The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00064

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
iber 25
Off Tampa
Tampa. Florida Friday, July 11, 1980
0 Frid Shochit
Price 35 Cents
Tas 'Territories for Peace' the Grand Illusion That Failed?
Lvidpela
ronicle Syndicate
|N On my
visits, most
still in a state
because of the
iments with
reasonably
that the peace
would hold,
iding to a
comprehensive peace
treaty with Israel's other
Arab neighbors.
Today, there is widespread
apprehension at what many now
regard as the over-hasty decision
by Premier Begin to return the
whole of Sinai to Egypt and a
growing belief that Israel has
been conned and that the
"territories for peace" idea is a
dead duck and a real threat to
Israel's existence because of
Arab determination, again ex-
pressed by the PLO only last
month, to destroy Israel.
DISENCHANTMENT with
Egypt's general attitude came
gradually, for in the early days of
the Israeli withdrawal the
Egyptians were on their best
behavior, anxious not to take any
action likely to impede Israel's
Continued on Page 10
ier Anti-Israel Forum
n hagen Women's Confab
is for Strong Debate
I LEVY
- (JTA) -
mference of
)nal Labor
ILO) ended
St with the
resolution
rael for its
[the occupied
including
{49-15, with
Itent ions ,
cs of debate
the 2,000
^presenting
governments, workers and
employers devoted 90
percent of their time to the
Arab-Israeli dispute,
neglecting the legitimate
concerns of the United
Nations affiliated labor
body.
THE POLITICIZATION of
the conference became clear from
the moment the Secretariat per-
mitted the Arab-sponsored anti-
Israel draft to be placed on the
agenda without any effective
opposition by the United States.
The Americans failed to raise
their voices in protest despite
US. Secretary of Labor F. Ray
Marshall's promise to Israeli
Labor Minister Israel Katz that
the Americans would put up a
fight.
Ironically, the U.S. walked out
of the ILO two years ago in
protest against just such poli-
ticization. It returned this year,
with much fanfare, after
ostensibly having been convinced
that the ILO would mend its
ways and longer engage in purely
political debates. When the
session opened, the big question
was would the Americans walk
out again if the conference turned
into a forum for anti-Israel
polemics.
Continued on Page 10
istration Palaver
kic Defends U.S. Move
Abstain in Vote at UN
>LAKOFF
IrroN -
tretary of
luskie said
stention on
)uncil reso-
) condemn-
ts activities
is "a posi-
tive act."
ihed "there
was another way" of con-
tending with UN reso-
lutions that "undermine"
the Camp David process.
Muskie made his remarks to
reporters after a long conference
at the White House following the
Security Council vote and
against the background of angry
protests from American Jewish
leaders and others who felt the
U.S. should have vetoed the
resolution.
THE SECRETARY of
State equated the series of seven
anti-Israel actions by the
Security Council over the past
four months with "unilateral
acts by the parties themselves."
While he did not mention Israel,
the reference seemed to apply to
Israel since the U.S. has not at
any time blamed Egypt for
"unilateral acts."
Muskie told reporters that the
Jerusalem issue "was discussed
very thoroughly with the Presi-
dent and other advisers" before
the UN vote. "We are being
faced constantly with these
resolutions in the United
Nations whose effect is
whether intentional or not to
undermine the negotiations now
going on the Camp David
process.
"They are not constructive in
the sense that they do not sub-
stitute for the process. They
divert attention from it. They
undertake to prejudge some of
the issues which will be nego-
tiated or scheduled. They have
the same effect as unilateral
actions by the parties them-
selves," he said.
MUSKIE CONTENDED that
"the only way" to keep the
Camp David process going "is
by abstention" on such
resolutions. "We ought not to be
diverted," he said. When a
reporter asked whether the
Knesset Legal Committee's
approval of a motion affirming
Jerusalem as Israel's capital was
a "unilateral act" of the kind to
which he referred, he replied, "I
have indicated all unilateral
actions, and I don't exclude any
having that effect."
The Jewish Telegraphic
Agency asked the Secretary,
"Why is it so impossible for the
U.S. to be able to say to the
world, 'we defend democracy;
Israel is a democracy, the only
one in the Middle East, and
Jerusalem is its capital, and we
recognize that?" Muskie replied,
"We've said it many times. I've
Continued on Page 10
Marsha Sherman 1980-81
Women's Division President
Marsha Sherman is the new
president of the Tampa Jewish
Federation Women's Division.
Bringing many of her talents
to the position, Marsha Sherman
was: vice chairman for worker
training of the Tampa Jewish
Federation 1980 Campaign;
selected by the United Jewish
Appeal Women's Division to be
one of the 28 women in the
United States to attend a
Volunteer Executive Training
Program at the Wharton School
of Business; member of the board
of directors of the Tampa Jewish
Federation, member of the Hillel
School board of directors, and
immediate past president of
the Hillel School Parent's
Association.
Sherman is a member of the
National UJA Women's Division
board and executive committee
and serves as a vice chairman for
the Florida Region of UJA. She
was conference chairman for the
UJA and Conference of Jewish
Federations Florida Regional
Women's Division Spring
Leadership Forum held in May in
Tampa.
As president, she has ex-
pressed her desire to expand the
profile of TJF Women's Division
ft L /
Marsha Sherman
through increased community
programming.
"Tampa is an emerging Jewish
community that is steadily
assuming its place throughout
the country as being innovative
and progressive," said Sherman.
"I know, with the community's
support, this year will bring us to
new heights and achievements."
Missing Your Newspaper?
If you have missed a copy of The Jewish Floridian of
Tampa, please let your mailman know. The issue of June 27
was delivered only partially in some zip codes. We are working
with the postal authorities to solve the problem but your
letting them know would help also.
A limited number of back issues is available at the front of
the Jewish Community Center or at our newspaper office.
Please stop at either place. We will happily distribute all the
copies we have.


'' ai : .

Jewish Dramatist Revives Messiah Four Are Named to CJF
Community Services Staff
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aataaii .r Wjtx I
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tame Jic.-. jc ir.iia* nrt yrv'f.
rnr um mrt t--an
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mv>r>9uc EMBBMB -tr. umbbsmmtt Caur t ". -i-i-:'.
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" r-ywi -ur.-,r-> tn T-a '> ICC MBSH. CBM *BC wil go
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mmu. Wjca -"
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Bpea.-.-.r^-t inrt >. i.-i'. ^ r ,--. s j. p^ac ,ihaaaii n A. an
ahmc -**se jczjb Tcmcaca.
'/nr..^Lr.5 --. '< aaMt
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aaoort-t .jirj> a&rt Mai ncai r.caj iaaaaxaaam aaa isaj
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r-AvA rnrr.ZArvr.rjL ir> Mr aa<< Vfn taaoai cVarad -r taaa 1 .r
).-.<'. W.- tart Vfn BiMBr4 I n aaaia if ?_at.iO- A
-' -7-.: -.v &** Mark Ksaa*.
_a.- ir,-.cu -jut aaaaaaj al Martae SaaMaaaa C
-M*]4rjuMr anrt arac -Jiiirt -^ J*ea aaal Marsa rnn T^bmb Baa
hawe wtm. aa :* tn* su-mt. x.ia>r -^Brt pawaaca z 'i-ci
t >mmi -.t |aj aart aaacaaaai u> Maaaac
nc
t< too ietla i :.iar ei> aaa vxh iiaiaiail and t*"Tm S
.. rn inr. .nztea Tenna Tocrnaraent.
I tckil.7 iz MiTi--. 1j^:i: --.cr% eataje, apooaored by the :>
i-.rali JaaocoEe :r r-_fjec r-.:j: \cnooatAnu. Elaine and :$
M3c W.ar. <:/7*ed back accooacaag. aetninars and aun.
aarf urt taart a; -j^ 5X.li:c w^cr aa head June 18-22 S
Same ic -jxac an* ~ir. t *"=* A- *"j -------- *r>aacchec ^> b>- the pro and then :::
3"--=c* her delight. Elame I
ac iftr ^r-^r araJuc -i;. -.-..-. -je prne lor first piace-
Tae ftaMwa= R^vg^aaatat Pr^rac. jnder the ausptces of ?!
Tavapa .-* an Sotm. Ser-.iM x< am monthlv newsletter S
T^ie aal btmit RaaUaaai. coordinator of'the Russiar. I
aeKie=:-. =>r-i- ~ aaaiec Mm mi ~**
3a.-t ria c-. :z
-srtne r -
=- -. -xfjr-^omm lar -j* .
bar aaaabacrt *vm r, m iiat-rt -araaar fer M-XAr-^a.
-a.*r.- v. -^ txonert -^s aHaatk. aa all faaaoftaaarebiierer.
S4P3M* iaj -jj* rv. -jnc aboas aajbe aaeaatba fcr a
.-^-r.---c n Taapa
kaaaj 2f. M aaaae araaa Arizona Scate Coueaa si
** a m a aapaaaaaara. anrt frx= *r. at F-. KfiM. Ky Fagbraaa jaar^ad Gar/ a acme fr-xn Leataaam. Era.
Oaaaaaraaa waer he a a freaaunan at the '.ar^raay o< F-u Eaatb
rM/vyasai '** arvjwra raaca m 12-wMr-nc: Aarwa wtao a z
the atrxb grarte at Oaaaii >merrar-< v74ar-oac:
u-.aters a a talented and %-ery
" -' -
i^crrec attending Hilel School
r i -a: heapaat theae children master
Taa program started in Janurar>-
"-V 'Jaaaa Eaaaaaai taaaaafaaaal hai
aaancr t .^ej aczeac :ae Jewisfa Community Center Camp.
Tsrougs taa efloru of tbea* recccth- acquired English language
-:..-iv/ Yfoane Cadtz. i_ oiunteers are skillfully
tzaaaad aad caaaaty aaaarvaaec
.r-.rrvz. Jitc&n *pecM_y want to thank dedicated
i'taa11 hi i ESea
-*m. Aaaa Tn
aaaa. Daaaa Panh. Terry Staaier.
aad Eaatb SwaaaV
aabypj '.K--.-J.-.A- u raa
-.' .'.- rraaati i".
wic 'HjiMe :eianr-...-^
TrtVMoe
Heaea Eraa*t
a\ =appy birthday to you. happy birth
a Je-anah Towers, happy birthday to
r-nng 'Jte month of June
Heraaaa Gner Rath
WeatheHBcr. 1 aaaaaj
Roaeabaam. Beaaae
w Mary WTJeox aad

ntt anrt >yar -x j
wrvc at
i* fxar. grade at Gorra
i the NX rWwhaaaal
fa addataoa to aararyaac a lot of anod anna* cooamg. the
Fakbaaa faanary rabhratad tbra* faaaary apeoai oetaaaoaa
Marad aad Edwaa a 21at aaaai ii aaa j wnacb waa May II
Sta<*7 bartbday. wbadi waa m Jin* and Mora* i osrt&ca-.
wbacb waa Jan* 25 We aop* that yoaaB aad a i
V^retheroeaa taa*
We are tanOed v- Mil yon aoont La*
aaal Laryaa Ohmm Luryan te the preaadest of Cc
y.r^ara. Z*d*ar. wnn r*atly gradnaotrt from the L'mwar
Flonda Law Sebooi wab boaon H* m now iraaanaaafcrtaabar
*"* a* wal aat iar tbaa awanener Lota of hack and good n
La*
Thought yoa aId baa to
reoentiy acorptad a
ty Coaeare Bn*:
ay to spend oe
of yoor atadaia wal caa
waa b* bard aaaaa-
We wal am oar fniaai Dr. Swrcfl aad Ja*ki* W
* bdt Taaapa tor apaami ar i ly a three year pence wnik
Sorraal Hoagtaaae aad vaaVkaaram pecbatnaan m towni
oack to merfjcal achooi aa St- Loaaa to atady lor a
aaa. Rarhatioa Tbarapy lor Pedaatnc Cancer
Sorrafl aaad that ha had baea wanting to do thai far
Baaaj -r*
D
s.
taat month were anm\ ersarv
Mr aad Mr. F
Frwaaet. aad Mr aaaf Mra. L
to yoa brabsrds
jiHgiiui from the Tampa area are enjoying a nryTaad
at Camp Bbae Star m Haaderson%ille. S C this
i* ipecai
Mr aad'Mrs H
Mr aaai Mrs.
'-'.- w BBBBB :/'
,. *f" S*^r* S'"PP- ta* Tampa representatrves from
(-amp Baa* Star, aaamaa aa that thai year s campers mchide.
H*rbry Mayer. Stcwea Akaa
aaa
Haaaborongh Com-
=; *Mf. tbaa area ib baa a
Karen, we hop* that ail
and '-tat all of'
We hope that yoo al have a perfectly
VU*t ^T- ^Su^ Gaataa. who moved to the CarroQwood
rea x March from Lerienon. Pa. Steven m ongmaDy from
LebaamLaad Enid baiai from rVrhbhrrn. Pa. The Gildars have
two rbaibiii w-year^ad Car*, who gomg mto the second
at Carrntrwnod Fi^raratay School, md 1-year^d Urea.
a the general aaaaag*, of Bay Dram Enid a a speech
to be workaag a> her farm m the near
-i^T- "d Emd en*>y tea*. .., .tob^and
*^f*"" Porks waa the cbadraa m ur^Enlii,,
aaaeaa^of Hadaaaah and the League of Women V(
Bar new city, aad

to retara to Ti
to practice haa
aad teoacgy
Jackie haa been a very active real
lor the Wat few years TW WoMaoa* hope
the road a paac*. when Sorrefl m ready
We reaary ataanrc your tpn
r*>r**>1^J#0W/*/MW^^
T-/
Saomm and Beth Israel
19T9. were oavked to Rodenh
bjk*. Jane 27. for a aervand
'dare, feioeabap chair-
from new and former
W.'ys
ajaai
m Pal
' -o tb
no
Iaj
'a'.e*idi|
f'oridil
' KM
-^kadeatena|
m ut communitj
- wvaH,
yre m JrBk
*- rrior to yjimul
CJF. he served as o_"ectc*oitb|
Yaatb aad Prograc: I)epartaei|
orjb* Laated S>^agogw of]
Anarnra. eaaatatioo coasulum
for the .LaaencaB Assocaaioafcr
aa. aad associate'
of *z.ration it"
aaaa)i C
taai
dnreetoc of the United Jewba 1
Fedcrataaa of Greater Soi
D*ego. wal job the CJF staff ud
for the Western Regwn. TheCJF
* eatera Office, currently located
m Denver. rtH be offkblj
moved to San Diego effectm
Aag 1.
Daraag has three years al
miwaiw darector of the Su
Daago Federation. Bergerbasbad
"mjor raaaaaaaaailities m the mail
of casapaagn. planning and I
budgeting. leadership
Soviet Jewish |
: and adminatration.
Hofaer kmos the CJF staff!
foOowaag his four year tenun
wath the Jewish Community
Federation of Metropolitan Nei I
Jersey. A participant in the CJF
FEREP program. Huber his
baaajataal all aspects cf Federation |
work whde in New Jersey in-
cluding campaign, planning and
budgeting and leadership]
devetoprnent
Aroosoc will move to Net
York from Milwaukee in mid-,
summer to become a community
consaaTant for CJF Since 1976.
he has served as campaigi
director of the Milwaukee Jewish I
Federation and this year b |
directed one of the most sue
oessful campaigns in Norti
America He has been associated
with the Milwaukee FederatioB |
since 1975 and has been involve
m ail areas of Federation work.
additions to ourl
Community Services Department
are in keeping with the CJF
Review which stressed the im I
port a nee of our providing
maximum service to our member |
Federations. Hiller rioted in
announcing the four if |
pointmeata.
Th* CJF a the assooakioni
200 Faderataana. Welfare Funds
and Community Councils which
serve nearly 800 commumues
and embrace over 95 percent of
the Jewish population of the
Unked States and Canada.
JCC Senior
Volunteers to M&l\
Senior volunteers and tb*
budgets will benefit from n*
tbeya boar at a meeting at
JewTsh Community Center oo
Friday. Jury 18. at 10 30 am.
reported Donna Davis, of
Senaor Citizens Project
All volunteers 60* cuxfet^l
insurance, mileage and *
reunbursetnent during V*,
volunteer work, if they rJ
with the Retired Senior Volunt**
Program (RSVF1-
Allit..ltarrveofRS\-Ph>j
speak to senior volunteers aoo
theae beaofiU and how to g*
them at tbaa meataig
Currenr. members of B^
tlbeajbaaaab


iFriday. July 11.1980
The Jewish Flpridian of Tampa
CRC Urges Letters to Governor
swgflftsaaawff^^
The Community Relations
I Committee of the Tampa Jewish
Federation, chaired by Dr. Carl
Zielonka, urges communication
with ('ov. Bob Graham con-
cerning the current pending bill
in Tallahassee regarding prayer
[ in the public schools.
The following is the text of the
| CRC letter:
"We are called upon to
I communicate with Gov. Bob
Graham seeking his veto of a bill
passed by the Florida legislature
which would violate the principle
I of Church-State separation.
THE PRAYER BILL: As you
[may know, the Florida
Legislature has passed into law a
bill that permits prayer in public
schools. Senate Bill 118,
amended, states that "The
' School Board may provide in the
I public schools in the district that
a brief period not to exceed two
minutes to be set aside at the
start of each day of each school
week for the purpose of silent
prayer or mediation." We are told
that the Governor may veto the
measure, if, indeed, there is a
"ground swell reaction" against
it. We call on you to be an im-
portant part of that ground swell.
SOME RATIONALE: Some
have suggested that since the
measure permits prayer and
meditation for only a "brief
period not to exceed two
minutes" it is innocuous and
need not be challenged. We
suggest to the contrary, and are
reminded of President James
Madison's reaction early in the
19th Century to a similarly
"innocuous" measure involving
Church-State separation. He said
in his Memorial and Remon-
strances Against Religious
Assessment, "We remonstrate
against the bill because it is
proper to take alarm at the first
experiment on our liberties." We
submit that the current measure
is but another of the many at-
tempted "first experiments on
our liberties" and suggest that
they must be fought whenever
they occur.
THE VETO: It is our un-
derstanding that upon receipt of
a measure from the legislature,
the Governor has fifteen working
days in which to either sign or
veto or, barring these choices, he
may allow the measure to become
law without his signature. As of
July 1, the prayer and meditation
bill had not yet reached the
Governor. There is then time to
respond if each of us acts quickly.
WE, THEREFORE, ASK:
1) That you write, wire, or
telephone Governor Bob
Graham, The Capitol,
Tallahassee, Florida 32304,
Phone No. (904) 488-5152, urging
Governor Graham's veto of
Senate Bill 118.
2) And urge your friends to do
likewise.
Exercise Class Interpreted for Deaf
Deaf and hearing-impaired
lolder adults may now enroll for
[the free, first-of-its-kind, in-
Iterpreted, easy does it yoga class
Iwhich began in Tampa, thurs-
day, July 10.
"This truly easy, exercise,
relaxation and "feel better"
program was the hit of our recent
open house for deaf and hearing-
\Lipoff Named to UJA Position
Norman H. Lipoff, a national
viii' chairman of
the United Jew-
ish Appeal, has
bee n named
Campaign Plan-
ning Committee
chairman for
1981-82 by Her-
schel W. Blum-
berg. UJA na-
tional chairman. Lipoff
In announcing the appoint-
ment. Blumberg cited Lipoff for
his "dedicated service to the
UJA." and for his "total com-
mitment to meeting the needs of
distressed Jews all over the
world."
Lipoff, a Miami attorney,
formerly practiced in Tampa. He
is a national officer of the UJA
and a past co-chairman of the
UJA Young Leadership Cabinet.
He also is a former general
chairman of the Israel Emer-
gency Fund Campaign of Miami
and the current vice president
and director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
In 1972, in recognition of his
exceptional service to the Jewish
community, Lipoff was
presented the President's
Leadership Award by the
Greater Miami Federation. He is
a past chairman of the Fed-
eration's Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies.

Kosher Lunch Menu
Kosher lunch menu of the Senior Citizen's Nutrition and
Activity Program is sponsored by the HiUsborough County
Commission and held at the Jewish Community Center. Marilyn
Blakley, site manager, 872-4451. Menn subject to change.
:>:
x
% 8
WEEK OF JULY 14-18
t Monday: Braised Beef Tips, Mixed Vegetables with parsley
noodles, Rosy Applesauce Salad, Dinner Roll, Gingersnap |
Cookie, Coffee or Tea. g
S Tuesday: Sliced Turkey with gravy, Chopped Broccoli and
yellow corn, Orange Juice, Whole Wheat Bread. Plums,
Coffee or Tea.
| Wednesday: Barbecued Beef, Carrot Cubes, Lima Beans,
Tossed Salad with Tomato wadge and Thousand Island
Dressing, Bun, Sliced peaches, Coffee or Tea.
% Thursday: Baked Chicken with gravy, Rice Pilaf and green
beans, Grated Carrots and pineapple salad, Bran square, ;.>
Fresh fruit (in season), Coffee or Tea,
Friday: Creole Meatballs, Whipped Potatoes and chopped g
spinach, Cherry gelatin with peaches. Whole wheat bread, |
8 Old fashioned Carrot Cake, Coffee or Tea.
WEEK OF JULY 21-25
i Monday: Beef Patty with broth, Carrot Cubes, Ranch Style g
Beans, Cole Slaw, Parve Bun, Old-Fashkraed Sugar Cookie, -
Coffee or Tea.
g Tuesday: Baked Chicken with gravy. Whipped Sweet Potatoes,
Green Beans, Strawberry Gelatin with Fruit Cocktail,
French Bread, Applesauce, Coffee or Tea.
$ Wednesday: Ropa Vieja. White Rice, Chopped Spinach,
Autumn Molded Salad with (Orange and Carrots), Dinner
Roll, Chilled Purple Plums, Coffee or Tea.
:? Thursday: Baked Fish with Tartar Sauce, Grits. Mixed
Vegetables, Tossed Salad with Tomato wedge and French
Dressing, Whole Wheat Bread. Cookie. Coffee or Tea.
Friday: Meat Loaf with gravy. Whippedi Potatoes .Broccoli
Carrot Salad with Pineapple, Whole Wheat Bread. Chilled
Peaches and Pears, Coffee or Tea.
impaired seniors," says Donna
Davis of the Senior Citizens
Project, "So we've arranged to
hold a full, 11-week class, with a
sign language interpreter
provided."
The hour-long classes will be
held once a week on Thursdays at
10:30 a.m. for 11 weeks at the
Sports Rehabilitation Center,
2405 W. Swann (between Howard
and Armenia), a location served
by several bus routes.
To insure that a space is
reserved, hearing-impaired, and
deaf senior citizens are en-
couraged to pre-register for the
free class. Mail name, address,
and TTY or phone number with
the Words "Easy Exercise
Class" to Donna Davis, Senior
Project, 2808 Horatio, Tampa,
FL 33609.
Anyone unable to take the city
buses and needing transportation
from somewhere in Tampa, is
asked to note that also. TTY
registration is available via the
Deaf Services Center, 223-2285,
or phoning the Senior Project.
A joint effort of the Senior
Citizens Project of the Jewish
Community Center, the Light of
Yoga Society and the Sports
Rehabilitation Center, the sign-
language interpreted .easy
exercise classes is the first ever
offered for deaf and hearing-
impaired seniors.
Participating seniors will be
provided with their own easy
does it yoga manual to keep and
use at home and materials for
recording their progress.
"Older people with various
disabilities have found these
exercises helpful," says Donna
Davis, "and they are so easy that
many are done in a chair."
The Senior Citizens Project
and the easy-does-it yoga
program are funded in part by
the Older Americans Act. The
Sports Rehabilitation Center is a
private business donating its
facility for this unique program.
Community Mission
Planned by Federation
i
I The Tampa Jewish Federation will sponsor a community g
*: leadership Mission to Israel in conjunction with the United g
:: Jewish Appeal, Oct. 16-26. The Tampa community will join *:
representatives of other communities throughout the United ::
i States as part of a National Study Mission. There will be an g
a opportunity to extend the stay in Israel or other countries.
In addition to the Oct. 16 mission, there is a UJA National |
|S Women's Division Mission scheduled Sept. 23-Oct. 1 and the |
:: National Young Leadership Hahiveinu Mission, Oct. 30- Nov. 9. jg
1 For additional information about Missions to Israel, contact 8
8 the Tampa Jewish Federation.
Community Survey Update
"We are in the final stages of
data collection and will soon be
entering computer analysis,"
commented Leonard Gotler,
chairman of the Tampa Jewish
Federation Demographic and
Attitudinal Survey Committee.
Every effort is being made to
insure a high response rate. A
committee of 24 volunteers has
been working on the retrieval of
data via Third Wave efforts.
Third Wave, part of the survey's
sequence of events, tries through
personal phone calls, to gain as
much community input to the
survey as possible. This Wave
comes after one attempt at a
general mailing to the survey's
sample population of 1,600 units
followed by another mailing to
those who did not respond.
The committee of telephone
volunteers consists of: Anna Lee
Markowitz, Sheila Shaw, Helen
Greenbaum, Susan Greenberger,
Lili Kaufmann, Marlene Linick,
Alice Rosenthal. Muriel Altus,
Donna Cutler, Harriet Cyment,
Joan Goldstein, Sharon
Greenbaum, Bonnie Hoffman,
Judith Wasserberger, Gina
Yaffin. Laura Kreitzer, Sara
Richter, Jane Finkelstein, Jane
Rosenthal, Cookie Buckman,
Ann Rudolph, Janet Silverman,
Sue Manassa and Jacquelin
Leipziger.
Gotler said the Tampa Jewish
Federation extends its deep
appreciation to these women who
have spent their time and effort
to help insure the recovery of the
survey questionnaires.
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Friday. July a,,,
Women's Conference
The upcoming women's conference in
Copenhagen will emphasize the Johnny-One-Not*
tune whistled by the Arab phalanx of this planet
Earth and the way in which the world dances in
response.
At a time that women in Iran are taking their
lives in their hands by protesting against the
medieval modes of 'female behavior" which the
Ayatollah Khomeini is attempting to reimpose on
them: when the Republican Party found it hard in
Detroit this week to come to a consensus about the
Equal Rights Amendment: when women everywhere
in lands that are both advanced and only now
developing are still victimized by various levels
of discrimination, at such a time it is difficult to
envision that the Copenhagen conference will be
subjected to another war over attacks on Israel as
racist.
We say another" because that is what hap-
pened in Mexico City to begin with in the infamous
Zionism equals racism resolution years ago and
what happened only last week in Geneva at a
meeting of the International Labor Organization.
where the Arab phalanx sang their one-note
symphony most recently.
Copenhagen No Surprise
Still, we should not be surprised. It is not only
women's problems that are put at the bottom of the
list of priorities in a conference designed to study
these problems. At the United Nations every day.
where world problems involving poverty, disease,
illiteracy, technological deficiency and military
aggression in a variety of hotspots ought to be top
priority, does not the UN agenda feature as vir-
tually a principal subject of its debate Israel, Israel.
Israel?
We say we should not be surprised if only
because, in the order of Arab affairs women's rights
would surely come last. And because a free society,
such as Israel's, is an absolute threat to its
medieval condition.__________________________
56 American Jews
We applaud the statement by Howard
Squadron, new chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major Jewish Organizations, who this
week deplored the statement signed by 56 American
It-wish intellectuals concerning the policies of the
Menacbem Begin government.
The intellectuals set their sights on Begin's
tough attitude toward the West Bank and Gaza and
his firm insistence that yet another separate
Palestinian state must not be permitted to emerge
in the Middle East, to be more precise, right on
Israel's borders.
What the intellectuals want is more concessions
to be wrung out of Israel in the name of peace. This
at a time when it has become absolutely crystal
char that Begin- own enthusiastic withdrawal from
the Sinai in the name of peace with Egypt has thus
far brought only Israel's withdrawal* not full
diplomatic reciprocity between the two countries.
not an enthusiastic intellectual and cultural ex-
change, not a new citizen-to-citizen relationship
pt insofar as Israelis have attempted to in-
stitute these things on a one-way street.
Principally, it has not really brought peace.
only more and more Anwar Sadat demands for more
and mere Israeli concessions. This is bitter enough
fruit of the Camp David accords. The 56 American
Jewish intellectuals were not really needed by Sadat
to press his advantage.
Squadron's deploring of their statement makes
this crystal clear.
'Ad Hominem': The Low Road
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THE RHETORICIANS, those
neanderthal creatures living out
their extinction among us in a
quiet despair for the extinction
with thetn of the logical and
meticulous use of language, call it
ad hominem It has to do with a
kind of argument addressed to
the man
In ad hominem argument, you
go for the jugular You ignore
ssues and address your attack to
the man himself his sex hfe.
his drinking habits, his business
practices, his religious affiliation,
his race, whatever is convenient
as a first fistful of mud
IN THIS kind of debate, the
implication is that a scoundrel
can not possibly be on the right
side of any issue, and so why
bother discussing any issue with
him at all? The logical fallacy
here is obvious, and in practical
terms ad hominem is
devastating
For ad hominem comes from
ignorance, bigotry and prejudice:
and it appeals to ignorance.
bigotry' and prejudice. Worse,
character assassination, for that
is what ad kominem amounts to
in the end. depends upon the
assassins artistic capacity to
delineate and embellish flaws of
personality in his opponent, or
even to make new ones where
none exifrl in the first place. It
8 the character assassin who
creates the scoundrel in order to
unmask him. It is a process that
appeals to the worst in us at the
worst of times
In essence, the person willing
to descend into the vile morass of
ad hominem is more than an
ignorant bigot, more than iattl '
lectually dishonest He is ,,
and-out liar
ALL THESE things must In
understood in order to apprecati
the enormity of (he Deinocrati
Party's announced cajnptin
tactic against Ronald Reagan^
the upcoming presidential race*
conceived by Chairman Robert
Strauss: that Reagan is not of
the stuff of which presidents art
made that Reagan is better
equipped to be a cowbov mov*
star."
It is not ad hominem to inquire
why a movie cowboy is more
poorly-equipped to be president
than. say. a peanut farmer. The
history of the American
presidency represents many pro-
fessions and occupations ranging
from military leaders Jackson.
Eisenhower) to engineers
(Hoover. Carter), from lawyers
(Lincoln, Nixon) to university
presidents (Wilson), from archi-
tects and philosophers I Jefferson.
who was also a university
president) to clever real estate
agents (Washington, who wu
also a military leader)
To question the admissibilky
of a movie cowboy into thia
populist panoply of presidential
personalities is not only to be in
elitist; it is to be a snob. Both,as
attitudes, establish dangerous
precedents with respect to pre-
requisites for the office, which the
Constitution spells out in a far
more reasonable and democratic
way except for the stipulation
that candidates must be native
born, a condition that has long
since outlived its usefulness.
IN FACT, ail our Chief Exec-
utives have found it beneficial in
the past to emphasize their
humble beginnings if they had
them (Lincoln's log cabin, an
exquisite metaphor for Moses
nver-bome basket): and all of
them have emphasised their
pastoral bucolic inclinations,
either that they were farmers
first, no matter what other oc-
cupation they ultimately came to
be engaged in. or else a* a more
recent phenomenon, that it was
only in their "summer White
House as fishermen (Truman in
Key West I or cattle-ranchers
I.vndon Johnson in Texa-i that
(Wiiiiiued on Page fi
U.S. Prepares for Tough World Meet
Friday, July 11. 1980
Volume 2
27TAMI Z
Numb.
Late in June and early in July,
when the >T-member 1
hi w rid
Conference of the UN Decadi
Women. 1980, wu going through
final briefings obvious efforts
ran !>>:ng exerted to pen up the
make let loose in 1975 in Mexico
City.
The reptile, the creation of an
Arab-Soviet-Third World
wrecking crew. w as adoption of a
statement equating Zionism with
racism. Those who really know
the meaning of racism and 'he
meaning of Zionism found, and
continue to find, such a
pronouncement obnoxious,
abhorrent, and downright nasty
IN THE five intervening
years, warning flags have gone
up to prevent a repetition of such
damaging nons.-nv Nowhere is
that more apparent than in the
warm-up sessions for the
women's Conference scheduled
for July 14 to 30 in Copenhagen.
A document prepared by the
Economic Commission for
Western Asia a section of the
U N Economic and Social Council
declared that three topics
must have priority at the
< "penhagen meeting: 1-
Apartheid. 2- Palestinian
women: 3- refuge.
>arah Waddingtor., assistant
to President Carter for political
liaison and women's concerns,
and co-leader of the U.S.
delegation bound for
"nitemned the
Robert
Segal
document lust mentioned (a
paper pre] th the help of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization!
Mrs Waddington has assured
all interested.that the American
delegation will work with other
"nference goers to oppose the
new Copenhagen statement,
reminiscent of the Mexico Citv
document
Other American delegates who
can be expected to share Mrs.
W'addington's watchman-at-the
gate stance include Lynda
Johnson Robb. Judv Carter
Dorothy Height (president of the
National Council of Negro
Women), and Esther R. Landa
(past president of the National
( ouncilof Jewish Women).
THESE FOLKS want to get
on with what should be the main
business of the Copenhagen
sessions. They will be demanding
discussions and action on health,
jobs, education and related issues
transcending in importance
dozens of other concerns.
However, if the PLO-inspired
delegates overpower the con-
vention and insist on eating up
the conference time I
for a Zionism-is-Racisn politic*
campaign, the Americans will be
prepared. They will lemand
discussion in depth of the plight
of South African blacks livingB
a traditional climate ol apar-
theid; they will join the fight to
end bloodshed in that ares They
are determined to block anti-
Israel political attempts to make
the plight of Palestinian women a
separate agenda item.
What a travesty that world
opinion has not reached that
desirable point at which the
politicalization of international
forums can be made to stop short
of the insatiable determination to
gang up on Israel. Zionism, and
Jews!
IN" 1975. it was pointed out
that those who try to draff
American delegates into the
scheme to make racism and
Zionism synonymous '".f*"]
tamount to'declaring the I'nitw
States in favor of anti-Semitism.
It was clearlv shown that the
end-goal of the Arab plotters was
not to smash racism but to try to
expel Israel from the I'nited
Nations.
And along the way. American
spokesmen asked the world to
take note that the United States
pays a disproportionate part ol
the heavy cost of maintaining the
UN and its multi-faceted com-
missions. Women who back tne
PLO move at Copenhagen may
wish to weigh carefully
significance of this lactor
the


Jocelyn Aronovitz
Thomas Martin
Aronovitz-Martin
Mrs. Arnold Golden, North-
brook, 111., and Marvin
Aronovitz, Tampa, announced
the engagement of their
daughter, Jocelyn Beth
Angela Sheikhet extends the hand of friendship to Alia t"112 to, T^oma8J 3hn
Libman. Angela is an old hand at resettling having arrived SHS. jS. f I- *"? w^
from the Soviet Union in 1978 with her*family*?Photo AJfaWi.
Audrey Haubenstock) '
1 he bride-to-be is a senior at
the University of Wisconsin in
Whitewater. She is the grand-
daughter of Mrs. Adolph Glick-
man and Mr. and Mrs. Manuel
Aronovitz.
The future bridegroom is
employed by Lewis Alice
Electronics Company of New
Berlin, Wis.
An Aug. 10 wedding is planned
in Chicago.
'More Joy of
Music9 Series
"Ever since our first 'Joy of
Music' series last fall, people
have been pressing us to organize
another one," said Marjorie
Arnaldi of the Senior Citizens
Project. "So we did!"
The new series, called "More
Joy of Music," will feature three
separate performances covering a
wide variety of music to please
older listeners and will be held at
Rocky Creek Mobile Home
Park's Recreation Center, 8400
W. Waters Ave., Tampa.
Scheduled for the summer
series are: July 15, Dale Johnson,
local soprano, singing favorite
songs; July 29, the Tampa
Community Players with ex-
cerpts from the musical "Annie
Get Your Gun"; and Aug. 12, the
Carbonnel Chamber Quartet. All
programs begin at 2 p.m.
The series, sponsored by the
Senior Project of the Jewish
Community Center, is free and
open to anyone 60+, through a
grant from the Older Americans
Act, through the HRS, and
Tampa Bay Regional Planning
Council. Donations are welcome.
Refreshments will be served.
Weary after the long trip from Rome to Tampa are the newest
Soviet Jewish arrivals: Boris Libman, 10-year-old Alia, and
Svethna Libman. They arrived June 20. (Photo: Audrey
Haubenstock)
Soviets Are Welcomed
The Libman family arrived
from Leningrad on June 20,
becoming the 16th Russian
family to settle in Tampa since
the program was begun and the
fourth this year.
Boris Libman, 45, a taxi driver,
arrived with his wife Svetlana,
36, an assistant draftsman and
10-year-old Allah. The welcoming
party had quite a large number of
children anxious to meet Allah,
and as the picture above in-
dicates, children get together
very easily.
Seniors Swim,
Exercise Class
Older Floridians who missed
their chance to get into the
Jewish Community Center's
senior aqua-exercise and swim
classes in June can pre-register to
reserve their places in the second
t of classes anytime before July
15.
Up to 40 people age 60+ get
'"^come-first-served places in
the classes, which meet twice
weekly on Tuesdays and
Thursdays between 4 and 6 p.m.
tor four weeks.
To reserve space in the free
c"ses, write or call (phone 872-
4451 or T.T.Y. relay through
UJM Services Center 223-2285),
1 ne Jewish Community Center.
The class is open to anyone
aged 60+ as no charge through a
Pam from the Older Americans
*ct., administered through
Inda s HRS and Tampa Bay
"egional Planning Council.
"onations are always welcome.
The Libmans are living at the
Villa Deleon Apartments, and
Allah is attending the Jewish
Community Center camp and will
be a student at the Hillel School
this fall.
The Librfflms left Leningrad
March 2, and 10 days later
arrived in Rome where they
waited until everything was set
for them to travel to Tampa. The
Russian Resettlement Program is
coordinated by the Tampa
Jewish Social Service and funded
by the Tampa Jewish Federation.
Rhoda L Karpay
C.R.S.
Avoid "tsoriss"-
Deal with a Pro/
SUN BAY CORP.
Realtors
IN FLA. CALL COLLECT
1(813)962-2126
OUT OF STATE TOLL FREE
1(800)237-2077
Jewish Families of
Tampa Meets July 11
.Ji'wish Families of Tampa, a
fledgling congregation on
Tampa's north side, had a most
successful first formal Shabbat
Service, according to Cy Woolf,
chairman pro tern of the group.
The next Shabbat worship
service will be held July 11 at 8
p.m. at the Holiday Inn at 400 E.
Bearss Ave. (two blocks west of
1-75). Mr. and Mrs. Herman
Stern will host the Oneg
Shabbat.
Woolf reports that Jewish
Families of Tampa has now
scheduled regular Friday evening
services the second and fourth
Fridays of every month at the
Temple Terrace Masonic Ixxige.
11807 N. 56th St. The first
Shabbat to be observed at this
new location will be July 25.
A meeting of this group for the
Cohen-Sjritolnwk
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cohen
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Mona, to Jamie
Spitolnick, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harold Spitolnick.
The bride-to-be attends
Hillsborough Community College
and works as a veterinarian
assistant for a horse vet. She
owns three horses. The future
bridegroom owns the restaurant
at Tampa Technical College.
A September 1981 wedding is
planned.
purpose of electing regular of-
ficers will be held Sunday, July
13, at 10 a.m. at Florida Federal
Savings and Loan Association.
207 W. Bearss Ave. An open
invitation has been extended to
anyone who wishes to attend.
Additional information about
Jewish Families of Tampa is
available by calling C'y Woolf.
Monday-Friday, between H a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. at 877-2515.
Beginning
Needlepoint for
Seniors
Volunteer instructor and
skilled craftswoman. Dorothy
Grossman, will be offering
beginning needlepoint for anyone
60 or older in the Hillsborough
County area, starting Wed-
nesday, July 16. from 10 a.m. to
noon, at the Jewish Community
Center.
The course, which will run for
four weeks, is available at no cost
through the Senior Citizens
Project of the Jewish Community
Center, through an Older
Americans Act Grant ad-
ministered through Florida's
HRS and Tampa Bay Regional
Planning Council.
Falk Foundation Funds
Special Reading Service
Matching funds from the
David A. Falk Foundation of
Tampa and a Public Telecom-
munications Facilities Program
grant have been awarded to the
WUSF Radio Reading Service to
purchase 435 special crystal
tuned radio receivers for print-
handicapped listeners.
The RRS is now accepting
applications for qualified persons
who cannot use normally printed
material because of a visual or
physical impairment, such as
multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy,
arthritis, dyslexia or a stroke.
Hospitals and nursing homes
may also make applications for
the receivers.
Since May of 1978 the WUSF
Radio Reading Service has used
the sub-carrier of WUSF, the
noncommercial FM radio station
at the University of South
Florida in Tampa, to provide
readings of daily Bay area
newspapers, magazines, and
books, along with special
programs from National Public
Radio.
More than 100 volunteers also
record programs designed
especially for the print-
handicapped and broadcast live
call-in programs over the sub-
carrier. The service, the only of
its kind in Florida, operates 142
hours a week. WUSF broadcasts
the RRS on its main channel at
89.7 from 7 to 8 a.m. weekdays.
Anyone interested in obtaining
a special receiver may call the
RRS office in Tampa, 974-4193.
or write the WUSF Radio
Reading Service, AOC 103.
University of South Florida,
Tampa, FL 33620.
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Friday, July 1119g()|
Davis Named to
Deaf Center Board
It was costumes all around at the SchZFTY (Schaarai Zedek Federation of Temple Youth)
Closing banquet and installation of officers held at the temple. Front row (left to right):
Marlene Bloom, Janet Echelman, Lisa Meyer, Rochelle Plavnick (best costume prize winner).
Back row (left to right): Ilene Kelman, Jim Hochberg, Beth Gould, Alice Cohen, Robin
Rosenberg, Sara Sundheim (outgoing president), Lvnette Solomon (incoming president) and
Jack Rosenkranz. (Photo by Jack Rosenkranz).
Donna Davis, coordinator of
the Senior Citizens Project for
the Jewish Community Center,
has become the newest member
of the board of directors of the
Deaf Services Center of
Hillsborough County.
The DSC opened in late 1979 to
provide deaf and hearing-
impaired persons better access to
public and private services;
information and referral; in-
terpreter services: Telecom-
munications relays for deaf
persons to hearing employers,
family, or services; and advocacy
to improve legal, educational,
business, economic, and human
services for deaf persons.
The Deaf Services Center is
located at 305 North Morgan St.
in Tampa, and is open Monday
through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Call T.T.Y. Number, 223-
2285; or voice number 223-2280.
after 5 p.m. T.T.Y. Calls wiill be
answered automatically and
returned the next working day.
Funding for the Deaf Services
Donna Davis
Center is provided by the
Hillsborough County board of
commissioners.
&
I
Community
Calendar
| FrWqy, July 11
:: (Condlelighting lime 8:09)
| JCC Pool Open 1 4:30 p.m. Painting for Seniors at JCC 9
12 Gomes at JCC 10 11.
| Saturday, July 12
jx JCC Pool Open noon 5
$ Chavurot of Rodeph Sholom Synagogue Social Synagogue ::
S social hall 9:15 p.m. ::
g Sunday, July 13
S JCC Pool Open 11 6 ::
I Monday, July 14
:: J("C Po' Open 6 p.m. Mocrame for Seniors at JCC 9 :
noon Arts and Crafts for Seniors at JCC 12:30 2:30 Pottery S
:: for Seniors at JCC 230 4:30 &:
| Tuesday, July 15
JCC Pool Open 1 9 Painting for Seniors at JCC 10 3 ::
;':: Aqua Exercise Class for Seniors 4 5 :
jx Wednesday, July 16
JCC Pool Open 1 6
I Thursday, July 17
S JCC Pool Open 1 9 JCC Food Co-op 10 12:30 Social
g Circle for Seniors at JCC 10 12 Blood Pressure at JCC 1 S
Jj: p m Aqua Swim / Exercise for Seniors at JCC 4 5 ?
Friday, July 18
:: (Condlehghting time 8:07) 8
?: Painting for Seniors 9 1 2 at JCC Games at JCC 10 11 8
:;> JCC Pool Open 1 4:30 S
$ Saturday, July 19
j:|: JCC Pool Open noon 5 ::
Sunday, July 20
$ JCC Pool Open noon 5 :
| Monday, July 21
g JCC Open 1 6 Tisha B'av Service at Congregation Rodeph S
: Sholom 8 p.m. Macrame for Seniors at JCC 9 noon
g Arts and Crafts for Seniors at JCC 12:30 2:30 Pottery for *:
: Seniors 2:30 4:30 ::
| Tuesday, July 22
:: JCC Pool Open 1 9 Painting for Seniors at JCC 10 3 ::
Aqua Exercise / Swim Class for Seniors at JCC 4 5 |
I Wednesday, July 23
jy. JCC Pool Open 1 6 S
| Thursday, July 24
g JCC Pool Open 1 9 Ballroom Dancing for Seniors at Rocky ::
:: Creek Mobile Home Park 7 p.m. JCC Food Co-op 10 12:30 $:
i Social Circle for Seniors at JCC 10 1 2 Blood Pressure at i*
ft JCC 1 p.m. Aqua Swim / Exercise Class for Seniors 4 5 ft;
S JCC ft:
| Friday, July 25
v (Condlehghting time 8:04) 8
j: Pointing for Seniors at JCC 9 12 Games at JCC 10 I I. 1

Smithsonian Comes to Tampa
The Museum of Science and
Industry (MOSI) welcomes the
Smithsonian Institution Travel-
ing Exhibit, "Edison and the
Electrical Age: 100 Years." The
Smithsonian exhibit will be one
of several displays celebrating
"Edison The Man Who
Invented the 20th Century."
The Edison Exhibit opens
July 13 and will run through
Sept. 28. It can be viewed at
MOSI. located at 4801 E. Fowler
Ave., Saturdays and Sundays
from noon until 5 p.m. and
Monday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. It is free to the public.
Special lectures, programs and
classes are planned during this
period.
Two workshops are being
offered to third and fourth grade
students.
"Batteries and Bulbs" will be
held Aug. 4 to 8, 9 to 11:30 a.m.
"The Invention Factory" will be
held Aug. 11 to 15 at the same
times.
These classes are being offered
to a limited number of par-
ticipants and require a small fee.
Programs for clubs and
organizations are also available
at no cost.
Israeli Dance Specialist to Teach Here
Ya*akov Eden, an Israeli folk
dance specialist, will teach and
perform in Tampa the weekend of
July 18 20 under the auspices of
the Tampa Festival Folk Dan-
cers.
m-
Eden teaches Israeli and
ternational dances. He has ap-
peared regularly on the staffs of
camps and workshops across the
United States. He directs the
Fred Berk Israeli Folk Dance at
Camp Blue Star each summer.
He is a former director of The
Banvolks, a performing troupe
from Ball State University which
recently toured Florida. His other
area of interest is the dances from
the Balkans and Ukraine.
Museum Exhibits under Construction
There's a lot of noise being
made these days out at the new
Museum of Science and Industry
on East Fowler Avenue.
Structures for Dr. Thunder's
Magic Boom Room and the Hall
of the Sun are nearing com-
pletion. These are just two of the
several exhibits to be open to the
public next spring. Children and
adults will experience science
first-hand in new ways.
The Hall of the Sun will
project actual sun spots onto a
large disk through the use of a
roof-mounted heliostat. In Dr.
Thunder's Magic Boom Room,
visitors will hear and feel the
development of a thunderstorm
by means of a Sensorramma
Sound System, while a Light-
ning Exhibit will allow visitors
to view six to eight-foot light-
ning bolts.
Not only will visitors learn by
experiencing and exploring but
they will actually participate in
many of the exhibits such as
converting one form of energy
into another at the giant Energy
Having a Bar Mitzvah'
Wedding?
Contact Bennie Stevens
Orchestra
626-7748
I'inball Game or by making
meteorological forecasts at the
fully-equipped Weather Station.
The staff at the Museum of
Science and Industry is making
a lot of noise these days as con-
struction of exhibits proceeds
toward opening day.
Although permanent exhibits
will not be open until next year,
MOSI sponsors lectures, classes
and traveling exhibits.
All activities will be at the
Coroelia B. Hunt Recreation
Center, 4017 N. Hesperides
(located off Tampa Bay
Boulevard west of Dale Mabry).
The registration for the entire
series is $26. Separate admission
information is available by
calling Judith Baizan. director of
the Tampa Festival Folk Dan-
cers. Checks should be sent to her
at 2503 Palm Drive. Tampa.
33609.
There will be dance and in-
struction beginning at 7 p.m. on
Friday, July 18, continuing all
day on the 19th with an Israeli
supper for all participants
followed by a costume party.
Sunday's schedule calls for
teaching and review beginning at
9 a.m. and continuing (with a
break for lunch) until 5 p.m.
The dancing will be on a real
suspended floor, but there is a
limit of 65 participants. Early
registration is suggested.
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July 11.1980
Congregations Rodeph Sholom and Beth Israel Unite
Dora Hyman was the first to
sign the Ketuvai assisting
with the signing was Bernice
Wolf. Besides the
congregation presidents,
rabbis and board members,
elders of both congregations
affixed their signatures to the
Ketuva designed and
executed by Sergio
Waksman, Tampa, an art
student in Israel.
Manuel AronoviU, honorary
president of Congregation
Rodeph Sholom, was among
the many dignitaries who
signed attesting to the
merger. This is believed to be
the first merger of its kind in
the state of Florida.
Barney Haimes signed under the watchful supervision of
Frank Szold, Aaron Trachtenberg, Melvin Pozner and Mark
Lewis. This weekend of June 20, 21 and 22, 1980 will long be
remembered in Tampa.
Sender, Memphis,
president of the
Southeast Region, United
Synagogues of America,
extended greetings on behalf
of the entire Conservative
movement.
Rabbi Nathan Bryn of
Congregation Beth Israel,
received two standing
ovations during the
ceremonies.
The combined Sefer Torahs of Congregations Beth Israel and Rodeph Sholom, united'asthe
Torahs of one merged congregation, were carried into the Rodeph Sholom sanctuary by Ann
lack. Jack SolowiU, Ben Lynn and Barney Haimes.
It was a large crowd at Congregation Rodeph Sholom awaiting
the arrival of the Torah procession.
U.S. Rep. Sam Gibbons and Mark Lewis leave the sanctuary
after the ceremonies. A beautiful luncheon followed the formal
events.
Florida
Davis
gation
Rep. Helen Gordon
represented Congre-
Schaarai Zedek pres-
ident, Lillyan Osiason.
Rabbi Martin I. Sandberg, rabbi of Congregation Rodeph
zholom, added his name to the Ketuva. Standing by his side is
Rabbi David B. Saltzman, Miami, Southeast Regional director
f the United Synagogues of America.
Sam Verkauf,
gation Rodeph
addressed the
congregations.
Congre-
Sholom
combined
Mayor Bob Martines brought
community greetings on the
occasion.
(Photos by Simon Rose)
Rabbi Theodore Brod,
Religious School director of
Congregation Rodeph Sholom
and former rabbi of
Congregation Beth Israel,
spok# at Beth Israel
Synagogue during the service
prior to removing the Torahs
to their new homes.


y-Ji
Vision of Resurrection
By ftABM THEOOOU BeUJD
#Dry
I these 'su+t* kt*>
tku Hetmdto
** **/re* Lcr 7V*j aaxAeeae' the Lord
mma* ihnt Ume%. rasas' I aw? fena* apcm tat* ;>
aaaX *? Aaa taenr caw* uoc term the tpxnt (M (4*7 faarf.
aatf >-x-d *i apes (tor Wi ;*o t TV Am a kaowx at Lxauei t psirpami. rvn erf the
a> the Vafiey of Dry Boon TYae a preceaee by the
of a MrxABHg jlu: u-.*e deserts have bars* farth aato
pBrx of Israel t reran to her H~ma I wr A
as win; nau-jr. -----^.n a erf a i
tribe* w^acoir.jig u* Iyjre Ooc waaer tne rvjeratup of a
I-------l^u-------.r. 'Tii ml
Lwfcjrt thongs that ac bmuc can be eo liupiliaaij at
'*?*: v..-* can be v. era*: act. ra chat a spark
wa.-.^f ju *ub to be wafted aato bit by Drv^x-
laepeKa*. It a a Maaor. assigned to raanJcexe &eaef a; in*
floe--- Teczuet Hazzauzr. {naanKtm The prophet
AaMMtMiMfi teat the tane wtLI cook when ttae dead will nee
la the Teased
k Jacob says There a no precept m the Torah where
re-ware a *jt'j*i from which yoc oix infer the aoctnae erf the
Meeurrecta-s-. Thus, as coacartyjc wah honoring parents, it a
*rraxm That Thy days aaay t* protoogad and that may go
weii wan the* Again m eoanecuon with the law of letting the
another bird go from the neat a a arxun That it may be wet
wath tin* and that thou mayest prolong thy dayi There was a
ease f*re a fatner aaud to hi* eon. Go op to the atuc and bring
a* vjrTMr squabs H* cbmbed up the ladder to the atuc be hS
the d .'.her bird) alone and took some of the young,
doara, be fail and was killed wbere a this max
UxkgUi 'A Daya and where is ma Happiness?' The answer a
that thy day* ha prolonged refcre to the Reaurrecuon and one
sauet not expect to recerve the reward erf any good deed 'M-
rvahr in the World (f.'huUn -..
The Sean
R Pmeaa B Jair said Howjfulneas leads to Ckanhneaa.
Cleanhneaa leads to Purity Purity leads to Abstinence
Abstinence lead* to Hohnest Holiness leads to Humility.
Humility leads to Fear erf am Fear erf sm leads to Sauntiincaa.
SewUineee leads to the Holy Spirit Hory Spirit leads to
resurr*cuon of the Dead 'A '.odah Zurah 2fjai
The med*evaJ phaoapher Hadai Creacas suttea: There are
lour (/ueauons with regard to reaurrecuon. 1 Will the re-
aurrecuon be complete or partial? If partial which part? 2. The
time of the resurrecuon? 3 Will they die again after reaurrec-
uon? 4 At the tune of reaurrecuon will there be another
Judgement Day? He holds that the reaurrecuon will take place
after the days of the coming of the Bltawsli There wil be a
reaurrecuon of ail but the greatest sinners. There will be another
Judgment Day The righteous will live forever in thesr refined
bodies, its functions being mystical and that the body itself is a
nacrocoam of the whole structure of the universe
Saadiah Ben Joseph Gaon, one of the great scholars erf the
Georac period (882-942), in his Book of Belieft and Opiniont, 6 7
writes that the souls of the dead remain m a treasury until the
resurrecuon. This he claims is Olem-Hsbah; the 'World to
Come.'
la TW Kabbalah:
The Kabbalah states that the physical resurrection of the
dead will take place at the end of the days of redemption or as it
known "on the great day of judgement." However, they are
divided as to the fate of those resurrected.
Nahmanides taught that after a normal physical life the
resurrected body would be purified and clothed in Malachut
(spiritual garments like angels) and then pass into the future
spiritual world, which would appear after the destruction of this
world In the future world, the souls and their spiritualized
bodies would be placed in the true bond of life, each soul
preserving its individual identity.
Another idea was, that the resurrected would experience
Beautiuide (supreme happiness) in this world Then, this world
would be destroyed or turn back to chaos (waste and void) in
order to be recreated in a new form. All souls will then return to
their primeval being or their "Higher Source". Thus there world
be two judgements on man's fate, one after death, and the other
after resurrection. Some Kabbalists deny this last theory of two
judgements and restrict the second judgement known as the
great Day of Judgement to the nations of the world. Thus, the
souls would only be judged once, immediately after death.
Judaism never made salvation dependent upon a doctrine.
Yet it did during the course of history enumerate the fun-
damentala of its religion.
During the Babylonian exile, such doctrines as the Unity
and -Spiritually of God became major teachings. In later cen-
turies, Hillel declared the "love of thy neighbor" of preeminent
importance. Ben Azzai said, it is written; "This is the book of
the generations of man" Kieneus 5:1) not black, not white,
not heathen, not Hebrew, but man. This proclaims the unity of
the human race, the brotherhood of man, the value of each
human in life.
Maimonides formulated 13 principles of faith The last
of them read: "I believe with perfection that there will be a
revival of the dead at the time when it shall please the creator."
In his own time the body will be reunited with the soul.
Resurrection is no more of a mystery than birth or the miracle of
the annual resurrection of plant life after winter. "If what never
before existed, exists; why cannot that which once existed, exist
again?
Dear readers, let me bear from you from time to time so that
my poor efforts may not be in vain!
8HABBAT SHOLOM
Tish 'a B'Ac Services at Rodeph Shohi
The Faet Day orf Ta a B k*
he Srh of A* eowasssaaerajes
auoaal
rJZZ
__ ** aeetracuoo as
t^e Fr-K and Second Tempies of
Thai day of fasting and prayer
lias beer, ooaarved far orer 2000
Jews tarcaarhoot the
and au episodes of sadness
Yet. according to Midraahk
sources. Tiah a BAv will be the
bath day of the Messiah who will
bring redemption to the people of
Israel So there a a silver
bnmg to the dark cloud.
During the services of Tisb'a
BAv. the Biblical book o*
Eichah iLamentauonsi is read.
That poem of pain describes the
ajftenng of our people during the
dtruc^cs, of the Fn,, Tefflpfej.
586BCE Vet. a recalls uTT!'
vrvai terms the suffenng'5
martyrs of all,
This year. CongrentiJ
Rodeph Sholom w^ff
aoeaal evening service, J\
memoraung Th*. B'Av
Monday. July 31, at 8 p^ ^
***** *** T*mp Jewuk
communay are invited
Leo gfjgdfjji
'Ad Hominem': The Low Road
I frees Pag* 4
*-at-y could truly be thssraervea
for a while and ponder the
problems of State away from the
of
auper-sopcueucated Washington
Even Fraaahn Roosevelt, one
erf the greatest of the elitists in
the hanory of the presidency,
who continued while in office also
to live m his ancestral mansion at
Hyde Park in Dutcheas County.
S Y nevertheless listed as his
occupation on his driver's license
that be was a farmer
The Straussian salvo against
Reagar. I BBSvia cowboy back-
ground a therefore not only
contrary to the spint of the
presidency, it is ignorant of our
history into the bargain This
apart, it is worse than ad
-.em with respect to Reagan
himself It is s reflection of the
Carter-Strauss tactic ever since
the 1980 run for toe presidency
began The deadly duo have been
ad ho mine m all tbe way
THE MOST painful example
of this, clearly, has been Carter's
handling of Sen. Kennedy's
challenge, which be has simply
refused to recognize exists on the
presumption that Kennedy is his
moral interior
While Kennedy has attempted
to talk issues. Carter has stone-
walled both Kennedy and the
issues on the sanctimonious basis
of his moral superiority, with
never a thought that it is but a
stone s throw, say, from Bert
Lance to Chappaquiddkk. if one
wants to throw stones at all, and
apparently that is precisely what
Carter and Strauss intend doing
in the same way that they have
done it all along.
The irony in this game plan for
handling Reagan is that Carter's
sanctimoniousness is shown up
for what it is: a gutless moral
fibre, reckoned in his own terms,
that makes him no more eligible
for the presidency than the
opponent he intends to pillory
BUT THIS is something that
Carter-watchers have known all
along. It is not just Kennedy and
Reagan with whom he has
refused to discuss issues.
California's Gov. Brown com-
plained about this very thing
during his own brief candidacy,
and so has every other presi-
dential hopeful whose hat hit the
brim of the ring even if only
momentarily.
What emerges is that Carter is
unable to discuss issues because
be has a first term behind him of
exquisitely revealing non-
performance except for the Camp
David accords, which were dead
even before they were signed, a
fact only few people were willing
to admit from the very begin-
nine, but which is emerging as an
Dr. Barry D.Shapiro
Chiropractic Physician
Suite 4
13940 North Dale Mabry
Tampa, Florida
24 Hour
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813-962-3608
incontrovertible reality today.
Thii is at the core of the up-
coming Democratic campaign
strategy the need to duck
issues as a component of the
President's non-performance in
office But ad hominem is a two-
way street, and one ought not
presume that Mr Reagan will
avoid riding down it if he has to.
And then. Sunday school teacher
or not. the President is bound to
find out just how deplorable ad
hominem can be.
WHEN YOU argue that a man
ought not to be president because
he panicked in a moment of stress
i Kennedy at Chappaquiddkk I, it
is easy to argue that a man ought
not to be president who is
hardly more" than a movie
cowboy.
Sexual hypocrisy being what it
is in America. Sen. Kennedy may
well have-been done in by that
argument. But let no one assume
that Ronald Reagan will remain
mum Behind anyone's sanc-
timoniousness, and that includes
President Carter's there lurk
many skeletons Indeed, sane
tirnoniousness is born and bred o(
skeletons, and surely the GOP
will know how to search them out
bo an ad hominem campaign of
their own if that is what will be
required of them.
My own very special sadness in
all of tins is that I had been
brought up to believe in the
tradition that the Democratic
Party is i-ox populi that it it
the mother and the father of mid-
twentieth century American
idealism. Social and economic
reform were bred of its roots.
Civil libertarian progress took
nourishment in the agony of its
intellectual ferment. There were
Sturm und Drang in the party
that led the nation on uncharted
paths that even its own messiahs
found themselves fearful to tread.
Comes now Carter. And
Strauss. And ad hominem
harvested in the peanut fields of
Plains.
Rodeph Sholom Chavurot Social
Chavurot of Rodeph Sholom
Synagogue will meet together at
a social Saturday, Jury 12, in the
synagogue social hall at 9:15
p.m. This will be the first joint
meeting of all seven of the
groups. Desserts and no-host
cocktails will be served.
The seven Chavurot have 10 to
15 people each. These groups
meet independently each month
at the homes of their members to
discuss subjects such as: Danger
from the Cults to our Jewish
teenagers, A Jewish Iranian
student's problems in the United
States; A study of Passover
Haggadahs through the cen-
turies, Jewish Mysticism or Book
Reviews on books of Jewish
content Frequently, inviutions
are extended to various guest
speakers in the area.
This July 12 get-together will
be an opportunity to share with
the other Chavurot each group's
activities. A synopsis of the
year's studies will be presented
by each group.
W GRAY ST.
TAMPA. FL
813/879-3210 |
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TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swonn Avenue 251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallmgar
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily: morning and
evening minyan
CONGREGATION KOI AMI
885-3356 Allan Fox, President Services: first and third Friday of
each month at the Community lodge, Waters and Ola, 8 p.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM CMMrvative
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Martinl.6andbr9'
Hazzan William Hauben Services: Fridoy, 8:00 p.m.; Saturday.
10a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15a.m.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK Rtfor*
3303 Swonn Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim Ser-
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.
CHARAD HOUSE
Jewish Student Center (USF), 3645 Fletcher Avenue, College Park
Apts. 971 6768 or 985 7926 Rabbi Lazar Rivkin Rabbi Yakov
Werde Services: Friday, 8 p.m. Saturday, 10a.m. Tunsm
The Jewish Sound. Sunday 11 a.m. to noon. 88.5 FM.
B'NAI R'RITN HILLEL FOUNDATION
Jewish Student Center, University
50U
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida,
Patricia Court fl72 (Village Square Apis.) 988-7076 or 98B-
1234 Rabbi Mark Kram Special programs to be announced


Dory Schary Passes at Age 74
NEW YORK Dore
chary, honorary chairman
the Anti-Defamation
eague of B'nai B'rith, is
^d. Mr. Schary passed
vay Monday at the age of
following a lengthy
llness.
Long active as chairman
the ADL in a variety of
ewish causes, Schary was
noted Hollywood and
roadway writer, producer
nd director.
Born in Newark, N.J., Mr.
hary went to Hollywood in the
_j's where he wrote more than
J motion pictures and produced
: was in charge of production of
me 350 additional films.
His credits included the
ocumentary film, Israel: The
\ieht to lie. and he was chairman
I the Bicentennial Conference of
Cultural Arts of the National
Jewish Welfare Board.
One of his most distinguished
jlms was Sunrise at Campobello,
story of the struggle waged
Franklin Delano Roosevelt
gainst polio, which was one of
i major Broadway successes. It
as staged in 1968. just one year
he was fired from Metro-
old wyn- Mayer for what Mr.
hary always insisted was his
rt of liberal causes.
Among his films was the
Academy Award-winning Boys
foun. Other of his credits in-
duded Edison the Man, Young
torn Edison, Battle of Gettys-
\urn. Lonely Hearts, and Act I.
His first interest in the theater
ame as a teen-ager with roles in
rMHA productions.
He is survived by his wife,
liriara; three children and seven
randi hildren.
JERUSALEM Prime
Ministei Begin, recovering from
1 mild heart attack at the Hadas-
Hospital in Jerusalem, was
insferred Monday from the
Mensive can unit to a private
|rard in the cardiac department.
The Prime Minister's condition
(able, and his doctors
!satisfied with his recovery.
JERl SALEM The
Supreme Court has issued a
lempor.i'A injunction barring the
loverniiunt from taking over the
Arab-owned East Jerusalem
Electric Co., which serves the
Vest Bank The High Court
H#an hearings on appeals
gainst the deportations of two
f\'e>t Bank mayors and a Moslem
digious iudge.
Both eases have important
oliticai ramifications. The in-
iction, answerable by Energy
Minister Yitzhak Modai and the
pW Hank military commander.
Rave the government 45 days to
phow cause why its takeover
decision should not be reversed.
The government announced late
Dory Schary
last year that it would terminate
the electric company's concession
within a year in order to
"eliminate inefficiency."
NETIVOT, Israel A sim-
mering kulturkampf between
secular Jews and the Orthodox
majority in this normally quiet
Negev township erupted into
angry demonstrations and street ,
brawls over the weekend
requiring intervention by police.
There were some minor in-
juries, but no arrests reported.
The police estimated that at least
4.000 of the town's 10,000
population participated in the
melee which began Friday night
and continued intermittently
through Saturday. The town was
quiet Sunday, but police
patrolled the streets.
The basic issue is the in-
sistence by the Orthodox that the
growing secular community
conform to their way of life. The
non-observant charge religious
coercion by the municipal leaders
who are Orthodox. The im-
mediate cause of the disturbances
was the municipal swimming
pool which is open six days a
week three days for men and
three days for women. The
secular community has not de-
manded that the pool be kept
open on the Sabbath, but they
insist that it be open to men and
women on the same days so that
families can enjoy the facility
together.
The Orthodox will not tolerate
mixed swimming.
NEW YORK NinememlxTs
of the Jewish Defense League
took over the Manhattan office of
Interns for Peace arid demanded
that the group stop helping
Arabs in Israel. Eight persons,
including officials of Hashomer
Hatzair and Americans for Pro-
gressive Israel, which also share
the office complex, were ejected
by the JDL group.
Dov Becker, who led the group,
called the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency to tell of the takeover. He
said the JDL demands that
Interns for Peace "give up the
dangerous false hope that Jews
and Arabs can peacefully co-exist
inside or outside the land of
Israel" and Becker said the
Interns should "disband im-
mediately unless all their efforts
are directed in aiding only poor
Jewish families and not Arab
ones in the State of Israel."
BONN Criminal charges
have been filed in a West Berlin
court against nine former judges
of the Hitler era who are accused
of having sentenced 350 Germans
and non-Germans to death for
political reasons. All were mem-
bers of the notorious Volks-
gerichtshof which handled the
cases of political opponents of the
Nazi regime.
The charges were brought by
the Frankfurt-based West Ger-
man Association of Nazi Victims
and the Union of Anti-Fascists.
A spokesman for the association
conceded that there are major
differences of opinion in legal
circles as to whether the charges
will be acted upon under present
West German laws.
To date there have been no
successful charges against former
Nazi judges.
JERUSALEM In a series of
hard-hitting speeches here last
week, the veteran American
Jewish leader Max Fisher of
Detroit called on the World Zion-
ist Organization to overhaul its
structure which is based on
political parties. Fisher, who is
chairman of the Jewish Agency's
Board of Governors, attended the
Agency's annual Assembly here
and also addressed the meeting of
the Zionist General Council
which preceded it.
Fisher claimed that the party
system is an anachronism which
has repeatedly proven detri-
mental to the Jewish Agency.
Services Held for Faye Mallinger
"We have seen how party politics
can interfere with the effective
functioning of the WZO and the
Jewish Agency," Fisher said in a
speech to the Council.
NEW YORK Valery Pilni-
kov, a Soviet Jewish activist
from Kiev, has been sentenced to
five years of hard labor, ac-
cording to the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ).
He was tried for allegedly
assaulting his neighbor.
Pilnikov was arrested on May
16 upon his return from Moscow,
where he and a group of Soviet
Jews from his home city
delivered a complaint to the
Communist Party Central Com-
mittee regarding new emigration
restrictions. The trial was held
without legal representation for
Pilnikov and despite written
evidence clearing him of all
charges.
In reaction to the guilty
verdict. Pilnikov's wife. Olga,
immediately planned to fly to
Moscow.
Peres Sounds Unusual Note
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Shimon Peres, chairman of the
opposition Labor Party, said that
he had "not encountered any
American opposition" to the idea
that Israeli settlements could
remain along the Jordan Valley
in a future peace settlement.
Similarly, Peres told
correspondents here, the U.S.
was prepared to see the Israeli
army remain on the Jordan River
under a peace agreement.
Peres warned that if Israel did
not take the diplomatic initiative
during 1980 it would face massive
American pressure for either a
return to Geneva or a return to
the Rogers Plan in 1981.
HE SAID this was because
any newly elected or reelected
administration would feel free to
squeeze Israel, especially.since by
that time Israel's foreign debt
would belli the order of $20 billion
and its dependence on
Washington would be nearly
total.
The U.S. "will not have to
exert pressure but merely to
refuse to increase its aid," Peres
warned. He recommended that an
Israeli initiative be taken in one
or more of the following direc-
tions:
Implementing autonomy in
Gaza first, since the Egyptians,
he said, believed it could be
implemented there without
reference to the West Bank; a
more "meaningful" approach
towards the question of the
powers of the proposed autonomy
authority.
Publisher Brin Passes
BOSTON (JTA) Funeral
services were held here in Brook-
line for Alexander Brin, editor
and publisher of the Jewish
Advocate of Boston, who died
after a lengthy illness at the age
of 87.
Brought to this country from
Russia by his widowed mother at
the age of 11, Brin went to work
as a newsboy to help bring over
his sister, Sarah, and his younger
brother, Joseph.
WINNER of an essay contest
sponsored by Mayor John Fitz-
gerald, grandfather of President
Kennedy, he was given a job as
office boy on the Boston Herald
and within three years became a
staff reporter.
A dramatic series of articles by
him on the I>hi Frank case in
Georgia attracted the attention
of Louis Brandeis, then a Boston
attorney, who asked Brin, then
21, to become editor of the
Advocate, succeeding Jacob de
Haas, a former secretary to
Theodor Herzl.
While editor of the Advocate,
he served longer on the
Massachusetts Board of Edu-
cation 39 years than any
other member. He was the first
Jew to become chairman.
NOW'! OPENINGS FOR:
ENGLISH TUTORS, TRANSPORTATION VOLMEERS,
SENIOR PROGRAM VOLUNTEERS
START fl HEW
MBIT
I funeral services for Faye
[lallingei. wife of Rabbi Samuel
Mallinger. rabbi of Temple
vid. were held Monday af-
noon,July7.
I Rabbi Theodore Brod of Hillel
KM officiated. Interment
flowed in Mvrtle Hill Memorial
irk.
IMri Mallinger had been very
tjve in synagogue activities
w was past chairman of the
fomens Division of the Tampa
MM Federation.
In addition to her husband,
Pre Mallmgcr is survived by a
P| Dr. Barry L. Mallinger;
,frd. Va.; and daughter.
' Luke, Atlanta, Ga.; two
Wers and three sisters; and a
Woohild Andrea Mallinger
Preparation was by Chessed
Shel Ernes. In lieu of flowers,
contributions may be made to
Temple David Memorial Fund.
BERKMAN
|iii ,il lerviCW (or Max He rk man. 73.
of MB V\ Indiana were held at the
gravMMa m Beth Israel Cemetery
Rabbi Nathan Bryn officiated. Horn in
N.-w Ymk City, i" had been resident of
Tampa Im He whs ve,,,'r?n
,,i World Wai and > member of the
Odd Fellowi Lodge Burvlvom Include
his io. Mi- Dor* Herkman: two
brother*, l>i William Herkman and
Mavei Herkman both Ol NW **
PUj adle SwMMaon,
\, v,,ii City
WEINBERGER
Funeral service were held M
June M, ai Bath Israel Cemetery r
GlxaWelnberaei 87 ol III Columbia
in widow hi tbraham h Welnb
Un Welnbergei '''"' "'
Tampa la urvlv< 'i bj b ion Bn
Preparation bj I
Volunteer
"printed with permission of
Jtonttjsrmry Cbujnty,f*3. (juv&rrrant
r AI I TODAY : TAMPA JEWISH SOCIAL SERVICE
372 4451


The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
F
nt*ay, July
II.
'Territories for Peace' Grand Illusion Thsrt Failed?^
_ .. attain orpsnl t k> irlon nf ...nin' "OPS half W8\ from 181 ,__n_m,:.n ,umtal
Continued from Page 1
pulling-out process, the
evacuation of the oilfields, the
strategic military passes, the
vast Sinai air bases.
Disillusionment became
widespread as the Egyptians
took over more territory, made
new demands in the autonomy
talks and dragged their feet over
the various "normalization '
processes. Israelis could not
understand, for example,
Egyptian reluctance to sign the
agreement for a multi-national
force to police the buffer zone
between the Sinai desert and the
1967 border.
This led Premier Begin to
threaten, as Moshe Day an had
urged previously when Foreign
Minister, that Israel would not
implement the final stage of the
Sinai withdrawal in less than two
years unless Cairo signed the
agreement.
DISTURBING statements by
Egyptian Defense Minister,
Ahmed Radawi, have done
nothing to assuage Israel fears.
Only a few days ago, he made it
abundantly clear that Egypt had
retained its military com-
mitments to the rest of the Arab
world, emphasizing that "if there
is any aggression against any
Arab State, and they ask us for
help, we are committed to pro-
vide it."' In the present chaotic
state of the Arab world, it is not
impossible for such a situation to
be manipulated.
Badawi also disclosed that
Cairo has military advisers,
technicians and military com-
manders in many Arab count ires,
including the militant States that
reject the peace treaty with
Israel. In other words, military
cooperation exists oh the highest
level with the bellicose rejec-
tionist States.
Many Israelis who initially
supported withdrawal from Sinai
now believe that they have been
outmaneuvered by the Egypt-
ians, that peace is illusory, that
Sadat has obtained by clever
diplomatic means what he could
not achieve by force, and that a
similar situation could be
engineered on the other borders,
so that ultimately Israel is
virtually confined to the narrow
and indefensible Mediterranean
costal plain.
It waa fear of Egypt's long-
term intentions, certainly after
Sadat disappears from the
political area, that compelled
people like Yigal Alton (and no
one wanted peace morel to ab-
stain from supporting (as did
Moshe Shamir, now Begins '
Foreign Minister) the decision to
pull out of the whole of Sinai,
thus putting Egypt's big guns
again within range of Israel's
cities.
ISRAEL'S SECURITY,
rather than acquiring disputable
Biblical territory, was always
uppermost on A lion's mind and,
desperate though he was for
peace, he always insisted that it
was imperative for strategic
reasons for Israel to retain the
Red Sea costal strip from Eilat to
Sharm e-Sheikh, Israel's gateway
to Africa and the Far East.
Today, more and more Israelis
believe that he was right.
Moshe Sharon, a person who
understands the Arab mind more
than most, being a senior lecturer
on the islamic people at the
Hebrew fnviersity, is firmly of
the opinion that the time will
soon come when other Arab
States m[\ repeat the Egyptian
exercise 'and offer peace for
territories: He believes that be-
cause otahe political climate in
Israel and the country's growing
international isolation, Israel will
be plaeed in an extremely
dangerous position, whatever
government is in power.
His view is that no responsible
political leadership in Israel could
again accept the idea of
"territories for peace" since this
will be used as a vehicle to reduce
Israel to a defenseless mini-State
without giving her peace.
In other areas, away from the
political arena, the Egyptians
shy away from achieving nor-
malization and the type of
cooperation that should exist
between friendly neighbors. This
is particularly evident in the field
of tourism.
THE MATTER of Egged bus
route 362 is typical. "This new
. .._, from
Aviv to Cairo, terminating at the
Neot Sinia border crossing. At
the time I left Israel, the
Egyptians were still ignoring the
Israeli bus company's request to
coordinate timetables so that
passengers would not have a long
wait at the frontier (if all goes
well, it's anyway a tiring 11-hour
trip, including ferry crossing of
the Suez Canall.
Similarly on El Al's Tel Aviv-
Cairo service where Israel's
airline is forced to fly a cir-
the Egyptian capital.
At the top tourist
Muskie Defends
McHenry's Abstention
On Jerusalem
Vote at UNations
said
Continued from Page 1
it many times. This
Administration has said it many
times. The question assumes a
condition that doesn't exist."
When the JTA asked why it
wasn't said at the UN, he
responded: "One of the problems
of these resolutions is that we
are asked to repeat rhetoric over
and over again. What we're
trying to do is to get away" from
such rhetoric.
"THAT DOES nothing but
create sometimes emotional
responses, divisiveness, diver-
sionary actions. What we're
trying to do is to get down to the
nitty gritty of the issues which
stand between us and peace in
the Middle East. Now you can
embroider it with all the rhetoric
that you want, but the issue and
the problem have been sur-
rounded by rhetoric for almost
40 years now, and the only real
effort to get down to the nitty
gritty has been the Camp David
process.''
He added, "You cannot do it
(solve the Arab-Israeli conflict)
by the succession of resolutions
in the UN which consume
energy, which confuse issues,
which ask us to prejudge issues
that are going to be negotiated.
That's my point. And abstention
is the only way that we can
make our point clearly. I wish
there was some other way. What
I am saying is that in this
context abstention is a positive
act."
In a telegram to the White
House, sent before the UN vote,
Howard Squadron, new chair-
man of the Conference of Presi-
dents of Major American Jewish
Organizations, had urged the
U.S. to veto the resolution. "The
failure to veto this is a failure to
defend the Camp David ac-
cords," he said. Later, the out-
going chairman of the Presidents
Conference, Theodore Mann,
expressed "disappointment and
dismay" that the U.S. abstained
from but did not veto the
resolution. "Instead of ab-
staining from the latest attempt
to settle the Arab-Israel conflict
by UN action rather than by
face-to-face negotiations, (UN)
Ambassador (Donald) McHenry
should have been instructed to
cast a veto," Mann said.
JACK SPITZER, president of
B'nai B'rith, also criticized the
U.S. abstention. Asserting that
the Security Council vote shows
that the Council "is less con-
cerned about peace in the Middle
East than it is about developing
Israel as a scapegoat," Spitzer
contended that a U.S. veto
"would have been the only
appropriate response."
The Jewish Labor Committee
in New York sent President
Carter a telegram expressing
"shock and dismay" that the
Administration abstained in-
stead of vetoed the resolution
"The issue is not really
Jerusalem but caving in to
OPEC threates and PLO ter-
rorism," the JLC said.
American Eagle Turned
Chicken at Geneva
Continued from Page 1
"The American eagle turned
into a chicken," one Western
correspondent observed when,
daring the debate over the
agenda, the U.S. remained silent.
Some of the American delegates
explained that they had wanted
to speak but were told that the
speakers' list was closed for lack
of time.
OTHERS SAID they did a tot
of lobbying. But the fact
remained that the Americans did
not fight to keep the resolution
off the agenda, and that attitude
worried the Israeli as well as the
Western delegations. Francis
Blanchard, director general of the
ILO, acknowledged in a
television interview that he was
worried about the organization's
future.
"The politicization of the
conference made it impossible to
tackle many of the ILO's real
problems, and there is a danger
that the ILO will cease to be what
it is meant to be and will deal
only in political matters," he
dd said. Yet many observers claimed Echeverria
that Blanchard did not do as
much as he might have to stop
the Arab resolution from being
presented.
According to the voting
procedures, negative votes do not
count and if the 15 had abstained,
the necessary quorum would not
have been attained.
ISRAEL WAS supported by
Latin American countries and the
Western Europeans. Thanks to
Histadrut and the International
Confederation of Free Trade
Unions (ICFTU), many worker
delegates sided with Israel, while
their governments supported the
anti- Israel move. This was the
case with Sri Lanka, Niger,
Mauritania and Uganda.
Even workers from France,
Italy and Iceland whose
organizations are Communist
supported Israel. The Mexican
government, which is pur-
portedly now friendly toward
Israel, spoke against it, in-
dicating a reversion to the
policies of former President Luis
Israel are
initiatives
WHETHER EGV^
retain these reports J
concerns i8 anyone",
though there are runJ. W
Cairo has asked a SUr"
company for a bluenri
develop 11 holiday vilfe
Red Sea and MediT
areas, and that it mav Q
casino on the shore.*!! Jf
level,
contacts between Egypt and
extremely formal,
invariably coming
only from the Israelis, tounsi industry, iie ,
Repeatedly, the Egyptians have born Sheila Meltzer who wS
declined friendly invitations to husband, operates a note!
Israel for themselves. On
Sea.
Some EUat people
industry, hxe
see .-------
lower touristic levels there is,
according to senior Israeli of-
ficials, virtually a blank wall on
the Egyptian side, though one
could be magnanimous and put
this down to the sort of negative
bureaucracy one finds in many
countries, even in Britain.
Another disquieting touristic
feature is that the traffic is more
or less one way, with large large
numbers of Israelis anxious to
visit their erstwhile enemy, even
though Egypt is far from ideal as
a tourist area, while tourist
traffic from Egypt to Israel is
virtually non-existent.
IT IS, most people agree, a
good thing for borders to be open,
but there is nevertheless some
concern in Israel that many
tourists, particularly Americans,
who normally spent the whole of
their Middle East visit in Israel,
now stay part of the time in
Egypt, depriving Israel of much
needed foreign exchange.
Of greater concern to the many
people involved in tourism is the
future after final withdrawal from
Sinai of the delightful resorts
developed by Israelis at great
cost along the Red Sea "Riviera"
south of of Eilat. What for
example, will be the fate of
Neviot Zahav and Sharm el-
Sheikh into which Israeli
pioneers have put so much effort
and loving care and travel
companies and hoteliers like
Haim Sniff so much money.
Shiff, who ownes Israel's biggest
hotel network, is, so far as Sinai
is concerned, an eternal optimist,
believing that the Egyptians will
allow him to continue to run his
hotel at Ophira, almost at the
southerne8t trip of the Sinai
peninsula.
But moshav and kibbutz types
elsewhere along this wonderful
stretch of coast are less sanguine.
Preactically all the pioneers who
built the Zahaz holiday village
have already pulled out, leaving
the Jewish Agency to conduct a
holding operation until the final
withdrawal.
thrrvmg travel company ^J
the optimists. She Bun
Egyptian travel firm?'
believes that it win u
business persons, rather that
politicians, who havethed
voice so far as future Ea
relations are concerned.
But this view is not snared 1
the many sceptics who fed |
the whole situation could i
radically before April, 19821
the events in the coining,.
could compel Israel to decidet
hang on at least to the
coastal strip south of Eilat.
During my latest visit
Israel, I found a widespn|
desire for new leadership, fcj|
change of direction, as therei
in Britain before the last ek.
It's not so much a preference!
the Israeli Labor Party,
split by internal wrangling!, i
general dissatisfaction with
Government weakened by
resignation of such
figures as Moshe Dayanandl
Weizman and, because of
internal policies, probably
most unpopular Gover
Israel has ever had.
THE GENERAL belief is l_.
it would be toppled well beftxtj
next year's Knesset elections I
Yigal Yadin's Democratic Party,!
though strongly opposed ii|
many of Prime Minister Begnij
policies, were not determined I
cling to office and prop up t
Government rather than facet
near certainty of extinction in I
general election.
Yadin was a distinguished
soldier, a brilliant archaeolog*
but to many Israelis he seemsM
of his depth in dealing wi
skilled politicals of Begin
vanity. Israelis are unlikely I
forgive him and his party hf
denying them a change i
leadership at this crucial pewl
one which enabled a aw|
government to reconsider Isradil
relationship with the Aan
States, not least the hazards (*l
the "territories for peace'' kka
W. German Police Arrest Former
SS Official at Vacation Spot
BONN (JTA) West German police BrrestedL
former SS official during his vacation in a shore rewfl
off the Baltic Sea. The 64-year-old man is retired mi
lives in Dusseldorf. His name was not disclosed. T|
prosecution said that the former SS official killed at letfl
24 Jewish inmates in the concentration camp of RiH
Kaiserwald, where he was chief of the first-aid post*]
tween 1942 and 1944.
Activists Concerned
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jewish activitists here and
abroad are concerned about the
apparent crackdown on Soviet
Jewish young men who are of
military age and who apply to
emigrate to Israel, according to
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry (NCSJ).
The latest incident, concerning
the plight of Grigory Geishis, 20,
of Leningrad, indicates that the
Soviet government is, once again,
using the pretext of "draft
evasion" to imprison young men
who wish to leave the country. In
recent years, several young men
have been incarcerated for the
same reason, the latest one being
Boris Kalendarov, who is serving
a two-year sentence in a labor
camp.
GEISHIS, who was expelled
from a university in Leningrad,
his local draft board on May*
Instead of appearing at tra
office, he delivered
statement to
the Miliurj
statement to m ts
Commissar of his district, swi
why he would not serve
army. He specifically crtadtej
he was refused perrnissx*
emigrate because of his b*
aliened access to ctaM*" *
alleged access
formation.
Therefore, because he cud*
want to be privy to state sen
Geishis told them that he cud
want to serve in the army-
Subsequently, the drsftjg
held an inquiry. '^Zji*
neiu an unfits ?
Geishis for over 45 *?*".,
NCSJ learned that theJ*
questioning leveled eg*** J
was demowlfcwfc* d
humiliating, with
., .....*> **' traitor
w-s^sched^edto.piPW,b^_^^^
"traitor" raaounding
through
tea
v


,y. July 11,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 1
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*+> >=*r in
He thanks you
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too late u> support the
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eaaapaega. Make joor pledge today.
'If you htn.4 made a IWj pledge.
zhe Tampa Jetcish Federation thanks you.'t
Date
TAMPA JEWISH FEDERATION/UNITED JEWISH APPEAL
1980 CAMPAIGN
fe*tsh Federanoa
Name

53409
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1980 TOTAL
Address
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sgr.-c- *-cr --i-- 9 1.. .wj -^
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Full Text

/ *\
*
..
*'

Jocelyn Aronovitz
Thomas Martin
Aronovitz-Martin
Mrs. Arnold Golden, North-
brook, 111., and Marvin
Aronovitz, Tampa, announced
the engagement of their
daughter, Jocelyn Beth
\ngela Sheikhet extends the hand of friendship to Alia J;ro"?vitz *, T.hma9J hn
libman. Angela is an old hand at resettling having arrived ?, Jk*.ui *"? SH
fm the Soviet Union in 1978 with her family8(Photo luTwis
'\udrey Haubenstock) '
The bride-lobe is a senior at
the University of Wisconsin in
Whitewater. She is the grand-
daughter of Mrs. Adolph Glick-
man and Mr. and Mrs. Manuel
Aronovitz.
V
Weary after the long trip from Rome to Tampa are the newest
Soviet Jewish arrivals: Boris Libman, 10-year-old Alia, and
Svetlana Libman. They arrived June 20. (Photo: Audrey
Haubenstock)
Soviets Are Welcomed
The Libman family arrived
from Leningrad on June 20,
becoming the 16th Russian
family to settle in Tampa since
the program was begun and the
fourth this year.
Boris Libman, 45, a taxi driver,
arrived with his wife Svetlana,
36, an assistant draftsman and
10-year-old Allah. The welcoming
party had quite a large number of
children anxious to meet Allah,
and as the picture above in-
dicates, children get together
very easily.
Seniors Swim,
Exercise Class
Older Floridians who missed
their chance to get into the
Jewish Community Center's
senior aqua-exercise and swim
classes in June can pre-register to
reserve their places in the second
t of classes anytime before July
15.
Up to 40 people age 60+ get
hrst-come-first-served places in
the classes, which meet twice
weekly on Tuesdays and
Thursdays between 4 and 6 p.m.
lor four weeks.
To reserve space in the free
passes, write or call (phone 872-
4451 or T.T.Y. relay through
i**f Services Center 223-2285),
I he Jewish Community Center.
The class is open to anyone
Red 60+ as no charge through a
Pant from the Older Americans
*ct administered through
flonda's HRS and Tampa Bay
"egional Planning CouncU.
uonations are always welcome.
The Libmans are living at the
Villa Deleon Apartments, and
Allah is attending the Jewish
Community Center camp and will
be a student at the Hillel School
this fall.
The Librmms left Leningrad
March 2, and 10 days later
arrived in Rome where they
waited until everything was set
for them to travel to Tampa. The
Russian Resettlement Program is
coordinated by the Tampa
Jewish Social Service and funded
by the Tampa Jewish Federation.
The future bridegroom is
employed by Lewis Alice
Electronics Company of New
Berlin, Wis.
An Aug. 10 wedding is planned
in Chicago.
'More Joy of
Music9 Series
"Ever since our first 'Joy of
Music' series last fall, people
have been pressing us to organize
another one," said Marjorie
Amaldi of the Senior Citizens
Project. "So we did!"
The new series, called "More
Joy of Music," will feature three
separate performances covering a
wide variety of music to please
older listeners and will be held at
Rocky Creek Mobile Home
Park's Recreation Center, 8400
W. Waters Ave., Tampa.
Scheduled for the summer
series are: July 15, Dale Johnson,
local soprano, singing favorite
songs; July 29, the Tampa
Community Players with ex-
cerpts from the musical "Annie
Get Your Gun"; and Aug. 12, the
Carbonnel Chamber Quartet. All
programs begin at 2 p.m.
The series, sponsored by the
Senior Project of the Jewish
Community Center, is free and
open to anyone 60+, through a
grant from the Older Americans
Act, through the HRS, and
Tampa Bay Regional Planning
Council. Donations are welcome.
Refreshments will be served.
Rhoda L Karpay
C.R.S.
Avoid "taoriss"-
OMf with a Pro!
SUN BAY CORP.
Realtors
IN FLA. CALL COLLECT
1(813)962-2126
OUT OF STATE TOLL FREE
1(800)237-2077
Jewish Families of
Tampa Meets July 11
Jfwish Families of Tampa, a
fledgling congregation on
Tampa's north side, had a most
successful first formal Shabbat
Service, according to Cy Woolf,
chairman pro tern of the group.
The next Shabbat worship
service will be held July 11 at 8
p.m. at the Holiday Inn at 400 E.
Bearss Ave. (two blocks west of
1-75). Mr. and Mrs. Herman
Stern will host the Oneg
Shabbat.
Woolf reports that Jewish
Families of Tampa has now
scheduled regular Friday evening
services the second and fourth
Fridays of every month at the
Temple Terrace Masonic Lodge.
11807 N. 56th St. The first
Shabbat to be observed at this
new location will be July 25.
A meeting of this group for the
Cohen-SpHolnick
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cohen
announce the engagement of
their daughter, Mona, to Jamie
Spitolnick, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harold Spitolnick.
The bride-to-be attends
Hillsborough Community College
and works as a veterinarian
assistant for a horse vet. She
owns three horses. The future
bridegroom owns the restaurant
at Tampa Technical College.
A September 1981 wedding is
planned.
purpose of electing regular of-
ficers will be held Sunday. July
13, at 10 a.m. at Florida Federal
Savings and Loan Association,
207 W. Bearss Ave. An open
invitation has been extended to
anyone who wishes to attend.
Additional information about
Jewish Families of Tampa is
available by calling C'y Woolf.
Monday-Friday, between H a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. atH77-'2515.
Beginning
Needlepoint for
Seniors
Volunteer instructor and
skilled craftswoman. Dorothy
Grossman, will be offering
beginning needlepoint for anyone
60 or older in the Hillsborough
County area, starting Wed-
nesday, July 16, from 10 a.m. to
noon, at the Jewish Community
Center.
The course, which will run for
four weeks, is available at no cost
through the Senior Citizens
Project of the Jewish Community
Center, through an Older
Americans Act Grant ad-
ministered through Florida's
HRS and Tampa Bay Regional
Planning Council.
Falk Foundation Funds
Special Reading Service
Matching funds from the
David A. Falk Foundation of
Tampa and a Public Telecom-
munications Facilities Program
grant have been awarded to the
WUSF Radio Reading Service to
purchase 435 special crystal
tuned radio receivers for print-
handicapped listeners.
The RRS is now accepting
applications for qualified persons
who cannot use normally printed
material because of a visual or
physical impairment, such as
multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy,
arthritis, dyslexia or a stroke.
Hospitals and nursing homes
may also make applications for
the receivers.
Since May of 1978 the WUSF
Radio Reading Service has used
the sub-carrier of WUSF, the
noncommercial FM radio station
at the University of South
Florida in Tampa, to provide
readings of daily Bay area
newspapers, magazines, and
books, along with special
programs from National Public
Radio.
More than 100 volunteers also
record programs designed
especially for the print-
handicapped and broadcast live
call-in programs over the sub-
carrier. The service, the only of
its kind in Florida, operates 142
hours a week. WUSF broadcasts
the RRS on its main channel at
89.7 from 7 to 8 a.m. weekdays.
Anyone interested in obtaining
a special receiver may call the
RRS office in Tampa, 974-4193.
or write the WUSF Radio
Reading Service, AOC 103,
University of South Florida,
Tampa, FL 33620.
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sn^**"*-
rVida>
Women's Conference
The upcoming women's conference in
Copenhagen will emphasize the Johnny-One-Note
whistled by the Arab phalanx of this planet
Earth and the way in which the world dances in
response
A; a time that women m Iran are taking their
bves in their hands by protesting against the
medieval modes of female behavior' which the
Ayatollah Khomeini is attempting to reimpos* on
them, when the Republican Party found it hard in
Detroit this week to come to a consensus about the
Equal Rights Amendment, when women everywhere
in lands that are both advanced and only now
developing are still victimized by various levels
of discriminator, at such a time it is difficult to
a: del Copenhagen conference will be
bet war over attacks on Israel as
rac :-
V\ e say another' because that is what hap-
pened m Mexico City to begin with m the infamous
Zionism equals racism resolution years ago and
what happened only last week in Geneva at a
meeting of the International Labor Organization.
v ben I be Arab phalanx sang their one-note
symphony most recently.
Copenhagen No Surprise
Stili we should not be surprised It is not only
womer. ~ problems that are put at the bottom of the
its: of priorities in a conference designed to study
these problems At the United Nations every day
where wond problems involving poverty disease
illiteracy technological deficiency and military
aggression in a variety of hotspots ought to be top
priority, does not the UN agenda feature as vir-
tually a principal subiect of its debate Israel. Israel.
[sm
We Nrj we should not be surprised if only
because, in the order of Arab affairs women's rights
would surely come last. .And because a free society
such as Israel f is an absolute threat to its
roedieva, condition________________________________
56 American Jews
appifc^:. ne statement by Howard
Squi new chairman o: the Conference of
PrW i iizations. who this
v eel igned bj M American
7>o;irH--
Men
n Beg
and Gaza and
--ept
-
BBR | M -t -^ght or.
Wka nah wi concessions
This
time I
irawal fa
me of peace wur. Egypt has I
rawal -
an entimsmstac intellectual and cultural ex
not a new -eiationship
ve at temp'-;, to tn-
I .-...- really I peace.
uwar 5>aaa: aemands for r
and This is bitter enc
i mencan
ad by Sadat
atement makes
'Ad Hominem': The Low Road
" Jewish Florklian
of Tampa
rilllii 'Mi: 3B! Hendemor Bivc hmpk Fit 31SS
-. Mikm. Fife SIS!
no an
F.x- :.:o- Aoclat* Editor
-r BNMM
Tl li-wtmt FlartdMB Dam Voi bwnumr Tm kuaniB
('TV MerrkMidMr M'TTHm In l'ip|nmn.
r*uhlratH-< 13*" -.' V'm<-niHf" tti-miKt M>
It' rrvk.lv lam tBVnurt *ueii: bj Tht Jr-M Fiortauu 7 amp*
imt Cmm PnUi* F'nio i Mmm. rk I BJPM71 St*
ripif arm nn(tfict>r Farm SST* ittv*ni unOrllvfi-M) p*|M u Tlw Jntat
FH-rtdMir. 1 0 hrni'.'*: Mlwnu FU ss
THE RHETORICIANS, those
neanderthal creatures living out
their extinction among us in a
quiet despair for the extinction
with them of the logical and
meticulous use of language, call it
minm It has to do with a
Kind of argument addressed u>
the man
In oc hominem argument
go for the jugular You ignore
issues and address wur attack to
trie mar. himself his sex life
M annkmg habits his business
practices, his religious affiliation
rut- race whatever is convenient
as e first fistful of mud
IN THIS kinc of debate the
unphcaten is that b scoundrel
car. not possibly be on the right
side of an issue and sc why
bother discussing any issue -1 I"
him at all" The logics, fallacy
here is obvious., and in pracuca.
*. I TTiS CQ ". IS
devastating
For oc a comes frorr.
ignorance bigotry and prejudice
anc it appeals to ignorance
Leo
MiiKlliti
bigotry and prejudice Wc
character assassination, for that
at ad hominem amount* to
in the end. depends upon the
assassin s artistic capacity to
delineate and embellish flawa of
personality in his opponent, or
e\er. to make new ones where
none existed in the first plan. It
e the character assassin who
creates the scoundrel m order to
unmask him It is a process that
appeals to the worst m us at the
of times
In essence, the person willing
to descend into the vile morass of
ad hominem is more than an
jporant Ug more than |K
Actually diahonest Hej,J5
and-out bar
ALL THESE -.map^J
euaOa Blood in order to apor*kv|
the enormity of the DmS'
Party a announced aim2
tactic against Ronald Ream,
the upcoming presKknualrin>_
conceived by Chairman Robn
Strauss that Reagan u n^
the tuff of whitr, preadenna,
made that Reagan W
equipped to be a cowbov mn'
star "
It is not ad '"''".iiemtoinqual
why a movie cowboy ts monl
poorly-equipped U be prtsdl
than. say. a peanut farmer. Ta|
history of the America!
presidency represents many p|
fa as ion* and occupations rangjM I
from military leaders iJackson,]
Eisenhower i u engineeril
(Hoover. Carter' from liwyajl
(Lincoln Nixor.. to unmnb
presidents (Wilson >. from n&l
tecu and philosophers (Jefferaa,
who was also a umvertjtj
president) to clever real eatatt I
agents (Washington, who ia|
also a military' leader'.
To question the admissMbl
of a movie cowboy into tail
populist panopiy of presidential
personalities is not only to be a
elitist, it is to be a ?nob. Both.al
attitudes, establish dangerou
precedents with respect to prel
requisites for the office, which the
Constitution spell.' out in i fit
more reasonable and democratic |
way except f c r I ne stipulation
that candidates must be native-
born, a conditior that has loag .
since outiivec ba _stfulness.
FACT, at our Chief Eie> I
uuves have found e beneficial a
the past to emphasize their I
humble begmmngs if they had
them (Lincoln s log cabin. m|
exquisite metaphor for Moses'
nver-borne basket and all of
them have emphasized their J
pastoral bucolic inclinations,
either that the> were farmers
first, no matter w hat other oc-
cupation they oh -ame
be engaged a? a men
recent phenomr: it *!
onlv m the* ^^ i
House as jaaiiiiiirii T-uman a
Kev IVesl ranchaij
Co.iti.iuec or Page*
U.S. Prepares for Tough World Meet
MTMtfEIFTIO* R*Tf

L a'lUW. wrw-n S **
;-ta\
L*:-.
iited
!
I
p tht
i
-
case wa> mm | I
- ll:

neanmp
mear..- .>und. and
rack a
obi
abh;'- gets
IN THE five in;-
yaars. warnmg fiag> ha\ t
up to pre\'nt a repetition of such
damaging nonsv: Nowhere is
tfu.: mort appa-< -
wfc*rr B| for tht
womer s Cnnierenc* scheduled
io- .i. enhagen
A docurn :>ared b\ the
Economic Coma for
W esne*rr. Asia a sectior. of the
IN Economi: HatCtl
- deciarec trw: pan
must hai'e araJTU) at the
Apart beic J -r.
"""1T1
ltaca.
liaisor. anc w m : erns

Robert
Segal
CMaaad ia
M help of
'he beratioi
:
has as>..-ec
hat the American
detegatior
ne* ^ rtrtrnsMsl
remin ClU
docan
Other American delegates who
can be expected to share Mrs.
addingt*.ns *ai<-hman-at the
gate stance include L\tda
Johnson Robb. Judj Carter
h) Height ipraaiSaal of the
National Council of Negro
and K st her R Lands
oast prvMdom of the National
CouDolof Jswits Wvimeni
THESE FOLKS want to get
r with what should be the main
:iusiness of .vnhagen
'.edema
- and action oa hoa.th
truest lor.and related issues
"^n" in importance
do^-t ns
Howex-er if the Pl.tVmsjured
'.he oon-
or. eatm
the conference I W*1*
for a Zioms- ':ilic*
campsigr. tht ^ *'lUt''
prepared 1- **
discussion ir P""
of South Afncar ^ingin
a tradit : ap"'
thrid: inev w TefigMW
enc "*?
are determined I o)oA an"-
Israel poiiucai attamp" w "^
the plight of Pa- ,:T,a,,
separate agenda :
M a travest;. thlU tJ
aaa ha> B**S.^
desirable point at which w
poliucauzation of LV.ernauoosI
forums can be mack : p*J;
of the insatiable detersuiaW
gang up on Israel. Ziorusm
Jew
IV 1975. >t as po**m
that those who try to dg
Amencan detegett- o scheme to make -seism
Zionisrr. .. -.^i
umount to gartering the I"
States m favor.: ****
It was ctearh *owb that W
end-goal of the Arsr ?k*i**
ilTiiaiBal '--""
expel Israel frorr tht I m*
Nations
And along the wa> *****
spokesmen asked -.ne *
tske not* thst the I :rff2fJ
pavs a daaproport^r.hu p*"
ir^hes^co of maintaining*
. \ aad ...- muit, fa^'.wl J
missions Womer. srbi D*c*
PLO nvn-e at Copanhag* *
M .. weigh ca1**"*'
aafBificsnoe of this tactor-
_________
...s.
asasssssi


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