The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00072

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Number 33
Of Tampa
icern voice
Tampa, Florida Friday, October 3.1980
frtd Shochti
Price 35 Cents
\TA Funds to Religious
Schools Questioned
(EN GALLOB
)RK (JTA) Deep
expressed here by a
sal expert over a
[ppeals Court ruling
lower court decision
pel payment of funds
le Comprehensive
nd Employment Act
I full or part-time jobs
ly sponsored schools,
fwish day schools.
Kuckerman, president
tional Jewish Com-
Law and Public
,PA), indicated that
eference to the ruling
| the Court of Appeals
irenth Circuit which
ruling by Federal
urt Judge John
lilwaukee.
)S RULED last
[such participation in
nded under Title II
violated the First
ban against
involvement in
kerman said COLPA
[friend of the court
brief in the Appeals Court on
June 6 for itself and four other
Orthodox Jewish organizations.
The brief was prepared by
Nathan Lewin of Washington, a
COLPA vice president.
On June 3, final appeals had
been filed in the Appeals Court,
which sits in Chicago and has
jurisdiction over Wisconsin, by
Milwaukee County, the Arch-
diocese of Milwaukee and the
federal Department of Labor,
which distributes CETA funds.
Zuckerman said the exact
number of CETA II trainees in
Jewish elementary and secondary
day schools was not certain but
that the five Jewish
organizations were "deeply
disturbed" by the ruling because
of its impact on CETA programs
"which have provided many
useful job training sites for the
jobless" in the religious schools.
ZUCKERMAN added: "We
are also concerned that this
decision is another step along the
road that may ultimately lead to
Continued on Page 10
Jordan's Assurance
Iraqi Ships Pose
No Threat to Israel
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The landing of several Iraqi
transport planes at an
airfield near Amman
brought prompts
assurances from Jordan
that they were not intended
as a threat to Israel's
security. Israel has ac-
cepted the explanation
which U.S. Ambassador
Samuel Lewish conveyed to
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin at the request of the
Jordanian authorities.
The Jordanians, who granted
landing permission to the Iraqi
transports, said the planes were
flown to Jordan as a
precautionary measure, lest they
become targets of Iranian air
attacks. Iraq is currently
engaged in bitter land, sea and
air battles with Iran.
ISRAELIS apparently are less
concerned with the presence of
the non-combat aircraft near
Amman than with the growing
rapprochement between Jordan
and Iraq. This has also caused
some concern in Syria whose
ruling Baath Party has long been
at odds with the Baath Party
that governs Iraq. There has
been tensions between the two
countries although Israel regards
both as potential threats on its
eastern flank.
Now the Syrians see possible
military cooperation between
Jordan and Iraq as a threat to
their own southeastern borders.
According to some Israeli ob-
servers, Damascus would not
remain idle in fact of a Jordan-
Iraq military buildup.
Meanwhile, Begin told a youth
group at Beit Shemer that Israel
was carefully watching the Iraqi-
Iranian situation. "We are not
happy about this conflict even
though both Iraq and Iran are
our enemies," he said. "It is easy
to say where a war begins but
much harder to predict how it
could develop and what it could
lead to." He noted that both Iran
and Iraq have links to countries
bordering Israel.
Volunteers Honored
i
ierly Housing Loan Okayed
. for a loan from the
of Housing and
Blopment for the
)f 85 housing units
i has been approved,
[Jewish Federation
lias learned.
building site is
ipa city limits near
ce, on property
lissions Hills Road
(Street, near 56th
i\ loan approved
wpo ration, TJPH,
jarate, non-profit
led by the Tampa
it ion. Members of
appointed by the
president of the
Federation, Ben
libers are Eleanor
luliet Rodriguez,
Mickey Frank,
)r. J. Justin Older,
)h, Les Scharf and
jiberg. From the
were elected as
|resident, Juliet
Vice President,
foty; Treasurur,
and Secretary,
ph.
ired 900 applications
profit sponsoring
throughout the
M. Of these, 324
approved totaling
i build 17,900 units.
jroved for Tampa
[million to construct
units. This is the
program (a Section
l) under which the
was built. Section
direct, long-term
to eligible private,
aups to finance
sing and related
the elderly or the
Volunteers of the Senior
Citizen project will be feted at a
special reception Oct. 5 from 2 to
5 p.m. in the Jewish Community
Center auditorium.
"This is a recognition and
awards party for all our
volunteers," said Donna Davis,
Senior Project coordinator.
"Some of our volunteers are
seniors, some are not, but all
have made vital contributions to
the program."
There are over 175 volunteers
in all aspects of the seniors
program including arts and
crafts, lunch program, the ad-
visory board and teachers. In
addition to the major awards,
recognition will be given to all
volunteers. A pin has been
designed entitled "The Giving
Tree" to be awarded for the first
time during the afternoon social.
It was felt to be especially ap-
propriate because these
volunteers give so much of
themselves.
At the meeting of Tampa Jewish Federation Housing, Inc., a
separate non-profit corporation formed by the Tampa Jewish
Federation, members of the board and guest, Sol Walker,
learned of the Housing and Urban Development approval of the
loan request. Seated are Lionel Elozory, Juliet Rodriguez and
Ronald Rudolph. Standing are Gary Alter, Maril Jacobs, Sol
Walker and Mickey Frank. (Photo by Audrey Haubenstock)
"There is a substantial waiting
list of several hundred names at
the Jewish Towers," according to
Juliet Rodriguez, Jewish Towers
manager and president of Tampa
Jewish Federation Housing, Inc.
"During 1979, only 12 units
became available. Obviously,
there is a great need for this type
of facility. '
Although the program is
designed primarily for people
with low and moderate incomes,
the occupants of Section 202
housing are expected to have a
wide range of incomes, including
some who need no financial
assistance. Subsidies will be
available, however, under HUD s
Section 8 Rental Assistance, a
program for those who do need
help in paying their rent.
Under Section 8, HUD pays a
rent subsidy in behalf of low-
income families, enabling them to
live in decent, safe and sanitary
housing they otherwise couldn't
afford. Eligible families, those
whose incomes do not exceed 80
percent of the median incomes in
their areas, pay no more than 25
percent of their income toward
the rent.
According to Gary Alter,
executive director of the Tampa
Jewish Federation, it will be a
minimum of two years and
possibly longer before this
project is complete, if everything
runs smoothly. "This only means
that money has been set aside for
Tampa's project pending ap-
proval of many, many more
things," Alter added.
Military Expert Says U.S.
Rescue Mission Didn't Fail
TEL AVIV (ZINS) Gen. Mati Peled, an expert
in military strategy, rejects the common notion that the
U.S. rescue mission in Iran was a complete fiasco. In an
interview with the weekly Haolam Hazeh, Gen. Peled said
that after studying ail the facts of the action he has come
to the conclusion that the real goal of the intervention was
not to free the hostages.
It would have been ridiculous to believe, Peled
continued, that a mission of that scope would be planned
for only 90 commandos and a few helicopters. That sort of
a mission, with limited soldiers and just a few aircraft,
would under no circumstances have been able to succeed
in freeing the hostages, Peled said.
IT IS FOR that reason that he has come to the
conclusion that the U.S. Pentagon is concealing the true
objective of that action which actually succeeded but
which cannot be publicly revealed. Gen. Peled is well
acquainted with the condition of the U.S. armed forces
and is very much impressed with their quality and
potential. The U.S. officer corps, said Peled, does not
indulge in fantasies or adventures.
' They have the capability of ingenious solutions in the
most difficult of circumstances. Therefore, he does not
believe in the official record and what is being said about
the military action in Iran. The true goal of that action
has not yet been revealed, Peled concluded.


fc?MBBPSP''
Page 2
The Jewish Fbridian of Tampa
Friday. October3
A/eivs #/? Brief
Demos to Shun KKK Candidate
WASHINGTON Rep. nounced that he will lead a move
Stephen. Solarz (D., N.Y.) ap- in the Democratic Caucus to pre-
9fe qam
B> LESLIE AIDMAN
(Call me about your social news
at 872-4470.)
A warm glow of contentment spread around me like a com-
fortable old blanket, as I stepped back to view the Sukkah.
Along with other Sisterhood members, we had just completed
hanging the last fruit and vegetable bunch and wrapped the
final spring of leaves through the chicken wire. Once again, the
congregation at Schaarai Zedek would enjoy a truly beautiful
Sukkah. I felt sure that the eyes of my little ones would just
shine and glow tonight whey my husband and I brought them to
temple to share in this joyous service. As a matter of fact, my 2-
year-old would probably continue to bubble throughout the
entire service, (forgive her chatter, rabbi!); and my 6-year-old
would, on cue, remind me that he needed his canned good to take
to Religious School on Sunday, Yes, this holiday still ignited a
freshness and energy of harvest time just as vibrantly as the red
of the apples and the yellow of the squash. It marked the
beginning of a shining new year, one full of numerous
possibilities of fruitful labors for us all. Indeed, Sukkoth still
held that magic for children and adults alike. I know I could feel
the excitement bubble up in me once again!
In an afternoon garden wedding on Nov. 2, Iris Grant will
become the bride of Elliott Buchman. Rabbi Martin Sandberg
will officiate. Following the ceremony, there will be a reception,
which will also be in the backyard of Elliott and Iris' home.
Elliott is a CPA in his own firm, Buchman and Bilby. Iris will
soon enjoy being full-time mother to 10-year-old Todd Buchman
and 8-year-old Jarrod Buchman.
Best man will be Larry Bilby, maid of honor will be Sandra
Davis and Thelma Rosenberg will serve as matron of honor. Iris'
parents, Jack and Shirley Grant, will be visiting from Fort
Lauderdale for the big occasion. In addition, other out-of-town
family and friends will be in Tampa for the wedding.
Elliott and Iris will enjoy a one and a half week honeymoon in
Hawaii. Our most sincere congratulations to you both.
Be sure to mark Nov. 21 on your calendar, as that is the date
of the annual ORT Sabbath. This year it will be held at
Congregation Kol Ami. Toni Schultz. president of the Evening
ORT Chapter and a member of Congregation Kol Ami, will be
coordinating the religious portion of the evening with Rabbi
Rosen thai. She and other ORT members will be actively par-
ticipating in the services that evening. Claudia Valins will be
coordinating the Oneg Shabbat for which ORT members will
bake many delicious desserts. This is an especially significant
evening for ORT members because they know that in hundreds
of other synagogues, fellow ORT members are celebrating their
annual Sabbath, too. Regardless of whether you area member of
ORT, however, this is a warm and touching service which can be
thoroughly enjoyed by anyone who attends, So, you don't have
to be a member of ORT or a member of Congregation Kol Ami to
worship and socialize on this special evening, Nov. 21.
Since the inception of the Russian Resettlement Program in
1976, over 40 physicians and over 15 dentists have generously
donated their professional services to the Soviet immigrants.
Even though the medical and dental needs of these new
Americans are often immense, this exceptional group of
volunteers has willingly provided these essential services.
Problems for these volunteers are complex, as the immigrants
usually do not understand American medical techniques and
have little command of the English language, making diagnosis
and treatment often difficult. Each refugee charge for the first six months after arriving in Tampa. Dr.
Barry Verkauf and Dr. Jay Older chair the Physician's Com-
mittee, while Dr. David Moore chairs the Dental Committee. All
have provided valuable input into the policy, development and
implementation of this facet of the resettlement program.
Tampa i9 indeed lucky to have such caring and giving
professionals in the Jewish community.
At a recent Temple board of trustees meeting of Congregation
Schaarai Zedek, three persons were elected to the 1980-81
executive committee. Simon Dingfelder, Richard Levi and
Connie Rosenberg will join the officers and immediate past
president, Maril Jacobs, on the second Monday of each month to
review temple business and make recommendations to the board
of trustees. With the addition of Connie and Richard, the board
is encouraging newer board members with new and fresh ideas
Co contribute to the committee, while Simon and Maril provide
the much needed continuity and guidance that only experienced
leaders can bring. Our wishes for a productive and satisfying
year to the four of you.
| Meet Dr. Don and Joan Kwalick, who moved to the
Carrollwood area of town this past May, from Trenton, N.J. As
a matter of fact, Joan lives here off and on until she completes
her master's in counseling at Trenton State College in December.
Then she will become a full-time resident of Tampa. The
Kwalicks have two children, 18-year-old Steven who hopes to
start Hillsborough Community College in January and 20-year-
old Cheryl who works in New Jersey. Don is the new director of
the Hillsborough County Health Department. In his spare time
(while waiting for Joan to move down here ) he enjoys tennis.
Joan hopes eventually to practice either privately or with some
agency that specializes In cerontology and alcoholism, which are
her specific areas of interest. We welcome you both here to
Tampa Don, you can convey our message to Joan on one of her
visits!
Until next week.
vVvVv .SV/vVvW '.'.>
t -10-1 oc
we consider as an enemy of the
Arab people."
LONDON A dramatic
change in the balance of British
trade with Israel was revealed |
with the publication of figures for
the first eight months of 1980.
They showed that the balance is
moving in Israel's favor faster
than ever and that while her
exports to Britain are booming,
her imports from Britain are
falling at the identical rate.
In the first eight months of last
year, Britain sold Israel 184
million Pounds Sterling worth of
goods and bought goods fa...
to the tune of 148 SnP?1*
Sterling. But this ye>*
position is reversed British J?
to Israel are down 15 pe^
156 million Pounds Sterling'!
[raelisalee to Britain haveS
oy a irr110 171 m^
Pounds Sterling.
million
Mayor Kollek
vent the Democratic Party from
giving any campaign assistance
to Tom Metzger, the Democratic
candidate for the House of
Representatives in San Diego's
43rd Congressional District.
Metzger, the president of the
California chapter of the Ku Klux
Klan, has called for the expulsion
of all Jews from the U.S. because
they are "parasites."
"There is room in the
Democratic Party for moderates,
conservatives, and liberals; for
people who favor public funding
of abortions, and for people who
don't; for people who support a
balanced budget, and for people
who don't. But there is no room
in the Democratic Party for
someone who resurrects the ban-
ners of racist calumny and
slanders entire races and creeds,"
Solarz said.
"Since Mr. Metzger has chosen
the path of defamation, inflam-
matory remarks and derogatory
statements, he would seem to
have little regard for either the
Constitution or laws of the
United States." Solarz said, "and
thus has no claim to the support
or assistance of the Democratic
Party."
MONTREAL Mayor Teddy
Kollek of Jerusalem declared here
that Jerusalem will always be the
capital of Israel, that its uni-
fication was almost "as im-
portant as the founding of the
State of Israel itself" and that
the city has been "comparatively
peaceful" despite considerable
tension there.
Addressing an audience of
1,000 persons at the Queen Eliza-
beth Hotel, organized by the
Allied Jewish Community Ser-
vices with the Canadian Jewish
Congress and the United Israel
Appeal, Kollek said Jerusalem
was a "success story" and "will
remain the capital of Israel no
matter how many countries move
their embassies from the city."
But, he warned, "If we want to
be a strong nation we have to
give everyone the same chances.
If we want to keep Jerusalem as
one city, we have to give the
same chance to the Arabs and the
Christians as to the Jews. If we
don't, what are we going to say if
they try to divide us again?"
Kollek stressed that Israel would
never bow to outside pressure
again.
PARIS Iraqi Deputy
Premier Tarek Azia had to wage
war against Iran and stressed
that the main struggle for Iraq
was against "Zionism."
The Iraqi envoy, who came
here to present his country's
views to President Valery Gis-
card d'Estaing, said the conflict
against Iran would continue until
Iraq could recover sovereignty of
its territories "usurped" by the
Iranians who violated the 1975
Algiers agreements. "Our
soldiers wish to return home
rapidly and prefer to fight
against Israel," the minister said.
Asked if Iraq accepted
mediation offers to end the
conflict, the minister said: "Yes,
from everyone except from Israel
and from the United States which
The biggest surprise j,fcl
statistics for last month wjZi
show that British export,*!
August fell by a dnuEJ I
percent from 20 to justov4
million Pounds Sterling. Anew,
greater drop in Israeli demands
Bntish road vehicles is a nZ
reason for this. M
Community
Calendar
Friday, Oct. 3
(Candlehghling time 6:56)
Simchat Torah JCC Closed
Saturday,Oct. 4
Congregation Kol Ami Sisterhood Couples Bowling 8 p.m.
Hadassah/Ameet Fundraiser 8 p. m.
Sunday, Oct. 5
Brandon Jewish Chavurah Board Meeting 9:30 a.m. ORT
Region-Wide "Phon-A-Thon" 10 a.m. ORT (daytime chapter)
Bridge Night 7 p.m.
Monday, Oct. 6
Congregation Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Board Meeting 10
am. Congregation Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Luncheon
Meeting noon University of South Florida B'nai B'nth/Hillel
Foundation Area Board Meeting 7:30 p.m. Congregation Kol
Ami Sisferhood Board Meeting 7:45 p.m. Jewish Women for
Jewish Suivival General Meeting 7:45 p.m B'nai B'rith
Women Board Meeting 8 p.m.
Tuesday, Oct. 7
Hadossah Board Meeting 10:30 a.m. Congregation Rodeph
Shoiom Lunch and Learn noon Hillel School Open House -
7:30 p.m Hadassah/Ameet Board" Meeting 8 p.m ORT
(Evening Chapter) Board Meeting 8 p.m
Wednesday, Oct. 8
Notional Council of Jewish Women General Meeting 9 30 o.m.
to noon Tampa Jewish Federation Women's Division Cam-
paign Cabinet 9 to 10:30 a.m. Congregation Schaarai Zedek
Brotherhood Board Meeting 7:30 p.m. Jewish Women for
Jewish Survival Study Group 7:45 p.m. Congregation Rodeph
Shoiom Board Meeting 8 p.m. Congregation Kol Ami Men's
Club 8 p.m. ORT (Evening Chapter) Bowling -9pm.
Thursday,Oct. 9
JCC Food Co-Op 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. ORT (Daytime and
Evening Chapters) Bowling 9:30 a.m. Jewish Towers
Residents/Management Meeting 1:30 p.m. Congregation
Schaarai Zedek Adult Education Class 8 p.m.
Friday, Oct. 10
(Candlelighting time 6:46)
ORT (Daytime Chapter) Garage Sale 9 a.m. to noon B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization Leadership Training
Religious ftipectopy
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallmger
Services: Friday, 8 p. m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily: morning and
evening minyan
CONGREGATION KOL AMI Conservative
962-6338/9 Rabbi Leonard Rosenthal 'Rabbi's Study, 12101 N.
Dale Mabry 1312 (Countrywood Apt*.) Services: Friday, 8 p.m
at the Community lodge, Water* and Ola Saturday, 10 a.m. at
Independent Day School, 12015 Orange Grove Dr.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SH0L0M Conservative
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Martin Sandberg
Hazzan William Hauben Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 10
a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15a.m.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Reform
3303 Swann Avenue/ 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim Ser-
vices: Friday, 8 p.m. -Saturday, 9a.m.
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewish Student
Park Apts 971
Center (USF). 3645 Fletcher Avenue, Colleg*
. .-6768 or 985-7926 Rabbi lazar Rivkin Rabbi
Yakov Werde Services: Fridoy, 8 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m.
Tune in The Jewish Sound, Sunday- 11 a.m. to noon 88.5 FM
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida, 5014 Potricio
Court #172 (Village Square Apt..) 988-7076 or 988-1234
Jeremy Brochin, director David Dee, program associate
Services: Friday, 6:30 p.m. followed by Shabbat dinner at 7:15
p.m. (please make dinner reservations by 5 p.m. Thursday);
Saturday, 10a.m. Sunday morning Bagel Brunch, 11:30a.m.

T-ii-3-ei
T10-1-SO


Ldav October 3. 1980
The Jrmjhfjpndiun uf 7
IL. David Shear to Receive ADL Award
L. David Shear, partner in the
,w firm of Shear, Newman and
Bhn, in Tampa, and immediate
jt president of the Florida Bar
Association, will be honored by
he Anti- Defamation League at a
nner to be held on Oct. 26, at
he Host Hotel.
Arthur Pearlman, Florida
Ihairman of the League's Society
(f Fellows, announced that Shear
prill be presented with ADL's
juman Relations Award during
he dinner. Julian Lane will serve
the dinner chairman. Honary
i-chairmen include: Mayor
obert Martinee, William F. Poe,
J)ick A. Greco Jr. and M. B.
lacobs.
A native of Tampa, and a
)iember of ADL's Florida
egional Board, Shear attended
cal public schools where he
ade his mark at an early age.
\e received honors and awards
om the American I utstanding graduate in both
Lnior and senior high, was
fampa Plant's High School class
esident each year of his high
bhool career and was elected
turt justice for Boy's State.
hear went on to Vanderbilt
Jniversity where he graduated
urn laude in three years and then
btained the J.D. degree in 1960
om the University of Florida
ollege of Law. After graduation,
headed home to Tampa and
egan his law practice. David
Ihear was overwhelmingly
About Voting
Today is the deadline to
register to vote in the
November presidential
election.
Supervisor of Elections for
Hillsborough County, Robin
C. Krivanek, has announced
that there are registration
booths all over Hillsborough
County that will remain open
until 5 p.m., Oct. 4.
If you are not a registered
voter, call the Registrar's
office, and find the closest
location.
Dr.Barry D.Shapiro
Chiropractic Physician
Suite 4
13940 North Dale Mabry
Tampa, Florida
24 Hour
Emergency Service
813-962-3608
Metropolitan
can simplify
your Ufa
.. .with insurance
protection for your
Auto m Uto
Horn* Hlth
I Makes life a little simpler, doesn't
" one person to handle your
personal Insurance needs.
[And you can be sure that with
Metropolitan Property and
Liability Insurance Company you
*w receive the same excellent
service Metropolitan Life policy-
holders have enjoyed for over a
I century.
[Call me for your personal Irv
| surance needs.
Michael aChemeff
11 North Westshore Mvd.
Suite 401
Tampa, Rs. 33607
872 2661 677 3856
OMeoopolcan
* ii a* uk) a*. s, m, at.
L. David Shear
elected president of the Florida
Bar for 1979-1980.
At 43, he was one of the
youngest lawyers to serve as
president of the Florida Bar. He
entered the arena of state bar
work after serving as president of
Tampa's Hillsborough County
Association in 1971-1972 the
year the local bar received three
awards of merit from the Florida
Bar and one from the American
Bar Association, and David
Shear was named outstanding
local bar association president in
the Florida Bars first annual
statewide competition. Later he
served as chairman of the Florida
Council of Bar Association
Presidents. "1 believe part of
one's professional life includes a
responsibility, even a com-
mitment, to contribute to it in an
effort to make it better," Shear
says.
As a father of two young sons,
it was natural that he became
interested in the operation of the
local Boy's Club. In fact, he
begun a lifelong love affair with
the organization which
culminated in his receiving the
Golden Boy Award following his
presidency of that organization in
1975. He is still a member of the
Boy's Club board of directors.
During all of his civic and
professional organizational work.
Shear has been a fully par-
ticipating member of Rodeph
Sholom Synagogue, where he has
attended since his youth. Shear
served as president' of the
synagogue in 1976 and retired as
chariman of its board in
February, 1979. His wife, Goldie,
and his two sons, Steve and Jeff,
are active members of the
synagogue.
Tampa AZA and BBG members decorated the sukkah for the
Jewish Community Center. Standing inside the completed
Sukkah are Stella Waaserberg, BBG president; Scott Levinson,
Jill Levine, Bevie Karpay and Jack Rosenkranz in the back
row. AZA and BBG are part of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization. Membership is open to all boys and girls in
grades eight through 12. Anyone intersted in joining may leave
his name at the JCC desk. .
it.
*tWTZT-
Kosher Lunch Menu
Kosher lunch menu of the Senior Citizen's Nutrition and
Activity Program ia sponsored by the Hillsborough County
Commission and held at the Jewish Community Center. Marilyn
Blakley, site manager, 872-4451. Menu subject to change.
WEEK OF OCT. 6-10
Monday: Braised beef tips, mixed vegetables with parsley
noodles, rosy applesauce salad, dinner roll, gingersnap
cookie, coffee or tea.
Tuesday: Hot turkey salad, chopped broccoli and yellow corn,
orange juke, whole wheat bread, plums, coffee or tea.
Wednesday: Barbecued beef, carrot cubes, lima beans, tossed
salad with tomato wedge and thousand island dressing,
bun, sliced peaches, coffee or tea.
Thursday: Baked chicken with gravy, rice pilaf and green beans,
grated carrots and pineapple salad, bran square, fresh fruit
(in season), coffee or tea.
Friday: Creole meatballs, whipped potatoes and chopped
Sinach, cherry gelatin with peaches, whole wheat bread,
1-fashioned carrot cake, coffee or tea.
PHONE (813) 837-5874
PAT COLLINS.
BABYSITTERS AGENCY
3218 CHEROKEE AVENUE
TAMPA, FLORIDA 33611
WE GUARANTEE AQUAUFED SITTER W YOUR HOME
FOR A FEW HOURS OR A WHOLE WEEK.
Tempest in London
Rothschilds Squabbling
Over Family Name?
London Chronicle Syndicate
LONDON A bitter
long-simmering dispute
among members of the
Rothschild family surfaced
in public in the city of
London this week. The
dispute centres on use of
the family name by the
Rothschild Investment
Trust.
Directors of Rothschilds
Continuation, whose chairman is
Evelyn de Rothschild, 49, the
holding company for the N. M.
Rothschild and Sons merchant
bank, wants Jacob Rothschild, 44,
and cousin of the former, to
resign from both companies.
SHOULD THIS happen, the
Rothschild Investment Trust, of
which Jacob Rothschild is
chairman, could be forced under
its articles of association to drop
the family name. The articles of
association adopted ten years ago
provide N.M. Rothschild with
power to bring about such a
change in Rothschild Investment
Trust's name when there are no
longer common directors.
The public dispute follows a
period of growing friction within
the two branches of the family
that has led this year to some
uncertainty about the use of the
family name and the connections
between the merchant bank and
the trust.
Jacob Rothschild, though
never formally chairman of the
N.M. Rothschild merchant bank,
was effectively its helmsman
from 1967 to 1975 when he served
as chairman of its executive
committee.
BUT THE balance of power
shifted in the mid-1970s when
Lord Rothschild, Jacob
Rothschild's father, became
chairman of the bank. A year
later, the chair passed to Evelyn
de Rothschild.
Since then, N.M. Rothschild
has tended to revert to its former
status as a conservative citv
merchant bank while Jacob
Rothschild has transformed the
Rothschild Investment Trust
into an important aggressive
force on the financial markets.
Differences within the family
surfaced last year when Eagle
Star was allowed to purchase a
minority stake in Rothschild
Continuation at a time when the
Rothschild Investment Trust had
expressed an interest in in-
creasing its own share stake.
Subsequently, the U.S. in-
surance group, Reliance, headed
by Saul Steinberg, bought a
shareholding in RIT in August
last year and, last May,
discussions started between the
bank and the trust on the "ap-
propriate" future relationship.
FINANCIAL advisory
arrangements between the two
companies were to be discon-
tinued, and Evelyn de Rothschild
resigned from the RIT board.
Then, last month, RIT raised
money on the euro-sterling
market without support of the
bank either as manager or un-
derwriter.
At the same time, however, the
possible conflict over use of the
family name became evident in
the decision of the Rothschild
Investment Trust to launch the
euro-sterling issue under its own
name.
Jacob Rothschild told
shareholders at the annual
meeting of the Rothschild
Investment Trust that the board
had offered to change the
company's name to the J.
Rothschild Investment Trust.
DIRECTORS were told that
the Rothschild Investment Trust
would not have to change its
name so long as neither it, nor its
associates nor Jacob Rothschild
carried on additional or
recognized banking business
anywhere in the world.
Additionally, the use of the
Rothschild name would be
restricted to the holding com-
pany alone.
sun cove realty
realtors
mc
commercial residential
investments
19
oiAiiotr
3216S. Dale Mabry
837-8543
v*ntoQ:2S1-M7a
J?
*?A + CHIEVE,INC.
r^ Education Center
* Audtotogy & Speech Pathology
* Educational Testing
* Counseling
* Tutoring-Math, Reading, etc.
* Test Preparation & Test Taking
* Study Skill
* Study SklHs
* Educational Enrichment
* Learning Disabilities Program
HELEN V.H. BAINES, PH.D. DIRECTOR
NANCY LEWIS, MJL, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
.
1325S.Grady
876-1393
10549 N Florida Ave.
935-6261



>*i^.pjfjry^*t' -t.
^ieT^wish r londianjijjjimpa
*y. otob*r3
Vote on Tuesday
We can not urge too strongly that qualified
voters go to the polls on Tuesday. Oct. 7, and cast
their ballots in the runoffs. Of special importance is
the U .S. Senate seat up for grabs occupied by incum-
bent Sen. Richard Stone.
We have endorsed the candidacy of Sen. Stone.
We repeat that endorsement. It is indeed a matter of
urgency that Stone be reelected.
It is clearly indefensible to support a candidate
for public office simply because he is Jewish. In the
past, we have refused to support candidates simply
because they were Jewish.
But in the case of Sen. Stone we believe that his
reelection is vital precisely because he is chairman of
the Senate Foreign Relations Subcommittee on
Middle Eastern Affairs. His reelection is vital
because, as chairman of that prestigious body, he has
done a creditable job in helping our nation steer a
more balanced course in the stormy seas of Middle
Eastern diplomacy at a time when our national sym-
pathies have shifted in favor of the petroleum-pro-
ducing Arab nations.
In the event Sen. Stone fails to be returned to
office, odds are that his successor will be Sen. Paul
Tsongas. Democrat of Massachusetts, whose record
in these matters is questionable.
In any case, there is little doubt in our minds
that most Floridians know this, and that many more
of them would vote for Sen. Stone than did in the pri-
maries if only they go to the polls.
That is why a vote Tuesday in the runoffs is so
critically important. Unless a significantly larger
number of registered voters do go to the polls Tues-
day, the results may be something most of us will
regret.
Change in Germany?
Speaking of elections, the Federal Republic of
Germany will be going to the polls on Sunday,
among other things to see who will be the new Chan-
cellor of that country.
Pitted against incumbent Helmut Schmidt is
Franz-Josef Strauss. Strauss is Prime Minister of the
State of Bavaria and chairman of the Christian Social
Union, which he represents as candidate along with
the Christian Democratic Union.
Schmidt, incumbent since 1974, is a candidate of
the Social Democratic Party.
Many changes have come to the Realpolitik of
the Federal Republic in the last few years involving
Jewish insitutions generally and the State of Israel
specifically. The "special relationship" between
Germany and these latter two entities, taken for
granted since the end of World War II, now comes
cloaked in many qualifications.
One is not to jump to the conclusion that the
intentions of Bonn have changed which may,
perhaps, be relied upon with a greater degree of
certainty than this question in the other European
capitals. But as is the case with the other European
capitals petrodiplomacy has nevertheless eroded
this "special relationship" rather profoundly.
As Chancellor. Schmidt has presided over this
erosion, and his shortsighted assertions about the
Palestine Liberation Organization for example are a
case in point. But in urging support of recognition for
the PLO. Schmidt did nothing more and nothing less
than did other member nations of the European Eco-
nomic Community at the EEC Venice summit last
June.
Strauss, the Bavarian hoping to take over Sch-
midt's office, has had the opportunity during the
election campaign to be critical of the erosion process
in the "special relationship" between the Federal
Rpublk and Israel and to imply that, had he been
Chancellor, this would not have occurred.
It remains to be seen whether Strauss wins and,
if he does, whether one can look forward to a change
in Bonn's policies. We rather doubt both
possibilities.
After all, witness the wild promises being made
by our own candidates for the presidency in the
November elections their testaments of faith that,
after their election, comes the millennium, depending
upon just what the individual voter believes the
coming of the millennium will constitute. No one can
really take all those promises seriously.
Why should it be any different in the Federal
Republic especially when the polls indicate that
Chancellor Schmidt really doesn't have much to
worry about in the matter of retaining his office?
i^.
French Supremacy is Artificial
WHAT IS there to write
about? Well, there's the war be-
tween Iraq and Iran. Or the
Oktoberfest bombing in Munich.
How about Castro and Carter
and the "miraculous" closing of
Mariel?
But everybody has already
said something about each one of
these items. And more, into the
bargain.
REMEMBER the old Fred
Astain? ditty. 'You say potayto,
and I say pota/ito"? To the same
tune. I have just composed the
following while searching for a
suitable theme to pursue in this
column:
"You say Baygin, and I say
Beegin, You say Raygin, and I
say Reegin. Baygin. Beegin,/
Raygin. Reegin, Let's call the
whole thing off."
Bearing Shakespeare in mind,
perhaps I could write about
what's in a name. After all. Begin
and Reagan by any other name
would be exactly what they are,
their names and how you pro-
nounce them notwithstanding.
That is certainly tragic enough.
BUT THAT, too, has been
done before, not only by Shake-
speare on the meaninglessness of
names, but by dozens of colum-
nists during the past few weeks
on American and Israeli politics.
In any case, the choice of a
column theme becomes in-
creasingly and irritating *
f.cult until quite by 3JJ
come upon the 1931 pubS
by John Day of the fife
Hook, a compendium of i
photographs, paintings andi
extracts appearing m vl-
Fair, a marvelous magazine SI
since defunct. l
The collection is awe-in^l
There are essays by CUrenil
Darrow. Arthur (iarfield H. I
and Harold Nicolson, p9
tracts by Ferenc Molnar photo
graphs by Edward SttJcUj
political and social satire 21
ings by Charles Uborde^l
William Cotton. It is an i|
inspiring potpourri.
The accent is on the n.
World War I scene with iu|
flapper sexuality and Prohibitiotl
era obsession with alcohol; tvl
depression bust; the remnantioll
royalty in Europe, predominantly I
featuring Edward, Prince if
Wales, and whether in the new]
era of egalitarianism it would I
all right for him to mam; u I
American commoner this.hail
a decade before the fact in tal
person of Wallace Warfiesll
Simpson; the struggle ell
democracy to survive iniluatJ
less Germany under the chuJ
cellorship of Heinrich Brueniql
the fascination shared by intaJ
lectuals with the decadent kultt]
of Berlin.
HAROLD NICOLSON wyiofl
Winston Churchill, He isamul
who leads forlorn hopes, ui\
when the hopes of England I
become forlorn, he will onceagan
be summoned to leadership" -
this, a full decade before thef
of Churchill s last call
What strikes me especially ill
an eaaay by Walter l.ippmann.1
"How Peace Might Come ul
Europe." It seems timely on its 1
face only because of the recently-1
published Ronald Steel volu
this year,' 'Walter Lippmann aW |
the American Century.'
One is no longer accustomed to I
treading lightly on the eggi of i
internecine European struggle 1
except in terms of a Russia]
Continued on Page 9
Secret Meetings
Is Hussein-Israel Tie Possible?
By JOSEPH FINKELSTONE
London Chronicle Syndicate
According to totally
reliable diplomatic sources,
contacts between Israeli
leaders and King Hussein
began before, the Six-Day
War in 1967. At that time,
the subject of discussion
was not a peace settlement
but how to keep the
Palestinian Arab terrorists
under control. They had
established themselves in
Jordan and were launching
attacks on Israeli territory
without the approval of
King Hussein.
The Israelis had no choice but
to respond by attacking terrorist
targets in Jordan itself. For the
King, the situation was an im-
possible one. His country was
being destroyed and he saw no
reason for acquiescing in the
presence of terror groups in his
kingdom. Hence the horirming of
the talks with the Israeli leaders
It was essential that the ut-
most secrecy should be main-
tained about these contacts,
given the King's fear that his
throne would be endangered if it
became known in the Arab world
that he was in contact with the
Israelis. This would have been
seen as the deepest treachery.
THE MAN chosen to meet the
king and to arrange the ensuing
discussions was the late Dr.
Jacob Herzog, a brilliant
diplomat and profound rabbinic
scholar.
Several meetings took place in
London between the King and
Abba Eban. the then Foreign
Minister. Eban was accompanied
by Dr. Herzog and. from time to
time, by the late Yigal Allon.
The manner of arranging the
encounters had more in common
with an espionage novel than a
diplomatic discussion. Eban.
Allon and Dr. Herzog would
arrive at a prearranged secret
rendezvous in London and wait
for the King. On arrival. King
Hussein would dismiss his
guards rnd his Scotland Yard
escort and tell his driver to wait.
The Israelis, having witnesses his
arrival, would leave their
"waiting room" and go to
another building where they
would meet the King and his
advisers.
Equally secretive hut eval
more colorful were the meeting
on islands in the Gulf of Aqabi
when the King and the Israeli
leaders would arrive by boat.
having exchanged signals Again j
not a hint of the meet ings p
colated to the outside world.
The major Israeli figure intbt
Aqaba Gulf meetings (after 19
was Golda Meir. both a^ Foreiga
Minister and as Prime Minister.
ALLON. Eban and Hera* I
also participated in the Cm I ot |
Aqaba discussions. The lattU"
Eshkol, when he was BJ
Minister, suggested to Mosne
Dayan that he should join in m
talks, but Dayan believed at tn
time (so it is churned! that Israel
should remain on the \N est Ban*
Continued oa Page 10
Jewish Floridian
', of Tub pa \
BusIimm Ott.ce: MM HendereBn Blvd.. Tampa. Via. MM*
Telephone 871-4C70
PubllcaUon Office: ISO N.E. It. Miami. Fla. MUB ^.^jM
mEDK sHocHtrr suzannc shocwt 1VDTTHFS^tS'
Editor and PubUahar Execialve Editor Asaooaw
Bl Weekly: J
VM.uspfl4iiai*
rterMtaa. P.O. Bet MSTS. Miami.
(Term MTt) refartag
toTfce
***
S L-BSCMFTION RATES: (Le OatwTewaUaaal
iltr. .11, .>. ,h rtter, lh..>.*> .rrtfrnml ilk Ihr Itvi* PV*rt*iH o* Tm|Nl p^| *
Friday. October 3. I960
Volume 2
23TISHRl57li
Number^


Friday, October 3, 1980
The Jewish Floridian oj l'ampa
Page 5
Shoresh-Roots
Journey Toward Understanding a People and Country
Carl and Paula Zielonka took
their children, Stephen, 12, and
Caryn, 9'', on a United Jewish
Appeal family Mission to Israel
this past summer. It was Carl
and Paula's third trip to Israel
and their children's first. Paula, a
superb note taker agreed to share
their experiences with our
readers. This is the second in-
stallment covering this trip.
By PAULA S. ZIELONKA
Wednesday July 2, 9 .m. -
Mediterranean Sea, Tel Aviv
Miriiuse a planned trip to an
air force base had to be cancelled,
F-l.Vs from the United States
were arriving that morning, we
took a break from our hectic
schedule and went swimming in
the Mediterranean with the
children. Seeing the hundred of
Israelis soaking up the intense
sun. watching the children
joyfully splash in the water and
listening to the loudspeaker
giving instructions to swimmers
in Hebrew was only marred by
the sight of the military
patrolling the roads along the
beach. Even while enjoying a few
hours in the sun at the beach, the
Israelis must he on their guard.
I p.m.-Carmel Market, Tel Aviv
After hirichihg at a falafel
stand, we wulked through Carmel
Market The Market is an
amazing sight with stall after
Stall of fresh fruits and
vegetables as well as nuts, seeds,
olives, candy, cookies, chicken.
lish and clothes. The size of
[ produce, such as radishes and
eggplants is unbelievable. People
come with small shopping bags
ii> buy their food for the day,
quite different from the super-
markets at home.
: p.m.-Bet Hatefutsoth. Tel Aviv
University
We very much want the
children to understand the ex-
perience of the Jewish people in
the Diaspora as expressed in this
Museum the beauty and the
hatred, the glory and the dispair.
Hopefully, some of the ideas that
the museum presents, especially
the feeling of the richness of our
| Jewish heritage and pride in our
Jewish people, were absorbed by
the children as they looked and
listened.
18 p.m.- Jaffa
Jaffa is the spot where, as the
Bible tells us, the great fish
expelled Jonah from its stomach
onto the beach. Once an Arab
stronghold, Jaffa has been
rebuilt. The narrow, winding
Streets climb up the hills. Shops
of artists and craftsmen line the
streets, making each turn an
interesting adventure. At the top
of the hill, the view of Tel Aviv is
spectacular.
July 3, 8:30 a.m. Site of Oper-
ation Bin Nun
The name of this 1948 battle
come from Joshua's full name,
Joshua Bin Nun, because the
same roads, hills, and valleys
were fought over in 1948 as were
Caryn Zielonka, center, surrounded by her traveling friends,
Ruth Winchell, Lafayette, Calif. Heft) and Marcy Kamfer,
Akron, Ohio.
Stephen Zielonka, right, with the Krugel brothers from South-
field, Mich. They are on Mount Scopus overlooking Jerusalem.
(ought over by Joshua and his
armies when the Israelites
returned to the Promised Land.
Overlooking the roads and
valleys that were involved in
both battles is the "Monument to
Those Who Freed the Road."
Inscribed on the monument are
those words: "If I forget thee O
Jerusalem, may my right hand be
cutoff."
11 a.m.-TelNof
Tel Nof is a paratrooper base;
near by is a memorial to the
Paratrooper Corps. This
monument was built by families
of paratroopers who were killed in
Israel's wars. At the base, we
watched parachutes being in-
spected and folded. W'e then
watched the paratroopers going
through different stages of
training as they learn how to
jump and how to land. As the hot
sun blazed down, 1 knew that I
might not have the courage or the
stamina to endure what these
young men and women were
doing. ...
12:30 p.m.-Kiryat Gat
Kiryat Gat is a development
town. The idea of a development
town is to put Jews in an area
where there are none. Kiryat Gal
is a successful development town,
with a 50 percent Ashkenazic and
50 percent Sephardic population,
ana with a good textile industry.
I p.m.-Guvrim Caves
On the way to our picnic lunch
at the Guvrim Caves, we passed
Tel Lahish, the area where
Samson terrorized the
Philistines. The caves are
Siiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiij
| About Voting
= Today is the deadline to
= register to vote in the 5
= November presidential =
selection.
Supervisor of Elections for =
Hillsborough County, Robin =
= C. Krivanek, has announced 1
= that there are registration =
= !xx)ths all over Hillsborough =
= County that will remain open |
= until 5 p.m., Oct. 4.
= If you are not a registered =
1 voter, call the Registrar's |
= office, and find the closest |
= location.
(SiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiinS
limestone caves and stones were
quarried for construction by the
Romans before, during and after
the time of Jesus.
2 p.m.-Ilaela Valley
This valley is where David
killed Goliath. This area is near
Ezyon Block where four, set-
tlements were being attacked in
1948 by the Arabs. Thirty-five
men from the Haganah in
Jerusalem attempted to resupply
Ezyon. They were dicovered by
an elderly Arab whom they"
spared and set free. This Arab
then warned the Arab army of
the presence of the young Jews.
The Arabs attacked and
surrounded them. After their
ammunition ran out. they used
rocks until they were finally
overcome by the Arabs. The
Arabs then mutilated the bodies
of the young Jews.
3:30p.m.-Moshav Aminadav
We visited with the Bar-Koch-
Ba family. The wife, Yehudif,. is a
nurse at Hadassah Hospital; and
originally came from Holland 20
years ago. Her husband rcame
from Morocco in the 1950s and
teaches agriculture to school
children in Jerusalem. They have
five children, ranging in age from
4-17 four boys and one girl.
Their view of Jerusalem was
spectacular, and the flowers in
their garden were lovely.
Although the moshav seemed
Howard B. Greenberg
President/Realtor
Associates
Holly Pardl
Sid Schuster
Bob Wolf
fius/nass Broker
Nat Abel
O.TY OF TAMPA.
879-8863
H
Commercial, Industrial, Income Properties
financially well oil, the Bar-Koch-
Ba's home was still far from
luxurious by American stan-
dards.
8 p.m.-Shoresh
The evening began with Zonik
Shaham, the man who planned
the raid on Entebbe, speaking to
our group about those plans and
how they were executed.
According to Zonik, the, prime
reason for the attempt to rescue
the hijacked passengers was
Israel's continuing commitment
to save Jews wherever they are in
trouble. Zonik said that he was
chosen to plan the raid because
he had helped to build the airport
at Entebbe and because he knew
Edi Amin so well. After listening
to Zonik, the children watched a
movie, dramatizing the raid in
Entebbe, while the adults heard
Shalmi Barmor, assistant
director of Yad Vashem, explain
how we parents should approach
the Holocaust and the- museum
with our children "when we visit
Yad Vashem. He stressed using
an analytic as opposed to an
emotional approach with them.
He felt that using emotion would
have a shock effect, causing them
to close out the issue and to
suppress the whole idea of the
Holocaust. In using the
analytical approach, Shalmi
stressed telling the meaning
of the Holocaust, explaining it
^
Exciting, live musical entertainment
We played for the Rodeph Sholom Beth Israel merger,
we'll be happy to entertain for your personal simchas, too.
Call Larry Wasserberger 933-1995 (day) 961-8881 (Night)
Larry Wasserberger
and
Tampa Bay Brass
Rhoda L. Karpay
GRLCRS
Let's
Talk
Tacfiffsf"
SUN BAY CORP.
Realtors
IN FLA. CALL COLLECT
1(813)962-2126
OUT OF STATE TOLL FREE
1 (800) 237-2077
as destruction and rebirth.
Although Hitler planned to
destroy the Jewish people, (he
survivors decided on a process of
rebirth through the formation of
the state of Israel. He also
stressed that we now have
organized ourselves so that we
can act. He felt we should also
emphasize the bravery of many
Jews during the Holocaust, and
the helpfulness of the righteous
Gentiles.
(In be continued)
What's new?
the Old Orleans Motel is the
newest talk in Tampa. Well
ilanned renovation is really
naking the motel relive it's dis-,
inctive past! Not to mention,
he Mardi Gras Lounge is now
booking some spectacular show
groups from around the coun-
try. So bring in the free drink
coupon below and come see
why the new Old Orleans Motel
is the talk of the town!
135 beautifully decorated
rooms
5 newiy furnished suites
Enjoy excellent dining in
Glaros Steak House
Show Groups nightly in the
Mardi Gras Lounge
Private meeting rooms
"Real'' limousine service for.
Airport transportation
Two minutes from Tampa
Stadium
COCKTAIL in the
Mardi Gras Lounge
Fr Drink with thi* coupon!
u/
2055 NORTH OAU MAIRY
TAMPA, rtORIDA 33607
(13)177-7471
VMOTtL


Page 6
The Jewish Fioridian of Tampa
Friday. October 3.19
White House Raps
Baptist Statement
On God, Prayers
WASHINGTON (JTA) The White House
reacted to the statement by Dr. Bailey Smith, president of
the Southern Baptist Convention that "God Almighty
does not hear the prayer of a Jew." Smith made that
remark at a gathering of fundamentalist Christians in
Dallas Aug. 22.
Dr. Robert Maddox, special assistant for religious
liaison on the White House staff, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, "I personally believe most Southern
Baptists would disagree with the Rev. Dr. Smith."
Maddox, an ordained Southern Baptist Minister from
Calhoun, Ga., who has been at the White House for the
past 18 months, also said:
"President Carter has prayed with people like Israeli
Prime Minister Menachem Begin and Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat and felt a spirit of prayer and comunion with
them. The President believes that God hears all his
children when they pray." Maddox asked the JTA
reporter if Smith's remark had disturbed the Jewish
community and observed, "It has disturbed thousands
and thousands of Southern Baptists across America."
2, 3. A 4 U&oom honwi from $173 mexfMI All
NCWM No* in normd *hm hoot w. hod wch
tanM. UctfcM cho<* of p*om. On. cB n d*1
W.VM3-3I;
"' "'
IN tin M fur Nmm W VTMty Pr itac Oh PIm
253-3171 2109 So. Dale Mabry
tor I
Letter to the Editor
EDITOR, The Jewish Fioridian
of Tampa:
On Sept. 9, Tampa Jewish
Social Service celebrated its sixth
anniversary of providing
professional social work services
to the Tampa Jewish community.
In those six years, Tampa
Jewish Social Service has directly
served 860 families with coun-
seling, advocacy and en-
viromental support; resettled 53
Soviet Jews and many other
refugees; developed with the JCC
a comprehensive program of
services to seniors; trained over
200 volunteers to provide service;
put on family-life education
programs attended by over 3,000
persons; offered vocational
services to close to 400 people
and much more.
Tampa Jewish Social is proud
of its impressive track record of
contributions to the survival of
Jewish familv life in Tampa.
Paula Zielonka, President
Tampa Jewish Social Service
Fruit Tree Sale
The Tampa Chapter of the
Rare Fruit Council wil hold its
first annual Tree Sale at the
Jewish Community Center on
Oct. 19, starting at 1 p.m.
Hundreds of typical and rare
fruit trees, vines and bushes
compatible to this area, mostly
grown, will be offered for sale to
the public along with information
on their planting and care.
O-W-LS- to Meet
All Jewish singles over age 35
who read this announcement are
invited to attend the O-W-L-S.
(Older, Wiser, Livelier. Singles)
planning meeting on Oct. 9 at 8
p.m. The meeting will be held at
the Jewish Community Center.

\
'Charlie Brown' to Benefit JCC
This year's major fundraiser
for the Jewish Community
Center is the onenight Broadway
production, "You're a Good Man,
Charlie Brown." The national
touring company of the
production will present this show
November 1. 8 p.m., at the
Tampa Theatre.
Alice Rosenthal and Marsha
Irvine, co-chairman of this major
fundraising performance, have
stressed that the money raised
for this night will benefit the
entire Jewish community.
Among the benefits will be
improvements to the JCC gym,
improvements in equipment and
curriculum for the preschool
program, enlarging the scope and
activities of the JCC summer
camp and repairing and updating
the pool equipment Each
donation of a ticket is tax
deductable and paid tickets may
be donated for use by disad
vantaged children.
To add to the festivities of the
evening, a cast party with
refreshments will follow the
performance. Door prizes will be
given away, as well as free
parking provided by the
Exchange Bank Garage and Zack
and Florida Avenues.
JCC Men's Basketball League
Over 18? Its lime again to get
out those sneakers and join the
JCC Men's Basketball League,
which begins* Nov. 19.
Registration starts Oct. 1. To be
guaranteed inclusion in the
league, complete teams must be
registered and paid in full by 9
a.m. Oct. 15. After that, team
registration will be permitted on
a first-come, first-served basis (if
openings remain). Registration
ends 9 a.m. Oct. 24.
League games will be played
on Wednesday evenings, and if
necessary, games will be
scheduled for Sunday evenings.
To assure team a spoi in the
league, turn in registration forms
with full payment to Danny Thro
at the JCC before deadline time.
For more registration forms or lo
ask questions, call Danny Thro or
Lee or Glenn Tobin.
Thank you for your vote, your support and your confidence in me!
PLEASE VOTE FOR
FRED A. ANDERSON
County Commissioner, District 1 (D)
We Support Fred Anderson!
Dr.CariZiek>nka Punch # 100 Tuesday, October 7
Michael A. Linsky Oil the ballot
Paul Gorman
GeneLazarus
Dr. Robert A. Turkel, M.D.
'Fred Anderson is a capable leader with proven ability."
Jacob Gottfried
"Fredis the man to be one of our leaders to represent
us in the new decade of growth. He will be a
| "Commissioner for all people'.
Richard M. Turkel
'Tm proud to support Fred Anderson for
County Commissioner, District 1."
Barry A. Cohen
"Fred's many years of experience in public service and his
knowledge of Hillsborough County governmental affairs,
needs and problems make him an excellent candidate forthe
position of County Commissioner."
IrvEdelson
"Itis my pleasure to support Fred Anderson, a man of integrity,
for County Commissioner, District 1."
Robert A. Trope
Paid for by the campaign fund to elect FRED A ANDERSON. County Crrtaatorw, Irene R Silver. canipalgninMaurer.


October 3, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 7
The Jewish Community of Hawaii
, JUDITH ROSENKRANZ
_ is the second in a aeries on
l^thand visit with the Jewish
[munily of Hawaii.
here we were in the middle of
Pacific Ocean, 2,500 miles
of the California coast,
fing Jewish geography.
director of the Hawaii
rish Welfare Fund, Mike
^hofsky, invited me to lunch
the Hawaii Women's
(ision campaign Chairman,
dy Wong, and the general
ipaign Chairman from San
go, Marsha Dry an. The
eral topic was the Women's
sion Campaign in Hawaii for
I coming year.
|ven in this island paradise,
[Federation campaign sounds
much like any other com-
hity. Washofsky laughingly
ihasized, "We have no
problem with speakers here."
Looking around at the beautiful
blue water from the open air hotel
terrace where we had lunch, it
was easy to see why. But the
Hawaii Federation rarely brings
outside speakers for their events.
There are so many "names" who
live in the Islands, they prefer to
use someone from "home." One
of their frequent speakers for the
Women's Division is Kathryn
Murray, (Mrs. Arthur Murray).
The Women's Division in
Hawaii raises about 10 percent of
the total campaign of $400,000,
which represents 650 gifts. Of the
total raised, only 10 percent is
kept locally, the remaining 90
percent is sent to United Jewish
Appeal.
Obviously, from the figures, it
is apparent that there are very
few local Jewish projects. The
one project that is very much in
hinberg Heads Archives Center
lEW YORK Marshall M.
Inberg of New York City, vice
feident of the American Jewish
i Distribution Committee, has
named chairman of the
[bout Voting
Today is the deadline to I
kgister to vote in the
lovember presidential =
(lection.
Supervisor of Elections for |
iillsborough County, Robin =
Knvanek, has announced |
hat there are registration 5
Inoths all over Hillsborough |
fount} that will remain open I
[Uil'i p.m., Oct. 4.
ll you are not a registered 1
Dter, call the Registrar's |
Iffice, and find the closest |
nation.
Hi' llllll.......Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllli
United Jewish Appeal Archives
and Records Center by Herschel
W. Blumberg, UJA national
chairman.
The appointment includes
responsibility for the directon of
UJA's oral history program and
preparation of materials and
plans for the United Jewish
Appeal's 1989 Jubilee
celebration.
Commenting on Weinberg's
appointment, UJA President
Irwin S. Field said: "The ar-
chives and oral history program,
under the dynamic leadership of
Marshall Weinberg, will provide
the needed perspective as we
attempt to summerize the first 50
years of UJA service to the
Jewish people, a period that has
moved us from destruction to
redemption and from chaos to
organized and responsible Jewish
communal effort."
evidence in the presence of a
shaliach, Gabi Bron. Shaliachim
are sent throughout the world
through the Jewish Agency to
represent Israel on a personal
level. This has nothing to do with
the Israeli Foreign Ministry. A
shaliach helps keep an Israeli
presence, makes speeches, an-
swers questions about aliyah and
often works with youth groups.
Gabi Bion is the youth worker
for Young Judea and also serves
as the professional working with
the students at the University of
Hawaii in the University of
Hawaii Jewish Student
Chavurah. "No one would believe
that this Jew gets up every
Sunday morning to go to
church," he laughed. "I speak to
church groups throughout the
Islands who want to hear more
about Israel, or as they put it
"The Holy Land."
Young Leaders
Pledge
$1.7 Million
NF.W YORK, N.Y. A Total
of $1.7 million in pledges for the
1981 Campaign was received
from 175 members of the United
Jewish Appeal's Young
leadership Cabinet at the
organization's annual retreat,
held Aug. 20-25, at the Harrison
Conference Center in Lake Bluff,
111. The pledges represented a 43
percent increase over the amount
the Cabinet members donated to
the 1980 Campaign.
Tampa representatives at the
retreat included Dr. Norman
Kosenthol and Dr. Carl Zielonka.
Gabi's office looks like an
Israeli travel office, it is so
covered with posters of Israel.
Before I left his office, I, too, had
Israeli posters to carry with me
throughout the remainder of our
trip. I'm not sure of the
relationship of Coals to
Newcastle, but bringing back
Israeli posters from Hawaii to
Tampa seemed a little far-
fetched.
Back to Jewish geography. It
is indeed a fun game to play.
Those with large families, or who
have been involved in Jewish
activities, have a higher success
rate than those who have neither
of the above preliminary
qualifications. Southern Jewish
geography generally brings
quick, guaranteed results and
this lunch was to prove no dif-
ferent.
Trudy (Schandler) Wong from
Asheville, N.C., the Hawaii
Women's Division Campaign
chairman, wanted to know if I
knew her high school friend
Karen who married and moved to
Tampa. "I don't know her
married name, but she was very
pretty," Trudy reminisced.
Karen Linsky was our Jewish
connection. Proving once again
that my friend is right when she
insists, "There are only 136 Jews
in the world. We just keep
meeting them over and over, and
their cousins and their neigh-
bors!"
DAVID ROSNIK S
100% HID C0NDITIONI0
hoiil root too n. hum'
RfNOWNtO FOR
unsurpassed
caloric and
illllUt! OUTS
On the Ocean at 67th Street,
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Dear Friends,
We are happy to announce that the
Rosner family are here to welcome you
again for the coming winter season of
1980-81 beginning November 25.
We want to assure you that the usual
high standards of comfort, cuisine and
service will be maintained as it has been
for 27 years.
Please write for rates or any other in-
formation, or
CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-327-6642
Sam Rosner
Par pron double occupancy
includes breakfast dinner.
luncheon snack
Nov 25 to Dec 16
Under strict
Rabbinical
supervision
IF ITS THE STERLING,
YOU KNOW ITS THE FINEST
Senator s
Richard (Dick)
AT WORK SECURING VS. INTERESTS IN THE MID-
DLE EAST:
As chairman of the Middle East Subcommittee of the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Senator Stone is the
acknowledged leader for peace in the Middle East and for
continued strong support for the State of Israel, the
dependable ally and friend of the United States.
Senator Stone consistently and forcefully opposes the
sale of advanced weapons to the enemies of Israel In 1976
he led the opposition to the sale of F-15 jet fighter planes to
Saudi Arabia. Recently, he initiated the letter signed by
two-thirds of the members of the U.S. Senate which
warned the Administration that further F-15 offensive
capability for the Saudis would not be approved. He also
successfully amended the Senate Foreign Aid bill to
prohibit the sale of U.S. built warship engines to Iraq.
Senator Stone has repeatedly called for the United
States to work in conjunction with Israel to secure
American interests in the Middle East. Towards this end,
and in order to project American strength in the Middle
East, he has publicly called for the United States to lease
the Sinai military bases at Etzion and Sharm Al Sheikh.
IF YOU CARE ABOUT
THE SURVIVAL OF
ISRAEL.
Re-elect U.S. Senator
RICHARD (DICK) STONE
Port tor tw Senator Rrchard (IX*) Stone Condon Commmee A copy o< our reoortis Wed wth the federal Elects Comn.ssK)n and .s
a^toWeior purchase at the Federal Election 5ommiss.on, Washington, D C 20463


Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday,
Octobe, J
On Drawing Board
Israel Studies Hydrogen Auto
HAIFA With fossil fuel supplies running
low and gasoline prices running high, some car
owners wistfully dream that their gas-guzzlers
could run on water.
Well, as impossible as that may seem, it may
one day come to pass, in a manner of speaking, if
research now underway at the Technion-Israel
Institute of Technology succeeds. And pre-
liminary results have been hopeful. The cars
would not run on water exactly, but rather on
hydrogen, which could be extracted in near-end-
less supply from the water of the world's oceans.
TECHNION physicists have succeeded in
storing hydrogen in a dense form within metal,
which might serve like a battery for a car. When
the metal is heated, the hydrogen is released and
can then be used as a fuel. Of course, as with all
scientific investigations in their early stages,
there is a drawback: until recently, it has taken
metal of some two tons in order to hold enough
hydrogen to power a car a mere 300 kilometers.
In their research for low-weight materials that
can store the hydrogen, Technion physicists Prof.
T. Genossar and Prof. Peter Rudman have suc-
ceeded in reducing that to a mere 5O0 kilos (1 kilo
equals 2.2 lbs.). A big step, but still a bit too
heavy to put into the average car.
In their research, which centers around mag-
nesium and its alloys, the Technion team is
dealing with two problems: energy storage per se
and storage with application to transport.
Though not yet at a practical stage, Genossar and
Rudman already have a system working in their
laboratory, where they have been studying the
problem since 1974.
HYDROGEN is already known as a fuel in
liquid form, it has powered flights to outer space.
However, liquid hydrogen as an automobile fuel
has several drawbacks it might explode, at
worst, and at best is impossible to store for long
periods.
The Technion team is continuing in its search
for a light enough storage medium to make
hydrogen-powered automobiles a reality. The
advantages are obvious: no cartel controls the
oceans. And hydrogen-burning cars would
produce no pollution other than water, which
would be formed when the burned fuel was
released into the air.
ZJ
^
G
\' OQ* '/,* Sj
c
c
's
'A
Trwy'r* playing OUR ong!
Court Says OK
Meyer Lansky Visit
To Israel Approved
Case Closed
PLO Denied Observer Status
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The two chief
branches of the World
Bank, the International
Monetary Fund (IMF) and
the Reconstruction and
Finance Corporation
(RFC), have denied the
Palestine Liberation
Organization observer
status at its annual
meeting here and in the
process upset a decision by
the chairman of the
sessions which began
Tuesday to exclude all
other observers.
The IMF and the RFC said
that the resolution offered by the
United States against changing
the rules that prevailed at the
1979 meeting has been adopted
by their boards of governors. In
accordance with the usual
practice, the IMF and the RFC
refused to give details of the
balloting either by the IMF's 140
members or the RFC's 135.
THE IMF, making the first
announcements, said its
resolution provides for the
executive directors to "consider
the relevant rules with a view to
making such proposals to the
board of governors as they
believe necessary." An IMF
spokesman said he would not
comment on whether this means
the issue will arise again next
year since Saudi Arabia and
Kuwait, both strong backers of
the PLO. have been agitating for
its inclusion as an observer.
The RFC disclosed that the
resolution adopted by its board of
governors "provides that at-
tendance at the 1980 meetings is
limited to those observers invited
to the 1979 meetings." It is
assumed that the IMF will
support this stand.
The two resolutions effectively
bar observer status to the PLO
since it did not have this status
at the 1979 meetings. However.
Tanzania, which has the
chairmanship at this year's
annual meetings, decided to deny
observer status to all other
organizations.' Tanzania,
represented by its Finance
Minister, Amir Jamal. made its
decision known after the IMF
disclosure of the balloting that
ended Friday.
BUT THE RFC ruling ap-
parently has effectively overruled
the Jamal decision. The Tan-
zanian decision reportedly was a
sop to the Arab countries for
being defeated on their PLO
maneuver.
The organizations, which
traditionally participate in these
World Bank meetings of finance
ministers and central bankers,
include the Bank for Inter-
national Settlements (BIS) and
the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development
(OECD). An American source
said prior to the RFC statement
that the OECD and the BIS
probably would be able to have
representation through "unof-
ficial observers or special guests"
to circumvent Tanzania's
decision.
The RFC's decision apparently
took cognizance of the view that
these important international
finance organizations should not
l>e excluded because of pique
among the PLO'a allies.
Although the results of the
balloting have been unofficially
known since Friday.the IMF and
the RFC reportedly have delayed
announcing the results because
Aral) countries had challenged
the results, and Saudi Arabia and
Kuwait suspended financing
some projects in demanding
status lor the PLO.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Interior Ministry has lifted
the ban on an entry permit for
Meyer Lansky. The 79-year-old
Lansky, allegedly connected with
organized crime in the U.S., has
not been allowed to visit Israel
since the early 1970s. His
repeated requests to come here as
a tourist were turned down
l>ecause he was considered
'dangerous to the public
welfare'."
The Ministry changed its mind
only after Lansky recently ap-
pealed to Israel's Surpeme Court
which handed down a show cause
order compelling the Interior
Ministry to explain why he
should not he permitted to visit
the country on a tourist visa.
Kight years ago. Lansky wanted
to slay here on an immigrant visa
but was turned down by the
Interior Ministry. After hefaj
to obtain a court order
the Ministry he was exo
from the country.
LAST JUNE.
Minister Yosef Burg
Lansky a tourist visa, bull
changed his mind. Lansky I
appealed to the Surpeme
which gave Burg 30 days t
respond. The 30 ikiys expiredjn
before Kosh Hashanah.
A senior official in the.Mfmsi
explained that the Ministry to
into consideration l.ansky'si
and poor health. In a tele
interview with Israel TVIrorob
Miami home, l.anskv expn
gratitude at the decisicai
praised the courage of
Interior Ministry He said1
does not care if he is given i
immigrant or a murist visa.
long as he is granted permisji
to visit Israel.
New Ramaz School
Defaced by Vandals
NEW YORK (JTA) The new seven-story
Ramaz high school, an Orthodox Jewish day school on
Manhattan's- Upper East Side, was defaced Saturday
night after Yom Kippur, apparently by supporters of the
Palestine Liberation Organization.
Rabbi Haskel Lookstein, principal of Ramaz, said
that Sunday morning he discovered one-foot-high red
slogans spray-painted on the Joseph H. Lookstein Upper
School of Ramaz. He said the slogans read, "Begin
Assassin," and "PLO Lives."
LOOKSTEIN NOTED that the vandals may have
chosen the school because it is a "Jewish-looking
building." He said it has windows on which are depicted
scenes of Jerusalem and Torah Scrolls.
The new high school opened last week and has some
450 students. It is on East 78th Street several blocks
away from Ramaz's main building on East 58th Street.
The slogans were removed by machine, Lookstein said.
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Who named the "Turkey"?
A: Luis de Tones who called it -TUKKI -
The Hebrew word for peacock!
The first of Columbus' crew to set foot in the
"New World" was Luis de Torres, a Jewish
crewman, a master of languages and one of
Columbus' trusted friends. Thinking that any
natives they might meet may be descendants of
the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. Columbus sent
de Torres ashore first, to find out if the natives
were friendly and whether they spoke Hebrew
or some other known language of the day
The beauty and richness of the land captivated
de Torres imagination and he prevailed upon
Columbus to let him settle there In writing
to his friends back home de Torres used the
Hebrew word for peacock-TUKKI-to describe
a new bird he encountered And through
usage, the American bird came to be called a
Turkey (probably because there is no known
Hebrew word for Gobble Gobble).
A NOT SO RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affection
is to open the house' when mishpocha.
guests or friends drop in. Out comes the
fine food and. invariably. J&B Rare
Scotch. And why not?-J&B is a clean,
light scotch with the superb taste that fits
right in with the tradition of serving the
best And because of its great taste.
J&B commands a high level of elegance...
at home or at your most important
simchas.
And that's a fact!
J'B
RARE
SCOTCH


kdav, October 3, 1980
o Minrilin
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
^^^1
French Supremacy is Artificial
Continued from Page 4-A
,sauli on the North Atlantic
eaty powers. The eggs are
one, long since replaced by an
ven stronger and interdependent
pntinental relationship than
lATO the European Eco-
omic Community. And so, if
iere is no peace in the destiny of
lurope. the threat will come not
I an act of suicide from itself to
(self but from the Muscovite
hallenge to the east.
STILL, half a century ago, well
More the 1931 appearance of the
farui Fair Book, in an undated
or issue of the magazine (they
unfortunately all undated, a
libliophile's nightmare). Walter
"ippmann put his finger on a
jieme that is as cogent today as
] was at the time that he wrote
"How Peace Might Come to
Europe" examines the post
jVorld War I chaos emerging out
the arbitrary punishments
sited upon Germany by the
aty of Versailles. In it, Lapp-
harm lists the staggering
arations payments demanded
' Germany; what he calls "the
^ar-guilt lie" that placed the
ame for the war unilaterally
on the Germans; the careless
turn of Alsace-Lorraine to
Franc.', and the brutal Mud-
oning out of the geography of
Europe of the phenomenon
nown as "the Polish Corridor"
liithin the territorial hegemony
(Germany in East Prussia.
I.ippmann sees much of these
lunitive measures as a result of
imperiousneas of the French,
nd he predicts that if they are
ot "forgiven" and removed from
lierman obligation, that the
ushing burden imposed, no less
nan the calculated national
nsults heaped upon it, could well
bad to the downfall of the Wei
ar Republic.
HISTORICALLY, Lippmann
pas later proven correct with the
advent to power of Adolf Hitler
who pointed to the Treaty of Ver-
sailles as the ultimate treason
committed by those German
leaders who had agreed to it and
what is worse, signed it. The Nazi
triumph was indeed based upon
the repudiation of the treaty as
treason, a sentiment passionately
shared at the time by the German
nation at large, which embraced
his unspeakable dictatorship as
the price it seemed willing to pay
for its rehabilitation and lib-
eration from the Versailles
humiliation.
Perhaps there is little new in
this that an observer in the
1980 8 does not know about. But
Lippmann's most startling
observations in his essay are
about French Realpolitik and
France itself, and in these there is
a lot that is new and in the
guise of prophesy. Lippmann
sees France as the architect of
Versailles and the post-World
War I European experience, quite
as if neither the British nor the
Americans, who also fought in
the war, contributed to it or had a
significant role to play so far as
the ultimate destiny of Germany
was concerned. He sees the
French role as uniquely singular
and uniquely punitive.
As to the nature of that role,
Lippmann speculates that the
French feared that if the burdens
imposed upon Germany by Ver-
sailles were forgiven, the dis-
tinction between France as victor
and Germany as vanquished
would blur, and "Germany would
become the center of attraction
for the whole of Central Europe,
drawing it into the orbit of
German diplomacy, commerce
and finance. In such a Europe,
the Frenchman says, Germany's
will would be law, and France,
without allies to support her,
would be isolated and second-
rate."
IN THE end, Lippmann agrees
with the French assessment of
their European role in a world
without Versailles that France
would indeed become second-
rate.
"I do not mean to deny," he
writes, "that there is a French
imperialism which enjoys ex-
ploiting the artificial hegemony
created by the peace treaties.
There is plenty of it. But I should
maintain that Frenchmen are
quite as well able as we are to see
that their supremacy in Europe is
artificial and. in the perspective
of history, temporary and in-
secure."
Lippmann sums it up this way:
"In fact, that is what the French
really mean when in spite of their
great army, their stores of gold,
and their circle of alliances, they
proclaim their insecurity from the
housetops. They mean that they
are living beyond their real
political income, and that they
dread (and intend to postpone as
long as they can), the inevitable
deflation of their mastery."
WHAT STRIKES me about
the essay is that its conclusions
are also applicable to France at
the end of World War II. Nothing
has changed except the irrelevant
details of the scenario. France
lost World War II just as it lost
World War I. Ditto for Great
Britain and the United States,
except that Britain knew it
immediately.
The United States did not
discover the defeat until after
Vietnam, but the French are still
not aware of it. What is more
startling about France's astig-
matism in this regard is that, in
the case of both wars, it seized
the leading hand in forging the
victor's peace.
Furthermore, French
Realpolitik today is based upon
the very same perception that the
French had of their role in Europe
as Lippmann surmised it to be in
Ambush Slayers
Hebron Terrorists Arrested
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Security sources have
mouneed the arrests of
iMi West Bank Arabs al-
k'cdlv responsible for the
jmbush slaying of sue
leshiva students in Hebron
Bst May 2. According to an
Inny spokesman, four of
Tic suspects belong to the
Fatah cell which planned
Iwi curried out the killings
Ind six are members of
[nother cell that provided
nem with material assis-
ance and transportation.
I Three of the terrorists accused
the actual killings are residents
the Hebron area and one lives
the Jenin region. They
ortedly confessed and said
Ny acted on the direct orders of
[ou Jihad, deputy to Palestine
liberation Organization chief
[Mir Arafat. One of the men
>rested reportedly confessed to
F* murders of Hadassah and
M Barak whose bodies were
pund m a parked car near
usalem last March.
THE ANNOUNCEMENT
w details of the manhunt that
to the apprehension of the
apects. The search began
met immediately after the
ngs more than three months
nd ranged throughout the
* Bank. Three weeks ago,
wmty forces arrested a young
Mat of Bani-Nayim village
[MmuiMiQmH .** ___,___ ,1
Possession of
"unition.
arms and
Und-
er interrogation he ad-
mitted membership in El Fatah
and provided information as to
the identity of the Hebron
terrorists. As a result, security
forces closed the Jordan River
bridges to young Arab males.
The terrorists apparently
aware that the net was tighten-
ing, attempted to cross the
Jordan away from the bridges
and wen- raptured by a military
patrol several days ago. The ter-
roristfl were described as young
men of above average educational
background, a number of them
holding academic degrees.
THE LEADER of the four-
man cell that set up the Hebron
ambush was identified as Yasser
Hussein Mohamman Zeidat, 30, a
resident of the Bani-Nayim
village in the Hebron area. He
joined the Fatah terror
organization in the early 1970s.
In April, 1977, after having par-
ticipated in firing Katyusha
rockets toward Kiryat Arba, he
escaped to Jordan. He then went
to Lebanon where he trained new
recruits arriving from the
territories.
Zeidat's deputy was Adnan
Jaber, 30, a resident of the village
of Taysir, in the Jenin area. He
has been with the Fatah for the
past 11 years. He spent several
months of training in the Soviet
Union. The third member of the
cell was Taysir Abu-Sneina, 28, a
resident of Hebron. He joined the
Fatah two years ago. He is a
graduate of Amman University
and served as mathematics
teacher in a Hebron school.
The fourth member, who con-
fessed to the killing of the Barak
couple, was Mohammad Shubaki.
33, a resident of Edna, a village in
the Hebron region. A farmer, he
joined the unit by a directive of
the Fatah headquarters in Beirut
and trained with them in the
Hebron mountain region.
THE SUPPORT unit was
headed by Omma II an nib. a
resident of Beit Jalla village near
Bethlehem, who is a graduate of
Beirut University and was em-
ployed as a chemist in an F.ast
Jerusalem blood bank. He joined
El Fatah two years ago. Haroub
allegedly admitted driving the
killers before and after the
Hebron ambush and providing
them with material to prepare
explosives.
The terrorists also led their
captors to an ammunition cache
where explosives were found
similar to those used in the June
2 bomb attacks on three West
Bank Arab mayors, two of whom
were permanently crippled. The
perpetrators of the Hebron at-
tack denied any connection with
the attacks on the mayors. That
act has been widely attributed to
Jewish extremists seeking ven-
geance for the Hebron killings.
The arrests of the alleged
Hebron killers was greeted with
elation by residents of Kiryat
Arba, the Orthodox township
adjacent to Hebron where most
of the ambush victims had lived.
Leaders of the community
demanded the death penalty for
the terrorists
Holland: 'I am sorry for you.'
Israel: '1 am sorry for you.'
(Ihtsh in the Israeli evening newspaper 'Maarir'l
London Chronicle
his essay after World War I.
There is a fear of inferiority in
global affaire that is real, and one
comes to the conclusion that it is
perhaps largely the only honest
perception that the French have
about themselves. The conclusion
is a bitter one, not because the
perception cripples the French so
unnecessarily, but because their
failure to see themselves for what
they are cripples the rest of the
West, as well.
ONE STEP beyond the
honesty of this painful perception
lies the self-deluding gigantism of
Charles de Gaulle, his funny tittle
force de frappe in whose atomic
firecracker box he saw the "new"
France emerge: the consequent
French withdrawal from NATO
to kick the shins of Uncle Sam as
a reminder, I suppose, that /< Hoi
Soleil shone splendidly upon
world arrairs when the pipes
would not yet he made for
hundreds of years upon which to
play Yankee ttoodh Handy: the
national determination at the
Quai d'Orsay to be earth-shaker
rather than shaken. In short, to
play the mouse that roared.
What shock of recognition lies
ahead for France? Sadly, there is
no Walter Lippmann these days
to say. Unfortunately, if history
does indeed repeat, it is a shock
that will include us, as well, the
perennial bailers-out of the glory
of France, long after the glory is
less than glorious, when it lies in
Utters and begging for help pour
la pa trie.
U.S. Withholds Funds to UN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
U.S. has withheld $5 million in
funds for a United Nations
program following a request from
Rep. Bill Green (R., N.Y.). the
legislator's office here reported.
Green, in a letter dated-Aug. 12
to Secretary of State Edmund
Muskie, recommended that the
U.S. reconsider its funding to the
UN because the United Nations
Environmental Program (UNEPI
director, Mostafa Tolba,
prevented an Israeli firm from
being the contractor on a major
construction project.
THE ISRAELI firm had
submitted the lowest bid on a
proposed 123 million UNEP
headquarters complex in Nairobi.
Kenya, but "under pressure from
Arab and African states," Green
said. Mr. Tolba simply threw
out the bids," and plans on
revamping the project
specifications.
According to the State
Department, it warned UNEP
that U.S. support was "in
jeopardy" and then on Aug. 22 it
called its representative in
Nairobi and ordered him to
advise UNEP that the U.S. $5
million contribution to UNEP for
the second half of 1980 has been
indefinitely deferred.
The State Department, in a
letter to Green, said it is now
awaiting Tolba's report on the
project to the UN General
Assembly. "It would be absurd
to give money and have it used
unfairly and against the best
interests of the U.S. and our ally
Israel," Green said.
Soviet Guilty Of'Parasitism'
NEW YORK (JTA| -
Dmitri Shchiglik, 53, has been
found guilty of "parasitism" and
"malicious evasion of payment
for support or maintenance" of
his first wife and sentenced to one
year in a labor camp, it was
reported by the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ).
Shchiglik, who has been applying
for an exit visa since 1973, was
sentenced to one year on the
charge of parasitism and six
months on the charge of non-
support, but is serving the two
sentences concurrently.
The NCSJ said that his lawyer
was unsuccessful in proving that
Shchiglik, who was employed as
a maritime engineer for 36 years,
was living off the salary he had
earned working for the Hydro
Meteorological Service.
AS TO the second charge,
Shchiglik s former spouse
claimed that he had pressured her
to sign a contract releasing him
of all monetary obligations and
responsibilities. This claim came
six years after their divorce and
despite a statement she signed in
his emigration file that she did
not object to his desire to
emigrate and that all alimony
and child support payments have
been made in full.
4806 W. GRAY ST.
1 TAMPA FLA 33808
aj13)873210
Having a Bar Mitzvah?
Wedding?
Contact Bennie Stevens Orchts tra
962-6373
Pnvt drum kHaora, all atyls. privatr
A&nal
Inc.
MLUEA.WOOLF
PET PICKUP / DELIVERY
APPROVED FLIGHT KENNELS
PRE FLIGHT CHECK-UP
HEALTH CERTIFICATES
EXPORT DOCUMENTATION
BOARDING KENNEL
VETERINARY SERVICES


ft-ktay.Oi
There Were Secret Meetinqs
Tie Possible Between King Hussein and Israel?
Continued from Page 4
and was not convinced that Israel
could reach an agreement with
King Hussein or should even
try to. In any case, he did not at
first take part in the talks with
the King. Eventually, however,
he did join the discussions, as did
the then Chief of Staff, Gen.
Chaim Barlsv, and other military
leaders.
Levi Eahkol did not meet the
king, but when Golda Meir
succeeded to the premiership in
March, 1969 on his sudden death,
she began to have talks with
King Hussein. At one meeting
she was accompanied by Eban, at
another by Dayan. She also met
the King alone.
When Yitzhak Rabin became
Prime Minister, on Golda Meir's
death, there were further talks
with King Hussein in which
Rabin himself, A lion and Shimon
Peres, then the Defense Minister,
participated.
When the Begin Government
took power, the contacts with the
King were maintained. Dayan,
who had become Foreign
Minister, had at least one
meeting with the King. There
may have been further contacts.
It is believed that on one oc-
casion. King Hussein crossed the
border into Israel and had
discussions with Israeli leaders
on Israel soil.
ISRAELI negotiators were at
all times impressed by the King's
demeanor, his regal manner and
his grasp of the problems under
discussion. He never raised his
voice, and his face remained sad,
as if aware that the chances of
success were not great. He was
conscious of the fact that, unlike
Egypt where the headquarters of
the Arab League were located,
Jordan was not the center of the
Arab world.
There was great disap-
pointment in Israel when, despite
his contacts with Israeli leaders,
King Hussein decided to join
Gamal Abdul Nasser's war
against Israel in 1967.
Overcoming the tremendous
traumatic experience of the total
defeat in the Six-Day War, King
Hussein reestablished contacts
with Israel towards the end of
1967. When he went to
Washington in October, he in-
timated to the American
Administration that he would
acquiesce in any resolution, such
as UN Res. 242, which called for
Israeli withdrawal from Arab
territories in return for secure
and defined boundaries. The
King was anxious for a UN
mediator so that the situation
"on the ground should not be
frozen."
ALTHOUGH the long-range
peace talks with King Hussein
failed, they did establish a de
facto normalization in the
relationship between Israel and
Jordan. There was a constant
movement of people between the
two countries, and King Hussein
clamped down on the PLO so
that they were unable to launch
terror attacks on Israeli targets.
Since 1973, few terrorist attacks
have been launched across the
Jordan border against Israeli
civilians.
Over the years, there have been
occasional displays of personal
concern. Thus, the King sent a
message of condolences when
Levi Eshkol suddenly died. When
PLO terrorists killed Israeli
athletes at the Munich Olympics,
the Jordanian monarch sent a
message to the Israeli Gover-
nment expressing his revulsion.!
But at the same time he kept up'
his diplomatic onslaughts.
Agonizing analyses have since.
taken place to discover why these,
talks, which extended from 1967,
when Eban and Herzog took part
in them, to 1978 or later, whet
Dayan participated, failed to
reach agreement. There were two
Detailed revelations
about secret talks
which Israeli leaders
have held both in the
Middle East and in
London with King
Hussein of Jordan
make plain the
reasons for their
failure. But they also
provide some hope of
a future resumption
of the negotiations,
perhaps without the
secrecy which has
shrouded them until
today.
crucial problems which the king
could not overcome.
FIRST, how could Jordan, a
small country, with a large
number of refugees break the
policy of hostility towards Israel?
Only Egypt, a central power in
the Arab world, was capable of
making the attempt. Why should
King Hussein take on the
responsibility for such a move,
with all the dangers that would
ensue? In the early part of the
discussions. King Hussein was
regarded by some Arabs as an
imperialist tool and agent of the
West. It took a certain amount of
courage for the king to agree even
to meet with the Israeli leaders.
The second problem followed
on the first. How could King
Hussein change the Arab policy
of non-recognition of Israel and
at the same time give up Arab
territory? To accept general Arab
approval of his moves, which was
essential to him if he were to
survive, he had to show that
through his efforts there had
been a 100 percent recovery ol
Arab territory.
Acceptance of the King's
demands would have entailed
giving up the Western Wall
Mount Scopus as well aa vital
land in the Jordan Valley. Such
concessions would have
destroyed the Allon plan. They
were totally unacceptable to the
Israeli Labor Party and to the
Likud of Prime Minister Begin.
Israel offered King Hussein the
Allon plan which would have
meant the return of large centers
of population to Jordan. Israel
would have retained about a third
of the West Bank, as well as Gaza
and a large chunk of Sinai King
Hussein rejected the plan and
claimed it was annexationist, but
he failed to realize that the plan
did not have a "take it or leave
it" label attached. It was the
opening gambit in the
negotiations.
THE ISRAELIS proposed to
give the king an outlet to the sea
in Gaza in return for his con-
cessions but this, too, was
rejected. In fact, the King raised
his demands and asked for both
the West Bank and Gaza.
Hussein argued, "It is very
doubtful that I can make any
agreement with you at all outside
the Arab consensus but, if I do, it
must be on the basis of 100
percent recovery. What you are
asking of me is to be portrayed as
a betrayer of Arab interests on
two levels ideological and
territorial."
He called for the absolute
restoration of the 1967 armistice
line. The King took the view that
it would be better for him for
Israel to occupy 100 percent of
Arab territory without his
consent than 33 percent with his
consent. Perhaps if King Hussein
were not dependent on his fellow
Arabs, he might have continued
the talks and compromised and
made counter-proposals. After
all, Israel was offering him 70
percent and this from B
givernment which included
egin and he wanted 100
percent. That could have been the
start of give and take. But he
remained inflexible, immovable.
IN THE 1970s, another
element came into existence
the option of a disengagement
agreement, leaving the dispute to
the Israeli and the Palestinians.
King Hussein had acted savagely
against the PLO, destroying
their bases in Jordan. Israel, with
the approval of the Americans,
moved troops to the Jordan
border to prevent a Syrian-PLO
takeover. But at the same time.
King Hussein yielded to the
doctrine that the Palestinians no
longer needed Jordan tc
represent them.
When the Geneva peace talks
took place in 1973 with the
participation of Israel, Jordan,
Egypt and with Syria only
coming in (partially) later, there
was one crucial secret session.
After it was announced that there
would be disengagement talks
between Israel and Egypt and
Syria, there was an interruption
by the Jordanian Prime Minister,
who asked, "What about Jor-
dan?"
He received a reply that an
Israeli-Jordanian disengagement
agreement was not urgent. Even
Andrei Gromyko, the Russian
Foreign Minister, remarked to
the Jordanians, "You can wait."
It was thought that it was vital
to disengage the troops of Israel,
Syria and Egypt who were in
such dangerously close
proximity.
Dr. Henry Kissinger might
still have brought about an
Israeli-Jordanian agreement in
1974 had he not returned to
Washington where the Nixon
Administration was disin-
tegrating because of the
Watergate scandal. Such an
agreement would have entailed
the giving up of Jericho to
Jordan, but the Rabin Gover-
nment had pledged not to
surrender any of Israel without
first holding an election.
THUS WHEN the Rabat Arab
summit took place. President
Sadat could boast of the recovery
of Suez, President Assad of Syria
could point to Kuneitra, but King
Hussein could show no gains
whatever. From that moment,
say some observers, the PLO
began to make enormous gains,
culminating with Yaair Arafat's
appearance at the United Nations
General Assembly.
It is true that King Hussein's
initial demands on Israel were
exorbitant, but there is a view
that, if Dr. Kissinger had been
able to spend as much time in
Amman as he did in Cairo and
Damascus, those demands could
well have been modified. Had
King Hussein gained a foothold
in Jerfcho, the "Jordanian op-
tion" would have been fully alive
today, and the people of the West
Bank would have looked to the
king as a better bet than Yasir
Arafat. One senior diplomatic
source has remarked, "This was a
tragic omission, the con-
sequences of which are fully
apparent now.''
Although Jordan is prosperous
today, although King Hussein is
accepted by moderate,
radirai* m the Arab work)
ainas dowing in from tk.
States and from the West
although the king is foremost!
opposing the Camp n,
agreement, there are inflm
circles in the Israeli Labor ]
who believe that there is
today, the possibility of
"Jordanian option."
THE EUROPEANS
thought to be too negative i
skeptical about Jordanii
participation, evident froa
fact that while the PLO
mentioned in the Ven
Declaration, Jordan is
Basing themselves on the |__
remarks and behavior over
long years of secret talks, i
Israeli circles believe that
King would not again re*
outright a chance to recover 1
tracts of former Arab terril
In any case, they believe that]
would be worthwhile making |
attempt.
Altough President Sadat'J
historic act in visiting Jenisalen
and his signing of an
with Israel is not in any
minimized, there are
political and diplomatic ci
which see King Hussein as i
real innovator at the secret I
of the idea that the Israelis i
the Arabs can live in peace.
Concern Voiced
Funds to Religious School
Continued from Page 1
the total exclusion of religious
efforts from significant efforts to
alleviate social ills which affect
the Jewish community and other
religious communities."
The four other Jewish groups
joining with COLPA in the brief
were Agudath Israel of America,
the National Council of Young
Israel, Torah Umesorah, and the
Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America.
In reporting on the
background of the case,
Zuckerman said that Congress
had enacted a public service
employ n ent section in CETA in
1978 o provide jobless
economically disadvantaged
persons transitional employment
in public service areas to enable
them to develop job skills to
make it possible for them to
become gainfully employed by
the private sector.
Zuckerman said that at issue
were si ch job positions as
providing remedial educational
services, instruction in summer
or recreational programs, in-
struction in adult education
program!-, custodial child care for
after school hours, diagnostic or
therapeutic speech and hearing
services, services related to
student health and safety,
grading state-prepared
examinations, and general food
service work.
THE LEGAL battle began
when a i ax payers suit was filed
in Milwaukee Federal Court on
Oct. 3, 1978 (Decker v. U.S.
Department of Labor), con-
tending that the use of religious
schools as federally-funded job
training sites violated the First
Amendment becuase the services
were provided within the context
of the operation of the parochial
schools.
In the brief prepared for
five Jewish organizations,
argued that the First An
ment "establishment" clause (
not require disqualification I
a totally secular program cr
to help solve the press
nationwide jobless problem
large number of useful
available openings for
which service no religious
tion, only because the ser
were provided in pa
schools.
In two orders, dated July 11
1979 and last Feb. 12, Ju
Reynolds generally b
placement of workers,
CETA Title II funds, in rehg
schools on the grounds that I
placements would create
potential for excessive gove
mental .nfluence in relii
affairs, and the likelih
excessive political lobbying i
allocation of tax funds involv
predominantly religious
siderations, all resuking in
violation of the "establishment]
clause of the First Amendment.
About Voting
Today is the deadline to
register to vote in tJ|
November presidential
election.
Supervisor of Elections for
Hillaborough County, Robin
C. Krivanek, has announced
that there are registration
booths all over Hillsborough
County that will remain open
until 5 p.m., Oct. 4.
If you are not a registered
voter, call the Registrar's
office, and find the closest
location.
QmMf-


October 3. 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 11
Holocaust Council
Speeded by Lawmen
L JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
- Congress has
Jed formalities on
lislation for the
ablishment of a "U.S.
jcaust Memorial
ncil" as a permanent
jy that will have
ftutory authority to plan,
struct and oversee the
jration of a museum in
[ashington to the victims
(Nazism and to sponsor
oual observance of
iys of Remembrance"
the 11 million people
died in the Holocaust
ix million of them Jews.
JBy voice vote, without dissent,
House of Representatives
pted legislation Tuesday
Jit after it was offered by Rep.
Hip Burton (D., Calif.). Rep
iFrenzel (R., Minn.) was co-
of the bill which had 125
onsors The Senate, also by
vol. without dissent,'
oved legislation introduced
John Danforth (R.. Mo.)
i 40 co-sponsors.
(CLARIFICATION in wording
^appointments of the Council's
[members 50 to be named by
President and five each by
!Speaker of the House and the
sident Pro Tem of the Senate
temporarily delayed tran-
of the legislation to
sident Carter for signing into
Signing ceremonies at the
kite House were expected to
splace this week.
|The memorial movement
flpn to take form Nov. 1, 1978
en President Carter created
Commission on the
pbcausi. with author Elie
as its chairman, to make
nmendation for an ap-
priate memorial "to those who
ished in the Holocaust."
nforth. who two years ago
i the first Congressional
resolution establishing
of Remembrance; told the
ate, "All Americans should
'aside a lew days each year to
front the memory of the
caust and to search our
vidual consciences for any
blesses that may encourage
i hatred or apathy in the
'of evil."
IN MAKING his presentation
Ithe House, Burton asked to
"tolge in a personal ob-
ation my beloved wife
a'a family was decimated by
Nazi terrorists, and it has
a special honor for me to
a small role in this long
due tangible recognition of
horror that Hitler and his
om inflicted on the Jewish
P*-" Burton is not Jewish.
tinting out the Council's
w. Rep. Sidney Yatos (D.,
\ loted it also would establish
administer an Educaitonal
pndation and a Committee on
cience to "provide early
n8 threats of genocide
Mut any people throughout
t world."
[Noting that the funding for the
**um is to be through private
wibutions, Yates said a
""ate foundation "The U.S.
P'locaust Remembrance
["Nation" has laready been
Wished and it "will receive
'ons and contributions from
'citizens and groups."
ff GEORGE Danialaon(D.,
observed that the "first
* of the 20th Century"
he massacre of Armenians
'J;j15-1919. He said the Council
commemorate for all times
Horrible genocide and
J>t the American and
*/
'Mr. Levy, where are you,
Mr. Levy?'
London Chronicle
Defense of Rights
Syrian Jewry Suffers Abuse
Jewish peoples."
Rep. Margaret Heckler (R.,
Mass.) said that the Holocaust
Memorial not only com-
memorates the deaths of six
million Jews "but permanently
honors the memory of their lives
in the fervent hope that this
people's safety and security will
forever more be certain."
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The New York Legal
Coalition for Syrian Jewry
has announced that more
than 200 prominent
members of the legal
profession, including public
officials, deans, attorneys
and judges have joined
together to defend the
rights of Syrian Jews,
especially the right to
emigrate.
I New York State Attorney
General Robert Abrams, one of
the four chairmen, stated that the
Coalition "will seek to document
and publicize the facts regarding
the denials of rights and per-
secution of the Syrian Jewish
community." The other chairman
are Gov. Hugh Carey of New
York; Clifford Case, former
Republican U.S. Senator from
New Jersey; and Joseph
McLaughlin, Dean of Fordham
University Sohool of Law.
CASE SAID that according to
reports on Syria from in-
ternational rights organizations,
there have been "several striking
abuses of civil liberties. These
include arbitrary detention
without trial for political of-
fenses, closed trials with no right
to defense counsel, no right to
call witnesses when trials are
held, torture and beatings, severe
internal travel restrictions, and
an absolute ban on Jewish
emigration."
In its most recent report, the
Department of State has severely
criticized the Syrian government
noting in particular the
prohibition against Jewish
emigration, Case said. In ad-
dition, he noted, the report
stated, "There are significant
restraints on freedom of speech
and assembly, although these
freedoms are guaranteed by the
Syrian constitution."
Laurence Tisch, president of
the Jewish Community Relations
Council of New York, with which
the Coalition is affiliated, noted
the timeliness of this an-
nouncement.
"IT IS important to realize
that Syrian Jews have risked
their lives and the lives of their
children in order to escape," he
I said. "There is evidence that a
in
group of lawyers organized
Syria to protest restrictions was
recently forced to disband. This,
together with other reports of
violence in Aleppo and Damascus
and threats of civil war, cause us
great concern for the safety of our
brethren in Syria. The more
I unstable the situation becomes in
| Syria, the more likely it is that
the Jews may be used as pawns,
even scapegoats."
Abrams added, "The new
merger between Syria and Libya
causes us great concern for the
safety of the Syrian Jewish
'community. Mr. (Hafez) Assad
(President of Syria), well-known
for his hostility to Israel, recently
declared, 'Unity will be a health
potion for us and the death knell
for our enemies.'
Among the attorneys working
on various Coalition projects are
lawyers from families that
emigrated from Syria. The
Coalition will work with a similar
group established in Los
Angeles. The leadership of the
California Coalition includes
Mayor Thomas Bradley,
Republican Sen. S.I. Hayakawa
and other prominent members faf
the state's legislative bodies.

Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
6 mq "T*". 0.B fcJ.mcWmtWjl*' OS**!* M'C I


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Fri miami rug co.
Florida's oldest and largest carpet chain brings you the big sale of the season!
Save With Confidence
At Miami Rug!
. we're Florida's okMd Over 56 yeer in Fie.
. Were Florida's largest 23 stores in Fla
. Every yard guaranteed perfect quality
We carry America's finest name brands.
V. .
October Sale!
MIAMI RUG CUTS IT!
We cut the carpet! We cut the price!
We cut the carpet right in our Warehouse
We have the largest inventory of carpet in Fla.
We buy direct from the finest carpet mills
. No middleman to pay.
SAVE UP TO 50%!
Sale Prices Include Expert Installation
Over Luxury Rubber Padding!
October Sale!
Choke of 2 Durable Nylon Carpets
Choose from nylon mini shag or loop pile
patterns Beautiful colors Shop early while
they lastl
Installed over luxury rubber petfdsng
October Sale!
Two Luxury Nylons by Gulistan
your choice of a hi-lo sculptured nylon or a soft
nylon plush Both available in decorator colors
I over luxury rubber |
Dacron Polyester Carpet by Evans-Black
Deeply etched geometric texture m long
wearing Dacron Polyester A rainbow of
colors
MM ever he
October Sale!
Vocue "Value-Rated" Plush Nylon
Deep dense lush sculptured pCsh in a beautiful
selection of multi-colorations. A wonderful
vekjef
Inefaeed over luxury rube*
October Sale!
Luxurious Super Spiush by Gufstan
Made of extra soft nylon for long wear and
beauty. A magnificent selection of smart subtle
ee,*d.
bulaflsd ever luxury reeair psaJng
October Sale!
DuPont Antron M by Evans-Black
Premium nylon fibers made mlo a delicate etfj P" Q O
sculptured plush Easy to maintain Glorious I %
Waq.yd.
over luxury rubber padding
tone-on-lone colors.
October Sale!
Choke of Super Bijelow Carpets
Finest quality subtle tone! spiush or the newest
"interrupted" saxony texture. Made ol long
wearing Urtron* nylon Gorgeous colors I aT *q. yd.
metebed over luxury rubber padding
20 OFF
Any remnant m stock
from $120 to SIM.
on*r i coupon pw aaaeel
30 OFF
Any remnant m stock
fromSl70 and Up
vM em mm. tea
OM 1 coupon pw tWMWM
SHOP SUNDAY 12:30 to 5:30 OPEN MONDAY 9 A.M. to 9 P.M.
fC MOMC SIP VICE
Florida's oldest and largest 1 carpel chain since 1924
miami rug co
Credit Plans
To Suit
Any Budget
TAMPA
IN
Open
.t-m
thru Fri.-till 9
tofcOO
1230 to 5:30
Maw Store
ttME. Fowler Ave.
977 3888
Open Mon Thru Frl ill g
aetesaaPM
. Sunday I*30lo5.
LARGO
t0N UieeourlAve. Phone
Mon thru Frl.'til 9
totftot
Vtntjfjyiataoiofcao
in
8T.PETE
* Men Mem. mmm M7*47i
Opon Mon. Thru Frt. till 9
Salt 9100*0
"*" 1230 loSSO
SARASOTA
Op-nMon .A Frl.'till 9
rusjti VVfxJ.. Thurt. 4 Set.9toe fuoeV, VVod.. Thur
**"ay 12:30 to &30 I
lanje Neweect
NEW PORT RICHEY
S00U* ?Norm. *
Mon. Frt.9to9PM
.tVajd..Thur. ISttHOt
Sunday 12J0 to 5:30


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EHYISWCB2_3K6WRT INGEST_TIME 2013-06-06T01:49:30Z PACKAGE AA00014305_00072
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


^^^^^ -n Ftondian of !
FVWa
V
There Were Secret Meetings
Tie Possible Between King Hussein and Israel?
Continued from Page 4
and was not convinced that Israel
could reach an agreement with
King Hussein or should even
try to. In any case, he did not at
first take part in the talks with
the King. Eventually, however,
he did join the discussions, as did
the then Chief of Staff, Gen.
Chaim Bar lev. and other military
feeders.
Levi Eshkol did not meet the
king, but when Golds Meir
succeeded to the premiership in
March, 1969 on his sudden death,
she began to have talks with
King Hussein. At one meeting
she was accompanied by Eban, at
another by Dayan. She also met
the King alone.
When Yitzhak Rabin became
Prime Minister, on Golda Meir's
death, there were further talks
with King Hussein in which
Rabin himself, Allon and Shimon
Peres, then the Defense Minister,
participated.
When the Begin Government
took power, the contacts with the
King were maintained. Dayan,
who had become Foreign
Minister, had at least one
meeting with the King. There
may have been further contacts.
It is believed that on one oc-
casion. King Hussein crossed the
border into Israel and had
discussions with Israeli leaders
on Israel soil.
ISRAELI negotiators were at
all times impressed by the King's
demeanor, his regal manner and
his grasp of the problems under
discussion. He never raised his
voice, and his face remained sad,
as if aware that the chances of
success were not great. He was
conscious of the fact that, unlike
Egypt where the headquarters of
the Arab League were located,
Jordan was not the center of the
Arab world.
There was great disap-
pointment in Israel when, despite
his contacts with Israeli leaders,
King Hussein decided to join
Gamal Abdul Nasser's war
against Israel in 1967.
Overcoming the tremendous
traumatic experience of the total
defeat in the Six-Day War, King
Hussein reestablished contacts
with Israel towards the end of
1967. When he went to
Washington in October, he in-
timated to the American
Administration that he would
acquiesce in any resolution, such
as UN Res. 242, which called for
Israeli withdrawal from Arab
territories in return for secure
and defined boundaries. The
King was anxious for a UN
mediator so that the situation
"on the ground should not be
frozen."
ALTHOUGH the long-range
peace talks with King Hussein
failed, they did establish a de
facto normalization in the
relationship between Israel and
Jordan. There was a constant
movement of people between the
two countries, and King Hussein
clamped down on the PLO so
that they were unable to launch
terror attacks on Israeli targets.
Since 1973, few terrorist attacks
have been launched across the
Jordan border against Israeli
civilians.
Over the years, there have been
occasional displays of personal
concern. Thus, the King sent a
message of condolences when
Levi Eshkol suddenly died. When
PLO terrorists killed Israeli
athletes at the Munich Olympics,
the Jordanian monarch sent a
message to the Israeli Gover-
nment expressing his revulsion.
But at the same time he kept up'
his diplomatic onslaughts.
Agonising analyses have since.
taken place to discover why these;
talks, which extended from 1987,.
when Eban and Herzog took part i
in them, to 1978 or later, when |
Dayan participated, failed to
reach agreement. There were two
Detailed revelations
about secret talks
which Israeli leaders
have held both in the
Middle East and in
London with King
Hussein of Jordan
make plain the
reasons for their
failure. But they also
provide some hope of
a future resumption
of the negotiations,
perhaps without the
secrecy which has
shrouded them until
today.
crucial problems which the king
could not overcome.
FIRST, how could Jordan, a
small country, with a large
number of refugees break the
policy of hostility towards Israel?
Only Egypt, a central power in
the Arab world, was capable of
malting the attempt. Why should
King Hussein take on the
responsibility for such a move,
with all the dangers that would
ensue? In the early part of the
discussions. King Hussein was
regarded by some Arabs as an
imperialist tool and agent of the
West. It took a certain amount of
courage for the king to agree even
to meet with the Israeli leaders.
The second problem followed
on the first. How could King
Hussein change the Arab policy
of non-recognition of Israel and
at the same time give up Arab
territory? To accept general Arab
approval of his moves, which was
essential to him if he were to
survive, he had to show that
through his efforts there had
been a 100 percent recovery 01
Arab territory.
Acceptance of the King's
demands would have entailed
giving up the Western Wall
Mount Scopus as well as vital
land in the Jordan Valley. Such
concessions would have
destroyed the Allon plan. They
were totally unacceptable to the
Israeli Labor Party and to the
Likud of Prime Minister Begin.
Israel offered King Hussein the
Allon plan which would have
meant the return of large centers
of population to Jordan. Israel
would have retained about a third
of the West Bank, as well as Gaza
and a large chunk of Sinai. King
Hussein rejected the plan and
claimed it was annexationist, but
he failed to realize that the plan
did not have a "take it or leave
it" label attached. It was the
opening gambit in the
negotiations.
THE ISRAELIS proposed to
give the king an outlet to the sea
in Gaza in return for his con-
cessions but this, too, was
rejected. In fact, the King raised
his demands and asked for both
the Wast Bank and Gaza.
Hussein argued. "It is very
doubtful that I can make any
agreement with you at all outside
the Arab consensus but, if I do, it
must be on the basis of 100
percent recovery. What you are
asking of me is to be portrayed as
a betrayer of Arab interests on
two levels ideological and
territorial."
He called for the absolute
restoration of the 1967 armistice
line. The King took the view thai
it would be better for him for
Israel to occupy 100 percent of
Arab territory without his
consent than 33 percent with his
consent. Perhaps if King Hussein
were not dependent on his fellow
Arabs, he might have continued
the talks and compromised and
made counter-proposals. After
all, Israel was offering him 70
percent and this from a
government which included
Begin and he wanted 100
percent. That could have been the
start of give and take. But he
remained inflexible, immovable.
IN THE 1970s, another
element came into existence
the option of a disengagement
agreement, leaving the dispute to
the Israeli and the Palestinians.
King Hussein had acted savagely
against the PLO, destroying
their bases in Jordan. Israel, with
the approval of the Americans,
moved troops to the Jordan
border to prevent a Syrian-PLO
takeover. But at (he same time.
King Hussein yielded to the
doctrine that the Palestinians no
longer needed Jordan tc
represent them.
When the Geneva peace talks
took place in 1973 with the
participation of Israel, Jordan,
Egypt and with Syria only
coming in (partially) later, there
was one crucial secret session.
After it was announced that there
would be disengagement talks
between Israel and Egypt and
Syria, there was an interruption
by the Jordanian Prime Minister,
who asked, "What about Jor-
dan?"
He received a reply that an
Israeli-Jordanian disengagement
agreement was not urgent. Even
Andrei Gromyko, the Russian
Foreign Minister, remarked to
the Jordanians, "You can wait."
It was thought that it was vital
to disengage the troops of Israel,
Syria and Egypt who were in
such dangerously close
proximity.
Dr. Henry Kissinger might
still have brought about an
Israeli Jordanian agreement in
1974 had he not returned to
Washington where the Nixon
Administration was disin-
tegrating because of the
Watergate scandal. Such an
agreement would have entailed
the giving up of Jericho to
Jordan, but the Rabin Gover-
nment had pledged not to
surrender any of Israel without
first holding an election.
THUS WHEN the Rabat Arab
summit took place. President
Sadat could boast of the recovery
of Suez, President Assad of Syria
could point to Kuneitra, but King
Hussein could show no gains
whatever. From that moment,
say some observers, the PLO
began to make enormous gains,
culminating with Yasir Arafat's
appearance at the United Nations
General Assembly.
It is true that King Hussein's
initial demands on Israel were
exorbitant, but there is a view
that, if Dr. Kissinger had been
able to spend as much time in
Amman as he did in Cairo and
Damascus, those demands could
well have been modified. Had
King Hussein gained a foothold
in Jericho, the "Jordanian op-
tion" would have been fully alive
today, and the people of the West
Bank would have looked to the
king as a better bet than Yasir
Arafat. One senior diplomatic
source has remarked. "This was a
tragic- omission, the con-
sequences of which are fully
apparent now."
Although Jordan is prosperous
today, although King Hussein is
Vti
accepted by moderated
radirala tunds dowing m ^
states and from the Was.j
although the k.ng i foJJL"
opposing the Ctrao
agreement, there are k4U
circles in the Israeli Lib* \
who believe that the*
today. ," possibility
Jordanian option."
*25 E"RWAN8 ,
thought to be too negative
skeptical about Joti
participation, evident I
fact that while the
mentioned in the
Declaration, .Jordan
Basing themselves on the Kjw
remarks and behavior overM
long years of secret talks L
Israeli circles believe that
King would not again n
outright a chance to recover!
tracts of former Arab terriu
In any case, they believe thati
would be worthwhile making t
attempt.
Altough President Sad*
historic act in visiting i-n|J
and his signing of an
with Israel is not in 1
minimized, there are
political and diplomatk _
which see King Hussein at
real innovator at the secret.
of the idea that the Israelis
the Arabs can live in peace.
Concern Voiced
Funds to Religious School
Continued from Page 1-
the total exclusion of religious
efforts from significant efforts to
alleviate social ills which affect
the Jewish community and other
religious communities."
The four other Jewish groups
joining with COLPA in the brief
were Agudath Israel of America,
the National Council of Young
Israel, Torah Umesorah, and the
Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations of America.
In reporting on the
background of the case,
Zuckerman said that Congress
had enacted a public service
em ploy n ent section in CETA in
1978 .0 provide jobless
economically disadvantaged
persons transitional employment
in public service areas to enable
them to develop job skills to
make it possible for them to
become gainfully employed by
the private sector.
Zuckerman said that at issue
were si ch job positions as
pro v id in, remedial educational
services, instruction in summer
or recreational programs, in-
struction in adult education
program*-, custodial child care for
after school hours, diagnostic or
therapeucic speech and hearing
services, services related to
student health and safety,
grading state-prepared
examinations, and general food
service work.
THE LEGAL battle began
when a taxpayers' suit was filed
in Milwaukee Federal Court on
Oct. 3, 1978 {Decker v. U.S.
Department of Labor), con-
tending that the use of religious
schools as federally-funded job
training sites violated the First
Amendment becuase the services
were provided within the context
of the operation of the parochial
schools.
In the brief prepared for 1
five Jewish organizations. I
argued that the First
ment "establishment" claused
not require disqualification I
a totally secular program <
to help solve the
nationwide jobless problem of i
large number of useful
available openings for
which service no religious
tion, only because the ser
were provided in
schools.
In two orders, dated July 1
1979 and last Feb. 12, Jn
Reynolds generally ba
placement of workers,
CETA Title II funds, in 1
schools on the grounds that!
placements would create
potential for excessive
mental influence in
affairs, and the likelihood
excessive political lobbying 1
allocation of tax funds invo
predominantly religious
siderations, all resulting
violation of the "establishn
clause of the First Amendment
About Voting
Today is the deadline to I
register to vote in ml
November presidential j
election.
Supervisor of Elections for I
Hillaborough County, Robin
C. Krivanek, has announced
that there are registration
booths all over Hillsborough
County that will remain open |
until 5 p.m., Oct. 4.
If you are not s re
voter, call the Registrar*
office, and find the cl
location.


L October 3, 1980
The Jewish Fbridian of Tampa
Page 11
Holocaust Council
Speeded by Lawmen
py JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
|A) Congress has
eded formalities on
Sslation for the
tblishment of a "U.S.
locaust Memorial
knril" as a permanent
that will have
jiutory authority to plan,
struct and oversee the
ration of a museum in
shington to the victims
iJazism and to sponsor
lal observance of
|iys of Remembrance"
the 11 million people
died in the Holocaust
kix million of them Jews.
|y voice vote, without dissent,
House of Representatives
pted legislation Tuesday
; after it was offered by Rep.
Hip Burton (D., Calif.). Rep
\ Frenzel (R., Minn.) was co-
of the bill which had 125
ansors. The Senate, also by
vote without dissent,'
oved legislation introduced
en. John Danforth (R., Mo.)
140 CD-sponsors.
lLARIFICATION in wording
Appointments of the Council's
nembers 50 to be named by
President and five each by
|Speaker of the House and the
sident Pro Tern of the Senate
temporarily delayed tran-
Ittal of the legislation to
sident Carter for signing into
Signing ceremonies at the
lite Mouse were expected to
i place this week.
fhe memorial movement
to take form Nov. 1, 1978
l President Carter created
Commission on the
Dcausl. with author Elie
sel as its chairman, to make
pmmendation for an ap-
priate memorial "to those who
(shed in the Holocaust."
nforth, who two years ago
nsored the first Congressional
resolution establishing
ol Remembrance; told the
ate. "All Americans should
aside a few days each year to
the memory of the
caust and to search our
Ividual consciences for any
pknesses that may encourage
ermit hatred or apathy in the
sof evil."
MAKING his presentation
the House, Burton asked to
dulge in a personal ob-
lation my beloved wife
is family was decimated by
Nazi terrorists, and it has
a special honor for me to
a small role in this long
due tangible recognition of
horror that Hitler and his
ons inflicted on the Jewish
pie." Burton is not Jewish.
Pointing out the Council's
"ions, Rep. Sidney Yatea (D.,
| noted it also would establish
administer an Educaitonal
undation and a Committee on
nscience to "provide early
mnK threats of genocide
^inst any people throughout
6 world."
Noting that the funding for the
l>*um is to be through private
ptributions, Yatea said a
pate foundation "The U.S.
"locaust Remembrance
"ndation" has laready been
Wished and it "will receive
potions and contributions from
PVale citizens and groups."
[REP. GEORGE Danielson (D.,
^"') observed that the "first
"owde of the 20th Century"
the massacre of Armenians
[1915-1919. He said the Council
commemorate for all times
horrible genocide and
fugtof the American and
<*s
'Mr. Levy, where are you,
Mr. Levy?'
London Chronicle
Defense of Rights
Syrian Jewry Suffers Abuse
Jewish peoples."
Rep. Margaret Heckler (R.,
Mass.) said that the Holocaust
Memorial not only com-
memorates the deaths of sue
million Jews "but permanently
honors the memory of their lives
in the fervent hope that this
people's safety and security will
forever more be certain."
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The New York Legal
Coalition for Syrian Jewry
has announced that more
than 200 prominent
members of the legal
profession, including public
officials, deans, attorneys
and judges have joined
together to defend the
rights of Syrian Jews,
especially the right to
emigrate.
| New York State Attorney
General Robert Abrams, one of
the four chairmen, stated that the
Coalition "will seek to document
and publicize the facts regarding
the denials of rights and per-
secution of the Syrian Jewish
community." The other chairman
are Gov. Hugh Carey of New
York; Clifford Case, former
Republican U.S. Senator from
New Jersey; and Joseph
McLaughlin, Dean of Pordham
University Sohool of Law.
CASE SAID that according to
reports on Syria from in-
ternational rights organizations,
there have been "several striking
abuses of civil liberties. These
include arbitrary detention
without trial for political of-
fenses, closed trials with no right
to defense counsel, no right to
call witnesses when trials are
held, torture and beatings, severe
internal travel restrictions, and
an absolute ban on Jewish
emigration."
In its most recent report, the
Department of State has severely
criticized the Syrian government
noting in particular the
prohibition against Jewish
emigration, Case said. In ad-
dition, he noted, the report
stated, "There are significant
restraints on freedom of speech
and assembly, although these
freedoms are guaranteed by the
Syrian constitution."
Laurence Tisch, president of
the Jewish Community Relations
Council of New York, with which
the Coalition is affiliated, noted
the timeliness of this an-
nouncement.
"IT IS important to realize
that Syrian Jews have risked
their lives and the lives of their
children in order to escape," he
i said. "There is evidence that a
group of lawyers organized in
Syria to protest restrictions was
recently forced to disband. This,
together with other reports of
violence in Aleppo and Damascus
and threats of civil war, cause us
great concern for the safety of our
brethren in Syria. The more
unstable the situation becomes in
Syria, the more likely it is that
'the Jews may be used as pawns.
jeven scapegoats."
Abrams added, "The new
Imerger between Syria and Libya
causes us great concern for the
safety of the Syrian Jewish
community. Mr. (Hafez) Assad
(President of Syria), well-known
for his hostility to Israel, recently
declared, 'Unity will be a health
potion for us and the death knell
for our enemies.'
Among the attorneys working
on various Coalition projects are
lawyers from families that
emigrated from Syria. The
Coalition will work with a similar
group established in Los
Angeles. The leadership of the
California Coalition includes
Mayor Thomas Bradley,
Republican Sen. S.I. Hayakawa
and other prominent members t>f
the state's legislative bodies.
Warning The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Oangerous to Your Health.