reuven Grodner of
Young Israel of Scarsdale: and
the nuns. Sister Rose Thering,
professor of education at Seton
Hall University in New Jersey,
and Ann Patrick Ware, vice
president of the National Co-
alition of American Nuns.
MEANWHILE, the two
mayors, who began Jheir hunger
strike inside the UN following the
unamimous adoption of a resolu-
tion by the Security Council
calling on Israel to permit them
to return to their homes, have
ended their action.
Their decision to do so followed
an appeal by Waldheim and U.S.
Ambassador Donald McHenry,
who was Decembers Security
Council president, and several
Arab delegates. Waldheim told
Weiss charged that 'Two
mayors who hare encour-
aged terrorism and are guilty
of instigating the murders of
two Jews from New York in
the attack in Hebron (last
Mayl where six were mur-
dered have been granted
unique treatment in the UN
while expression of concern
for the American hostages
has been denied. We will not
tolerate nor accept any de-
rision which allott l the free-
dom of demonstration for the
two PI A) supporters while
denying the same right of
demonstratii>n for the Amer-
ican hostages and Jens mur-
dered in Hebron.' Weiss
said.
the mayors that he would con-
tinue his efforts to have the
Council resolution implemented
The mayors said they would con-
tinue their hunger strike at an
undisclosed plan
In Washington State Depart-
ment spokesman John Trattner
said the plight ol the two mayors
had been discussed with Prime
Minister Menachem Begin of
Israel.
JWV Auxiliary
Albert Aronovitz Auxiliary
No. 373 of the Jewish War
Veterans has closed the year with
many activities
Jo Woolf. chairman of the
Child Welfare committee which
includes Esther Piper and
Marguerite Spit/, prsented
furnishings to the Davis Cottage
of the Childrens Home. Many ol
the donated items were made by
committee members.
Residents of Su Casa Nursing
Home received five dozen ditty
bags and one dozen lap robes
made by Betty Woolf,
Marguerite Spitz and Minnie
Posner. The pediatric wards of
Tampa General Hospital and St.
Joseph Hospital were presented
with home-made cupcakes,
packaged candy and scrapbooks.
The auxiliary was represented
by president. Minnie Posner, at a
meeting in Miami in December.
Four new members joined the
Auxiliary after the Membership
Tea according to the president,
and the closing event of the year
was a program featuring Rabbi
David Mallinger.
Murder of
Jewish Leader
Continued from Page 1
after the shooting, the police said
the assailants would be found
among enemies of Israel and the
Jews, but they did not repeat
lhat speculation and insisted
later that there were no clues.
No organization or individual
has claimed responsibility for the
killings. Premier Franz-Josef
Strauss of Bavaria denounced the
crime and promised that every
effort will be made to trace those
responsible.
Levin came to West Germany
in the late 1950s from Israel
where he is known to have a
family. He was chairman for
several years of the Jewish com-
munity of Nuremberg, near Er-
langen, and for a time owned the
Ner Tamid Publishing Company
which specialized in Jewish
books.
WERNER NACHMAN,
chairman of the Jewish Com-
munity of West Germany, con-
demned the murder which, he
said, was aimed against all
Democrats in the country. He
denied a rumor that Levin had
been a personal aide to Moshe
Day an when the latter was
Israel's Defense Minister. A
similar denial was issued by the


lewis/
Indian or lam pa
i
The Tampa Jewish Federation Presents a Musical Spectacular for the entire
family. One performance only, celebrating the harmony of the heritages of
America and Judaism and their contribution to freedom.
Order Your Tickets Now!
PROCLAIM
Sunday, January 18
Tampa Theatre
One Performance Only
7:30 EM.
Starring
Herschel Bernardi
is highly acclaimed tor his performances
in such memorable productions as
"Fiddler On The Roof," "Zorba The
Greek," "Irma La lixjce" and I host or
others. He has become a perennial
favorite for his many stage, film and
television roles.
Lou Jacobi
is one of Broadway's most versatile channel
acton, equally at home in huh drama and
comedy. The Toronto bated performer
appeared as the Talmudic Mr. V'.in Doan in
"The Diary ol Ann Frank." a role he repeated
for the movie.
Mr. Jacobi has guest starred on practtcalry all
major t. v. shows and was awarded a "( "In f
(the Oscar of commercials) lor his wry
ponrayal of a hone tired businessman
in a Hertz soot.
LIBERTY
GEULAGILL
has proven herself a gifted singer since her appearances
on the Ed Sullivan Show. Numerous television
perfonnantes have gained her
wide acclaim for her
brilliant tonal quality and
range in her dynamic
performance*.
KENNY KAREN
is known as the "King of Jingles." He is easily recognized
as the voice of many radio and t. v. commercials. Mr.
Karen is tnilv amazing in his versatility as a singer,
Kr.K ist. composer, and pianist. As a singer his
repertoire ranges from modem jazz to opera.
MISHA RAITZ1N
i< among the greatest voices to come from Russia.
This native of the I Ikmine studied at the M ( oraervatory where he graduated with honors.
I le became i star perfonna with that country's most
prestigious companies including the Leningrad and
Moscow operas.
ELAINE PETRICOFF
\m extensive performance credits as an actress -singer-
dancer including three Broadway plays "Grease," The
Me Nobody Knows." and "Ride The Winds." Heroff-
Broadway appearances include "Hark." "Under the
(i.islight." and "Johnny Manhattan "
Elaine portrayed Ann Putnam in the Columbia tilm,
"Witches of Salem."
BEL KAUFMAN
is the granddaughter of the great Yiddish humorist,
Sholom Aleichem, and is in her own right a
distinguished author tor her number one bestseller,
Up The IX>wn St.ntc.ist. short stories, and articles
in national magazines
TICKET ORDER FORM
Tickets available by mail only. Seating will be assigned as order forms are received.
Encksed is my stamped, self-addressed envekipe and mv check, made
payable to The Tampa Jewish Federation for_______tickets at $______.
# of Patron Orchestra tickets-------------------.
' # of Orchestra tickets-------------------.
# of First Balcony tickets-------------------.
# of Second Balcony tickets-------------------.
' # of $5.00 Second Balcony tickets______________
Name______.------------------------------------------------------------------------
Address-------------_------------------------------------------------------------------
City------------------------------------Zip------------------Phone-----------------
Mail your ticket order today to:
Tampa Jewish Federation 2808 Horatio Tampa. Florida 33609
0
CMttttr. ^ l'fir.aSo.Jklcl>*
A $18.00 Patron Orchestra
B $1400 Orchestra
C $14.00 First Balcony
D$ 8.00 Second Balcony
E$ 5.00 Second Balcony
Patron Orchestra tickets incMe
a cast party folk>wing the perform*"


Full Text
Luary2.1981
ie Magic-Maker
The Jewish Fkridian of Tampa
Page 7
issinger Back in Power Circles
Wdle East Tour Poses Questions;
nswers Unveil No Major Surprises
IRO What former Secretary of State Henry
ger's trip to the Middle East portends is hard to
ius far, there are two patterns to be observed.
-ie is that Kissinger went to Egypt first, and his
[scheduled to last at least through the week. On the
I hand, he plans to hold meetings with Prime
er Menachem Begin over little more than a two-day
Jwhen he finally leaves here and arrives in Israel,
lis next on his itinerary.
DOWNGRADING of
not only diplomatically,
militarily, begun by the
[administration thus con-
bn i he eve of the takeover
lesident-Elect Ronald
Reagan. The question is whether
the latest slight to Israel is part
of the last sputterings of the
Carter administration or whether
the slight has the tactif approval
of the Reairan tam when it takes
Foreign Affairs
\Alien SaysKissinger
111 be Reagan Aide
Joseph polakoff
IsHINGTON -
Richard Allen,
ent- Elect Reagan's
Itee to head the
Security Council
White House, said
^at Reagan "accepts"
ip David formula as
Idequate framework
Itinuation of the pur-
[peace" in the Middle
id that Former Sec-
lof State Henry Kis-
] will be assisting the
ent on foreign policy
ess conference following
nal announcement of his
tin \Uen said. "Should
|Uons ever be required in
np David process, they
made with the consent
I who participate."
APPEARED to be an
&n ot his previous state-
lal changes would occur
|th the consent of Egypt
Wl However, since the
Javid formula itself en-
broadening the base of
lions to include the West
paza inhabitants and
| Allen's statement is not
1 as a policy change.
that he and Kissinger
en friends for nearly 20
Wen said that Kissinger
[important and valuable
nd contributions in terms
Fee and strategy" to
[s election campaign and
Pgan, his Secretary of
P'gnate Alexander Haig
?nse Secretary-designate
Weinberger "respect his
Hded, "I anticipate he
Fl will be called upon
Pv for a range of under-
Perhaps beginning with
advice, perhaps under-
fvel on behalf of the
Ration" at Reagan's
plDENT CARTER'S
Ambassador to the
East, Sol Linowitz, said
"that he thought Kis-
nould uke over im-
Won of the Camp David ,
Dr. Kissinger
Carter's departure from office.
Allen said he had "no
recommendations at the present
time" with regard to "perma-
nent" U.S. bases in the Middle
East. But he stressed that "It is
clear" that Reagan has "in-
dicated the U.S. is going to be
increasingly concerned about its
presence in the Middle East for
the purpose of contributing to the
security of the oil routes." He
added that bases would be
"among early options" to be pur-
sued within the National Security
Council system.
Aim To
Stop Yerida
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Council for the Prevention of
Yerida has been established here
following the publication of a
report prepared by the Jewish
Agency that between 300,000 and
500,000 Israelis are now living in
the United States.
The Council was formed by the
Zionist Council in Israel and the
founding session was attended by
Absorption Minister David Levy,
Jewish Agency Director General
Shmuel Lahis. Knesset members
and other public figures.
Ephraim Urbach, professor of
Talmud and Midrash at Hebrew
University, blamed the govern-
ment and the Jewish Agency for
having failed to take action to
prevent yerida. He called for
public action to implement the
over on Jan. 20.
This question can be answered
only if there is a clear under-
standing of the nature of Dr.
Kissinger's trip in the first place
and therefore a clear under-
standing of the second pattern
that his trip has been taking. It is
arguable whether the question
can be answered at all.
President Anwar Sadat gave
Dr. Kissinger a warm three-hour
welcome at Mit Abul Kom in his
home village on Monday. Kissin-
ger carried secret messages with
him to Sadat from President-
Elect Reagan. Sadat obliged with
a message of his own, also secret,
which Kissinger is to carry back
to the U.S.
THUS FAR, it is insisted that
Kissinger is visiting Egypt as a
"private citizen," albeit with the
approval of the Reagan team's
foreign advisers. But there is
clear skepticism being expressed
over the "private" nature of the
visit.
Kissinger achieved prominence
for his shuttle dipolmacy between
Israel and Egypt following the
1973 Yom Kippur War, which
presumably led to the Camp
David accords, but these have
been lagging, and in the final
days of the Carter administra-
tion, it is clear that little progress
is being made over such thorny
issues as the West Bank, Gaza
and the Golan Heights.
Kissinger told reporters on his
arrival here that "I did not come
here to negotiate. I did not come
here with any messages. I did not
come with any ideas to speed up
the (peace) process." But the fact
that he did bring a message from
President-Elect Reagan belied his
statement, which is traditional
for Kissinger's method of
operation.
FOR HIS PART. Sadat de
dared that "I asked him
(Kissinger) to convey certain
messages to the new ad-
ministration."
Both men poured over a world
map later in Sadat's housing
compound and Sadat later de-
clared that "we discussed not
only the current situation in our
area, but all the world positions
around us."
Sadat and Kissinger have long
gotten along famously, and
Sadat's latest praise of the
former Secretary of State was in
accord with that friendship. "As
usual, our ideas have always been
identical," he said.
After his map meeting with
Sadat, Kissinger noted that "It
would not be appropriate to go
into the details of the analysis he
(Sadat) put forward and which I
must say, as always, I shared."
AS FOR his official or un-
official status so far as the next
Reagan administration is con-
cerned, Kissinger said, "I am
available for advice and special
assignments of limited duration.
I do not think I would be most
useful in the detailed working out
of the autonomy negotiations."
What is one to believe at this
point? You pay your money, and
you take your choice.
Pope Says No Nation
Has Jerusalem Claim
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Cairo newspaper, Al
Ahram, has quoted Pope
John Paul II as declaring in
an interview that "No one
nation can claim exclusive
ownership" of Jerusalem.
According to the semi-
official daily, he was re-
sponding to a question on
the Vatican's view of
Israel's law declaring un-
divided Jerusalem its
capital.
The Pontiff was quoted as
saying further, "The Vatican
categorically rejects the view
that it is enough to protect the
right to visit the holy places
while leaving Jerusalem a united
Jewish city under Jewish rule."
He reportedly urged Israel not
to obstruct attempts to bring
peace to the Middle East. He said
Moslems and Christians had a
duty to work together "to
achieve freedom for Jerusalem
and restore the Holy City to all
religious groups," Al Ahram
reported.
THE POPE also discussed the
status of Jerusalem and the
problem of the Palestinian people
with Prince Saud al-Faisal, the
Foreign Minister of Saudi
Arabia, during a private 45-
minute meeting in the Vatican
last week
The Pope "reaffirmed the well-
known position of the Holy See
that it is against any unilateral
initiative to modify the political
status' of Jerusalem and the
hope that the Holy City may
become a meeting place for faith-
ful of the three monotheistic
religions, Christianity, Islam and
Judaism," a Vatican com-
munique said.
It added that the Pontiff "also
expressed the urgency of an
action to resolve with imparti-
ality the problem of the Pales-
tinian people and to preserve the
independence, territorial in-
tegrity and unity of Lebanon."
According to the communique,
the meeting between the Pope
and Faisal "took place in an
atmosphere of deep cordiality
and understanding." It was the
first time that a Pope met with a
member of the Saudi royal
family.
*~JUDAIC DESIGNS** *
w.
Over
150 items
Talhs Cases and Yarmulkes
Specialty items for children
Traditional and contemporary
Chaliah Cloths a Matzoh Covers
Tablecloths and Napkins
The finest from Israel. Franca a U.S.
Write for your copy today!
e
STITCHERY BY HENYE
5710 W. Maripota St.. FLI
PhotniK. Arizona 85031
33
What's new?
The Old Orleans Motel is the
newest talk in Tampa. Well
plunrpd retiovatior. is really
making the motel relive it's dis-
tinctive past! Not to mention,
he Mardi Gras Lounge is now
booking some spectacular show
groups from around the. coun-
try. So bring in the free drink
coupon below and come see
why the new Old Orleans Motel
is the talk of the town!
135 beautifully decorated
rooms
5 newly furnished suites
Enjoy excellent dining in
I XjIotos' Steak House
Show Groups nightly m the
. Mardi,Grai. Lounge
. Private meeting rooVis
Reel limousine service for
Airport transportation
Two minutes from Tampa
Stadium
COCKTAIL in the"
Mardi Gras lounge
t Drink with thii touponl
JOSS NOtTM DAU MABtY
TAMPA, HOMOASSM7
, IU,177-7471
'tttaEf



xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EJ0WUHGE1_HOFOIN INGEST_TIME 2013-06-05T22:30:24Z PACKAGE AA00014305_00085
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian ofTampa_
Frid*y. Jwu.^,
New Organization
Jews Reminded 'Liberal View' is Not the Only One
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Prof. Seymour Siegel of
New York, widely-known
among politically-sophisti-
cated Jews as a staunch po-
litical conservative, said
here that the recently-
formed American Jewish
Forum (AJF) hopes to be-
come a national action cen-
ter for Jews with conserva-
tive views.
Siegel. Ralph Simon Professor
at the Jewish Theological Semi-
nary of America, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that the
initial meeting which led to
formation and incorporation of
the AJF as a non-profit, tax-
exempt organization was held
last June in Washington at his
initiative at the headquarters nf
the Heritage Foundation, a con-
servative think-tank, which made
facilities available for that
meeting.
Siegel said plans called for an
office in Washington, a paid
staff, sponsorship of conferences
and seminars, and a campaign for
a "substantial" membership. He
said several fund-raising events
were planned in an effort to raise
a $100,000 budget.
Citing the election victory of
Ronald Reagan, Siegel said he
hoped American Jews would
realize that there is now "a new
conservative reality" and that
"they cannot continue to po-
litically be tied to just one
party," the Democrats, and to
"the once fashionable 'liberal'
view exclusively."
HE DECLARED that a nice
group of younger Jews" had been
attracted by the AJF in
Washington, including some
Congressional aides, adding that,
even in its present "embryonic"
form, the AJF members "have
very good contacts" with the in-
coming Reagan Administration.
This means, he said, that AJF
members "can speak to key
people in the Reagan Adminis-
tration and in the new Congress."
Those present at the meeting
included Siegel. Michael Rubinoff
of the Heritage Foundation, and
David Meiselbaum. economics
professor at Virginia Polytechnic.
Siegel said Meiselbaum had been
named acting chairman of the
AJF Board of Trustees.
He said he was acting
president, adding that permanent
officers would be named at the
first formal conference of the
AJF, scheduled for Washington
sometime next spring. Elliott
Abrams. a former aide to Sen.
Henry Jackson (I) Wash.I. had
been named chairman of a com-
mittee to organize that con-
ference.
SIEGKL SAID the AJF cur-
rently has about 50 members,
most of them men. He said they
include Maxwell Raab, former
secretary of President Eisen-
hower's Cabinet and currently
president of Temple Kmanu-KI of
New York; Abrams and his
recent bride. Naomi; and Ger-
trude Himmelfarh.
He said the AJF had three
aims: to investigate "in an aca-
demic way" the relationship be-
tween Jewish traditional thought
and conservative political ideolo-
gies; to publish materials to dis-
seminate findings to the Jewish
community; and to serve as a
political education center on con-
servative ideology for Jews.
Siegel said the AJF plans to
sponsor academic conferences, at
which papers will be presented
Boschwitz Declares
Israel Strategic Asset to U.S.
NEW YORK The
newly appointed chairman
of the Middle East Sub-
committee of the Senate
Foreign Relations Commit-
tee has told the Zionist Or-
ganization of America that
the State of Israel "is in-
deed a strategic asset to the
U.S."
And, added Republican
Sen. Rudy Boschwitz, who
has been appointed chair-
man of the Middle East
Subcommittee, "While
Israel can not exist without
U.S. aid the U.S., if it is
to continue to grow
stronger can not exist
without Israel."
SOME 200 ZOA leader* who
were attending a two-day Na-
tional Executive Committee
meeting here, were told by both
Sea Boschwitz and Ivan J.
Novick. president of the ZOA,
that the Jewish vote was now a
swing vote," which made it
more valuable politically.
1 n an address in what probably
was his first talk before a Jewish
organization as the new chairman
Sen. Hoschu-itz
of the Subcommittee, Sen.
Boschwitz of Minnesota firmly
asserted that "peace in the
Middle Fast is not going to come
by establishing a Palestinian
state."
Calling any proposal of a
Palestinian state as "un-
settling," he said that if Sen.
Charles Percy of Illinois feels
that creating a PLO state would
end tensions in the Middle Fast.
Sen. Percy should "look to" the
conflicts today among the Arab
slates themselves.
IN HIS address to the NEC
meeting at ZOA headquarters

Die Vadenand
ban, Novick said he "looked wilh
anticipation to I he possibility
that the new administration will
examine the State Department
and decide, once and for all. that
tin) long-entrenched pro-Arabists
no longer will determine policy.
We will carefully observe what
action is taken as an indicator of
the direction the Heagan Ad-
ministration will take."
Declaring that the ZOA. "con-
sistent with its tradition and
sense of responsibility will con-
tinue to address issues." Novick
said:
"I do believe we can accept at
face value the firm declaration
made by both President-Fleet
Reagan and Vice President-Fleet
Hush that Jerusalem belongs to
Israel and to the Jewish people 1
believe that the incoming ad-
ministration means what it has
said in its rejection of the PLO
that it will not deal with it or
recognize it. Mr. Percy notwith-
standing.
1 look forward to this new
administration in the hope that it
will work towards making
American military strong, and
that urgent international and
domeetic issues confronting the
security and the welfare of the
American people will be ad
dressed torthrightly and ex-
peditiously."
SEN. BOSCHWITZ, a Berlin
born Jew whose parents fled Nazi
Germany for America when he
was three years old, told the ZOA
that "over and over again. Israel
has tried to achieve peace in the
Middle Kast."
He said that since the be-
ginning of the century. "Jews
have sought peace with the
Arabs and yet have been
frustrated in every desire for
peaceful coexistence with tht
Arabs."
In introducing Sen. Boschwitz,
Gordon B. Zacks, prominent
Jewish leader in the Republican
Party, made the announcement
of Sen. Boschwitz' appointment
as chairman of the Middle East
Subcommittee of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee.
Alleck A. Resnick, chairman of
the National Executive Com-
. mittee, presided. *t t,he NEC
meeting of the ZOA.
and then published for dis-
semination to the general Jewish
public. A regular periodical also
is being planned, he said.
HE TOLD the JTA that while
the AJF will be aligned philo-
sophically with conservatives in
both major parties, it will not
endorse parties or candidates in
order to protect its tax-exempt
status and that similar con-
straints would apply to lobbying
for conservative legislation.
Siegel commented that the
recently-announced "New Jewish
Agenda for the 1980s" (NJA)
was a "good sign," because it
meant that the Jewish com-
munity "is reconsidering its
political status." He said he
understood that Prof. Eugene
Horowitz, a liberal Reform rabbi
and editor of "Sh'ma." was
associated with NJA.
Asked for comment, Borowitz
told the JTA he was not formally
associated with the NJA. but
that he agreed with the liberal
goals of the NJA and had sent "a
bit of money and allowed tk
use mv name." "
.Borowitz said he did not
with descriptions 0f thT*,l
genceoftheNJAasreorT '
a liberal response to aie
dence of growing conserTJ^
among American JeT^S
Americans generally, u, "JJI
that the NJA indicated .5
teft n the Jwi.k ~Zm community j
not dead. On the other S"
quite clear that until now *e&
hud !!F [^ effortf to 3
through what the mmLSbzI
position is."
lhe consentS,!
HE SAID. as exfm ,
'What is the position?^
tional amendment on abortSS
and where can Jews "m ilLI
with the Christian evannJ2
movement and where do we dS
the line? "'
Borowitz added that "nowthzl
the right is in power" as a resttl
of the election of Heagan and 1
conservative-controlled Sen
"it is very important for _
Jewish right to define what J
stands for. They have told
what they are against: now L
them tell us what they are for."
TJF Leadership Program
The Tampa Jewish Federation
Leadership Development
Program will hold its third major
event on Tampa Jewish Com-
munitv Services. Saturday. Jan.
10.8p.m.
The program will focus on a
series of discussions with the
I/cadership of the Tampa Jewish
Federation, Tampa Jewish Social
Service, Jewish Community
Center, and the Hillel School of
Tampa. Facilitating group
discussions will be members of
the Steering Committee.
This progtam will take place at
the home of Norman and Jane
Kosenthal. Co-Chairmen overall
Leadership Development Project.
Planning programs of this nature
is the responsibility of the
Steering Committee which in-
cludes .loan and Bob Goldstein.
(o Chairmen: I.1I1 and Barry
Kaufmann, Brian Abeles.
Barbara and Bruce Goldstein. 1
Jan and Jeff Bloom. Harriet and
Larry Cyment. Svdell and David
Vogel.
Much Food
At Affaire
Continued from Page 4
who perhaps eat only ^aul
because just plain kosher is not!
good enough" are not necessarily]
"mete sensitive to these issues, t
He disclosed that the (ierral
Kebbe "publicly and several!
others personally are taking!
action to combat these problems.!
Nevertheless, he concluded, asl|
rule, we Beam to be like all 1
nations, rather than a light uni
the nations, a people who set a|
standard of sanctity that cai
serve as a beacon for all
follow."
sun cove realty
realtors
inc.
IB
QiAuoir
commercial residential
investments
A L LATTER, REALTOR
3216 b Dale MaDry
837 c545
yr i 251 $471
Art of Beauty (,y |zabeff
(Over 15 Years European Experience!
Personalized Facials and Correction of Skin Problems
Waxing Make-up Lessons and Porcelain Nail*
Gift Certificate Available!!!
Business 253-6026 Residence iWjIjj
2213 S. Dale Mabry r*T
(Ut G,t Mamtdi Bella DobroviUV
i*
*
*
|[,23l5W.UneOaughAve.
Millers seafood center
Nth Market
now has
Lox Chub* Herring
New York Bagels Bialyt
Barnl Pickets Smoktd king
9t 5.4793