The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00041

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
0eJewisii IFIIariidllann
Of Tampa
Volume 2 Number 1
Tampa, Florida January 4,1980
*> fr-3 Shochti
Price 35 Cent*
. ^RmEl"o>mpues
V4\TH COORT
RETURN* LAND
PRESS
NAR< AWIN^8
l] OF SADAT VISIT'
Cleveland Jewish News
iRftNJ MBJJS
HE \NILL TRY
HOSTAGES UMttR
ISLAMIC *Jv<>Tice_
Iran Leads Ten Top
79 News Stories
NEW YORK The Iran
:risis is one of the ten most
significant events that
iffected the cause of human
rights in 1979, according to
he Anti-Defamation
,eague of B'nai B'rith.
The "top ten" list in-
cudes Pope John Paul II's
/isit to the United States,
the signing of the Egyp-
tian-Israeli peace treaty,
ind the fall of Ugandan
lictator IdiAmin.
|THE HOLDING of American
Dstagcs by Iran is included in
selection because "hopefully
taught us to understand that
)se with just grievances may
metheless themselves be unjust
rants and because, having
jibernated following our Vietnam
jventure, this nation will hope-
illy react more vigorously to
iti-democratic terrorism
Broad."
[The nine other significant
kentsof 1979 are:
Pope John Paul II's visit to
be United States. "Because it
JCCFilm
Festival
i
| "The Apprenticeship of Duddy
avitz," a film starring Richard
eyfus, Jack Warden and
bseph Wiseman, will be shown
^turday evening, Jan. 5, at 7:30
in the Jewish Community
bnter auditorium.
In the film, from the moment
iddy graduates from high
hool he is driven by a desire "to
somebody." This is the story
Duddy's bitter triumph to
lieve wealth and recognition in
untreal in the late 1940's.
The film exposes the meek and
ifused ghetto Jews, the anti-
Tiitic French Canadians,
uveau riche Jews, and the
est mount Anglo-Saxons who
spire to keep them all in place.
Campaign Leadership
Sets Pace 52%
Ahead of 1979
If the present rate of con-
tributions continues to pour in
for the 1980 Tampa Jewish
Federation UJA campaign, the
Federation will realize its
greatest year ever, according to
campaign chairman Michael L.
Levine.
Levine based his assessment
on the fact that the Federation
has already received more than
$250,000 in commitments this
year.
"These pledges represent a 52
per cent increase over the same
pledges received last year,"
Levine pointed out, "giving our
campaign one of its most suc-
cessful starts in our history. Our
goal now is to maintain this
momentum throughout the
campaign."
Levine's words came on the
heels of a successful "Partnership
in Dialogue" forum held last
night at the Holiday Inn on
Cypress.
The symposium was the first
Community Leadership Forum
ever sponsored by the Tampa
Jewish Federation.
Participating in the session
were board members and the
leadership of Tampa's
synagogues, agencies,
organizations, and past and
present campaign leaders and
workers.
revealed that faith, regardless of
its language or sectarianism, is
both communicable and con-
tagious";
Argentina's release of
Jacobo Timer man. "Because in
the release of one brave man, we
are reminded of the anguish of
the thousands of political
prisoners still incarcerated
around the world, and in sharing
in the joy of one man's freedom,
we are encouraged to petition for
the freedom of those left behind";
The nonaligned nations con-
ference in Havana. "Because the
rabid anti-Semitism cloaked as
anti-Zionism and the pernicious
anti-Americanism cloaked as
anti-imperialism that emanated
from Havana were stark re-
minders to both Israel and
America of who their friends
and enemies really are";
The extension of West
Germany's statute of limitations
on prosecuting Nazi war
criminals. "Because culpability
for Nazism's war against the
Jews, like the anguish it has
caused, cannot be filed and for-
gotten";
Brezhnev's release of seven
Soviet Jews connected with the
Leningrad hijack case and three
Knesset Beats Move
To Legalize 'Bank'
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Knesset defeated by
a massive majority a proposal by the ultra-nationalist
Tehiya Party that Israel apply its law to Judaea, Samaria
and Gaza. Tehiya submitted a vote of no-confidence on
the issue and some Labor Party members joined with
the government coalition in defeating it.
Prime Minister Menachem Begin, replying for the
government, said Israel was committed under the Camp
David agreements not to change the status of the areas
during the transitional period. Begin said Israel had never
regarded Judaea and Samaria as "occupied" and it
retained its right to demand sovereignty over them in
eventual negotiations for the "permanent status of the
areas.
Soviet dissidents. "Because their
being freed teaches us that
although the Communists are
impervious to human rights, they
are pervious to this country's
most-favored-nation trade op-
portunities, a powerful weapon
we can use to further human
rights";
f The fall of Idi Amin.
"Because the fall of tyrants seeds
freedom";
0 The signing of the Egyptian-
Israeli peace treaty. "Because
Egypt, in breaking ranks with
her Arab brothers, and Israel, in
ceding territory vital to its
defense, have made daring and
momentous sacrifices for peace";
The suffering and starvation
of Indochinese refugees.
"Because their anguish is a
reminder that the propensity for
genocide is alive and well and its
new address is Southeast Asia";
The escalation of vandalism,
desecrations and verbal violence.
"Because violence in words and
deeds against property of racial
and religious groups had abated
for many years, its sharp
escalation in 1979 is an early
warning alarm that warrants
careful, concerned attention."
At the National UJA Conference in New York City, Irwin Field,
national UJA Campaign chairman (center), and Mort
Silberman, Florida Region chairman for UJA (right), are shown
congratulating Michael L. Levine on his acceptance of the
chairmanship for the 1980 Tampa Jewish Federation-UJA
Campaign.
Ball Would Punish
An 'Intransigent'Israel
By VICTOR M. BIENSTOCK
George W. Ball no longer holds
an official position in the United
States Government but he is a
ranking member of the small,
permanent establishment which
dominates American foreign
policy regardless of which party
is in power. Under Secretary of
State in the Kennedy and
Johnson administrations and a
former Ambassador to the
United Nations, Ball has closely
followed Middle East develop-
ments and has long been a
trenchant critic of Israeli policy.
He has been particularly severe
in his appraisals of Israel's
policies toward the Arabs and
has long advocated the Rogers
Plan, with minor modifications,
as the solution of territorial
issues. His viewpoint must be
accepted as, in large part, an
expression of the position of our
foreign policy establishment.
GEORGE BALL
WRITING in the January
issue of Foreign Affairs, the
influential quarterly published by
the Council on Foreign Relations,
Ball warns that American-Israeli
relations are "approaching a
Continued on Page 2-A


rw Jeaaa* Fiondm* of Tmm/m
George Ball's Formula:
Israel Must Shape Up Or Ship Out
Pagel
daaaaai tae ca tor aa
Arab-Israeli peace mti
thwarted and the
. -. -. -
tarn. taat faaare to
eapwsataagiBifiaea
of peace as the Maidfe East
highly atttimiata:
the Ineec States has nevw
ssace lie Eisenhower-Dofies
stood ap to Israel baa has
yaaded to the Israe*. hard j ac
peace He
THE ACTnTTlES ::
'. ?*-; laU w |- aanm
*a> I aer. i strong -
taaaasg aaaBeace aa am
larac*. rs_=
aaposed or \nmcaa freedom of
1 .: ----- ,-, ..-: -*.
- -i- .-- t -
A *5-,Tnp ':_:i-- :_-.*: r-*canaah, aa
actmaa cast he taaea ~e ever
- ----- --.-_- -.-- amaaal m
braocr. aac-;x a beaag qrackrj
haasm to the Israer. govers-
a to atanar dowa the Caaap
David at mi an oa tae Wrst
aaaaaau oa tae
Israea eaapaaaa ao oa Rcaaaaatj
Base caauwi are caustic
aad he cam a mi om fact
that Jar* 1969 t>k ha van
m tie Uaaaaa *
Lev. Eshkal
for peace. Israel won,;
to retara tae West
::
> -.--:. r..
aotnar B*_ narrates
ax at that taae a aaa
haaaaaa of tae Kharteaaa
Declaration barraaf any LaJks
xi Isra*--
THE CUMEST
the Is
Camp David implied
aad President CarUr clearly
. Ball declares, taat the
most inevitably lead to
ietf-determination by the Pales-
taaaaaa at the end of the tran-
aataoa period
Bal finds no merit in the
aigaunent that Israeli security
inquires retention of control of
the West Bank, iterating that
there is no such thing as a totally
secure border and that security
can be attained only through
development of peaceful
Friday. January <
WhaT Urrt
- -ything *
be advises, far
aafJer a eevere erosion of ni7v!!l|
al.1.nlf*asamndattg
to the iml|
* human
00 nuinUffl.
ad d*
oaAn^ncange.ero.n^1^
Jewa* rrwaiiuy. Ball v.|
that ordmaruy. such ^
frontaoon would be out of the!
quest mr n an esecuor. vear.
Federation Announce*
Two Missions
The Women 8 Division of the
Luted Jewish .Appeal will
sponsor a Studv Mission Feb 24
tfcmagh March 4
The Maaaoa
ad from the Lasted States aad
i** become a ward a kaadof
t --r aaaaal |aM ::'
Arserva '. f rae. ? aecenaeace oc
the Lutec States he chasms.
has sow .eacaed the poaat of

sj
r-.errsM Bal
ao hape whatever
. aaaal sj
of the West Baas
the core of aaa
Paaaaune issue whirr, z :^r= s
the kev to haataag peace
Isracaa for ea-
oa the We
wah
paachasas aad far
aaacaara Leaaaaa paaaa
aaaaaji
attacks that ahct
THE CVRBEVT pa
the Israeh ji n 1 aaaii
Project Trains Students
In Immigrant Absorption
B> L E EZER saaaai oi the cakaral dafierences
Lha greatest rtia rrirj ^parausg vaea rlaari frees the
- -.en oaaBaaBaataaa bbi
the aaaabar at? dim the cauntrr helped yoaag mothers ex
s 11 i 1 itaaaat aateres:
e '-be Miodie Lax BaX says- a
ai prcenote peace, partjeaaariy
betweea Israe. aad the .Arab
states, her as St Aaaenea neec
estahfash traaaarr re at maw
wah the .Arab states that are
1 ajaifk 111
1 the in laaiiaan life of
tae work! That a act tniatli
he *v as kaag as laraei is at
odds wa the Arabs.
FLTOHERMORE peace t
asoBBsar twraose we need to
keep the' Middle East out of the
orbit This requires
' between Israel and
-jae .Arabs but the avoidance of
chvBave issues that set Arab
states agamst each other and
ig to play one superpower
against the other
American support of the
B ptian peace efforts, he
contends, has contributed to the
polarization of the Arab world
and he warns that particularly
Susiata have bearfa-
heads it. the Horn of .Africa and
South Yemen. America must do
:ha*r possible to
taa r^-.j;3* aa thj
huoral of the iPersaaai Gulf
whsch a at the aaornent the
taai
is geared to
have not been
laraei before or who have not
ume there They
wai haav carat days exploring
aacaat laraei and absorbing
=K*dera laraei
The Maaaaa will be linazed to
-sen. Call the Tampa
Jewah Federation for details
ris z*z** ?f Fat tlHaa|
March 6 have been set for a
Yoaag Leadership Cabinet
to laraei Stopovers are
planned m Washington
Cairo Tha Mieason a limited"!
150 panidpanu. Attendance 1
the Nauonsl Young Leadmh
Conference. Feb 2 4-26
Viaahmgton. DC is requn
This is a chance to see Israeli
aaa p*fjp* oep^r:
At the same time, panianam
nll Meet yoaag leaders fi
across the coaatry. as w
counterparu as Israel and;
the world
Further information regardii
both these Missions will be!
ooaamg Contact the Ti
Jewish Federation office
refl
NEW TO TAMPA!
(All at discount prices)
Imported and American
'^a-^A^n-i
WE HA \E GO.SE SHOPPISG FAR A SEAR
WE'LL BE BACK
WITH \EW SPRIXG FASHIOXS
SEE YOU IX JAN 19G0.
HAPPY NEW Y*E.AR
GRu/A 6/4'a^
SPtt/e
The Jewish Community
is waiting for your ad.
ADVERTISE NOW
The Jeuish Floridian of Tampa
872-6063


^^^^^^^^^iu^itititititmm
m
* Florida's Largest
*
P.

*
*
ft
S
O
N
Sony Specialist *
"I
I
*\
TAMPA BArS ONLY EXCLUSIVE A
*\
m
The Consumer Center
46t6 EtsenhoartK Bouaerard
Tampa Phone o*5~4767
SONY DEALER
SALES SERVICE
rsom
!
I
ft DICK TURKEL STAN ROGERS *
T X


Friday, January 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 3
B'nai B'rith Men Operation Outreach
The B'nai B'rith Men's
tommunity outreach program
Fwas a very big success" ac-
cording to Dr. Jeffrey Miller,
Tampa B'nai B'rith lodge No.
1044 vice president and com-
nunity services chairman.
Fourteen people volunteered to
work on Christmas Day allowing
the people they replaced to spend
\,he day with their families."
Ron Pross, Skip Hirsch, Gil
.Veisman and Steve Levey
forked at the John Knox Village.
Jlen Runyan was assigned to the
lewish Towers, while Ben Gutkin
and Sheldon Wind worked at the
Methodist Place Apartments.
Roy Kaplan, Dr. Maurice Novick,
Dr. Bob Goldstein and Marc
Perkins, B'nai B'rith president,
worked at Senior Meadows.
Pauline Grossman, James
Stillman and Bill Hirschberg
I were volunteers at large.
I Marc Perkins said of his ex-
periences, "I spent the day
making beds, changing towels
and doing general janitorial
work. It was one of the most
rewarding days I've spent. I
know this sounds corny but the
people in these nursing homes
felt good knowing someone cared
enough to make their beds on
Christmas Day," Perkins con-
tinued.
Most of the people worked
from 1 to 5 on Christmas Day,
and the success of the project this
year has the lodge looking for
ways to expand the program for
next year. Dr. Miller and the
National Conference of
Christians and Jews executive
director, Robert Kittrell, worked
together on developing this first
year of the program.
Firestone to Speak at Schaarai Zedek
Florida Secretary of State,
|(Jeore Firestone, will be the guest
Ispeaker at the annual
I Brotherhood-Sisterhood dinner
(meeting of Temple Schaarai
Zedek on Wednesday, Jan. 9 in
[the temple social hall.
Cocktails will begin at 6:30
Ip.m., followed by dinner and the
address by Firestone.
Sisterhood members, spouses
jf Brotherhood and Sisterhood
Imembers and special guests are
ivited. Brotherhood members,
Idinner fee is included in their
lues. Reservations must be made
by Jan. 6 by calling the temple
office.
A member of the Florida
I Cabinet, Secretary Firestone has
[the constitutional responsibility
I of keeping the official records of
I the legislative and executive
I departments. Firestone also
uv
George Firestone
administers the state's
volvement with a number of
other affairs, including the state
library, historic preservation.
B'nai B'rith Youth
Hold Big Dance
At the 33rd annual Holiday
Vance sponsored by the B'nai
I'rith Youth Organization at the
lewish Community Center,
jsan Steinberg was named
^leph Zadik Aleph Sweetheart
lid Michael Bobo was named
I'nai B'rith Girls' Heart-throb.
[Other members of the AZA
jurt are Stella Wasserberger,
Lisa Tawil, Felice Garyn and Gail
Oliphant.
Members of the BBG court are
John Albert, Jeff Shear, Brad
Haas and Steve Schaffer.
Steinberg is BBG president
and Bobo is AZA president. They
served as dance coordinators
along with Steve Aranow.
Jewish Singles Hold
New Year Eve Bash
By MARK GOLDSTEIN
(Editor of the Mac Dill
Air Base Newsletter)
| The biggest and the best New
ar's Eve bash to be held
^ywhere in Tampa Bay's area
s hosted by the Jewish Singles
jb. Good food, cheer, company,
bil only the best in music
flighted the ending of a
ade and the beginning of a
era.
|So everyone didn't go through
i evening hungry, great snacks
ire available. However, to
lplement the snacks, party-
were asked to bring a
sher-covered dish (meatless),
[ a bottle of their favorite spirits
1 party favors.
[Speaking of spirits, the wit-
ting hour of midnight was
pped off with a champagne
ast.
[Because this was the best
ty of the year, only the best in
way of entertainment was
ovided. On tap was recorded
jsic by Eric Clapton, Chicago,
tnny Rogers, Lawrence Walk,
Israeli Chassidic Music
atival, Sytx. Theodore Bikel,
da Rondstad t and many other
names in the world of en-
ainment.
[information on future events
onsored by the Jewish Singles
available from Pate Pies.
program director of
Community Center.
the Jewish
-BUSINESSMEN-
Of Tampa
SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL NEWSPAPER
ADVERTISE IN
The Jewish Floridian
NOW!
872-6063
Have We Got an Event
For You!
Ths) Tampa Jawieh Community Center
on Saturday evening, Jan. 5,1960 at 7:30 p.m.
of fere you fun, with Richard Dreyf use and
Jack Warden In tho movie apoctacular
The Appreaticeahip of Daddy Hravitz.
OUR
Readers
wRite
.' /(. Hi
/ '
cultural affairs and the licensing
of private employment agencies,
charitable solicitations and
private security guards.
The Secretary of State also
qualifies candidates for state
office and has the responsibility
for conducting primary and
general elections.
UN Pushing
Israel Again
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The General Assembly
adopted a resolution calling on
Israel to "submit all its nuclear
facilities to inspection by the
International Atomic Energy
Agency" and urging all states
"to take all necessary measures
to prevent the transfer of
fissionable material and nuclear
technology to Israel which could
be used for nuclear weapons."
The resolution, sponsored by
Iraq, was adopted by a vote of 97-
10 with 38 abstentions. Israel and
the United States were among
the countries that opposed it.
ISRAEL'S Ambassador to the
UN, Yehuda Blum, denounced
the resolution as nothing more
than "a vehicle for the con-
tinuation of the anti-Israel
political warfare conducted by
the Arab states and their sup-
porters in the UN." He em-
phasized that Israel "remains
faithful to its commitment to
prohibit and prevent the spread
of nuclear weapons."
The resolution, titled "Israel's
Nuclear Armament," appealed to
all states "to put an end to any
cooperation with Israel which
may assist it in acquiring and
developing nuclear weapons."
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
This past month, our Jewish
Community Center hosted two of
our largest events of the year; the
Israeli Chassidic Music Festival
and our major fund-raising effort
of the year "Star Trek."
Approximately 600 people at-
tended each event. Needless to
say, they were both highly
successful.
The Israeli Chassidic Festival
was a joint effort of seven
agencies and synagogues,
coordinated by the JCC. It
brought to Tampa one of the
finest Jewish performing troupes
in the world for our enjoyment
and education and was attended
by one of the largestgatheringsof
Jews for a Jewish event ever held
in Tampa, with the exception of
Israel Independence Day. It
' shows what we can accomplish
when we work together. Thanks
to the leadership and staffs of
congregations Beth Israel, Kol
Ami, Rodeph Sholom, Schaarai
, Zedek. Chabad House, and
Tampa Jewish Federation for all
their work and support.
The JCC benefit performance
of "Star Trek" was a near sellout
thanks to you, as well. The $6,000
raised by this benefit will go
towards enabling our JCC to
continue to provide its fine
services to our community for
this year. The growth the center
has experienced over the past few
years is due to the support of all
of you and it will continue to
grow with your continued help
i and encouragement.
Our Jewish Community Center
is a strong, viable agency which
owes its "success" to all our
supporters and you each deserve
a very special "Thank you," for
helping us welcome 1980 as we
have this month. I cannot wait to
see what the next decade will
bring to our Tampa JCC.
Si nprrely,
SARA RICHTER
President
Jewish Community Center
Training for Project
'Share Yourself
Project "Share Yourself,"
initiated by Beth Israel
Sisterhood has now become a
community-wide project. The
project is designed to match
volunteers with elderly shut-ins.
It will put young, middle-aged
and older people in touch with
each other to provide friendship
and family in the celebration of
holidays and the experiences of
daily living.
Individuals, families and
groups are invited to participate
in this endeavor. Children of all
ages are welcome as well as
adults. Opportunities are
available for nursing home
visitation, adopting a grand-
parent or visiting the elderly in
their own homes. Transportation
can be arranged if needed.
All volunteers will be working
in close cooperation with the
already existing volunteer
program at Tampa Jewish Social
Service. A training session for
interested volunteers will be held
Monday, Jan. 7, from 10 a.m. to
noon at the Jewish Community
Center. For more information,
contact Betty Jo Blauner after
5:30 p.m. or Harriet Cohen,
Tampa Jewish Social Service.
sun cove realty
commercial residential
Investments *
RiAiiocr
AL LATTER REALTOR
Xm^fSy tw %M
3216 S Dais Mabry
S37-eM3
lJMT
Apple
Iti thv first thin*} you should bnOw?
'<' about persona computers.
Give your child a
head start on the
road to straight A's
with an Apple' II per-
sonal computer. An
Apple can help with
drills, generate new in-
terest in learning, and
stimulate creativity with
color graphics and musk-.
Come see. We'll show
you why an Apple II is a
student's best friend.
Also, come see
the Apple II
Small Business
System
land
1520 E. Fowler Avenue Tampa, FL 33612
(813)971-1680


Page4
The Jewish Floridian ofTampa
Friday
January 4,
*
Jewish Floridian
of Tampa
MV;
Offlc*
F1UCD K. SHOCHET
Editor and PubUahar
Haruterson Blvd
T*taptMm*rS-*IS
SUZANNE SHOCHET
BneutM Editor
CfntfSMcW
JUDITH ROSENKRANZ
AuocUiU Editor
(Laoal Ana,) ta Ymr-txm
SUBSCKIPTION BATES
Wdlw|Mlniii
Thr Jtwitf Knm iaii maintain, rx frv Hal Pvopl* nvotlvlnf Uw ptftr wHo haw wtacr1k*4
aVrvvlly an? aubarrtfcvrs mrouc* amaaamant with tna >lan F* <>! of Tampa afearafey C M ptr
rnru *-1uf ll (ram th*lr corn nsulion* tor aubor npUom 10 caor Anven* raWf w caol c
*iK~ ..|..n .ii*M *nlif, TtN- l-wlh rmrima*. wt tn* rwSvatMn
Friday, January 4.1960
Volume 2
15TEVETH6740
Number 2
Here's a Good Resolution
And what was your New Year's Resolution (s|?
To save money? (We don't have to look very tar
to find people, yes, Jewish people, too, who cannot
possibly live on their income in today's world. There
are some who do not have any income Social
Security only begins at a certain age.)'
Did you resolve to give more of yourself to your
community? To volunteer for one project in the
Tampa Jewish community? Inside this paper you
will read of a project begun by Beth Israel Sisterhood
and now undertaken by the Tampa Jewish Social
Service of having some people call someone else
daily. Do you know there are people who do not have
their phone ring even once a day?
Did you resolve to give this year to your
community what is really your share? And if you
have made a gift in the past, to pay that pledge
NOW?
Yes, Tampa is rapidly expanding. Not only in
population, but also in services through Social
Service, the Center, the Federation, Hillel School
and we can afford all these services if we ALL do so
Now, here's a good resolution .
I will not wait to be asked. I will volunteer and I
will give .1 will be proud of my community and of
what my community does for Jews throughout the
world.
A Long-Needed Move
The United Nations General Assembly finally
did something constructive. In the closing days of
the 34th General Assembly, after years of delay on
acting against international terrorism, the Assembly
adopted a convention outlawing the taking of
hostages.
The convention adopted by consensus last
month was first proposed by West Germany three
years ago. The Iranian crisis apparently had some-
thing to do with this lack of opposition to the
resolution, as diplomats realized that they, too, can
be" targets of terrorism, despite diplomatic im-
munity.
The new convention compels nations who sign it
either to prosecute hostage-takers or to send them
back to the country of nationality to stand trial. A
hostage-taker is defined as anyone who seizes
another to compel a state or government
organization to take some act. This no doubt covers
the terrorist activities of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Of course, the catch is that the convention only
applies to countries that sign it. But international
pressure can now be raised against those who refuse
to do so by the United States and other countries
who want to end terrorism. A stronger stand against
terrorism itself is still needed.
Tal Brodie Named Top Athlete
TEL AVIV (JTA) Muviv has named Tal
Brodie, the American-born basketball player, as the
Israeli athlete of the 1970s. Brodie, from Trenton, N.J.,
immigrated to Israel after participating on the U.S.
basketball team in the 1965 Maccabiah Games. He was an
all-American at the University of Illinois. Maariv said the
athlete of the world for the decade was heavyweight,
boxing champion Muhammed Ali.
THIS IS a fantasy for the new
decade of the 1980s. The facto
are these:
Long after the news was out
that the "students" holding the
hostages in the U.S. Embassy in
Teheran are not students at all,
but terrorists trained by the
Palestinian Liberation Organiza-
tion instead, Secretary of State
Vance in the final weeks of 1979
was still welcoming the proffered
assistance of Yasir Arafat to
intercede in the hostages" behalf.
This was not the first time that
Arafat had been at the source of
international mayhem only to
appear moments later as "dis-
interested negotiator" in the
cause of a humanitarian reso-
lution of the mayhem.
FOR THOSE who do no more
than read a good newspaper, it
will be recalled that Arafat had
staged the very same per-
formance in Cyprus and then in
Turkey long before his Teheran
gesture. And if this recollection
fails to ring a bell, there is
Arafat's statement in Teheran
immediately after the _
takeover at the begiimingj!
laat yew of the de3ef
1970's about the Western
perialist dogs, the Cb
infidels and the racist |^
who would soon be getting thejjl
Didn't Vance and rW,,|
Carter know? Didn't they^JI
stand that you can not hirtJ
sentiments such as these it j
same time that you offer yourelul
as "disinterested negotiator" 3
the lives of 53 Americans? tEI
likelihood is that they did Bui
also the likelihood is that, in th
dealings with the Arabs, as in u
case of everybody else, the hfl
pulse baa been to dismiss the!
known political and reiigioq,|
patterns of Arab behavior J
Zionist propaganda.
Well, now they know. And if I
they are not yet convinced about I
Arafat and his PLO, surely then
are convinced about the anti-l
weaternism of the Third World in
general.
PRESIDENT Carters effortil
at the United Nations during thel
last week of 1979 finally gave bin I
a good dose of what Israel hail
been suffering there for yean.
The brutal reality is that thel
United Nations is a battlefield for
the explosive exercise of growing I
Moslem power against the in-1
dustrialized nations.
The struggle there is not]
against Israel and Zionism. That I
would be too parochial, tool
miniature a campaign for tail
Third World to be waging. Undf
now, Israel and Zionism bavtl
been mere surrogates for the [
much larger war and the fa I
vaster stake.
Furthermore, the UN hail
afforded the Soviet Union the I
opportunity to side with tail
Third World at brutal expense to I
the industrialized nations and it |
no expense to itself.
THIS IS not to say that the |
Continued on Page 11
Question: After Begin, What?
HAIFA The constant
discussions here with respect to
Menachem Begin s possible
successor as Prime Minister have
their basis in various and often
conflicting motives. There are
those in the opposition who are
interested in shaking the boat,
and feel that every reflection on
Begins health or ability to
govern, will weaken the present,
Government. And there are those
who are just as intent on
maintaining Likud supremacy,
but feel that it is wise to have an
agreed-upon successor available
just in case Begin should step
down.
It is also no secret that Begin
has been faced with revolt from
within. The extremists, those
who feel he has betrayed his own
nationalist principles and
capitulated to the Egyptians,
have already withdrawn and
formed their own party, Hatehiah
(Revival). On the other hand,
some of his colleagues consider
him still too extremist, and are
surreptitiously conniving to have
him edged out of office. In this
they are of course receiving
indirect encouragement from the
Labor opposition.
IT IS open talk that the
chairman of the Jewish Agency,
Aryeh Dulzin, is the master mind
behind the internal efforts to
unseat Begin. Dulzin presents
himself as the spokesman of
world Jewry, and implies that
those overseas who supply the
funds are also against Begin
This kind of pressure is seriously
resented here, and the Jewish
Agency chairman's latest effort
to engineer what has been called '
Carl
AI pert
a Putsch exploded in his face.
The problem of an eventual
successor still exists. The most
popular prospect spoken of at the
moment is Ezer Weizman,
present Minister of Defense.
Every straw poll puts him at the
very head of the list of potential
successors. He has personal
charm, enjoys splendid relations
with the Egyptian leadership,
has an excellent military
background, is convivial and
possessed of a strong sense of
humor, a quality lacking in moat
Israeli leaders.
However, some who have
observed him closely for many
years are disturbed by a certain
boyish attitude that he has never
outgrown. He is said to be im-
pulsive and to make snap
decisions. He deals with matters
lightly. His defenders maintain
that his perpetual optimism and
his sense of humor give a
misleading impression of his true
character.
THERE ARE also ideological
difficulties. In contrast to Begin,
and the still dominant hawkish
Herat group in the Likud.
Weizman is considered a dove.
Not a dove like Abba Eban or
others on the left, but relatively
moderate in his attitude toward
settlement in areas of Judea and
Samaria and toward definition of
autonomy. He might be called i
"dawk".
Still, a political machine s|
always concerned for its owi
survival. In the event of Begun
exit from the stage, for say
reason, there is no one in thi
entire Likud constellation, who
commands widespread popular
appeal except Weizman. One cu,
run through the list of namssof
the various Cabinet member.-
competent, devoted, intelaeaa
men most of them but none yd
of the calibre one expect*
Prime Minister. It takes yaw*
exposure to the public inposaw
of responsibility to develop
knag* and the qualities uat |
attract public support.
The Likud people havs ha.
such exposure for only two yea*
and are poor in "personauuei
Tbey have not had the
portunity to develop names m
those in which the Labor *
position is so rich. Names W
Shimon Paws. Yigal A1W,
Yitzhak Rabin. Abba Ehsfc
Chaim Heraog and others reffl
many years of publk ssrvxs
during whfch these men tm
built up a reservoir of public raw
and confidence-
Hence, if it has its eyes fa*
on the elections to be heW
two years from now. Likud wow
appear to have no cho)Ct r~".
than Weizman to lead 'is,1**" "
the competition for electors'*
support. At the same time, it w
not be denied that other facto"
economic, military and Pp'Jt**'
also have a way of influencn"
voter decisions


riday. January 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
~- r nrr ri"i iin'i niT
Page 5
Bonn Chancellor
He's Urged to Make Visit to Israel Soon
BONN (JTA) Erik
Humenfeld, a member of
the Bundestag who is
>resident of the German-
Israel Association, has
tailed on Chancellor Hel-
lut Schmidt to make his
jng postponed visit to
Israel as a demonstration of
[he Bonn government's re-
fection of oil blackmail and
|ts support of a negotiated
>lution of the Middle East
konflict.
He also urged all
Western governments and
)litical figures to stop
)ressuring Israel to nego-
tiate with the Palestine
liberation Organization.
I SCHMIDT was invited to Israel
1975 by the then Prime
linister Yitzhak Rabin. The
fivitation was renewed by Prime
linister Menachem Begins
government in 1977. But the
Chancellor has held back, saying
lie would go to Israel at a time
vhen such a visit would be most
Appropriate to the peace efforts in
the area.
Blumenfeld, who is also a
nember of the Parliament of
Europe, said that 1980 will be a
pear of "special significance" for
3erman- Israeli relations and
galled on the Federal Govern-
oent to support Israel at every
Itage of the difficult peace
process with Egypt.
He also urged that Israel and
Sgypt receive massive economic
bid financial support in a
European framework. In that
inflection, he proposed legis-
ation that would make it im-
issible to apply the Arab boy-
lott to trade between Israeli and
European firms. "The Federal
Upublic should do everything it
an in order to promote Israel's
rade with West Europe and at
|he same time encourage German
firms to invest in Israel," he said.
BLUMENFELD was critical
kf the media in both Germany
nd Israel. He said inaccurate
nd onesided reports were largely
sponsible for the deterioration
t>f relations between the two
Duntries. Finally, he said the
federal Republic should strongly
jpport the preservation of
Jerusalem as a united city,
>ting that Berlin is an example
jf the difficulties encountered in
i divided city.
Meanwhile, different view-
:>ints on the Middle East were
expressed by two members of a
German delegation that just
returned from Beirut where they
met with PLO Chief Yasir
Arafat.
Dieter Schinzel, a Social
Democrat member of the Bun-
destag and the European Parlia-
ment, called on the Common
Market countries to recognize the
PLO as the official representative
of the Palestinian people, to
support the establishment of a
Palestinian state, to condemn
Israel's settlement policy in the
occupied territories and "to put
on diplomatic pressure in order to
create the basis for peace talks."
ANOTHER member of the
delegation, Lenelotte von Both-
mer, also a Social Democrat,
claimed to have gotten the Im-
pression that Arafat "recognizes
Israel's right to exist." But none
of the delegation members was
able to quote Arafat directly in a
way that could be interpreted as
a deviation from the PLO
covenant's demand for the
liquidation of the Jewish State.
The German delegation was
originally announced as a
Bundestag delegation with par-
ticipants from all three parties in
Parliament.
CHOLESTEROL
FREE
BRIGHT DAY
DRESSING.
WE'VE
OUTCRAFTED
KRAFT.
larriet L. Cohen, senior social
vorker with Tampa Jewish
Social Service, has been
Elected president and
lembership chairperson for
\he Hillsborough County
}hapter of the Florida
\ssociation of Health and
iocial Services (FAHSS).
lohen served this past year as
\he education and training co-
ordinator. The FAHSS pro-
vides staff members of health
id social welfare agencies the
chance to participate in edu-
cational and training oppor
[unities.
Bright Day dressing is proof that
you don t have to be Kraft to make a
great salad dressing. Just crafty.
Bright Day gives you great taste but
has less fat and fewer calories than
mayonnaise.
And because of our specially
patented formula* here's a fact no
mayonnaise or Miracle Whip can
top. Bright Day has absolutely no
cholesterol.
And today with
all the imitations and
additives, its nice to
know someone is
making improve-
ments by taking
ingredients out.
We think that .
was pretty crafty
of us.
AVAILABLE AT:
Boogaarts
Grand Union
Great Value
Grocery Warehouse
Pantry Pride
Pic-N-Pay
Publix
Winn Dixie
US Paccn. >7MM7
I im.-d Food Industrie*. Inc Balnmorr MJ ZIIH
.W.V.V.


rage b
Th* Jiwish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, January 4,19^
News in Review
Five teens from Congregation Rodeph Sholom went to the
United Synagogue Youth International Convention held in Port
Chester, NY., from Dec. 23-27. Tampans attending this multi-
faceted convention included:Steve Gotler. Stuart Levine.
Michael Gold. Marne Beaterman and Julie Sandier.
The theme of the convention in which over 1.000 youths
from all over the world
The theme of the convention (in which over 1.000 youths
from all over the world participated) was "Higher and Higher
Making Jewish Prayer Part of Us." The first couple of nights,
the youths were the guests of the Forest Hills Jewish Com-
munity Center, and the latter part of the trip waa spent at the
Rye Town Hilton Inn in Port Chester. In addition to attending
various seminars and discussion sessions, one night featured a
very special program. The theme of this evening was "Lower
East Side Festival," when they dressed up as, and re-lived the
experiences of their ancestors, including coming through a mock
port-of-call such as Ellis Island. All in all. thia sounds like it was
a marvelous and most stimulating experience for those who were
lucky enough to attend.
Our heartiest congratulations to Rhode Karpay (Mrs. Joel),
who recently won the Palma Ceia Women's Golf Association
Match Play Tournament. Most surprising was the fact that
Rhoda really entered this tournament by a fluke she hap-
pened to be at the club on the day they were Qualifying for the
match play, so, since she qualified, she entered! In this type of
tournament, the top qualifiers play each other scoring hole by
hole (meaning that one's handicap figures into the play on every
single hole which evens up the players). And Rhoda came out
the top winner of the entire championships! She was awarded a
trophy and a $100 gift certificate to the ckib's pro shop, for her
victory. We just love hearing about personal triumphs such as
this and hope that more of our raadsn will write or call in about
their experiences.
"Wishing my daughter. Miady Beth Berg, a happy and
healthy sixth birthday with all my love always and forever
Daddy." And also from Poppy and Graadma Rath Berg. "We
too wish you the best of birthdays with all of our love."
Tomorrow Blanche Schwaru. sister of Haaaaa Sander, will
arrive for a two to three weak visit in Tampa. Blanche hails from
New York City. She will be staying at her sister's home on Davis
Islands during her vacation We hope you two have a wonderful
visit together
Once in a while we make a mistake and leave someone's
name out- When celling you about Congregation Kol Ami's
second annual Religious School service, we inadvertently
omitted teacher Miriam McManoa'a name. We're very sorry.
We were happy to get an update by Commander Cy Wooif
on some of the many activities of the Jewish War Veterans and
Auxiliary (Albert Aronovfcj Post No. 373). Over the last few
months, the Post has been very much involved n support of the
national resolution confronting the cults. Such involvement took
place Nov 18 in front of the County Courthouse in Tampa, com-
memorating the death of those innocent children that died in
Jonestown. Guyana As part of this support. Cy sat out the vigil
and was interviewed by television, radio, and newspaper people-
Post members mark your calendar. On Jan. 26 at 2 p.m..
this organization will present an American flag to the Tampa
Bowling Association, in full ceremony This event will be held at
Major League West Bowling I anew on Dale Mabry The event is
the beginning of the city Championship Bowling Tournament-
Congratulations to several young people in our Jewish com-
munity Brad Haaa. Mike Barkia. Triah Lvy. Beth Oaavaoa and
Saaaa Staiabatg recently were named to compete in the Hills-
borough county-wide "Math Bowl" at L'SF These youngsters,
all part of Plant High School team, placed second in the county.
while one of the students. Brad Haas, had the highest overall
score of all high school students of the 15 participating high
schools public and private. Brad is a member of AZA and
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
In addition, four of these students have been named by Plant
High School to partaripate in the Florida Foundation of Future
Scientists Symposium Mk Bart is. Brad Haas. Trish Levy
and Saaaa Steiaberg will be leaving for Gainesville in January
to meet with top students from all over the states
Congratulations on your past achievements, and we hope to
hear more exciting things from you all in the future.
Recently, the children of the Religious School at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek presented a delightful Chanukah
program followed by a delicious latke breakfast. This joyous
e%ect was performed for the parents and for the other students
oi the Religious School Much credit certainly goes to Jean
Ahsaeatr. educational director 0/ the Religious School, and to
the dedicated and enthusiasts: teachers of the school for this
creative and enjoyable program which was full of singing
, and skits
Meat EUaa and Robert Wolf, who moved to the CarroUwood
ige area ;ust three months ago from Bridgeport. Coon. EDen
at oraiisliy from Bridgeport, and Robert is originally from New
VocsaWwW- issuer reiyisaw for Refiecto Inc. ia com
pam^QaVt builds flight sawaaaasct for the Air Force the Navy
and far wan comsnercia! us*) ESWn is very icvohred at
aXear work specifically in the area of secuor citizens. She
worst/for Dale Jeaawea at the JCC as --ass aide, and around
wil be .rkmg-far Bs.v Area L* ceo
as x ca 1 the aw a laa ave
passed Ceogregatior t Ami. where EUec 3 jo a
her i the S **rhood. la addtioa, they are active members
of the CarroUwood Swan Club and enjoy 1
events, aackedng the symphony. the opera.
welcome you to Ta
Rabbis Contact Ayatollah
NEW YORK The Union of
Orthodox Rabbis of the United
States and Canada has sent a
cable to the Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini urging him "as a deep
believer in religious ethics" to
immediately free the 50
Americans held hostage" in
Teheran, "thereby alleviating the
pain and suffering of both the
hostages and their respective
families "
The cable, signed by Rabbi
Moshe Feinstein. president of the
organization, and Rabbi Simcha
Elberg. chairman of its ad-
ministrative committee, noted.
"The Union of Orthodox Rabbis
of U.S.A. and Canada, the oldest
and most authoritative rsbbinic
organization in the Western
Hemisphere, is a non-partisan,
non-political body. We are
strictly a religious organization
which has been established to
ensure that our people, the
Jewish nation, follow the in-
struction given to her by our
Hob/ Torah."
JERUSALEM Rabbi
Abraham Hirshberg of Mexico
has flown to Teheran and hopes
to be allowed to conduct services
for the Jews who are among the
American hostages held in the
U.S. Embassy.
Hirshberg told Kol Yisrael
radio in a telephone interview
from Teheran that he was in
touch with the Iranian
authorities who "invited" him to
Teheran and who would deter-
mine precisely when he would go
to the Embassy He said he did
not know bow many of the
hostages were Jewish. Four
Christian clergymen were allowed
to conduct lengthy services for
the hostages on Christmas Eve.
Kol Yisrael said Hirshberg.
bom in Poland and formerly a
rabbi in Chicago and Montreal,
reached Iran "via Jordan and
Svria."
NEW i'ORK Funeral
services were held Dec. 25 for
Asher Perm, an author and
former city editor of Tk* Jeuish
Daily Fom-ard. who died at
Mount Sinai Hospital at the age
of 71. Born in Gaisin. in the
Ukraine. Penn arrived in the
Inked States in 1935 by way of
Cuba where in 1932 he founded
and edited Cuba's first Jewish
weekly. Ha: oner Lebn. His
father. Sholem Pennes. who was
prominent in Cuba's Jewish
community, had brought his
family to that country in 1924
Before joining the Fom-ard in
1963. Penn was the news and city
editor for the Yiddish-language
paper. Tht Day-J*u.tsh Journal.
where he also functioned as the
paper's United Nations
correspondent
NEW fORK About 250
persons attended a ceremony
placing a new menorah on a
synagogue in the Riverdale
section of The Bronx. NY. in
response to the vandalism of two
outdoor Chanukah menorahs
Dec 23.
Rabbi Avraham Weiss, of the
Hebrew Institute of Riverdale.
said a menorah on the roof of the
synagogue, which is now being
built, was thrown over the roof
Sunday night and splattered
onto the street. He said a second
outdoor menorah two blocks
away was thrown onto the nearby
Henry Hudson Parkway
Vveiss said it was decided to
place a new menorah 00 the
igogue as i sta lenient of
aa^aaaaaJeasn rtiOT."
-nan
atttB*. serving ua the Ututed
Nations forces in Lebanon. Lt.
Col Alfred Gom. was sentenced
by a Jerusalem magistrates
court to 15
for smuggling weapons into
Israel in the service of the
Palestine Liberation
Organization and other illegal
activities. He was deported Dec.
24.
Israeli authorities reportedly
wanted a quick settlement of the
affair which has soured relations
with the UN Interim Forces in
I^banon (UNIFIL). Gom, who
was arrested by Israeli security
forces last June 15, was found
guilty of arms smuggling,
assisting the enemy, and having
contacts with foreign agents.
He was apprehended as a
result of what appeared to be an
accident. But the circumstances
indicated that he was under
suspicion even though he was
allowed to cross the Lebanese
border into Israel in a car later
found to be carrying a small
arsenal of weapons intended for
the PLO.
JERUSALEM Some 6.200
housing units will be built in the
administered territories within
the next year, the Ministerial
Settlement Committee of Israel
decided in Jerusalem. The
decision is subject to budgetary
approval by the Treasury which
is expected in a meeting between
Finance Minister Yigal Hurwiu
Agriculture Minister Ariel
Sharon and Construction and
Housing Minister David Levy.
Only Raanan Weitz, co-
chairman of the Jewish Agency
Settlement Department, and
Justice Minister Shmuel Tamir
voted against the plan. Weitz
argued that very little
preparatory work was done
regarding the financial aspects.
^^^waaaBn)
TEL AVIV Labor MK
Shoshana Arbelli-Almoslino hag
asked Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman to investigate the
circumstances that led to the
alleged snub of the Commander-
in-chief of the Israel Navy when
the Israeli missile boat Tarshiah
passed through the Suez Canal
last week. Arbelli-Almoslino. who
is a Deputy speaker of the
Knesset, said the failure of the
Egyptians to receive Navy
Commander Zeev Almog with
full honors amounted to a breach
of protocol.
The Tarshiah arrived at Port
Said on Dec. 18 enroute to Eilat
community 1

I.
Calendar
Friday, Jaw. 4
(Condlelighting time 5:28)
Saturday, Jaw. 5
JCC Film Festivol 7:30 p.m. "The Apprenticeship of Duddy
Krovitz"
Sowoay, Jan. 6
Congregation Schaarai Zedek Forum 10 a.m. Congregation
Rodeph Sholom Sisterhood (All community welcome) -
Congregation Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood Board Meeting 1030
am Congregation Schaarai Zedek Sisterhood noon
University of South Florida B'noi B'rith /Hillel Foundation Area
Board Meeting 7 30 p. m. "Shore Yourself" training program -
10 a.m.-noon at the JCC, sponsored by Tampa Jewish Sociol
Service
TvtsaWy, Jm. |
Hodossah Bowling Ameet Hadassah Board Meeting 8 15 pm.
- home of lilli Heller Tampa Jewish Sociol Service 'Industrial
Employment Advisory Committee Meeting noon
Congregation Beth Israel Sisterhood Board Meeting 12:30p.m.
ORT (evening chopter) Board Meeting Hillel School Board
Meeting 7 30pm
sMNMiy, Jan. t
JCC Food Co-op- lOo.m. to 12.30 p.m. AZA/BBG Mee' tog JCC
7 30 p m. Notional Council of Jewish Women Generol
Mee'mg and Hannah G Solomon luncheon Ameet/Hodassoh
Meeting -8pm Congregation Kol Ami Men's Club
Congregation Rodeph Sholom Men's Club Board Meeting
Congregation Schaarai Zedek |omt Sisterhood Brotherhood
D.nner 6 30 p m Speaker George Firestone Florida
Secretary of Sta'e
Tiarsaay, Jot. 10
Congregation Beth Israel Lecture "Our Jewish Roots" "oon
ORT (e.ening chapter) Bowling Tampa Jewish Federation
Women j Division Board Meeting noon University of South
da B'noi B'r.th Hillel Foundation Coffee- 2p.m.
Jot. 11
[Candle g*vgi,m5 33
Satwrwy.jM. 12
Altf Evening '30pm ,mt' O' '"
- Faaeru- sjdersh'P 3oup 'c *
Se-awY.JOT. 13
i\ Rod'
da
SCHZFTY Dinner (30pm
5r-0:om v\er Club mee aU '**
BnoiBr.- Founodhon Booel B>


January 4. 1980
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
age
~)r. George s 'Cure'
Jewish 'Defenders' Hit Anti-Semites
By EDWIN EYTAN
[rIS (JTA) A
2t "Jewish Defense
inization" has been set
in France with the
zed aim to combat anti-
itism by both political
is and "physical ac-
" After lengthy pre-
Lions it struck openly
Some 200 JDO
)ers, many wearing
>rcyclist helmets and
/ing steel bars, burst
[a meeting of the "New
It"
MEMBERS told the
\h Telegraphic Agency that
had originally come to
ss their "indignation" and
i clash broke out when the
ig's security men tried to
them out using anti-
lie terms. Both sides agree
the clash lasted about 15
BB during which the Jewish
sts had the upper-hand.
as suddenly as they
1, at the sound of a whistle,
iisappeared just before the
arrived. They took with
I their helmets, their sticks
Ven their wounded who were
fivately nursed, avoiding
hospitals and possible
I identification.
Jewish defense organizations of
one type or another have always
existed. Generally, they sought
'either to defend Jewish areas or
institutions or, like Rabbi Meir
Kahane's Jewish Defense
League, to play an active
political role by the use of
physical violence.
THE NEW French organization
is set up differently. First,
because it wants to act both
through political and physical
means, secondly, because it is
backed according to some of
its members by a number of
prominent communal per-
sonalities and organizations, and
thirdly, because most of its
members are not jusV "wild
youths," but respectable
members of the professional
classes doctors, lawyers and
upper level executives in their
late twenties or thirties.
The Jewish Defense
Organization was created, ac-
cording to some of its members
contacted by the JTA, about six
months ago. Its main purpose is
"to fight anti-Semitism in France
by a mixture of political action
and physical violence. Our attack
against the New Right meeting
had a double aim: We wanted to
scare them physically and show
them that if they are toughies we
can be tougher than them. But
we also wanted to brand them
politically as neo-Facists and
give them the publicity they
want to avoid," a committee
member told JTA.
The man is in his thirties, tall
and athletic looking. He stressed
his point by frequently using the
expression "Doctor's pledge"
and explained "I don't always hit
people over their heads
generally I try to cure them." He
is known as "Doctor George."
HE SAID that "trying to break
up their meeting is not our final
aim. Our task now is to inform
public opinion of who the New
Right members are and what
they want. For us physical
violence is part of a larger role:
provoking the moral and political
conscience of the country in
which we live, France, into some
sort of action to stop them before
it is too late."
"Most of the people in the JDO
are like me," the informant said,
"people with active, normal
professions who feel that the
traditional Jewish establishment
is not doing enough to combat
anti-Semitism or show its
support for Israel. Generally, all
they do is vote resolutions and
send them to the press. We feel
that something else is needed.
"A few months ago we started
organizing ourselves. The people
who joined us come from all sorts
or organizations, from the ex-
treme right to the extreme left.
We have former Trotzkyists as
well as former Betar people. All
we have in common is our desire
to do something concrete to
combat anti-Semitism in
France," he said.
THE JDO discovered to their
surprise that several respected
members of the Jewish establish-
ment were prepared to back
them. Among them is a young
Jewish deputy, Jean-Pierre
Bloch, the son of LICA president
and former minister Jean-Pierre
Bloch. The younger Jean Pierre-
Rloch, who was elected to
Parliament on a prc-Giscard
ticket last March, refused to
confirm or deny that he is the
JDO's honorary president. The
president of the Jewish Medical
Association in France, Dr.
Hubert Dayan, also refused to
comment on JDO members'
claims that he and his
organization back them "to the
hilt."
'nergy Crisis
Seen as Potential 'Disaster'
By GIL SEDAN
JSALEM (JTA) -
t and the Knesset are
ig to tackle Israel's
problem which Energy
K Yitzhak Modai has
ed as a potential
er." Energy conservation,
ng a plan to ban the use of
i cars one day a week, was
ve been discussed by
i Minister Yigal Hurwitz's
dc cabinet," but the
decided to defer the
) a general Cabinet
said he would ask the
for special powers to
! the use of energy. Under
; rules, the State is obliged
electricity to any client
ess of wastage.
tarry D. Shapiro
ractfc Physician
Suite 4
North Dale Mabry
Tampa, Florida
24 HOUR
URGENCY SERVICE
113-962-3608
MODAI APPEARED at the
first meeting of the Knesset's
new Energy Committee, headed
by MK Micha Harish of the
Labor Alignment. The new body
was formed by members of the
Finance Committee and the
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee, who have taken a
special interest in energy.
Previously, energy matters were
handled by four separate com-
mittees.
In his presentation, Jodai said
the recent meeting of the
Organization of Petroleum
Exporting Countries in Caracas
created new obstacles for Israel's
purchase of oil.
He said the inconclusive
outcome of the latest OPEC
meeting resulted in the disin-
tegration of the world's oil price
structure. The instability of oil
prices on the free market makes it
even more difficult than in the
past to calculate the feasibility of
potential oil transactions, Modai
said.
HE SAID the trend toward oil
transactions between govern-
ments was a negative
development for Israel because
most OPEC countries will not
deal with it. Modai said there
may be an increase in the supply
on the spot market in Rotterdam,
but prices there are almost
"Dr. George" claims that the
JDO has over 400 active
members prepared to participate
in future actions and cells
throughout France. "Our attack
>CAN
*2
SIS?
BSHn

Well care for your parents
when they can oo longer be
u independent as they'd
like. Skillfully, profession-
ally-lovingly. Home Health
Aides, Homemakers, Live-
in Companions, each care-
fully chosen for you, esch
responsible to
ourfu" re
N'uning
Supa
can help.

impossible to predict. The spot
market price has been con-
siderably higher in the past than
OPEC prices.
Modai said that by 1964 Israel
will obtain about 40 percent of its
electricity from coal-fired power
stations. The first of that kind
will start operating in Hadera
within a year.
Modai emphasized that the
gravity of the energy situation
must be brought home to every
Israeli. Therefore, he supported
the proposed one-day-a-week ban
on private cars even though past
experience has shown that
savings of fuel are only marginal
Arnon Quits as
Bonds Solon
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Michael Arnon, president and
chief executive officer of the
Israel Bond Organization for the
past six years, is returning to
Israel to assume the post of
chairman of the Israel Securities
Authority, which is equivalent to
the American Security and
Exchange Commission. He will
continue to serve as a consultant
to the Israel Bond Organization.
Under Amon's leadership, the
international Israel Bond drive
achieved record results by in-
creasing its annual rate of sales
every consecutive year. Total
sales of Israel Bonds and other
financial instruments are now
nearly S4.5 billion.
ARNON ASSUMED
leadership of Israel Bonds early
in 1974, when Premier Golda
Meir released him from his post
of secretary of the Cabinet
because of the importance the
Israel government attaches to
the Israel Bond program as an
instrument for the economic
development of the country.
879-6144
CANTOR
Aallabl tor aovor \f\ tiotot cn'y. Mad)
yaara Citiklll oxpartanc*. SMutlM tenor
MpaM* ot omMOtlrn MortcM,
Totah reading (oxporQ. DioUnoo no
Hllll writs bo* CML. Tho Jowtsti
Flortdtan. P.O. BW OlSm Mtomi, Flo. SJ101
against the New Right is just the
start of our operations. We in-
tend to go on," he said.
IN RECENT days, the JDO has
tried to keep a low profile. The
New Right organization, a study
and research group for a new
European organization, has
lodged formal complaints with
the District Attorney charging
assault, bodily harm and
claiming that 20 of the people
present in the meeting hall at the
time of the attack, including a
five-year-old girl, were injured
during the clash.
New Right president Alain De
Benoist, a philosopher and staff
member on France's respected
publication "Le Figaro," said
that the meeting was discussing
"ways to combat totalitarianism
and dictatorship" when its
members were attacked.
The Jewish organizations, with
the exception of the International
League Against Racism and
Anti-Semitism (LICA), headed
by Jean Pierre-Bloch. have also
kept silent. The French police
have started an official in-
vestigation and JDO members
believe that its attitude will be
directly linked to that of the
major Jewish organizations. Up
till now these have kept silent.
Lila Polur Bat Mtzvah

Lila Polur, daughter of Ruth
and David Polur, will be
celebrating her Bat Mitzvah at
Congregation Schaarai Zedek
'tomorrow morning.
Lila is an eighth grade honor
student at Berkeley Preparatory
School. She is an active member
of both the volleyball and track
teams and of the school drama
club. In addition, Lila enjoys
painting.
Celebrating this special oc-
casion with Lila will be numerous
family members and friends
their children, Nancy, Justin,
Jonathan, and Thomas; uncle,
Ben Gastel and his children
Ariella and Jonathan from New
Jersey; aunt, Mrs. Sidney Simon
and her children Joy, Carol, and
Doreen from Tulsa, Oklahoma;
from New York, aunt and uncle,
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Polur;
cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Jack
Applebaum from Long Island;
fnjpNis from Potomac, Maryland,
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Fischler;
from Westchester friends, Mrs.
David Haft and her children
Danie and Rachael and Mrs.
including: her brother Louie (16 Eugene Kaplan; and from
years old) and her sister Shari (15 Syracuse, New York, Ann Stark.
years old); great aunt and uncle
Mr. and Mrs. Sam Gastel and
great aunt Rose Simon, all from
Rochester, New York; also from
Rochester, aunt and uncle, Mr.
A kiddush luncheon following
services and a dinner party at the
Tower Club on Saturday night
will be given by Ruth and Dave
and Mrs. Bernard Gastel and / in their daughter's honor.

-NOTICE-
This Space Is Reserved
For You
Adv9rtl89 In
The Jewish Floridian
Call 872-6063
m
mm,

hoda L. Karpay
Broker Associate
Avoid "tsoriss"-
Dm/ with a Prol

SUN BAY CORP.
Realtors
IN FLA. CALL COLLECT
1(813)877-6011
OUT OF STATE TOLL FREE
1(800)237-2077


Page 8
ThfJfwuhTlaridia* ofiTampa
Frida
y. January 4
Daf Yomi
Torts Civil Damages
By RABBI THEODORE BROD
Dedicated to my son The Lawyer:
This discussion of Jewish law on torts (civil wrongs for
which the law requires damages) is based primarily on two
sources.
The first, the foundation of all Jewish Law, is the Torah (the
five books of Moses),
The second is the Talmud, which contains discussions and
interpretations of the Torah.
There are actually two Talmuds; the Babylonian Talmud
and the Jerusalem Talmud. These were drafted in Babylon and
Palestine respectively, and contain the discourses of the rabbis
and teachers in those areas.
The Babylonian Talmud records discourses which took
place over a period of 700 years from approximately 200 years
B.C.E. to 500 years C.E.
Jewish sources usually date occurrences as "Before the
Common Era" (B.C.E.) and "Common Era" (C.E.) rather than
as B.C" or "AD." which refer to the life of Jesus.
The Talmud is made up of two parts: the Mishnah and the
Gemara.
The Mishnah is a codification of rabbinic interpretation of
the Torah, which is generally credited to Judah Ha-Nasi (170-
219C.E.).
The Gemara is a further interpretation of the Mishnah.
Jewish law is strongly rooted in precedent. As a result,
growth or development of new law may be limited, because it
must follow the words of the fundamental codes.
The Torah contains an absolute prohibition against change,
"you shall not add to the word which I command you, neither
shall ye diminish from it, that ye may keep the commandments
of the Lord your God which I command you." (Deuteronomy 4:2)
The ancient laws as stated in the Torah were adjusted to the
needs of a changing society by interpretation. The law was
gradually readjusted by the rabbis through adherence to its
spirit, rather than amending its immutable letter.
The Talmud is a religious document because it is the law of
a state that is a theocracy.
God is the source of all Jewish law and so governs the
people by their consent. "And he (Moses) took the book of the
covenant, and read in the hearing of the people; and they said:
"All that the Lord hath spoken will we do, and obey." (Exodus
24:17)
To obey the law is to obey God's will; to disobey is to
transgress. Crimes against the individual are also crimes against
God. Therefore, they may require both forgiveness on the part of
the victim, and, also, religious expiation.
Jewish law divides cases into two categories: monetary
tdinay-manonot) and capital (dinay nefashot).
The Jewish laws seek to restore the victim's status (as
nearly as possible) to what it was prior to the commission of the
offense. The offender is ordered to make restitution by paying
the victim actual and / or punitive damages, in accordance with
the assessment of the injury inflicted. Note that crimes of
assault, theft and rape are regarded and classed as monetary
cases.
Talmudic law is concerned with motive as well as action,
with unenforceable attitude as well as with behavior that can be
regulated.
The test can be said to be not only, "Was it legal?" but also
"Was it right?"
The concern is not only with the deed but also with the
character of the culprit. The humanity and tragedy of the
malefactor are recognized no less than the wrong suffered by the
victim.
For example: If one steals a beam from his neighbor and
builds it into a home he is erecting, the owner of the beam may
not demand the return of the original beam. To put the thief to
the expense of tearing down the home he is constructing might
deter him from repentence. He must pay only its monetary
value.
Imperceptible damage is not in the category of legal
damage:
Abaye said, "We have it on tradition that if a man has
defiled his fellow's clean produce, which had been carefully
guarded by the owner from contamination, by throwing a dead
rat on the heap of washed corn or among the gathered olives or
grapes, thus making it prohibited to be eaten by a priest
(Kohune) or even pious lay-people would not buy such produce.
If the perpetrator of this damaging act should die before he is
brought to trial, his estate is not liable, for there is no visible
change in the produce which has been thus deteriorated, the
estate can claim that all is still as it was."
In cases where direct damage is done by man, he is con-
sidered forewarned (Mu-Ad) whether he acted intentionally or
inadvertently whether awake or asleep, he is liable for all his
acts. (Raba-Kama26a)
If the result of damage could be fores.3en by man, such as
lying down to sleep next to objects that he might break in his
sleep, then he is liable. However, if the objects (vessels)
damped were placed next to him after he fell asleep, he is not
liab1 ,'iabbat Shalom!
(To Be Continued)
Jewish Legislators
They Embrace Top Black Cause
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Jewish members
of the House of Represen-
tatives continue to demon-
strate their support for
Black causes despite the
setback in Black-Jewish re-
lations that stemmed from
the resignation of Andrew
Young as U.S. Ambassa-
dor to the United Nations
and the surge of some
Black leaders towards adu-
lation of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization.
In the drive by the Congres-
sional Black Caucus for a
national holiday in honor of the
late civil rights leader Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr., the House
rejected its three attempts in
recent weeks to establish a fixed
date suitable to the Caucus.
However, on each occasion an
overwhelming majority of Jewish
Congressmen voted with the
Caucus. Their support on the
birthday issue compares
favorably with the record they
set in support of Black causes
prior to the Jewish-Black rift
that opened in mid-August.
WHILE considerably fewer
than one-third of the House
membership joined in co-spon-
soring the Caucus' legislation for
King's birthday, more than half
of the 23 Jewish Congressmen
then in the House early in the
session were sponsors.
The 13 were Reps. Richard
Ottinger (D., N.Y.), Benjamin
Rosenthal (D., NY.), Gladys
Spellman (D., Md), Theodore
Weiss (D., N.Y.), Elizabeth
Holtzman (D., N.Y.), Henry
Waxman (D., Calif.), Marc
Marks (R., Pa.), Martin Frost
(D., Tex.), James Scheuer (D.,
N.Y.), Sidney Yates (D., 111.),
Benjamin Gilman (R., N.Y.),
Howard Wolpe (D., Mich.) and
Abner Mikva (I)., 111.), who has
since resigned to become a U.S.
Circuit Court judge.
The first of the three battles on
the birthday proposal came Nov.
13 when, as the Leadership Con-
ference on Civil Rights has
pointed out, the sponsors sought
to use a special expedited pro-
cedure available for bills deemed
non-controversial.
SUCH BILLS can be con
sidered without amendment and
passed if two- thirds of the mem-
bers present vote for it. That day
252 members voted for the bill,
four short of the number needed
to pass it. In that roll call, 17 of
the 22 Jewish Congressmen then
in the House voted for the bill.
They were Frost. Gilman. Dan
(bttuama
ISAACSON
Blindta F 87. of 4801 Gray view Court.
Ui-d Kriday, Dec 21 He was a 42 year
resident of Tampa and was a retired
clothing merchant He wa a U S Army
Veteran of World War I and a memberof
UM Ciiii^rcgatlon of Rodeph Sholom He
is survived by his wife, Helen, one
daughter. Mrs Hannah B Fried Of
Tampa, one son. Herschel D. of
Atlanta, one sister. Tlllle Feldman of
Baltimore; tight grandchildren, and
tin- kM.iI grandchildren B Marlon
Reed Funeral Home had charge of
.11 rancemente.
MARKS
I hmald, 56, Of iWI Mlllbruok. were held
at the H Marlon Reed Hyde Park
Chapel Dei 11 llabbl Martin I Han
doers, and Cantoi William Hauben of
itodeph Bholom Congregation, of-
in i.iti-d with Interment in Myrtle Hill.
Memorial Park I'reparatlon by
d She! Emea A naUve of New
York, he has lived in Tampa 14 years
Mi Id i member <>( Kodeph
Sholom Congregation; he was mer-
i hand! u Roebuck
for 24 years and Ull .l.-ran of World
\s..r II tervlng in UM IS Navy Sur
are hi ifi Barbara Marks,
Tampa, three children Lor) Marks
Reading, I'a Jim Marks and Larry
both of Tampa, his mother.
Mrs I."in- Marks, New York, and a
Mrs Doris Graham. Studio City.
(alii II Marlon Heed had charge of
arrangement*.
Glickman (D., Kans.), William
Green (R., N.Y.), William Leh-
man (D., Fla), Elliot Levitaa
(D. Ga.), Marks, Ottinger.
Frederick Richmond (D., N.Y.),
Scheuer, Stephen Solarz (D.,
N Y.i, Spellman, Waxman,
Weiss. Lester Wolff (D.. N.Y.),
Wolpe and Yates.
TRYING AGAIN, the spon-
sors proposed on Dec. 5 to set the
celebration annually on the third
Monday of every January, in-
stead of King's birthdate Jan. 15
as proposed in November. Seven-
teen Jewish Congressmen voted
for it. They were Beilenson,
fiilman, Glickman, Green,
Holtzman, Levitas, Marks,
Ottinger, Richmond, Scheuer,
Solarz, Spellman, Weiss, Wolff,
Wolpe, Lehman and Yates. Op-
ponents were Gradison and
Kramer. Necessarily absent''
were Frost, Rosenthal and Wax-
man. Frost was recorded as
paired against the proposal.
But Rep. Robin Beard (D.,
Tenn), arguing that a national
holiday on a week-day would
mean loss of S3 85 billion in
wages and productivity 8tp
it would cost the nation noth
if King s birthday .1
celebrated on the third SunrUJ
each year and offered an am.
mend to the passed bill to ,i
effect. The Beard substituu.
approved 207-191. Eighty]
who voted for the K1
celebration switched their
to Sunday.
Opposing the Beard
ment were 14 Jewish Cong
men Gilman, Green, Hoi
man, Lehman, Marks Cttin
Richmond, Scheuer," SoL
Spellman, Weiss, Wolfe Wj
and Yates. Favoring it
Beilenson, Glickman, Gr
Kramer, Levitas. "Necu
absent" were Frost, 3
Waxman.
IN THE compilation
America's Black newspaper.
lishers of voting on 18 prev
issues of concern to Blacks in"]
House in the first eight roontb
this year, Rep. PaulFindleyi
111.) voted with the caucus on j
In the three King bii
battles, Findley opposed
Caucus each time.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portioni
Vayehi
VAYEHI Jacob was 147 years old and he felt his endi
near. He had lived for 17 happy years in Egypt. Now he<
Joseph to him, and Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh.]
"My son," he said to Joseph, "swear to me that when It.
you will not bury me here in Egypt, but that you will carry met
Canaan, the land of my fathers, and bury me in the cavewb
they lie."
Joseph wept and took an oath to do his father's bid
Then Jacob blessed Joseph by blessing Ephraim and Manaai
"For I consider your sons as my own, and they will sharei
your brothers in the blessing of our people.
Now Jacob called for his other sons. "Gather round," I
said, "and receive your blessings." And he gave a
blessing to each of them.
When Jacob died, Joseph and his brothers fulfilled hist
They bore him to the land of Canaan and buried him in the (
of Machpelah. Afterward, Joseph and his brothers returnedt
Egypt-
Joseph lived for 110 years. Before he died, Joseph aaidl
his people: "God will surely remember you and bring you to th
land which He promised to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob-1
(Genesis 47:28-60:26)
(The recounting of the Weekly Portten of Ibe Law Is extracted m* mmI
open "The G rapftic Htstery ef ftie Jew ith Heritage." edited by P. **tim I
Tsamlr, SIS, published by Sbeneeld. The vebjeae is available at ;S Maeal
'-ant, New Ye**, N.V. itj. Jesea* Schlana is president ef Ike axMil
di s tr I bo tins the volume.)
Religious dinectORy
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL
2UI Swan Avenue 253-0623 or 251-4275 Rabbi Nathan Brf'l
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily: morning oel
evening minyan Beginners' Talmud Session following Saturd>|
morning services
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue
vices: Friday, 8 p.m
evening minyan
251-4215 Rabbi Samuel Moiling* *H
Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily: morning artj
CONGREGATION KOI AMI
885-3356 Allan Fox, President e Services: first and third Fridayof|
each month at the Community Lodge, Waters and Olo, 8 p.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM (Conservative,)
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Rabbi Martin I Son**'',!|
Hazzan William Hauben e Services: Friday, 800 p.m.; Saturday.
a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15a.m.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK (Mom)
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 e Rabbi Frank Sundheim Servicwj
Friday, 8 p.m.
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewish Student Center (USF),
Apis e 9716768 or 985 7926
Fr
3645 Fletcher Avenue, Co"9
Rabbi lazor Rivkm Robb''
e Shabbos meal folio
Werde Services: Friday, 6:30 p.m. vnwww
vices "\ Saturday, 10 a.m. Kiddush follows services
Bagels and Lox Brunch, Room 252, University Center 11 o.m
B'NAI B'RITH HltlEl FOUNDATION
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida, l3422^|
Circle, Apt I 21 988-7076 or 988-1234 e Rabbi Mark Krom X"\I
Sunday Wl
programs to be onnounced
Brunch 11:30am
Shabbat Service*


The Jewith Floridian of Tampa
SHOP SUNDAY 12:30 TO 5:30 MONDAY 9 A.M. TO 9 P.M.
MIAMI RUG
CUTS PRICES
THE
NEW YEAR!

MIAMI RUG CUTS IT!
Wecutthecarpetl
We cut the price!
We cut your carpet
right In our Warehouse
And because of our 22-
store buying power, we
not only cut the cerpet
... we cut the price.
Becauee Miami Rug
nee the largest
Inventory In Florida,
chancee are good, we
have your carpet In
stock. No mlddlornan
to pay. We pees ths
ssvlngs on to youl
Savu During Miami Rug's
Fabulous Event!
You always eeve MORE
st Fleride'e oldest end
lergeet cerpet dielsrl
And nowLyou save
even MORE during this
gigantic annual uM
Ntrndredaand
hu nor 9cs of rolls of
famous brand
cacpattno, every yard
PERFECT QUALITY ...
available In every
Imaginable color and
pattern. Buy now and
eeve during our first
Mg sale of the year!

r;
V

January Carpet Sale
Prices Include Expert Installation Over Luxury Rubber Padding!
Our 56th January Sale1
Famous Make
Nylon Shags
694
as ye.
8
Hilary i
I Essy-to-maintam nylon mini
shag lor maximum llocx
beauty O Beautiful mutti-
colored tweed effects
Our 56th January Salt1
Evans-Black Heavy
Nylon Splush
1155
Our 56th January Sale!
Evans-Black
Sculptured Shag
92
a. re.
Inetalted over
iu*ury rubber peddtog
Beautiful ni-lo nylon shag
that's long wearing
Decorator multi-colors tor
every decor.
Our 56th January Sale!
Milliksn Fine
Nylon Carpal
129.*
Our 56th January Sale'
Gulistan Heavy
Nylon Plush
994
eye.
Our 56th January Sale!
Vogue "Value-Rated"
Luxury Splush
1051
luxury i
e Great Wear and a super
look at big savings O Easy-to-
care-for O Choose Irom a
dozen fashion colors
Our 56th January Sato/
Vogue "Value-Rated"
Anso Nylon
14l
wawyi
O Smartly styled lor elegance
and super wear O Exotic
muted colors lor every decor
O Sort luxurious pile
Our S6th January Sale'
Gulistsn Heavy
Saxony Plush
1555
luxury rubber |
O A carpet so luxurious and
soli yet practical that it wiH
give years of beauty and
1 Stunning array ol
fashion colors
luxury i
O Luxurious, long wearing hi-
lo nylon carpet e Deep pile
for that luxury feel O Fashion
colors for every color scheme
luxury rubber passing
S A luxurious splush that's
ultra-soft and ultra beautiful
O 5-year wear guarantee
O Gorgeous colors.
hunaryi
O Made of Trevtra Star
Polyester, one of the toughest
fibers made e ideal tor heavy
traffic areas O Choose from
many decorator colors
Do-lt-Yourself SPECIALS!
Indoor-Outdoor Otoftn carpet. WhBe it lasts
1M
Carpel OMy
Turf-Uk* Or aaa Carpet ou
Hurry m now. A greet buy! av^
Carpel or*,
Nylon Carpet ass
In patterned prints Built-in rubber pad
Carp* only
January Sale Priced!
Room su. Carpet Remnants
50% OFF!
A fantastic selection of cerpet remnants ideel tor
rooms or tor wall-to-wall met easting AM colors, al sues all
patterns, el perfect qoawty Hurry In tor beat eefcsctton
since 1924
Florida's otdeat and largest T^carpet chain
miami rug co.
S 1.000 Instant CrMH
purchanra
lo
Othwcri
rcrwMpktra
to Kilt any budoM
ItMnn iMOMia
TAMPA
. Date Mabryf.3 Ska 8.17* 7OS040
iMon.thruFri.tiH9
Sat. 0 to 6:00
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
LARGO
1300 n Mleeourt Ave., Phone 588-281 I
Mon thru Fri. til 9
Sat. 9 to 6
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
ST. PETE
4424 34th St North. Phone 527-8471
Open Mon. Thru Fri. 'till 9
Sat 9 to 9:00
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
SARASOTA
f 325 Temterm TraiMUS 4t|958-7717
- Open Mon. & Fri. till 9
Tues, Wed., Thurs. & Sat. 9 to 6
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
I
NEW PORT RICHEY
500 US 19 North. 848-4889
Mon. & Fri. 9 to 9 PM
Tues., Wed., Thurs. & Sat 9 to 6
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
Other Showrooms in Miami Ft Lauderdele Pompeno Beech W. Perm Beech Boca Raton Orlando Oaytona Beech Tampa. St Pete Saraaola. Largo. New Port Richer


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, January
The Jewish Community Center benefit performance of the movie "Star Trek" had a full house
Over $6,000 was raised by this project, chaired by Leah Davidson and Sharon Mock.
On the eighth day of Chanukah, eight participants of the kosher lunch program at the Jewish
Community Center stood by the menorah as Barney Anton gave the traditional blessings. The
candles were lit each day with the number of participants and number of candles increasing
daily. Some of those chosen to stand with the menorah during the week commented, "This is
the first time I've lit Chanukah candles since my children left home," according to Marilyn
Blakely, site manager for the kosher lunch program. Pictured (left to right) are: Yetta
Antonoff, Danny Steinberg, Sadie Gregg, Sophie Newman, Florence Krug, Fanny Noim, Jack
Antonoffand Barney Anton. (Photo by Charlie Mohn)
Special Events Planned for Seniors
Free diabetes, glaucoma and
hypertension screenings will be
offered to anyone 60 or older at
the Jewish Community Center in
mid-January.
Although actual testing will be
done on Thursday. Jan. 17, from
8 a.m. to noon, anyone who wants
the diabetes test must pre-
register in person at the JCC on
Monday, Jan. 14, between 11:15
and 11:45 a.m.
SQUARE DANCE DEMO
The Senior Citizens Project of
the Jewish Community Center
will be taking a field trip to the
square dance demonstrations and
lessons put on by the Tampa
Recreation Department on Jan.
11 at the Tampa Bay Center.
The Senior Project van will
leave the Jewish Community
Center at 9:30 a.m. and return at
12:30 p.m. on that date.
To reserve for a seat on the
van, register at the front desk at
the JCC and pay the round trip
fare before Tuesday, Jan. 8 at 5
p.m.
MAKE NEW FRIENDS
"For many reasons, mature
adults find themselves wanting
to make new friends, but having
no way to do it," says Marjorie
Arnaldi of the Senior Citizens
Project. "Thafs why we've got
the "Social Circle.' "
Every Thursday from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m., people 60 and older can
come together to socialize, meet
new people in a meaningful way,
plan day trips together, enjoy
table games and other activities.
There is no charge for the event,
which is held weekly at the Senior
Lounge in the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
Recently, two of the par-
ticipants discovered they had
lived in the same neighborhood in
a northern city years before. That
was a delightful connection for
them, says Arnaldi.
Anyone 60 and older in
Hulsborough County to
to bring a bag lunch and enjoy
the day.
SENIOR WEEKEND
Join hundreds of senior
Floridians for a two-day
statewide senior weekend in
Orlando, sponsored by the 39'ers
of the Jewish Community Center
of Central Florida.
Leave the JCC in Tampa at 9
a.m. on Sunday, Jan. 27; meet at
Sea world's Hawaian Pavilion for
lunch, fashion show, and en-
tertainment; enjoy "Florida
Festival," the new shopping
village at Seaworld; stay
overnight at the Diplomat Inn
after an evening of wine and
cheese parties and live en-
tertainment at the Altamonte
Civic Center.
Monday, enjoy a community
breakfast at Orlando's JCC,
stroll through Winter Park's
"Little Europe," visit the Tiffany
Glass Works, Rollins College's
Cornell Art Gallery, the historical
"Walk of Fame" and the Shell
Museum at the Musicana Supper
Club and watch the "Fabulous
50s" show before returning to
Tampa.
Registration form and
payment must be in by noon,
Jan. 10, to the Jewish Com-
munity Center. Price* includes
overnight accommodations,
Seaworld lunch. Florida Festival,
wine and cheese party, Monday's
breakfast and lunch. Sunday
night dinner and incidentals are
on your own.
Pre-School Parents'Activities
A "Doing Museum" is planned
for Feb. 3 through the co-
operation of the pre-school
parents.
Jane Spector, chairman of the
project, asks that the following
articles be saved and brought to
Barbara Richman at the JCC for
use during the "Museum":
Orange juice cans, pine cones,
old socks, shoe boxes, baby bath
tubs, clean kitty litter boxes, or
plastic dish pans.
Jeanne Mendola of the De-
velopmental Center will speak on
learning disabilities and how to
identify potential learning
problems in pre-school children
on Monday, Jan. 14, at 7:30 p.m.
at the JCC.
Then is no charge for this
program which is open to the
entire community. All parents
are urged to attend and bring
guests.
Booths and booth chairmen for
the "Doing Museum" are- Joan
Goldstein, Sarah Cohen, Sandy
Nelson, Donna Greco, Laura
Kreitzer, Carol Weinstein, Celina
Forrester, Elaine Broverman,
and Jean MacNamara.
Fencing
Classes
The Jewish Community Center
will offer a fencing class
beginning Tuesday, Jan. 8.
Instructor Jack Esponoza, a
fencing master who was a star
pupil of Julio M. Costello, has
taught St. Petersburg's Fencing
Club, Tampa Fencing Club.
Centre Esturiano Fencing Club,
and is a member of the National
Fencing Coaches' Association of
America.
Pees: members, S20 10-week
session; non-members. $30 per
10-week session.
The Tuesday evening classes
will be held from 6 to 7 p.m.
For further information, call
Pate' Pie* st the JCC.
Free popcorn and soft drinks were included in the
Robbie Zamore and Steven Fink els tein are in line fiw!
refreshments.
Prior to the movie showing, Alice Rosen thai. JCCpngnm
president, and Sarah Richter, JCC president, distributtdi
prizes. The numbers were selected by Danny Richter t
Matthew Richter (kneeling).
(Photos by Charlie Mi
V
The Tampa Jewish Community Center has announced thit
of the second session of its School of Music. The school kj
to aspiring musicians of all ages for beginning and pi
classes on all orchestral instruments. The school is vtryl
to have on staff professional instructors from the Fiona]
Coast Symphony. For further information, call the lej
Jewish Community Center and ask for Pate Pies.
On the first day of the Winter Day Camp at the JtwM
munity Center, "The Curious Trunkets" performed for m
school children. In the morning, Bob Powers *"
Bailey-Powers conducted an improvisation and porW.
workshop for the three to six year olds. Working }
trout*, the children man able to craata their own sum
make their own costumes. Shown enjoying thi m
performance of The Curious Trunkets are (wft to rim
Bentley.'Laurie Albano (teacher), Anthony Albano.
Jacobson. Leslie Feldman. and Evan Finktlttn* I
Audrey Havbenstocn)


, January 4,1980
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
^!^^
Yoga Class At The JCC Continues
I Jewish Community Center
yoga classes Thursdays at
|p.m.
classes stress transfor-
pn through body awareness.
Lse your physical and mental
tension as the body is made more
flexible; stretching and toning
through yoga postures and
breathing exercises. Prepare the
body to experience a sense of
deep relaxation.
Fees are: members, $25 per
eight-week session; non-
members, $30 per eight-week
session.
For further information, call
Pate Pies at the JCC.
Sunday Fun Resumes Let jcc Work
At JCC Jan. 6
second session of the
3a Jewish Community
kr's "FUNDAY" will begin
[more this Sunday, Jan. 6.
your favorite teachers will
ack along with some new
> schedule is as follows: 12-1
creative cooking. 12-1
creative mime/drama,
p.m. creative
mime i drama. 1-2 p.m.
creative cooking. 2-3 p.m. arts
and crafts. 2-3 p.m. open gym
(free). 3-4 p.m. dance.
Everyone is welcome to share
the good times. All classes will be
10 weeks. Fees are: members,
$12.50, non-members $15.
For further information.
Pate Pies at the JCC.
call
For Your Benefit
Are you a newcomer to the Bay
area? Or perhaps you have been
here for awhile and want to "Get
acquainted with the JCC."
In either case, let the Jewish
Community Center open doors
for you. For further information
call Muriel Feldman, 872-4451.
wmmmmmwM
Ed Maley of the Florida
School of Judo and holder of
the professor rank in Judo
(one of six professors in the
U.S.) will conduct a free class
for women designed to im-
prove general physical fitness
and introduce the basics of
self-defense. Assorted exer-
cises from the martial arts, as
well as many stretching and
movement exercises, will be
utilized. The class will meet
Tuesday and Friday mornings
from 9:15 to 10 at the Jewish
Community Center. Contact
Danny Thro for more infor-
mation. JCC members only.
o Mindlin
UN: A Fantasy for the 1980's
Continued from Page 4-
World nations are unaware
terrible price you pay for
friendship. Afghanistan
this story explicitly. But
the UN arena has afforded
fhird World nations is ideo-
support from Moscow at
political advantage to
low and at no cost to itself.
Third World is not
anistan only. There is, for
Iple, Vietnam that in the end
its own shots.
kat we must come to reckon
[is that both Russia and the
World are the only power
that enjoy any advantage
Consequence of the existence
the United Nations
li/mi ion. This includes the
nations, the robber baron
smerates, many of which
have no real political
rity except for the UN.
far as Russia is concerned,
Iwe must come to reckon
I that Russia and tho
ab Heads
old They'
abdicated
jsponsibility
5TON- Dr. Elias El-
executive director of the
Lebanese Information
in Washington, has
that the Arab heads of
It their meeting in Tunis
bonth, "abdicated their
ksibilities toward the
and smallest member of
lb) League (Lebanon) by
it with the burden of the
Elian struggle at the ex-
Y the security and peace of
anese people."
letter published in the
Science Monitor, El-
noted that at Tunis
it Elias Sarkis of
finally broke his long
about the Palestinian
ihment on Lebanese
lty and demanded at the
of the Arab heads of
that they withdraw
tuth Lebanon and stop
kg attacks on Israel, or
|g responsibility for
i acts inside Israel."
irek observed that "The
lise which finally was
[by the summit is in fact
Bement of the PLO view:
kstinians will keep their
[bases in the south, but
halt temporarily their
>n Israel from the area.
tata
over ,
Lion ot
Soviet Union are not
synonymous. Russia is merely
the pivotal Communist state
power in a confederation of
captive multi-ethnic states, many
of which would prefer to be in-
dependent of Russia and its
Soviet Union hegemony many
of which frankly fear cultural
genocide at the hands of the
Soviets.
FURTHERMORE, while
Russia is essentially a western
power clamoring for techno-
logical equivalency with the west,
other of the Soviet states run the
gamut from outright Oriental to
Middle Eastern and Moslem
whose interests are about as far
removed from this Russian
ambition as are their ethnic roots.
What the Soviet Union has
been able to do in the United
Nations arena better than it
would be able to do outside of it is
to maintain a balance between
these two seemingly contra-
dictory objectives.
It enjoys its base of power over
these subjugated states, par-
ticularly since all too many of
them at the UN have the
cosmetic appearance of indepen-
dent nationhood with indepen-
dent voting rights in essence,
the UN thus serving as official
sanctification of enforced Soviet
dominion over others. At the
same time, the Soviet Union
scrambles for technological
ascendancy. Reckoned in these
terms, the UN gives it the op-
portunity to exploit the best of
two worlds.
SO MUCH for the facts. Here
is the fantasy for the new decade
of the 1980s:
Now that we in America, as a
consequence of Iran, are perhaps
for the first time inaugurated into
the meaning of the UN as a
growing tactical weapon against
western civilization, it will strike
us to remove ourselves from it
indeed, to consider having the
UN remove itself from our midst.
Opponents of this viewpoint
will argue that the Soviet Union
would immediately offer itself as
the new site for a successor
"world peace organization," thus
leaving us on the periphery of
international exchange. But that
is highly unlikely, given that the
UN in New York today is one of
the most complex intramural
espionage agencies on the face of
the earth, which the Soviets
would surely not want in the
shadow of the Kremlin.
Similarly, it is inconceivable
that any of the western indus-
(1 nations, including
. .11 iiuir .' in I" lill the
One* stripped ol its
Cameliit costume and seen for
what-*, latin tha-Uli. no one else.
with the possible exception of
ever-meddlesome France, will
care to supply the UN with a new
wardrobe.
AS FOR the Third World, it
will be unable to proffer the
prestige necessary for such a
stage and disinclined to supply
the funds. Furthermore, were
these not sufficient reasons for
the Third World to keep hands
off, there is always the
question of the incestuous real-
politik such a new United
Nations location would surely
pose. There, the Third World
would be performing only for
itself and therefore without the
international theatrical effect
that is its primary objective.
Given a successor body to the
present United Nations under
any circumstances, the shakeup
will force a reorganization of
member nations according to
more realistic power patterns
than presently exist, the power
patterns laid down after World
War II, and this will be bound to
work against the Soviet Union,
which can be relied upon to
struggle to retain its old position
of primacy against Third World
clamorings for a greater share of
it.
This will force Russia, not the
Soviet Union but Russia, to make
a choice between its role as a
western nation, and all that that
implies to the Third World, and
as the pseudo-paternalistic linch-
pin in the larger Moslem-Oriental
complex of the Soviet system.
WHAT ALL of this will mean
is a scramble for Third World re-
alignment. At "worst." it will
mean no successor organization,
leaving the Third World isolated
from its warfare arena in New
York, and the Soviet Union
without a stage on which to
produce its endless self-aggran-
dizing scenarios.
What does this fantasy for the
1980s also envision? It foresees a
basic struggle against such a
possibility by the continuing
western civil libertarian bleat in
the suicidal cause of humanity
suicidal because the Soviets and
the Third World have only
contempt for what the civil liber-
tarians talk about anyway.
The fantasy has staged a
rebuttal to the bleat in which it
contrasts the Soviet Union's
constant threat to veto United
Nations sanctions against Iran as
a means of gaining the freedom of
the American hostages with the
Soviet Union's invasion of
Afghanistan.
THE FANTASY takes delight
in the notion that not even a civil
libertarian will be able to argue
himself out of that political
contradiction.
But then, this is all only
fantasy.
-----^
NOW!!! OPENINGS FOR:
ENGLISH TUTORS, TRANSPORTATION VOLUNTEERS,
SENIOR PROGRAM VOLUNTEERS
START fl new
MBIT
TChmteer
^printed with ptriitiion of
Hx\t(ptiY CbiJity,^. Ccr\mrTTmrit.
r. A I 1 TODAY: TAMPA. JE
WISH SOCIAL
872 M51
SERVICE

v
.


The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, Janmr
NOW
A flood tide of emigration from areas of Jewish
distress, into Israel and our communities.
MORE
The human upheaval of working
toward peace in Israel.
THAN
300,000 people in Israel striving to rebuild
their communities and renew their lives.
EVER
Growing needs and spiralling costs challenge
local community resources.
Make your pledge today.
YOU are the Jewish lifeline.
Q
a
Tampa Jewish Federation
2808 HORATIO STREET
TAMPA, FLORIDA 33609
(813) 872-4451


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EGBQ4KOWK_S8WLVJ INGEST_TIME 2013-06-06T01:38:44Z PACKAGE AA00014305_00041
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Page 8
a
Th* Jewish Flaridia* otTumpo
Fridy. Janua
*>4.|
Daf Yomi
Torts Civil Damages
By RABBI THEODORE BROD
Dedicated to my son The Lawyer:
This discussion of Jewish law on torts (civil wrongs for
which the law requires damages) is based primarily on two
sources.
The first, the foundation of all Jewish Law. is the Torah (the
five books of Moses).
The second is the Talmud, which contains discussions and
interpretations of the Torah.
There are actually two Talmuds; the Babylonian Talmud
and the Jerusalem Talmud. These were drafted in Babylon and
Palestine respectively, and contain the discourses of the rabbis
and teachers in those areas.
The Babylonian Talmud records discourses which took
place over a period of 700 years from approximately 200 years
B.C.E. to 500 years C.E.
Jewish sources usually date occurrences as "Before the
Common Era" (B.C.E.) and "Common Era" (C.E.) rather than
as "H.C" or '" A.I)." which refer to the life of Jesus.
The Talmud is made up of two parts: the Mishnah and the
Gemara.
The Mishnah is a codification of rabbinic interpretation of
the Torah, which is generally credited to Judah Ha-Nasi (170-
219C.E).
The Gemara is a further interpretation of the Mishnah.
Jewish law is strongly rooted in precedent. As a result,
growth or development of new law may be limited, because it
must follow the words of the fundamental codes.
The Torah contains an absolute prohibition against change,
"you shall not add to the word which I command you, neither
shall ye diminish from it. that ye may keep the commandments
of the Lord your God which 1 command you." [Deuteronomy 4:2)
The ancient laws as stated in the Torah were adjusted to the
needs of a changing society by interpretation. The law was
gradually readjusted by the rabbis through adherence to its
spirit, rather than amending its immutable letter.
The Talmud is a religious document because it is the law of
a state that is a theocracy.
God is the source of all Jewish law and so governs the
people by their consent. "And he (Moses) took the book of the
covenant, and read in the hearing of the people; and they said:
"All that the Lord hath spoken will we do, and obey." (Exodus
24:17)
To obey the law is to obey God's will; to disobey is to
transgress. Crimes against the individual are also crimes against
God. Therefore, they may require both forgiveness on the part of
the victim, and, also, religious expiation.
Jewish law divides cases into two categories: monetary
Idinay-manonot) and capital (dinay nefashot).
The Jewish laws seek to restore the victim's status (as
nearly as possible) to what it was prior to the commission of the
offense. The offender is ordered to make restitution by paying
the victim actual and / or punitive damages, in accordance with
the assessment of the injury inflicted. Note that crimes of
assault, theft and rape are regarded and classed as monetary
cases.
Talmudic law is concerned with motive as well as action,
with unenforceable attitude as well as with behavior that can be
regulated.
The test can be said to be not only, "Was it legal?" but also
"Was it right?"
The concern is not only with the deed but also with the
character of the culprit. The humanity and tragedy of the
malefactor are recognized no less than the wrong suffered by the
victim.
For example: If one steals a beam from his neighbor and
builds it into a home he is erecting, the owner of the beam may
not demand the return of the original beam. To put the thief to
the expense of tearing down the home he is constructing might
deter him from repentence. He must pay only its monetary
value.
Imperceptible damage is not in the category of legal
damage:
Abaye said, "We have it on tradition that if a man has
defiled his fellow's clean produce, which had been carefully
guarded by the owner from contamination, by throwing a dead
rat on the heap of washed corn or among the gathered olives or
grapes, thus making it prohibited to be eaten by a priest
iKohane) or even pious lay-people would not buy such produce.
If the perpetrator of this damaging act should die before he is
brought to trial, his estate is not liable, for there is no visible
change in the produce which has been thus deteriorated, the
estate can claim that all is still as it was."
In cases where direct damage is done by man, he is con-
sidered forewarned iMu-Adl whether he acted intentionally or
inadvertently whether awake or asleep, he is liable for all his
acts. iBaba-Kama 26a)
If the result of damage could be foreseen by man. such as
lyinj' fown to sleep next to objects that he might break in his
sleep then he is liable. However, if the objects (vessels)
dam. i liab Haba-Kama 27b)
boat Shalom!
(To Be Continued)
Jewish Legislators
They Embrace Top Black Cause
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Jewish members
of the House of Represen-
tatives continue to demon-
strate their support for
Black causes despite the
setback in Black-Jewish re-
lations that stemmed from
the resignation of Andrew
Young as U.S. Ambassa-
dor to the United Nations
and the surge of some
Black leaders towards adu-
lation of the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization.
In the drive by the Congres-
sional Black Caucus for a
national holiday in honor of the
late civil rights leader Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr., the House
rejected its three attempts in
recent weeks to establish a fixed
date suitable to the Caucus.
However, on each occasion an
overwhelming majority of Jewish
Congressmen voted with the
Caucus. Their support on the
birthday issue compares
favorably with the record they
set in support of Black causes
prior to the Jewish-Black rift
that opened in mid-August.
WHILE considerably fewer
than one-third of the House
membership joined in co- spon-
soring the Caucus' legislation for
King's birthday, more than half
of the 23 Jewish Congressmen
then in the House early in the
session were sponsors.
The 13 were Reps. Richard
Ottinger (D., N.Y.), Benjamin
Rosenthal (D., N.Y.I, Gladys
Spellman (D., Md), Theodore
Weiss (D., N.Y.), Elizabeth
Holtzman (D., NY.), Henry
Waxman (D.. Calif.), Marc
Marks (R., Pa.), Martin Frost
(I).. Tex), James Scheuer (I).,
N.Y.), Sidney Yates (D., 111.),
Benjamin Gilman (R, N.Y.),
Howard Wolpe (D., Mich.) and
Abner Mikva (D., 111.), who has
since resigned to become a U.S.
Circuit Court judge.
The first of the three battles on
the birthday proposal came Nov.
13 when, as the Leadership Con-
ference on Civil Rights has
pointed out, the sponsors sought
to use a special expedited pro-
cedure available for bills deemed
non-controversial.
SUCH BILLS can be con
sidered without amendment and
passed if two-thirds of the mem-
bers present vote for it. That day
252 members voted for the bill,
four short of the number needed
to pass it. In that roll call, 17 of
the 22 Jewish Congressmen then
in the House voted for the bill.
They were Frost. Gilman. Dan
bttuarieB
ISAACSON
Sundl* F 87. of 4*01 Grayvtew Court.
died Kriday. Dec 21 He was a 42 year
resident of Tampa and was a retired
clothing merchant He wai a I' S Army
veteran of World War I and a member of
tin O incremation of Rodeph Sholom He
turvTvM by hi.s wife. Helen; one
daughter, Mrs Hannah B Fried of
Tampa: one son. Herschcl D of
Atlanta, one sister, Ttllle Feldman of
Haltiniore, eight grandchildren, and
tin r, stiMl grandchildren H Marlon
Reed Funeral Home had charge of
,ii nuigamrata
MARKS
I lon.il.l. 55. of 4301 Mlllbrook. were held
at the H Marion Keed Hyde Hark
- Rabbi Martin I San
ill" ic and Cantor William Hauben of
llodeph Sholom Congregation, of-
lii i.ited with Interment In Myrtle Hill.
Memorial Park Preparation by
Chesaed Shel Kme.s A native of New
York he has lived in Tampa 14 years
Mi Marks was a member of Rodeph
siioiiiin OOsSgrogation; he was mer-
i liamli.se manager fur Sears-Roebuck
lor 24 vaara and raa a veteran of World
I serving in the U S Navy Sur
vlvors are his wife. Barbara Marks.
rampa Ihrai children, Lorl Marks.
ruj, 1'a Jim Marks and Ijirry
Marks both of Tampa, his mother
mill Marka New York, and a
Mar, Mrs Doris Graham. Studio City.
Calif 11 Marlon Reed had charge of
arrangements
Glickman (D., Kara.), William
Green (R-, N.Y.). William Leh-
man (D., Fla). Elliot Levitas
(D., Ga.), Marks, Ottinger,
Frederick Richmond (D., N.Y.),
Scheuer, Stephen Solarz (D.,
N V ), Spellman, Waxman,
Weiss, Lester Wolff (D., N.Y.).
Wolpe and Yates.
TRYING AGAIN, the spon-
sors proposed on Dec. 5 to set the
celebration annually on the third
Monday of every January, in-
stead of King's birthdate Jan. 15
as proposed in November. Seven-
teen Jewish Congressmen voted
for it. They were Beileraon,
Gilman, Glickman, Green,
Holtzman, Levitaa, Marks,
Ottinger, Richmond, Scheuer,
Solarz. Spellman, Weiss, Wolff.
Wolpe, Lehman and Yates. Op-
ponents were Gradison and
Kramer. "Necessarily absent"
were Frost, Rosenthal and Wax-
man. Frost was recorded as
paired against the proposal.
But Rep. Robin Beard (D.,
Tenn), arguing that a national
holiday on a week-day would
mean a loss of $3 86 billion in
wages and productivity 8tn
it would cost the nation no
If King's birthday .
celebrated on the third Sunri,,
each year and offered an ami
mend to the passed bill tnT
effect. The Beard substitute,
approved 207-191. Eighty]
who voted for the Mo
celebration switched their
to Sunday.
Opposing the Beard
ment were 14 Jewish Con
men Gilman, Green [
man, Lehman, Marks, Ott
Richmond, Scheuer, <
Spellman, Weiss, Wolfe,
and Yates. Favoring it
Beilenson, Glickman, Gr
Kramer, Levitas. "Ne
absent" were Frost, Rosen
Waxman.
IN THE compilation
America s Black newspaper t
Ushers of voting on 18 pre
issues of concern to Blacks L
House in the first eight montl
this year, Rep. Paul Findley |,
111.) voted with the caucus on j
In the three King bir
battles, Findley opposed
Caucus each time.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Poitioni
Vayehi
VAYEHI Jacob was 147 years old and he felt his end i
near. He had lived for 17 happy yean in Egypt. Now net
Joseph to him, and Joseph's two sons, Ephraim and Manasseh.]
"My son," he said to Joseph, "swear to me that when I c
you will not bury me here in Egypt, but that you will carry meti
Canaan, the land of my fathers, and bury me in the cavewh
they lie."
Joseph wept and took an oath to do his father's bii
Then Jacob blessed Joseph by blessing Ephraim and Man
"For I consider your sons as my own, and they will sharet
your brothers in the blessing of our people."
Now Jacob called for his other sons. "Gather round,"
said, "and receive your blessings." And he gave a
blessing to each of them.
When Jacob died, Joseph and his brothers fulfilled his i
They bore him to the land of Canaan and buried him in the (
of Machpelah. Afterward, Joseph and his brothers returned t
Egypt
Joseph lived for 110 years. Before he died, Joseph saidt
his people: "God will surely remember you and bring you to ta
land which He promised to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob."]
(Genesis 47:28-60:26)
(The recounting of the Weakly Porttoo) of the Law l extracted aa4t MM I
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Horitaoc," edited by P. WtOnwl
Tiamir, US. published by Shanookt The veto me la available at 75 Masks I
.ana. Now York, N.Y. Mf0s. Joseph Scuta** la president of tk* mcKtI
distributing the volume.)
Religious diRectORy
C0NGIEGATI0N BETH ISRAEL
2111 Swan Avenue 253-0823 or 251-4275 Rabbi Nathan Bryn'I
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Doily: morning l
evening minyan Beginners' Talmud Session following Soturdorj
morning services
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue 251-4215
vices: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday,
evening minyan
Rabbi Samuel Mollinger $*!
9 a.m. Doily: morning ort|
Saturday. 1
CONGREGATION K0L AMI
885-3356 Allan Fox, President o Service*: first and third Fr.ckryo'|
each month at the Community Lodge, Waters and Ola, 8 p.m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SHOLOM (Comervativ.)
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-19)1 Rabbi Martin I. Sandbe
Hazzan William Hauben Services: Friday, 800 p.m..
a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15a.m.
CONGREGATION SCNAARAI ZEDEK (Reform)
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim &trv
Fndoy. 8 p.m.
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewish Student Center (USF), 3645 Fletcher Avenue, Co[J"9Y
Apis. 9716768 or 985 7926 Rabbi Lazar Rivkm Rabb
Werde Serv.ces: Fr.day, 6:30 p.m Shabbos meal follo*^
vices n Saturday. 10 a.m. Kiddush follows service* *
Bogels and Lou Brunch. Room 252, University Center, 11 o.nv
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
Jew.sh Student Center, University of South Florida, 13422 Vi"J
Circle, Apt 121 988-7076 or988-1234-Rabbi Mark Kram'SP* I
programs to be announced Shobbat Services Sunder,
Brunch- 11 30o m


y. January 4. I960
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

SHOP SUNDAY 12:30 TO 5:30 MONDAY 9 A.M. TO 9 P.M.
MIAMI RUG
CUTS PRICES
:
THE
NEW YEAR!
MIAMI RUG CUTS IT!
Wa cut the carpetl
We cut the price!
We cut yow carpal
right In our Warehouse.
And because of our 22-
tor buying powar, wa
not only cut the carpet
... wo cut tha price.
Bocouao Miami Rug
has tho largest
Inventory In Florida,
chanoao aro good, wa
have your carpal In
lock. No middleman
to pay. Wa paaa tha
savings on to you!
Sava During Miami Rug'i
Fabulous E vant!
You always mva MOKE
at Florida's oldoat and

v
And now, you sava
even MORE during this
gigantic annual sola!
Hundrada and
hundreds of rolls of
famous brand
carpeting, every yard
PERFECT QUALITY ..
available In every
Imaginable color and
pattern. Buy now and
sava during our first
big sale of the year!
January Carpet Sale
Prices Include Expert Installation Over Luxury Rubber Padding!
Our 56th January Sale'
Famous Maka
Nylon Shags
694
a**
8
luxury raaooi aaaaaj
a Easy-to-mamtain nylon mini
shag lor maximum How
beauty a Beautiful multi-
colored tweed effects
Our 56th January Sato!
Evans-Black Haavy
Nylon Splush
1155
In* tailed over
luxury rubber padding
a A carpet to luxurious and
soft yet practical that it will
give years of beauty and
1 Stunning array of
fashion colors
Our 56th January Safe'
Evans-Black
Sculptured Shag
? 92
a-r*
IneteMed over
kixury rubber paddNig
> Beautiful hi-lo nylon shag
that's long wearing
Decorator multi-colors for
very decor.
Our 56th January Sato!
Millikan Fine
Nylon Carpal
12H
Our 56th January Sato!
Gulistan Haavy
Nylon Plush
994
e> yd.
Our 56th January Sato!
Vogue "Value-Rated"
Luxury Splush
10tt
luxury I
a Great Wear and a super
look at big savings O Easy-to-
care-for O Choose from a
dozen fashion colors
Our 56th January Sato!
Vogue "Value-Rated'
Anso" Nylon
14*1
toaayi
O Smartly styled for elegance
and super wear O Exotic
muted colors for every decor
a Soft luxurious pile
Our 56th January Sato!
Guliatan Haavy
Saxony Plush
1555
luxury rubber padding
O Luxurious, long wearing hi-
lo nylon carpet O Deep pile
for that luxury feat a Fashion
colors tor every color scheme
luxury rubber |
a A luxurious splush that's
uttra-eott and ultra beautiful
a 5-year wear guarantee
a Gorgeous colors
luxury ruSbar padding
a Mads of Trsvira Star
Polyester, one of the toughest
fibers made O ideal for heavy
traffic areas O Choose from
many decorator colors.
Do-lt-Yourself 8PECIAL8I
Indoor-Outdoor omm carpet White it lasts
1M
Carpet Only
Turf-Use Grass Carpet <->at
Hurry m now. A great buy! at
carpet on*
Nylon Carpet ats
in patterned prints BuHt-m rubber pad
Carp* only
January Sate Priced!
Room six. Carpet Remnants
50% OFF!
A fantastic selection of carpet remnants ideal for
rooms or for wall-to-wall mstaaation AM colors, al sizes, an
patterns, al perfect qusfWy. Hurry In for beat selection.
since 1924
Florida's Oldest and largest \~Jfr carpet chain
miami rug co.
S 1.000 Instant CreM
lo auaBftsd purctoeara
Osier creM plant
10 au any BMSSt
TAMPA
|N DeleMebryOBMS 1 /i)S75O40
[Open Mon. thru Frl.'till 9
Sat 9 to 8:00
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
LARGO
1300 N. Missouri Ava.. Phone 486 11
Mon thru Frl. til 9
Sat. 0 to 6
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
Other Showrooma m Miami Ft Lauderdala Pompeno
ST. PETE
4424 Win St North. Phono S37-M71
Open Mon. Thru Fri. 'till 9
Sat. 9 to 6:00
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
Beach W Palm Beecti Boca Raton. Orlando. Daytona Beach Tampa. St Pete Saraaoia Largo New Port Pichey
SARASOTA
1325 Tamiami TraiNUS 41) 9SB-7717
- Open Mon. & Frl. till 9
Tuas., Wad., Thins. & Sat. 9 to 6
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30
NEW PORT RICHEY
W0US 19Nonn 848-4889
Mon. & Frl. 9 to 9 PM
Tuas., Wad., Thurs. & Sat 9 to 6
Sunday 12:30 to 5:30