The Jewish Floridian of Tampa

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fred K. Shochet
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Tampa (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Hillsborough County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Hillsborough -- Tampa

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vo1. 1, no. 1 (Apr. 6, 1979)-
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for: v.2, no. 21; v.3, no. 14; v.4, no. 32, and; v.8, no. 3, omitted in numbering sequence and were not published.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Feb. 27, 1981 called also v.3, no. 8, repeating numbering of previous issue.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issue for Nov. 12, 1982 called v.55, no. 46 in masthead, but constitutes v.4, no. 39, as stated in publisher's statement.
Numbering Peculiarities:
Issues for Jan. 9 & 23, 1987 called v.9, no. 2 & 3, but constitute v.9, no. 1 & 2 respectively.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44620289
lccn - sn 00229553
ocm44620289
System ID:
AA00014305:00010

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
^Jemsti floncli'&n
Off Tampa
\ i
Volume 1 Number 9
Tampa, Florida Friday, June 1,1979
Price 35 Cents
Special CJF General Assembly to Act on Review
NEW YORK Ben Green-
baum, Helen Greenbaum and
Gary Alter have been selected to
serve as official voting delegates
representing the Tampa Jewish
community at the Council of
Jewish Federations' special
General Assembly, Thursday,
June 14, in Denver, convened to
1 take action on the three-year CJF
Review which charts the future of
[Federations and CJF for the
11980 "s.
On Friday, June 15, Council
land UJA will initiate the first
steps in a new planning process
develop a comprehensive blue-
print for the 1960 community
ipaigns.
Both these events will coincide
irith the CJF Quarterly, which
rill cover a broad gamut of com-
lunity responsibilities in com-
littees, forums and workshops.
here will be a Forum on "Middle
st Issues Following the Israel -
Egypt Peace Treaty," featuring
as guest speakers Yehuda Blum,
Israel's Ambassador to the
United Nations, and Theodore
Mann, president of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
on Thursday evening.
THE SPECIAL General
Assembly will culminate a study
launched three years ago which
examined every major aspect of
the Council's philosophy,
operation and objectives and how
it can best serve the needs of its
190-member Federations.
"The review was initiated to
ascertain the priority needs and
purposes of North American
Jewish Federations," stated CJF
President Morton L. Mandel of
Cleveland, "and to adapt CJF's
programs to serve those needs
with maximum effectiveness in
the coming decades."
"Council was created by the
Federations of North America,"
added Raymond Epstein of
Chicago, chairman of the Review
Committee. "It is responsible to
them and its activities must be
responsive to their concerns. The
orientation of the review is
towards the future to enable
CJF to build on its established
strengths and meet the chal-
lenges and opportunities ahead."
Forty lay and professional
community leaders comprised the
Review Committee. A CJF
Review professional consultant-
staff team was headed by Henry
L. Zucker, vice president
emeritus of the Jewish Com-
munity Federation of Cleveland.
OVER 139 communities
throughout North America were
visited to solicit information for
the review, and 1,500 Federation
officers, executive committee
members and staff professionals
contributed their views to the
process.
According to Mandel, Review
Committee recommendations to
be considered by delegates to the
special assembly cover the
following areas: Strengthening
Communities and Federations;
UJA-CJF Relations; Priorities
and Planning; Governance of
CJF; Communications; Human
Resources and Staff
Organization; Budget. Also to be
considered are recommendations
from a separate report on the
future staffing of Federations
and related CJF personnel
services.
Assembly delegates will vote
on the Committee's suggestions
for changes in the CJF By-Laws
required to activate the review
recommendations.
"These two final decades of the
Twentieth Century will be ex-
citing and demanding ones for
the Jewish people," Mandel said.
"Federations must be ready to
carry out many crucial respon-
sibilities, and Council must assist
Federations to the utmost in this
endeavor."
A NEW campaign planning
format will be introduced at the
Continued on Page 6
ferry Aidman
Ben Greenbaum
Sara Richter
ee Agencies Combine
For Annual Meeting
The Tampa Jewish Federation,
|he Tampa Jewish Social Ser-
ices, and the Tampa Jewish
^immunity Center, will join
prces to hold a joint annual
leeting and installation of of-
Icers on Tuesday, June 12, at
[:30 p.m., in the auditorium of
! Jewish Community Center.
This marks the first time that
he three agencies have combined
jir annual meeting. According
Sara Richter, JCC president;
ferry Aidman, social service
esident; and Ben Greenbaum,
federation president. "A unique
prmat has been worked out to
kstall the new officers as well as
to recognize the many volunteer
workers who enable each of the
agencies to function."
Three awards for outstanding
service, given each year by each
of the agencies will be presented.
The Leo D. Levinson Memorial
Award will be presented by the
Tampa Jewish Federation; the
Bob Jacobson Memorial Award
will be presented by the Jewish
Community Center, and the
Tampa Jewish Social Service will
present the Rose Segall Award.
Refreshments will follow the
program and the total com-
munity is invited and urged to
attend.
Two Local Leaders
Attend Conference
Anne E. Thai, executive
rector of Tampa Jewish Social
Brvice, and Ed Finkelstein,
lecutive director of the Jewish
immunity Center, will attend
81st annual meeting of the
inference of Jewish Communal
Brvice beginning June 3 in
roronto.
This conference is a combined
fort of the professional
Fganizations t,hat serve Jewish
enter workers, Jewish family,
lildren's and health pro
issionals, synagogue ad-
listrators, Jewish vocational
/ices and others. A program of
rums and workshops designed
to stimulate and enlighten the
Jewish communal professional
are planned over a three-day
period.
In addition to expanding his
own knowledge and sharing
information, Finkelstein will be
using the conference as an oppor-
tunity to interview candidates for
the position of program director
being vacated by Harold Cohen.
Thai will be serving as a dis-
cussion leader at a family ser-
vices session entitled "The Plan-
ning-Program Development
Process Strategies for
Executive Directors."
Sadat Interviewed
Links Open Boidgrs
To 'Normalization'

Tourists Ready 5-A
Summitry 7-A
By DAVID LANDAU
Egypt's President- Sadat
pledged Sunday night that the
border opening that he and Prime
Minister Begin had announced
earlier would be implemented,
"as fast as possible." He said the
announcement of "open borders"
certainly meant "an ac-
celeration" of the schedule for
normalization laid down in the
peace treaty package.
With Begin at his side as his
presidential jet streaked across
the sands of the Sinai, Sadat
declared, "We have agreed on the
principle that whenever we can
give the peace process a
momentum we shall do it."
SPEAKING WITH a small
group of newsmen allowed on the
flight, Sadat said it would now be
up to ministers from the two
countries to nentiate the details
of the speeded up normalization.
"We have agreed together
today," he said, nodding at
Begin "It is now the duty of the
ministers to make the other
preparations for this."
Minister of State for Foreign
Affairs Butros Ghali. also on the
flight, said Israeli's foreign
minister Moshe Dayan would be
coming to Cairo June 4 to discuss
with him the arrangements for
the open borders.
President Sadat revealed that
he had been at odds with Ghali
and the Foreign Ministry over
1 Continued on Page 6
President Sadat
Carter Being Outflanked
Behind the New Summit Talks:
A Shifting of Key U.S. Personnel
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Under the
steadily tightening Arab
stranglehold on oil and
Western finances that the
industrialized democracies
are unwilling or unable to
halt, the Egyptian Israeli -
American talks in El Arish
and Beersheba appear to
spell intensively difficult
times ahead for Israel and
additional embarrassment
for the Carter
Administration.
President Carter
As she has always
maintained, Israel's
government asserts that
Jerusalem will never again
be divided, and Judaea and
Samaria and the Gaza Strip
will not become a Pales-
tinian state.
EGYPT TAKES precisely the
opposite position and at least
initially held out against "open
borders" for another eight
months in accordance to what
Egypt claims is the timetable set
down in the Camp David accords.
Israel, however, contended that
this violates the Camp David
Continued on Page 12


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, June 1,1979
1
/
Floridian Feature
Meet Valedictorian Tom Barkin
By JUDITH ROSENKRANZ
Introducing Tom Barkin,
valedictorian of Plant High
School, Class of '79.
Tom (which he prefers to be
called rather than the formal
Thomas Isadora) is the son of
Trudy and Marvin Barkin and
brother of Mike, a Plant tenth
grader and Pam, in the eighth
grade at Coleman Junior High.
"I like doing well," Tom said,
which seems rather low key for a
young man who has attained a
4.64 overall average (on a four-
point scale the "extra points"
come from Honors classes)
through the first semester of his
senior year. This has Tom ranked
number one out 517 students.
TOM WILL be attending
Harvard in the fall and will major
in math. And then? "Probably
graduate school of some sort.
Maybe even law school," replied
the calmest 17-year-old surjer
achiever you are likely to meet.
His father attended Harvard Law
School after college at Emory in
Atlanta, but Tom insists that his
father put no pressure on him to
choose his alma mater. "It is cold
and snows in Nashville and
Atlanta, so why not Boston?"
Tom said, referring to the
weather on the campuses of both
Vanderbilt and Emory
Universities.
A National Merit Scholarship
winner ($1,000), Presidential
Scholar (a week in Washington,
D.C., awarded to 121 students), a
Tampa Times Scholarship winner
($500), Tom will receive these
honors at Plant High School's
graduation June 5 at Curtis
Hixon Convention Center.
In the fall of the junior year the
PS AT (Preliminary Scholastic
Aptitude Test) is taken. Based on
this exam, the National Merit
semi-finalists are chosen. Then
the SAT exam is taken, and these
scores must be as least as good as
the first PSAT. The finalists for
the National Merit Scholarships
are selected from this group. To
be named a finalist (and Tom
was) is a pretty good indication
of how things are going. "About
30 percent of the finalists win
scholarships of some sort, in-
cluding school scholarships,"
'according to Tom.
"At every step along the way,"
Tom explained, "the forms to fill
out and essays to write seem
endless. Some of the awards I've
won 1 had never heard of. They
Tom Barkin
find you." {Ed Note: "They"
find you only when your record is
as outstanding as Tom Barkin's!)
THE PRESIDENTIAL
Scholar honors go to two
students from eacb state and
from the territories (making a
total of 121). This honor allows
the student to spend a week in
Washington, D.C., visiting with
government dignitaries and
seeing the city in a VIP manner.
Anqther honor Tom just
received word about is the
Golden Plate Award, sponsored
by the American Academy of
Achievement. This award is an
all-expense paid trip to wherever
this year's banquet is being held
(for Tom it means a trip to Salt
Lake City) and even the rental of
the tuxedo. The banquet will
bring together "400 students
from around the country and 40
Giants of Accomplishment" at
the 18th Annual Salute to Excel-
lence program. Tom's letter
indicated that his sponsor for this
award was George Jenkins of
Publix.
The Barkin family belongs to
Temple Schaarai Zedek, where
Tom was Bar Mitzvahed and
confirmed. He is a member of
SchZFTY. "Try whatever you
want." is another of Tom's
favorite mottoes and throughout
his high school career he certainly
has done so.
The Plant High Chess Team
Tom was on has won the
Southern Championship for the
last three years. That includes
the high schools in Florida,
Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama,
North Carolina and South
Carolina.
TOM PLAYED on the Plant
High golf team in his junior and
senior years and was fifth in the
Western Confference in his
handicap. He shoots in the low
80's on his home course, Palma
Ceia. He is very proud that his
handicap is lower than his mom's
and she is president of the Ladies
Golf Association at Palm Ceia.
A member of National Honor
Society, he attended the state
convention. He was president of
the I Dare You Club (to be
eligible you must have all A's in
conduct and grades for two
quarters in a row, placing you on
the Principal's Honor Roll) and a
member of Mu Alpha Theta,
math honorary society. Tom was
also a member of Gold and Black,
an honors club for school ac-
tivities while at Plant.
Tom was one of four Plant
students chosen to attend Boys'
State, sponsored by the
American Legion each year in
Tallahassee. Delegates attend
from every high school in Florida
and simulate state government
for a week. He also was captain of
the High Q and Categorically
Speaking quiz show teams and,
after these TV shows were
cancelled, Eckerd College con-
tinued the idea with its Hi Q
Bowl. Of course, Tom par-
ticipated. And let's not forget
that in the eighth grade Tom
liecaroe an Eagle Scout.
"Best grades do not
necessarily mean the best
student," Tom said as we were
about to conclude our interview.
In this instance, we do not think
that saying is applicable.

Israeli Musical Slated at JCC
"To Live Another Sum-
mer To Pass Another Winter,"
the Israeli Broadway musical,
opens at the Jewish Community
Center for three performances on
June 16 at 7:30 p.m. and on June
17 at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
This Israeli musical opened on
Broadway in 1970 and ran for
several months until members of
CLOSING SALE
We are having an end of the year closing sale at
Rodeph Sholom Gift Shop during the month of May.
Everything 15-20 %off. We have everything from A-Z
Open every Tuesday & Wednesdays 2pm-4pm and
Sunday Mornings 10am-12 Noon
Rodeph Sholom Gift Shop
2713 Bayshore Blvd.
Tampa,Fia. 33609
the all-Israeli cast had to return
to their homeland.
Jason Jones, producer and
director of this performance,
bought the stage rights and is
revitalizing the production with
hopes of taking it on the road this
fall. The cast is made up of
faculty members and students
from the University of South
Florida theater department.
The three performances at the
JCC will be the first time this
musical has been performed since
1970.
"To Live Another Sum-
mer To Pass Another Winter"
traces the history of the Jewish
people from the creation through
the establishment of the State of
Israel.
Ticket prices are $4 for adults
and S2 for students, children and
nonioi citizi
FOR A SUPER TIME COME JOIN THE
HBel School of Tampa Patents Assoc.
AT
An Evening with The Bucs
Sunday, June 3,1979-6pm
Jewish Community Center
Adulta-$3.75 Children$2.75
For Dinner and Evening Reservations send check and
coupon no later than May 25th to:
Mra. Laura Kraltzar
4111 W. Matt St.
Tampa, Fla. 33609
NAME.
ADDRESS
PHONE_
ADULTS__
CHILDflEN^
23
OPENING JUNE 28 SPECIAL
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On the Ocean at 67th Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
HIGH HOLY DAYS SEPT. 20-0CT 2
CONSTANT RABBINICAL SUPERVISION
RABBI JOS KAUFMAN
.1.7*
V
1
Bictured at the Hadassah installation dinner, May 23, are Rhoda
Givarz, outgoing chapter president; Barbara Karpay, new president of
Ameet; Terry Rapaport, guest speaker; and Diana Anton, new
chapter president.
photob^ufre^aubn8tock
Dayan Defends Begin's
Bank Autonomy Plan
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan
defended the autonomy plan to
settlers on the West Bank and
assured them that it will effect no
significant changes in the status
of Jewish settlements.
Addressing a meeting at
Tomer in the Jordan Valley north
of Jericho, Dayan called for an
increase in the number of settle-
ments and the number of settlers.
He said he "could not imagine"
any future Israeli government
adopting a different policy.
DAYAN SAID that the Sinai
pattern whereby Israel agreed to
remove its settlements and set-
tlers would not serve as a
precedent for the West Bank
because the status of the two
areas is different
Sinai was under Egyptian sov-
ereignty and now will revert to
Egyptian sovereignty, he said.
lie ,il- Heights were formerly under
Syrian sovereignly, leading some
obser\ ers to conclude that he was
signaling a readiness by Israel to
treat the Golan as it did Sinai.
But with respect to the West
Bank, Dayan insisted that the
status of the Jewish settlements
would remain "the same as
Nahalal or Degania" even after
the abolition of the military
government."
CAMP DAVID accords de-
liberately used the words "with-
drawal of" with respect to the
military government but Dayan
blurred the distinction.
He stressed that autonomy
was intended for the Arab
villages and towns on the West
Hank, not the Jewish set-
tlements
"It is better for Israel to base
its relations with the local Arabs
on autonomy since the per-
petuation of the military govern-
ment is impractical and inad-*
\ isable," Dayan said.
Hut he cautioned that
autonomy was only a transitional
arrangement and after five years
border and peace" will have to
be negotiated between Israel and
Jordan.
TAMPA'S ONL Y KOSHER CA TERER
Dining Facilities
3336 Henderson Blvd. Tampa, Fla.
877-1498
Opwi duly, Stl .Sun
STATE OF
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Corporation Ton Free (soo) 221-4838
?1-7?


Friday,June 1,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 3
hi
V*
>*
'
t*
I in the SpiRit of Shavuoth
By RABBI YAKOV WERDE
Ainntint Director
Chab.d House, USF
Shavuoth, or in the words of
the liturgy, "The Season of the
Giving of our Torah," is one of
the three festivals of the Jewish
calendar year. The festivals have
in common that they all mark an
important stage in Israel's
development as a nation, and
each occurs at an important
moment in the agricultural cycle
of ancient Israel upon which her
economy was solely dependent.
Pesach, the "birth of a nation
from within a nation," occurring
at the time of the harvesting of
oats. Shavuoth, commemoration
of the giving and receiving of our
most Holy Torah, coinciding with
the harvest of wheat and the first
fruits of the orchard. And
Succoth, memorializing the
clouds of glory which surrounded
our ancestors in the wilderness,
in concurrence with the reaping
of the fall harvest.
The proper attitude of the Jew
to his festivals can be understood
by the following. During the time
of the Glorious Age of Israel,
when all Jews lived on their land,
it was obligatory for all to travel
to Jerusalem, and there, in the
city of our Bet Ha Mikdash, to
celebrate joyously. Each person,
freed from his mundane work
would take of his finest and bring
an offering to God in the Temple.
THESE PILGRIMAGES
served to reaffirm Jewish faith on
a national level. The person
witnessing all this most certainly
was left with great inspiration.
So much so, that he would have
enough to draw from until the
next festival.
Among the many virtues
expressed by the Torah in
connection with the festival of
Shavuoth, is the very general one
reflected by the attitude of the
Jews toward the reception of the
Torah. "All the Eternal has told
us we will Do" (Exodus 19,8). Do
is the key word. It indicates their
willingness to accept and per-
Rabbi Werde
form, sine qua non, even before
they would have any un-
derstanding of what it was they
were to do.
There is much written in
Judaic literature in praise of
prefacing acceptance to un-
derstanding. Firstly, the
Talmudic Sage Rabbi Elazar
comments that God himself
stood in wonderment at the
awesomeness of this attitude on a
national level, for this attitude is
one possessed by heavenly
beings, wholly devoted to Divine
service. Man, however, possesses
free choice, is involved in worldly
pursuits and under normal
conditions does not remove
himself from them to give himself
over to the Divine. With this, we
can understand the magnitude of
our ancestors' desire to receive
the Torah.
Similarly, another sage, Rava,
points out that this attitude is
indicative of the reward of the
virtuous for faithfulness. So
states King Solomon, "the faith
of the righteous will be their
comfort." Those who embark
upon this leap of faith, placing
acceptance before understanding,
will most certainly be rewarded in
the end. A clear example of this
being the Jews of the wilderness.
They, by placing the search for
Truth, as their only motivation
were rewarded by the realization
of their hopes in the Revelation of
the truth of Torah at Mt. Sinai.
THE CHASSIDIC masters of
the 19th century have carried this
concept even further. One is to
relive the experience of receiving
the Torah each day and must re-
evaluate and reaffirm his com-
mitment to the Almighty, they
taught. This is to be experienced
every morning and evening at the
time one fulfills the precept of
reading the Shema Yisroel. For in
the first paragraph of the Shema
it is written, "And you shall love
the God, your Lord with all your
. might," indicating a com-
plete devotion to God. This is
followed in the second paragraph
by, "And it shall come to pass if
you shall hearken to the com-
mandments which ... in-
dicating the second stage, un-
derstanding.
From all the above, we can
truly see the significance and
value of placing commitment to
Judaic ideals before their full
understanding. In this light and
in line with the spirit of Mattan
Torah, Shavuoth is an auspicious
time to resolve commitments to
Torah true ideals.
Mary Anna Keshen, president-elect, and Arlene Verkauf, president of
the newly formed Friends of the Arts (FOTA), are pictured at their
installation luncheon. FOTA combines the Tampa Junior Museum
Auxiliary, the Guilded Lilies, the Docents and the Friends of Art into
one organization to work for the new Tampa Museum.
photo by audrey huabenstock
Senior Citzen Sing-along Set
The Senior Citizen Project of
the Jewish Community Center
will be holding a special "Open
House Sing-along," open to all
persons 60 and older, with Dale
Johnson on Sunday, June 3, from
2 to 4 p.m. in the JCC Library.
Coffee and refreshments will be
served. Bring your favorite songs
and requests.
Realty Course
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For further information and registration write or call:
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Bert Rodgers Schools of Real Estate
Incorporated
7801 Lake Ellenor Drive Suite 100 Orlando, Florida 32809
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, June 1,1979
Jewish Floridian Captial Punishment Needs to be Studied
of Tampa
BualncM Offlc* MMHmterwn Blvd., Tampa, FT*. tHN
Telephone 872 4470
FREDK.SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCHET JUDITH R08HNKRANZ
Editor and Publlahar Executive Editor 'Araodate Editor
GfndShochit
The Jawtaa Flor .tUaa Dee* Not Guarantee The Kaahnrik
Of The MercaanaUae Advtrtiaaa la Its Cataniaa
PaMliail Weekly Application to Mall
At Seoaaa daaa restate Hates to pattattag at Miami, Via.
papers te Tee Jewish
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year la dviucled from thalr ronlrlbuUona tor a nubarrlptlon to tha papor Anvona wlarttn* to cancal auch a
aubarnptlon ahould ao notify Tha J-wlah Florlrtlan or tha Fada ration
Please eead notification (Form MTt) regarding unaeUverea
Flortdlaa. P.O. Bex SUMS, Miami, Fla. MlII.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: (Local Area) One Year-ILM
Oat of Town Upon 1
Friday, June 1,1979
Volume 1
6 SI VAN 5739
Number 9
A Kremlin Report
It is only a Kremlin report. On the other hand,
the Kremlin wants things from Uncle Sam, and
pronto. The Kremlin wants Most Favored Nation
status, thus necessitating the scrapping or at least
major modification of the Jackson Amendment.
Also, the Kremlin wants a successful meeting
with President Carter on June 15 to bring SALT II
to a conclusion in accordance with the Communist
view of things.
And so, Anatoly Sharansky and 11 other Soviet
Jewish dissidents now in prison may be released.
As we say, it is only a report duly noted in
Moscow on Sunday by Lev Ulyanovsky, a dissident
Jewish spokesman, who said that the Kremlin
decision was revealed by a low-to-medium placed
Russian bureaucrat, Alexei Shibayev.
Shibayev calls Sharansky and the 11 others
"prisoners of Zion." We urge readers to let that
phrase roll over the convolutions of their brains:
"prisoners of Zion."
We call them prisoners of an oppressive dic-
tatorial state who fight for the right of a free con-
science nurtured by their Jewish heritage. But in
whatever way the Soviets seek to disguise their
abominable politics by insults hurled upon their
"enemies," in the end it is they who are the enemy.
Should the Kremlin report prove true, should
Sharansky and the 11 others in fact be freed, then
they themselves will be able to tell us whether they
were "prisoners of Zion" or of the Kremlin strangle-
hold on the free human spirit.
Meaning of Shavuoth
Shavuoth is known as the Feast of the Weeks
because it occurs exactly seven weeks after the
celebration of Passover.
When the American Jewish community joins
other Jews throughout the world* in marking the
Shavuoth Festival this week, it will be observing one
of the most important holidays of the Jewish
calendar the accepting by Moses of the Ten Com-
mandments from the Hand of God.
The Tablets of the Law have served as the
cornerstone of our ethical and moral, way of life from
time immemorial.
Out of its precepts have sprung the encompass-
ing aspects of the Torah at large, as well as the
philosophical principles of all our religious literature.
So broad is the influence of the Ten Command-
ments, that it has served as the inspiration of other
religious faiths, as well.
Shavuoth, also a symbol of the spring season
and fertility, thus establishes a framework for one of
the truly happy and meaningful celebrations in
Jewish history.
The ancient Israelites, wandering in the desert
after the exodus from Egypt, there became "chosen"
in the highest sense of the word. Purified by their
wanderings in a wasteland, prepared for their return
to the Holy Land, they were given the Word from on
High the moral code of human behavior upon
which humanity's best impulses have since rested.
THE PHOTO tella the story.
Dramatis persona* are John
Spenkelink's sister (right), Carol
Myers, who stands numbly,
staring vacant-eyed forward,
almost detached in her agony
because it is too painful to exper-
ience otherwise; and an
anonymous protester (left),
hysterical face torn by anguish of
tears, comforted in the arms of
another protester, back turned
toward the camera to show a
shirt bearing the declaration,
"Don't Murder."
Spenkelink's sister is dumb-
founded by her individual
tragedy, and I am of course
speculating, but it appears that
she has no interest in the case
except her brother's execution.
..
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
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I NOW I
Translators, Transporters, Frionds, Employers, Movers
BE A PART OF THIS EXCITING AND HISTORIC RESCUE
CALL
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for more information'
8724451! _____
Leo
Mindlin


But the hysterical protester's
interest lies beyond the case; it is
embedded in a cause, capital
punishment.
THAT IS what it means to be
a protester; it means to be com-
mitted to a principle, not neces-
sarily to people. Protesters would
like us to think that principles
and people are the same thing,
but they are very different in-
deed.
It is for this reason that the
protester can resort to hysteria,
while victims like Carol Myers,
woven into the fabric of personal
tragedy, resort to the anesthesia
of numbness.
Capital punishment as cause
rather than case is, of course, the
higher issue in the Spenkelink
execution, but orchestrated
hysterical vigils in Stark,
Tallahassee or Washington are
self-defeating because they
appeal to the hokus pokus of
"blood guilt," not to the principle
of lex talionis (tooth for a tooth)
brought down to earth across a
short circuit of 2,500 volts. It is
lex talionis that is at issue in
capital punishment, not
emotional outbursts about ar-
chaic notions of "blood guilt.''
WHAT I found most com
railing in the arguments of
Spenkelink himself, as well as of
others in the case who joined his
cause, was the allusion to con-
temporary philosophical treatises
on capital punishment that can
hardly be accidental.
Spenkelink's open letter from
Death Row on Tuesday, May 22,
declares: "I've learned a lot since
I've been in prison, with all the
reading I've had time to do. The
things that we said in my legal
papers were not just issues
brought up by my lawyer. They
had to do with facts about the
death penalty .."
Surely, these are not the
sentiments, and certainly not the
iwords, of a murderer. They show
an almost literal translation of
the core of the argument against
capital punishment by Albert
Camus in his classical essay,
"Reflections on the Guillotine.'
CAMUS ARGUES that
Continued on Page 8
Moscow Miracle
Ginzburg Digs Deeply into Thoreau
With the release by Moscow of
five heroic men two Jews, one
Baptist, one Orthodox Christian,
and one Ukrainian nationalist
most who puzzle daily over the
inscrutable ways of the USSR are
speculating on valid reasons for
the sudden decision in the Krem-
lin.
Others are so fascinated with
the drama of liberation that they
fasten on to the words of those
freed so abruptly, and finally find
in an absurd world without
heroes new hope for faltering
mankind.
AND MANY point with op-
timism to recent figures on exit
grants by the Russian govern-
ment, praying that Moscow will
now turn the spigot of emigration
even farther.
First, then, why this Spring-
time miracle? Towering largest
among the reasons are the desire
by the USSR to have SALT II
signed and sealed, the need to
win most-favored-nation trade
agreement, a wish to bring two
key spies back to the Soviet
Union, help in making Russia's
role as host for the Olympics
more palatable, and a determina-
tion not only to keep up with the
Chinese but to outdistance those
new friends of Washington.
Eventually, latent explana-
tions may burst to the surface.
The USSR is a nation of unend-
ing surprises: just yesterday,
Moscow was backing Idi Amin
with vigor; today Tanzania has
the Russian blessing.
As to the joyful thoughts
expressed by the best known
prisoner released, Aleksandr
Ginzburg turned to Henry
Thoreau for expression of his
Robert
Segal
thankssgiving: "Under a govern-
ment which imprisons unjustly,
the true place for a just man is
also a prison."
DEEPER INTO Thoreau,
Ginzburg undoubtedly had
found: "Must the citizen ever for
a moment resign his conscience
to the State? Why then has God
given to every man a con-
science?"
Rejoicing in their rush to liber-
ty, the Russian prisoners com-
pared their electrifying exper-
ience with that of astronauts
finding themselves on the moon.
"The heavy weight of unfree-
dom" startled them even as it
brought ecstasy to their hearts.
Eduard Kuznetsov and Mark
Dymshits, the Soviet Jews jailed
for allegedly trying to flee by
hijacked plane in 1970, are now at
home in Israel. Valentin Moras
("Don't call me a Russian dissi-
dent; I am an Ukrainian dissi-
dent") appears certain to accept
an offer to study and teach in
Harvard's Ukrainian Research
Institute.
WHEN WE TURN to statis-
tics on emigration of Jews from
the Soviet Union, we need to be
practical: True, some 4,408 Rus-
sian Jews were permitted to leave
in March and approximately
5,000 in April. True, experts in
the field expect a 50,000 total in
1979, some 20,000 above the 1978
figure. But as the crack in the
Russian door widens a bit, the
number emboldened to apply for
visas rises. Hence the percentage
of those actually winning free-
dom compared with the roll of
applicants is not all that encour-
aging.
It is essential also to keep in
mind the importance of Moscow's
desire to gain Most Favored Na-
tion trade status with the U.S.
Congressman Charles A. Vanik
of Ohio, one of the authors of the
Jackson Vanik trade amend-
ment, has been in Moscow
recently exploring with Russian
leaders their desire to vault over
a portion of the trade restraints
tied to emigration policy by that }
law.
SEN. ADLAI Stevenson of
Illinois has introduced a bill that
would grant $2 million in foreign
trade credits to the USSR and
China and replace provisions of
the Jackson-Vanik legislation
requiring assurances of healthier
USSR emigration practices.
Jewish leaders would be disap-
pointed to see the Stevenson
effort succeed. The Jackson-
Vanik amendment, they point
out, already contains a waiver
section for trade credits and Most
Favored Trade benefit on those
occasions when tie USSR
behaves as it is now behaving.
Let Moscow continue to try to
water down the U S. law which,
in the Soviet view, is too tough;
let the rest of us hold firm to that f
valuable piece of legislation. Ana
let us ail get on with the task ot
bringing Anatoly Sharansky, the
still-imprisoned prisoner of con-
science, to freedom.


Friday, June 1,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
PageS
KA
tr*
i>
ft
Members of the Israeli Wheelchair Basketball Team are shown with Mickey Mouse during their visit to
Disneyworld while they were m the Tampa area. The trip was arranged by Ed Finkelstein, executive
director of the Jewish Community Center, and Harold Cohen, program director of the Jewish Community
tenter. Both accompanied the team. This project was in conjunction with the Tampa Jewish Federation
photos by Ed Finkelstein
0
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
o
Pre-School Registration
SUNDAY MAY 20th
...... -**
FAMILY FUN DAY
Center Members will Receive Preference
Until June I5tn
Summer Outings Are Planned for Youth
Chabad House, USFs Jewish
Student Center, in cooperation
with Temple Terrace Hebrew
School, will sponsor weekly
summer outings for youth.
Formed for the purpose of
cultural and environmental
education, the group, called JOG
(Jewish Outdoor Group), will
take weekly trips to local points
of interest and natural beauty.
Nature walks, arts and crafts and
bike trips await the young
participant. These trips leave
Chabad House at 3600 Fletcher
Ave. every Wednesday beginning
July 11 at 9:30 a.m. and will
return by 4 p.m. Children 7
through 11 may participate.
Also JOG will sponsor three-
day canoe trips for teenage boys
ages 15 through 18 on the
Withlacoochee River. The first
trip will take place Sunday, June
17, through Tuesday, June 19.
Also, there will be weekly bike
tours of local countryside for
teens from 15 through 18 on
Thursdays. Each participant
must have his own 10-speed bike
(or give enough prior notice to us
to be able to borrow one.) Tours
will leave Chabad House at 8:30
a.m. and will return at 5 p.m.
Kosher meals and snacks will be
provided for all trips, and there
will be a minimal charge to cover
expenses.
For more information and to
make a reservation for your child,
call Rabbi Yakov Werde.
DON'T FORGET!
Don't be left out of the BUGS Dinner
sponsored by the Hillel School's Parents
Association. See you at the Jewish Com-
munity Center on June 3, 1979 at'6pm. For
Reservations call;
872-8728
Auschwitz Survivor
Named Inter-American Court Judge
%*>
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Law professor Thomas
Buergenthal, believed to be the
youngest inmate and survivor of
Auschwitz, has been elected to be
a judge on the new Inter-
American Court of Human
Rights, the only American to win
the honor.
Buergenthal, who is on the
University of Texas faculty, was
nominated by the government of
Costa Rica to serve on the court
and he was approved by the
general assembly of the
Organization of American States.
His term is for six years.
UNITED STATES is
ineligible to nominate or vote for
a iudj?e because it has not ratified
the American Convention on
Human Rights which entered
into force 'last July. President
Carter has signed the convention
and urged its ratification but the
convention, submitted to the
Senate in January, 1978, has not
been ratified by the Senate.
Buergenthal, whose home is in
Austin, Texas, was not im-
mediately available for an in-
terview, being out of the city, but
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
learned that he was born 45 years
ago in Czechoslovakia of Ger-
man-Jewish parents.
At the age of 10, he and his
family had fled from
Czechoslovakia to Poland from
where they were to leave for
England when World War II
began. The Nazis moved them to
various camps in Poland and in
January, 1944, he was sent to
Auschwitz with his parents.
He was separated from his
parents there and went on a
"death march" from Auschwitz
to Sachsenhausen near Berlin in
January, 1945 before being
liberated by Soviet and Polish
troops. In 1949, the American
Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee brought him out of
Poland and placed him in
Paterson, N. J. with an uncle.
HE ATTENDED Bethany
College in West Virginia and
obtained doctorates in law from
New York University and
Harvard. Before going to Texas,
he taught at the University of
Pennsylvania and the State
University of New York in
Buffalo.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, June 1,1979
New 197940 officers of Tampa BB YU (Bnai Brith Youth Organization) were installed at a banquet May
12 at the Lake House of the Tampa Airport Resort. Girls officers are front row, left to right, Amy
Stillman, treasurer; Alice Cohen, historian; Susan Steinberg, president; Felice Garyn, parliamentarian-
chaplain; and Eileen Weisman, past president. Back row, left to right, are Lisa Tawil, first vice president;
Stella Wasserberger, second vice president; Gail Oliphant, third vice president; and Shan Kaplan,
secretary. P00*0 bv Charlie Mohn
Officers of Aleph Zadik Aleph are: Michael Bobo, president, front; first row, Steve Schafer, treasurer;
9ruce Messerman and Lawrence Linick, historians; Jeff Shear and Craig Rodetsky, sergeants-at-arms;
fnd A Ian Sandier, past president. photo by Charlie Mohn
Sadat Interviewed Over Sinai Sands
Continued from Page 1
the "open border'* issue. This
was the reason for the string of
contradictory statements that
had emanated from Cairo, he
ndicated.
"MY MINISTRY of Foreign
'"vffairs opposes the idea," Sadat
said- "But I gave my promise to
Prime Minister Begin (at their
neeting in Cairo in March).
When the minister (Dr. Ghali)
vas asked, he put forward the
ninistry's point of view.
The purpose of Sunday
fvening's flight, Sadat explained,
as to signify the open borders.
ut he stressed that the national
irlines, El Al and Misr Air,
would not be flying the newly-
laugurated air corridor at
east not at first. He said that
perhaps" TWA, the American
company, would operate the
service initially. Later, specialists
from Israel and Egypt would
meet together to negotiate a civil
avaition agreement, he said.
"But I gave Begin my promise.
There has never been any
discussion in Egypt before I
came, and it was either I convince
them or they convince me. Well,
fortunately, I convinced them."
ASKED IF his relations with
the Israeli Prime Minister were
"improving with every meeting,"
Sadat replied, "Yes, for sure For
sure, yes."
Reporter: "Do you think he
will begin toning down his
statements regarding set-
tlements?"
Sadat: "Let us hope so. Let us
hope so." Sadat said he had
found Begins address at the
Jews Need Not Fear-Ayatollah
PARIS (JTA) French
iwyer and Nazi-hunter Serge
[larsfeld was told in Teheran
; iat Iranian Jews have nothing
fear from the new regime.
According to reports reaching
i)ere, the Iranian Minister of
,fustice Assadollah Mobasherin,
i'ssured Klarsfeld that Jewish
ijights will be respected.
Klarsfeld, who with his wife,
Jeate. has been instrumental in
tracking down wanted Nazi war
criminals, flew to Teheran to see
if he could assist four Jews
reportedly detained by Islamic
Revolutionary Courts pending
trial on a number of charges.
HE SAID before leaving that
he also intended to investigate
the execution of Iranian Jewish
community leader Habib
Elkanian by a firing squad on
Mav 9 on charges of treason
Negev University earlier in the
day, "a good speech."
Begin for his part said that
both he and Sadat were "born
optimists" and that Sunday had
been "a wonderful day." When
these remarks were translated for
Sadat from the Hebrew, he
nodded vigorously in approval.
SADAT SIDESTEPPED a
question about the commonality
of strategic interests between
Egypt and Israel in the face of
Soviet-inspired subversion in the
region. He did not talk about
these problems with Begin, he
said.
"We are dealing mainly with
the Arab-Israeli conflict
we're really very busy with the
'most important negotiations that
we are going to start regarding
the full autonomy ... I was very
happy in El Arish and Beersheba
today (but) I am looking forward
to the day when we reach
agreement on the autonomy for
the Western Bank and Gaza."
Sadat said he had not
discussed with Begin the precide
number of Palestinian political
prisoners whom Israel will release
in a goodwill gesture. "The
number is left to him (Begin),"
Sadat said. "I'm sure he will be
very generous."
Shavuoth VocabuIarv
Chag Shavuoth One of the
three major festivals of the
Jewish calendar, together with
Pesach and Succoth. Literally,
the "Feast of Weeks," this
festival is celebrated at the end of
seven weeks, counting from the
second day of Pesach, when the
Omer was offered in the Temple.
This is the name given in the
Torah.
Mattan Torah or Zeman
Mattan Toratenu The Season of
the giving of our Torah. The
story of the giving of the Torah is
related in great detail in the
Sedra Yisro. This portion which
includes the Ten Commandments
is read on the first day of
Shavuoth.
Chag Ha Katelr The Festival
of the Harvest. In ancient times,
it was necessary to bring an
offering to the Temple of the
produce of the field and orchards,
as a Thanksgiving to God for
sending His Blessings and
making things grow. Shavuoth
was the season of the wheat
harvest, and two loaves of wheat
bread were offered.
Chag Ha Katzlr -The Festival
of the Harvest. In ancient times,
it was necessary to bring an
offering to the Temple of the
produce of the field and orchards,
as a Thanksgiving to God for
sending His blessings and
making things grow. Shavuoth
was the season of the wheat
harvest, and two loaves of wheat
bread were offered.
Chag Ha Bikkurim The
festival of the first ripe fruits -
This occasion was marked by the
offering in the Temple of the first
fruit of crops for which Israel was
blessed.
Ruth On Shavuoth morning
the scroll of Ruth is read in most
synagogues. Its central episode
takes place at the time of the
harvest, and its heroine is a non-
Jewish maiden who accepts the
Torah of Israel Perhaps one of
the best reasons given for reading
it is that given by one of the
Medieval commentators:
"Because the scroll of Ruth is full
of loving kindness, and the Torah
is full of loving kindness."
Dairy Foods It is an ancient
custom to eat dairy foods on
Shavuoth in the morning. One of
the many reasons for this custom
is that the Israelites, upon
receiving the Torah and learning
about Kosher dietary laws,
realized that they did not know
how to ritually slaughter
animals, therefore they ate dairy
products. Also, there is a
statement in the Song of Songs
about Torah (4:11) that "Honey
and milk shall be under your
tongue." The Torah is as
delicious as honey and milk.
Akdamos A hymn chanted on
the first day of Shavuoth before
reading the Torah. It recounts
the glory of the Master of the
Universe as manifested, in the
creation of the world and by the
heavenly hosts. He then
describes the unwaivering faith
of the people of Israel in face of
the instigators for idolatry, as
expressed in their retorts to them
and their fervent trust in the
great bliss which is in store for
them, and depicts something of
its nature.
Spiceal CJF
General Assembly
To Act On Review
Continued from Page 1
CJF meetings in Denver, as the
leaders of North American
Jewish communities join with
CJF and UJA to initiate a com-
prehensive planning process for
the 1980 campaign.
On Friday, June 15, Federation
presidents, executives, campaign
chairmen, campaign directors
and other designated campaign
leaders, together with national
CJF and UJA leaders will
examine the impact on the 1980
campaign of watershed develop-
ments such as the emigration of
50,000 or more Soviet Jews per
year; Israel's transition to peace;
Project Renewal; the efforts of
rejectionist Arab states to
destroy the Israel-Egypt peace
treaty; the double-digit inflation;
and changes in our demography,
cultural mores and needs that
affect Jewish agencies and
services.
Local and national campaign
leaders will meet in a day-long
series of intensive sessions begin-
ning with a morning plenary and
extending into caucuses of in-
dividual city delegates and
groups of cities sharing common
potentials and concerns.
The recommendations of this
top leadership cadre will be
brought before local Federations
for additional input through
community meetings held be-
tween June and September.
"THIS NEW campaign plan
ning process represents another
milestone in the history of the
North American Jewish com-
munity," said Mandel. "It is an
indication of both how far we
have come, and how far we still
can go. We are ready to move
forward in an unprecedented
effort of planning and co-
ordination. Now we must use this
process in a concerted effort to
mobilize the full resources of
American and Canadian Jewry."
The CJF is the association of
more than 190 Federations,
Welfare Funds and Community
Councils which serve nearly 800
communities and embrace over
95 percent of the Jewish
population of the United States
and Canada. Established in 1932,
the Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
in developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective com-
munity services; through estab-
lishing guidelines for fund-raising
and operation; and through joint
national planning and action on
common purposes dealing with
local, regional, national and
international needs.
The Russian
Resettlement Program
of the
Tampa Jewish
Social Service
URGENTLY NEEDS
DONATIONS
Furniture, household goods.
dishes, appliances, linens,
bedding, etc.
Trucks, drivers and movers
are also badly needed
Please help this historic
effort to provide a new
community for incoming
Russian Jews
Call TJSS Today!
872-4451
"f


riday, June 1,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 7
The Floridian salutes
These six students were among the 191 selec-
ted by The Tampa Times in its 21 st annual Senior Honor
Student Program. These students hold at least a 'B'|
average in academic courses, have high scores on
standardized test, were nominated by teachers and
principals for academic achievement and par-
ticipation in school affairs and were in the top 3% of
their graduating class.
A panel of judges selected four students to
receive $500 scholarships from The Times. Tom Barkin
was one of the scholarship winners announced at the
banquet held May 21.
!
Valedictorian Thomas Isadore Barkin, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Marvin Barkin, 1605 S. Culbreath Isles
Dr., Tampa! Plant High SchooL Plans to attend
Harvard. Activities: chess team, golf team, Quiz
Club, Mu Alpha Theta, National Honor Society,
Interclub Council, Student Council
Linda Anne Wolfe, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
)S. Wolf, 5007 Rivieria, Tampa. Plant High School.
Plans to attend Vanderbilt University. Activities:
National Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta, Gold and
Black, Optimettes, French Club.
Lee M. Weinberger, son of Mr. and Mrs. Rubin
Manuel Weinberger, 753 Pearl Circle, Brandon.
Brandon High SchooL Plans to attend the
University of Florida. Activities: Mu Alpha Theta,
BETA, Chess Club, Spanish Honor Society,
National Honor Society.
Hi
Eileen Sharon Weisman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs^i
S. Gilbert Weisman, 11504 Country Oaks Dr. SSS
Chamberlain High SchooL Plans to attend the'SS,
University of Florida. Activities: Pan Am Club.SX
Spanish National Honor Society, National //onorSSS
Society, Beta Club, BBA president.
\mm/////////m^^^^


ti. r
. i. vat
Page8
The Jewish Flondiaii of Tampa
Friday, June 1,1 #9
To celebrate the fourth anniversary of the Jewish Towers, a reception
was held on May 23 for an overflow crowd of residents and board
members. The musical entertainment was provided by the residents,
including the Towerettes.
photos by Audrey Haubenstock
Violinist Fernando Porredon provided background music for the
afternoon.
9 5
The display of crafts made by residents of the Towers was appreciated
by all
A t Stake
The Very Existence of Israel'
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Minister of Justice
Shrriuel Tamir cautioned Ameri-
can Jewish community leaders
that "the security of Israel, the
very existence of Israel" are at
stake in the next phase of the
Egyptian-Israeli-American
negotiations opening in El Arish
May 26. He spoke at a dinner
meeting of the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committee.
Alluding to Israel's determina-
tion to maintain its view of
autonomy for the West Bank,
Tamir said "as highly im-
portant" as the Sinai is "Samaria
and Judaea are intertwined in the
tiny piece of geography" that is
Israel.
Israel "for the goal of peace,
has shown a global viewpoint and
understanding of the free world's
needs," he said, -n its peace pro-
posals.
POINTING TO anti-Israel
statements from Syria, the
terrorist Palestine Liberation
Organization and even Egypt in
recent days, Tamir said, "We in
our generation learned to trust
the threats of dictators and the
noises and voices of totalitarian
regimes because they are true.
Hitler lived up to fulfillment of
every threat."
The more than 1,000 men and
women at the dinner meeting at
the Capital Hilton Hotel broke
into applause when Tamir said
that Jerusalem is open for Jews,
Moslems and Christians for "the
first time in 2,000 years" and
"this is the way it will remain."
Tamir, who met here with
Secretary of State Cyrus Vance
and Special Ambassador Robert
Strauss who is heading the U.S.
delegation to the autonomy talks,
left later to address two United
Jewish Appeal functions in Tor-
onto.
President Carter sent greetings
to the AIPAC conference dinner.
Among the guests were Presi-
dential political advisor Hamil-
ton Jordan, Presidential con-
sultant Edward Sanders, Assis-
tant Secretary of State for Near
East and South Asian Affairs
Harold Saunders, White House
Congressional liaison Frank
Moore and two score of Senators
SEN. ALAN Cranston (D.,
Calif), the second ranking leader
of the Senate's Democratic
majority, and Robert Packwood
speaking program. Referring Uk
the impending Carter-Brezhnev
conference in mid-June in Vienna,
Cranston indicated that because
of the second SALT agreement,
the Soviet Union "won't actively
subvert" the Egyptian-Israeli
treaty and that the Soviet Union
has shown "restraint" on de-
velopments in Iran.
"The promise of the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment has been sub-
stantially recognized," Cranston
said, regarding increased Soviet
Jewish emigration. "That does
not mean it should be repealed or
amended," he said, but that
"compliance" with the trade law
"has been achieved." He ex-
pressed hope that "much more
comes out" of the summit con-
ference than the SALT agree-
ment, f
Packwood aroused storms of
applause in his series of attacks
on the Carter Administration's
Middle East policy. With
Saunders and top White House
officials sitting nearby, he
pointed out that "at a time wrier1",
we should be strengthening
Israel. Harold Saunders was
telling the Arabs j>n the West
Bank 'hold on" we will get
Israel out of the West Bank like
did in Sinai."
we
I,co Mindliii

Capital Punishment Needs to be Studied
Continued from Page 4
capital punishment once made
sense when society affirmed its
belief in the existence of God
institutionally and handed men
who committed heinous crimes
against His divine laws over to
the higher heavenly authorities
to dole out the punishment
because it was His laws that had
been transgressed, not man's,
and the social order was simply
too puny to judge the trans-
gresser. In executing him, it was
riot in fact murdering him, only
facilitating the act of meeting his
maker.
Today, argues Camus, when
men are either cynical about the
existence of God or else outright
disbelievers, it is sheer hypocrisy
to usurp the Divine role of
ultimate judgment, for how can
Divine law in fact be Divine when
men no longer affirm the doctrine
of divinity? Execution is hence no
longer a passive role of
facilitating the transgresser's
judgment at the hand of God. It
is a pure act of murder committed
by one man (the state) against
another man.
The transgresser is merely, in
the Camusian view, eliminated
from a social order which pur-
ports to be striving toward per-
fection and will not tolerate
anomalies (criminals) among its
numbers. He is hurled from the
would-be earthly paradise like a
rotten apple from a barrel which
would otherwise also become
infected with the spirit of
transgression.
THIS IS what Spenkelink had
in mind when in his open letter he
referred to execution as an in-
strument of "discrimination .
economic and racial." For who
are the "rotten apples" among us
if not those whom we dis-
criminate against?
The proof of this lies in the
inequity of our penal system at
the hands of which the rich pass
over and through it; the poor
(those we do not like) are the
main tenants on Death Row.
What is Camus' solution?
Every man has a right to make
"amends" for crimes he has com-
mitted. Execution deprives him
of that right. When Spenkelink
talked about what he learned in
prison, and how much he read, he
was saying that he had made
amends; and one is meant to
believe that he would never have
committed murder in the first
place if he knew what became his
intellectual legacy in prison.
IN THIS, he echoes Camus'
Maquis fighter doomed to
execution by a French under-
ground court during World War
II" for betraying his comrades to
the Nazis. Interviewed shortly
before his death, he declared that,
while in prison, he had the oppor-
tunity for the first time in his life
to read the Bible.
And then, says the Maquis
fighter, if he had read the Bible
long before then, nothing could
have seduced him into betraying
the Maquis. In effect, in prison he
learned to make amends for his
crime.
Understood in these terms.
"Reflections on the Guillotine" is
a complex brief against capital
punishment, which Spenkelink
virtually paraphrased in his open
letter. Like the doomed Maquis
fighter, he too learned to make
amends.
EQUALLY COMPLEX were
Spenkelink's purported last
words: "Man is what he chooses
to be. He chooses that for
himself." In these words is
embodied the fundamental
principle of existential freedom in
the philosophy of Jean-Paul
Sartre.
Here, Sartre argues that
"existence precedes essence,"
meaning that it is senseless to
inquire into a purported human
purpose on earth. That is a meta-
physical question which does not
lend itself to empirical answers!
Rather, we begin with fhe
given that we exist. Thiff is
empirically demonstrable, and it
requires no argument. Beyond
that is the "essence" of man
his capacity to choose what he
will become. In effect, man is his
own personal God; he has the
power to create himself in his own
1
image. That, concludes Sartre, is
what it means to be free man's
right to choose his own destiny
which is the meaning precisely
of Spenkelink's last words.
I SAID beforehand that these
philosophical precepts embodied
in Spenkelink's final com-
munications with the outsid^
world do not square with the
brutal murder he committed
that they are neither the sen-
timents of a murder nor, indeed,
his words.
The complex parallels to
Camus and Sartre certainly bear
this out. and so the logical
conclusion would seem to be that
Spenkelink was not in fact the
author of his final com-
munications. For obvious
reasons, perhaps his Gainesville
attorney, Susan Cary, wrote
them for him. Or former U.S.
Attorney General Ramsey Clark
did, who worked so hard
in Spenkelink's defense in
Washington.
But we can not discount the
possibility that Spenkelink did
indeed write them himself, which
would mean that Camus is
correct: man has the right to
make amends, or at least to say
that he has. And that execution
denies him this right.
IN THE end then, capital
punishment is, as I said in the
beginning, a cause and not a case,^ t
going beyond the hysterical face
of a vigil-keeper in Starke, or
even the numb and impassive
visage of Carol Myers.
Spenkelink's execution must
now make us knowledgeable in
the nuances of capital punish-
ment as Spenkelink himself may
well have become when the
hooded monolithic state took his
tooth for a tooth.
Otherwise a man has been
destroyed only in retribution.
A bit abstract to far I'
Sunday Time*


,June 1,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 9
fA^Gddll^^SSSWWSWfftW:^
Mrs. David Stern
Stern Dressier
The Robert Dressier family of Tampa an-
nounces the marriage of Carrie Dressier to David
L. Stern, son of Mr. and Mrs. Boris Stern,
Tampa, on May 27.
The wedding was performed by Rabbi Nathan
Biyn using Robert Dressier's tabs as the hand-
held chupah. Best man was Robert Stern, Louis-
vflle, Ky., the groom's brother. Grandparents
attending were Bertha Dressier, Tampa, and Mr.
and Mrs. Alfred Sabel, Tucson, Ariz.
The./couple honeymooned in Atlanta, where
they also visited with Rosie Reiber Gerson,
formerly of Tampa, and her husband, Steve. The
couple continued on to Cincinnati, Ohio, where
. they will make their home.
David, a graduate of the University of Cin-
cinnati, holds advanced degrees from the
University of South Florida and City University j
of London. He is employed as a systems analyst
for Cincinnati Electronics. Carrie will be at-
tending the University of Cincinnati to complete
her education in computers. :>
Carrie and David were honored by several
parties given by close family friends including &
Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Frank, Mr. and Mrs. Bui
Hughes, Mrs. Rosie Rood, Mrs. Albert Tawil,
Mrs. Bernice Nadler, Mr. and Mrs. George
Thompson, Mrs. Carlotta Jacobeon and Mrs.
Eladio Rocia.
5
The annual trip to Tallahassee by the eighth grade ofHMet School was taken this year by (standing, left
to right) Goldie Shear, chaperone; Toba Oreenbaum; Craig Smilawitz; Danny Ochshorn; Adam Slohn, ,
June Finke, Sodal Studies teacher. Kneeling (Uft to right). Barbara Eriich, Mical Solomon and Joey
Willis. They are pictured just prior to departure May 17 for their four-day trip. ~i
photo by Audrey Haubenetodc


The Origin of 'Akdomos
9



Bar Mitzvah
Jonathan Wittner
Jonathan Ian Wittner, son of Dr. and Mrs.
Harvey Wittner, will be called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 2, at
Rodeph Sholom Synagogue. The Friday night
Oneg Shabbat and Saturday Kidduah luncheon
will be hosted by Dr. and Mrs. Wittner in their
son's honor. i
Jonathan is a seventh grade student at Hillel
School and is also active in Kadima. Recently he
earned the Junior Merit Fitness Award from the
American Alliance for Health, Physical
Education, and Recreation.
Out-of-town guests will include Jonathan's
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W. F Tribble,
Daytona Beach; great-aunts Elizabeth Tribble
and Margaret Tribble, Anderson, S.C.; Dr. and
Mrs. Andrew Aronfy, New Carrollton. Md.; and
Mr. and Mrs. Leo Frye, Providence, R.I.
, (A stray about, the origin of
Akdomos" recited .on
Shavuoth).
About 800 years ago, there
lived a man famous for his
beautiful voice and melodious
renderings of the sendees. His
name was Rabbi Meir Ben
Yitzchok, and he was, in fact, a
friend, of Rashi.
Rabbi Meir was a Hebrew poet
(Paytan) writing inspiring poems
and prayers, pouring out his
heart to God. Thus he served his
Maker with song and verse which
were said to be wonderful, on
earth and acceptable on high. All
his life, Rabbi Meir wrote poems
about the sorrows of people and
their endless suffering. He would
pray for his people and the
coming of the Messiah.
People said about Reb Meir
that he was one who truly
mourned over the loss of Zion, his
poetic soul being the violin which
played to its memory and to the
hope of its rebuilding.
THE ANGEL Sodiel (God is
my secret) who knows all secrets,
went to Reb Meir to warn him.
He told him that he was not alone
in singing those wonderful
melodies to God, and that Angels
on high were trying to outdo him,
learning his songs and singing
them to the Almighty.
Reb Meir thanked Sodiel for
his kind information, and sought
and found a remedy. He knew
that Angels did not know
Aramaic in which the Talmud
and the Zohar were written, and
so began to write in Aramaic. He
wrote many songs in this
language, one in particular
becoming especially beloved
among all Jews. This was the
famous poem "Akdomos"
written in beautiful verse, each
beginning with a letter of
the Alef-Beis. The concluding
verses contain the initial letters
which spell his name and that of
his father and the Hebrew words
meaning may he grow in Torah
and good deeds, Amen. Be strong
and fortified.
Since then, it became
customary among European
Jews to recite this great poem on
the first day of Shavuoth, to the
melody of a beautiful tune.
It is told that this song was
sung with great enthusiasm in
Wurms, Germany. On one oc-
casion a chazan so lost himself in
ecstasy when singing this
melody, that his soul tore away
from his body and sped back to
its Maker! When the congregants
saw this, they decided that they
would never again include this
song in their service. .
However, many oynagogus
still include this song in their
services on Shavuoth, just before
reading the Torah. It is only a
pity that, not only do the engels'
not understand the words, but
many worshippers, too. Perhaps
you would like to try and learn
their meaning.
.
m
mmmmmmmmmmmmm
Jewish Floridian
| Community Calendar
|J !
::: Shavuoth Jewish Community Center Closed.
j:*:j Jewish Community Center Closed.
||Jmm 3
::::: Schooroi Zedek annual meeting at the Temple, 7:30 p.m. RodeprSx
xttSholom Religious School picnic Philippe Park 10 a.m. Senioft:-::
SgCitizen Project, JCC library Open House Sing-along 2 to 4 p.m. $*|
-;"! ""
ffl4 1
SSSchaarai Zedek Sisterhood Post Board Meeting 10:30 a.m. a&$
Aj&Temple Schooroi Zedek. %::
hJm5 M
ggHadassah Bowling Luncheon 11:45 a.m. La Mediterranee FreWl*:?:
SgRestaurant : ;:w
w $ m
pj.w.6
cSSBeth Israel Men's Club meeting 7 p. m. fe
m*7 I
Hillel School graduation 7:30p.m. Rodeph Sholom sanctuary*'
June I
>Beih Israel Synagogue Gimmel Chavura. Group
hope I following services.
10
Jewish Community Center Flea Market
nil
eth Israel breakfast program 9:30a.m.
NEW IN TOWN?
PLEASE CALL RHODA
SHALOM TAMPA
872-4451
..
NIM_

T*4ftot\one%
ASnfet ot Jtrnp* Jawtth Maratts
i


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, June 1,1979
Karen A Iter
Barbara Goldstein
(Call me about your social news at 872-4470).
We just had to rave about Karen Alter, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Gary Alter, who recently won president of the year first
place award for Junior Achievement of Tampa. Karen was
presented her plaque by Jim Walter at an award banquet held at
the Holiday Inn, May 10. Additionally, Karen wins an all-
expense-paid trip to the National Junior Achievement Con-
ference being held in Bloomington, Ind., in August. This will be
Karen's second year attending the conference which is quite an
honor considering that only the top 1 '/i per cent of all the junior
achievers in the United States get to go. A hearty round of
applause for you, Karen this is an outstanding ac-
complishment.
Mazel Tov to Dale and Larry Solomon on the birth of their
son, Harris Scott, on May 22 at Women's Hospital. Harris
weighed in at 7 pounds, 15 ounces-
Hal and Judie Goodman, who own Adventure '79 la two-for-
one entertainment club) led a group of 50 members of a four-day
trip to Ochos Rios in Jamaica. The vacationers ranged in ages
from 35-65 years. Hal and Judie plan more exciting trips in the
future, possibly even one to Israel.
Visiting Milt and Erin Carp for a short stay were Mr. and
Mrs. Hyman Carp, (Milt's parents) from Charleston, W. Va.
They were here enjoying the Florida weather and grand-
daughter, Sasha. Also staying with the Carps was Erin's father,
Howard Abramson, whose Tampa apartment was under three
feet of flood water after our recent torrential rainstorm.
Mr. and Mrs. Bookie Buchman recently loaned the use of their
home to the Culbreath Isles Garden Club for their annual picnic
for members and their husbands.
A cap and gown will play an important part in the lives of
highschool seniors this week. Many will not only be anticipating
the end of an era and wonderfully exciting summer vacation
plans but will be looking ahead to the fall and this, the
beginning of college. We would like to tell you where some of
these college-bound seniors are headed:
Tommy Barkin, Harvard; Snookie Walboreky, Wellesley;
Emily Heller, Goucher; Tracy Taub, Northwestern; Nancy
Shimberg, Northwestern; Aileen Miller, University of Michigan,
Gary Waltzer, Colorado College; Lauren Osiason, Emory
University; Linda Latter, Emory's Oxford; Lori Tenenblatt,
University of South Florida; Randee Schafer, University of
South Florida.
Also, Eileen Weiaman, Vicki Horn, Fredda Brinen, Andrea
Woolf, Shari Stupp, Alan Sandier, Fern Rabinowitz, Larry
Oiiphant, Cacky Levy, David Wolfson and Robbie Brunhild, all
University of Florida; Michael Echelman, Emory; Sheldon
Hauben, Vanderbilt; Paula LeBov, Furman; Betsy Corwin,
(after having taken a year off), Johns Hopkins; and Christ!
Guerre. University of South Florida.
Mr. and Mrs. Barney Humes are celebrating "double doc-
tors" these days. Their son, David, will graduate from the
University of Florida College of Medicine and will do his
residency in Columbia, S.C. Their son, Stanley, will graduate
from the University of South Florida College of Medicine and
will be a resident in Birmingham, Ala.
Tonight is a joyous one for 29-year-old Barbara Goldstein as
she celebrates her Bat Mitzvah at Temple Schaarai Zedek by
leading the Sabbath service. About a year ago, Barbara decided
to attend the Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah classes held at the
Temple and taught by Rabbi Frank Sundheim because, "I
didn't know what was going on at the services and felt com-
pletely lost, and later on, I came to realize that every Jew has a
responsibility to learn about himself and his role in his religion."
In addition to Barbara's husband, Brace, her grandmother,
Mrs. Sadie Block, from Miami will be at the temple for the big
night. Barbara added that Stephanie, her 2'/i-year-old daughter,
was not invited to the Bat Mitzvah, and hopefully the baby,
whom Barbara is expecting on July 4, will not make an ap-
pearance either! Our most sincere congratulations on this special
event, Barbara.
Our hearty congratulations to the newly elected officers
(1979-80) of the Tampa Chapter of Women's American ORT.
They are Gretchen Hollander, president; Michelle Winnlck,
Aida Weiasman, Maraha Polin, Maxine Stark and Wendy Fier.
vice presidents; Barbara Leckner, treasurer; Gloria Berkowitz,
financial secretary; Audrey Romaner, corresponding secretary,
Sylvia Levy, parliamentarian.
These officers were installed Thursday, May 24, at a dinner.
We wish the new board a happy and productive year.
Howard Sinsley, chairman of the education committee at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom tells us that the school gaTWUI
be closing with a whopper of a picnic, being held at rrnJippe
Park. This annual religious school picnic is being sponsored by
ithe Men's Club and will take place on Sunday, June 3, at 10 a.m.
(- so don't be late! In addition to a delicious lunch, there will be
' an awards assembly, and lots of fun and games.
More high school graduates: from Plant High School, Ellen
Sue Levine, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irv Levine, from Tampa
Bay Technical School, Andy Poxin, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel
Poxin; from Jefferson High School, Eatrella Parter, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Parter.
Meet Jackie and Joe Leipxiger who moved to the Davis
Islands area from St. Louis, Mo., nine months ago. The Leip-
zigers have a 13-year-61d daughter, Stephanie, who is an active
eighth grader at Wilson Junior High School, In addition to
being a Bat Mitzvah this past December, Stephanie plays
trumpet in her school band and participates in the Schaarai
Zedek Junior Youth Group. Joe occupies the majority of his
time as the assistant manager of the Lawton's Jewelry Store at
Westshore. Jackie has become very involved in the temple where
she is the Oneg Shabbat chairman for sisterhood and works in
the religious school office and in the library two days a week.
The Leipzigers love the water, so it looks like they have moved
to the right place and we're happy to have them here!
Until next week......
WHO Pulls
Back To Suspend
Israel's Vote
GENEVA (JTA) Thf^
World Health Organization
shelved for one year an Arab-
sponsored move to suspend
Israel's voting rights in the
organization. The shelving
followed a move by a main com-
mittee of WHO's annual
assembly which accepted a com-
promise proposal from its
Mozambique chairman after a
series of behind-the-scenes nego-
tiations to avert an open clash
between Islamic states and
Western nations.
The proposal noted that a
special WHO committee on
health conditions in Israeli-
occupied areas had not visited
the region this year. It called for
the three-member team to
conduct a new on-the-spot invuj
tigation and report back next
year.
Preparing to test drive the new bus for the Senior Citizen project of the Jewish Community Center are thr a'
project workers. Seated in front, Dale Johnson; clockwise: Sara Richter, JCCpresident; Susan Treitman
and Donna Davis. ^tuAo by Audrey Haubenstock
t!
s
Sanka fills your cup with ta'am
BRAND DECAFFEIMATEO COFFEE
not caffein.
C Oncr.l Foodi Corporation. IW9
If you love coffee but are concerned about
caffein, try SANKA- Brand Decaffeinated Cof-
fee. SANKA* Brand is a blend of African coffee
beans for strength, South American for
smoothness100% real coffee for real coffee
ta'am. No wonder more people drink SANKA*
Brand than all other decaffeinated coffees
combined. Even doctors drink and recommend
SANKA* Brand more than any other decaffein-
ated coffee. So if caffein bothers any of your
family, reach for SANKA* Brand. 97% caffein-
free, it's a cup full of ta'am.
K CERTIFIED KOSHER
The 100% real coffee that lets you be your best.
?..*?
I


Ly, June 1,1979
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Page 11
Left to right, Karla Edelson and Jennifer Golub took a snack break
during the day.
to right, Kim Edelson, EUse Cohen and Sarah Dolgin rode the tram during the Temple Schaarai
ek Junior Youth Group trip to River Country at Disney world. ^*
fo Anti-Semitism
bviets Introduce the China Factor
LSHINGTON The Soviet
has given a "potentially
ler edge" to its virulent
pionism by adding the
\& Factor," Dr. William
a specialist on Soviet
[s, charges.
a report to B'nai B'rith
[national. Dr. Korey, the
pzation's director of inter-
nal policy research, declares
the coupling of the
lin's "unceasing anti-
It propaganda assault,
incorporates every anti-
lie canard," with its media
against China "only
is the anxiety of a Soviet
i community."
f. KOREY says the "China
r" was introduced in 1971
ladimir Begun, the Soviet
s Julius Streicher. Writing
Minsk journal, Belarus,
cited U.S. Secretary, of
J Henry Kissinger's contacts
(Chinese Communist Party
Mao Tse-tung and warned
Ihey were being made under
banner of the "six-comered
bf David."
cause of the publication's
pve obscurity, the "China
or" did not gain much
linence until this year, Dr.
fy says. "Since January, the
na Factor' has been in-
fently repeated and has
pie a central element of the
ets* anti-Zumist campaign,"
?serts.
^e opening shot was fired by
on Jan. 8. In an English-
Jage radio broadcast, Tass
>red that China was
inng to establish diplomatic
*3ns with Israel, an act
|h would demonstrate
(oist double-dealing in the
East."
AN Arab-language broad-
the same day, Radio Moscow
led that "Peking supports
la demands for annexing
vest Bank, Gaza and the
Heights.'
Jo weeks later, Dr. Korey
the Ukrainian Communist
t> organ, Komsomolskoye
-i. claimed that China and
fsm were intimately linked
jo forces "inherent" in their
|<'K'ies: racism and
nation.
publication quoted
se Deputy Premier Kehg
las having said, "What the
jse and the Jewish people
lin common is the' fact that
llove for their country is
per than that of any other
and contended that this
ftuted "open racism."
*g was also accused of
"ing plans for world
hegemony" while Israel was
charged with "trying to dictate
its will to the neighboring
countries," Dr. Korey reports.
THE SOVIET publication said
that because the Chinese were
trying to establish close ties with
the United States an issue
placed on the agenda of the U.S.
Congress it was inevitable
that Peking would seek "to
assure for itself the support of the
influential pro-Israeli lobby."
Dr. Korey reports that Pravda
put the issue in the spotlight on
Jan. 25. In a leading article, one
of the Soviet Union's principal
anti-Semitic ideologists. Vladimir
Bolshakov. contended that China
was preparing to "normalize"
relations with Israel and that the
United States was "actively sup-
porting these steps" by en-
couraging international Zionism.
He described Zionism as "one of
the shock troops of U.S. im-
perialism."
I What the Pope Really Said I
ROME V(JTA) When Msgr. Hilarion
Capucci made a bravado declaration in an interview
after his Papal audience May 8 to the effect that the
Pope, "who fought in his country (Poland) against
the Nazis," had "understood" Capucci's "problem,"
he omitted the Pope's reply in their private audience.
ACCORDING TO reliable sources, when
Capucci told Pope John Paul II, "I defended my
people just as you did yours in Poland," the Pope
raised his finger at him and said, "In Poland we
defended morality without engaging in politics
whereas you engaged in politics without taking
morality into account."
While there has been "no comment" by the
Vatican on Capucci's statements, informed sources
reveal he is being watched very closely because of the
Vatican's honor in holding to its agreement with
Israel at the time of Capucci's release in 1977.
\ Synagogue Directory
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL
2111 Swann Avenue 255-6371 or 251-4275 Rabbi Nathan Bryn
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily: morning and
evening minyan
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue251 -4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services:
Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily: morning and evening
minyan
CONGREGATION KOI AMI
885-3356 Allan Fox, President Serv.es: first and third Friday of
each month at the Community Lodge, Waters and Ola, 8 p. m.
CONGREGATION RODEPH SH0L0M (Conservative)
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Hazzan William Hauben
Services: Friday, 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15
am.; Sunday, 9a.m.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK (Reform)
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim Services:
Friday, 8 p.m.
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewish Student Center (USF), 3645 Fletcher Avenue 971-6768 or
985-7926 Rabbi Lazar Rivkin Rabbi Yakov Werde Services:
Friday, 8 p.m. Shabbos meal follows services Saturday, 10a.m. -
Kiddush follows services.
HILLEL
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida, 13422 Village
Circle, Apt. 121 988-7076 or 988-1234 Rabbi Mark Kram Ser-
vices: Friday, 7:30 p.m.
Israel Frees 16 Arabs
As Begin Vowed to Sadat
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Less than 24 hours after
the Sadat-Begin announcement about release from
prison of a number of prisoners, Israel has freed 16
Arabs suspected and indicted for terrorist activities.
It might be the first group of freed terrorists in
accordance with an agreement for an Israeli gesture to
Sadat and two more groups might be released soon.
IT WAS LEARNED that the group of 16 includes
ten persons detained upon an administrative order (not
sentenced) and six who were sentenced by courts for
imprisonment two or three years with only one #ho
was sentenced to five years imprisonment.
It was stated that the guideline of the released
prisoners was that they do not endanger Israel's
security. Seven of the freed prisoners have crossed the
El Arish checkpoint into Egyptian-held territory. The
others preferred to stay in Judea and Samaria and the
Gaza Strip. .
Jewish Community Center
Summer Activities
2808 Horatio, Tampa, Florida 33609
AQUATOTS
Parent and child swim
together in our pool
under the guidance of
a qualified instructor.
Open to any age
pre-schooler.
Tuesdays Thursdays
12:15-1:00 P.M.
FEES
4 Weeks:
$12.00 Member
$17.00 Non-member
8 weeks:
$20.00 Member
$25.00 Non-member
PLAYTOTS
Parent and child Par-
ticipate together in free
play, manipulative ac-
tivities, art and music
experiences.
Open to children
18 mo.3yrs.
Tuesdays & Thursdays
9:30 A.M.-10:00 A.m.
or
11:00 A.M. 12:00 noon
FEES
4 weeks
$12.00 Members
$17.00 Non-Members
8 weeks:
$20.00 Members
$25.00 Non-members
DATES
1st Session June 19-July 12
2nd Session July 17-Aug. 9
.
Parents may choose either 4 week session or
full 8 weeks. Parents may choose either Aquatots
|or Playtots, or both.
For information call
Barbara Richman at the
Jewish Community Center
872-4451


V
o
u
H
(8
G
to
U
n
fr.
w
I
Outflanked
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Full Text
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Friday, June 1,1979
.'.trice presidents; Barbara Leckner. treasurer; Gloria Berkowite,
financial secretary; Audrey Romaner, corresponding secretary,
Sylvia Levy, parliamentarian.
These officers were installed Thursday, May 24, at a dinner.
We wish the new board a happy and productive year.
Howard Stanley, chairman of the education committee at
Congregation Rodeph Sholom tells us that the school year wdl
be closing with a whopper of a picnic, being held at frnUppe
i Park. This annual religious school picnic is being "Ponsored by
I ithe Men's Club and will take place on Sunday, June 3 at
| so don't be late! In addition to a delicious hinch, there will De
Jjan awards assembly, and lots of fun and games.
More high school graduates: from Plant High School, Ellen
Sue Levine, daughter of Mr. and Mra. Irv Levin*; from Tampa
Bay Technical School, Andy Poaln, son of Mr. and Mrs. Mel
Porin; from Jefferson High School, Eatrella Parter. daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Parter.
Meet Jackie and Joe Leipriger who moved to the Davis
Islands area from St. Louis, Mo., nine months ago. The Leip-
zigers have a 13-year-bld daughter, Stephanie, who is an active
eighth grader at Wilson Junior High School, In addition to
being a Bat Mitzvah this past December, Stephanie plays
trumpet in her school band and participates in the Schaarai
Zedek Junior Youth Group. Joe occupies the majority of his
time as the assistant manager of the Lawton's Jewelry Store at
Westshore. Jackie has become very involved in the temple where
she is the Oneg Shabbat chairman for sisterhood and works in
the religious school office and in the library two days a week.
The Leipzigers love the water, so it looks like they have moved
to the right place and we're happy to have them here!
Until next week.
Karen A Iter
Barbara Goldstein
(Call me about your social news at 872-4470).
We just had to rave about Karen Alter, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Gary Alter, who recently won president of the year first
place award for Junior Achievement of Tampa. Karen was
presented her plaque by Jim Walter at an award banquet held at
the Holiday Inn, May 10. Additionally, Karen wins an all- |
expense-paid trip to the National Junior Achievement Con-
ference being held in Bloomington, Ind., in August. This will be
Karen's second year attending the conference which is quite an
honor considering that only the top 1 '/t per cent of all the junior
achievers in the United States get to go. A hearty round of
applause for you, Karen this is an outstanding ac-
complishment.
Mazel Tov to Dale and Larry Solomon on the birth of then-
son, Harris Scott, on May 22 at Women's Hospital. Harris
weighed in at 7 pounds, 15 ounces.
Hal and Judie Goodman, who own Adventure '79 la two-for-
one entertainment club) led a group of 50 members of a four-day
trip to Ochos Rios in Jamaica. The vacationers ranged in ages
from 35-65 years. Hal and Judie plan more exciting trips in the
future, possibly even one to Israel.
Visiting Milt and Erin Carp for a short stay were Mr. and
Mrs. Hymen Carp, (Milt's parents) from Charleston, W. Va.
They were here enjoying the Florida weather and grand-
daughter, Sasha. Also staying with the Carps was Erin's father,
Howard Abramson, whose Tampa apartment was under three
feet of flood water after our recent torrential rainstorm.
Mr. and Mrs. Bookie Buchman recently loaned the use of then-
home to the Culbreath Isles Garden Club for their annual picnic
for members and their husbands.
A cap and gown will play an important part in the lives of
highschool seniors this week. Many will not only be anticipating
the end of an era and wonderfully exciting summer vacation
plans but will be looking ahead to the fall and this, the
beginning of college. We would like to tell you where some of
these college-bound seniors are headed:
Tommy Bar kin. Harvard; Snookie Walborsky, Wellesley;
Emily Heller, Goucher; Tracy Taub, Northwestern; Nancy
Shimberg, Northwestern; Aileen Miller, University of Michigan,
Gary Waltzer, Colorado College; Lauren Oaiaaon, Emory
University; Linda Latter, Emory's Oxford; Lori Tenenblatt.
University of South Florida; Randee Schafer, University of
South Florida.
Also, Eileen Weisman, Vicki Horn, Fredda Brinen, Andrea
Woolf, Shari Stupp, Alan Sandier, Fern Rabinowitz, Larry
Oliphant, Cacky Levy, David Wolfson and Robbie Brunhild, all
University of Florida; Michael Echelman, Emory; Sheldon
Hauben, Vanderbilt; Paula LeBov, Furman; Betsy Corwin,
(after having taken a year off), Johns Hopkins; and Christ!
Guerre, University of South Florida.
Mr. and Mrs. Barney Haimes are celebrating "double doc-
tors" these days. Their son, David, will graduate from the
University of Florida College of Medicine and will do his
residency in Columbia, S.C. Their son, Stanley, will graduate
from the University of South Florida College of Medicine and
will be a resident in Birmingham, Ala.
Tonight is a joyous one for 29-year-old Barbara Goldstein as
she celebrates her Bat Mitzvah at Temple Schaarai Zedek by
leading the Sabbath service. About a year ago, Barbara decided
to attend the Adult Bar/Bat Mitzvah classes held at the
Temple and taught by Rabbi Frank Sundheim because, "I
didn't know what was going on at the services and felt com-
pletely lost, and later on, I came to realize that every Jew has a
responsibility to learn about himself and his role in his religion."
In addition to Barbara's husband, Brace, her grandmother,
Mrs. Sadie Block, from Miami will be at the temple for the big
night Barbara added that Stephanie, her 2 '/i-year-old daughter,
was not invited to the Bat Mitzvah, and hopefully the baby,
whom Barbara is expecting on July 4, will not make an ap-
pearance either! Our most sincere congratulations on this special
event, Barbara.
Our hearty congratulations to the newly elected officers
(1979-80) of the Tampa Chapter of Women's American ORT.
They are Gretchen Hollander, president; Michelle Wlnnick,
Aide Weiaaman, Marsha Polln, Maxine Stark and Wendy Fler,
WHO Pulls
Back To Suspend
Israel's Vote
GENEVA (JTA) Thf
World Health Organization
shelved for one year an Arab-
sponsored move to suspend
Israel's voting rights in the
organization. The shelving
followed a move by a main com-
mittee of WHO's annual
assembly which accepted a com-
promise proposal from its
Mozambique chairman after a
series of behind-the-scenes nego-
tiations to avert an open clash
between Islamic states and
Western nations.
The proposal noted that a
special WHO committee on
health conditions in Israeli-
occupied areas had not visited
the region this year. It called for
the three-member team to
conduct a new on-the-spot invi>
tigation and report back next
year.
Preparing to test drive the new bus for the Senior Citizen project of the Jewish Community Center are the
project workers. Seated in front, Dale Johnson; clockwise: Sara Richter, JCCpresident; Susan Treitman
and Donna Davis. photo by Audrey Haubenstock
Sanka fills your cup with taam
not caffein.
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The 100% real coffee that lets you be your best.



Left to right, Karla Edelson and Jennifer Golub took a snack break
during the day.
jto right, Kim Edelson, Elise Cohen and Sarah Dolgin rode the tram during the Temple Schaarai
tk Junior Youth Group trip to River Country at Disneyworld.
o Anti-Semitism
Soviets Introduce the China Factor
3HINGT0N The Soviet
has given a "potentially
Br edge" to its virulent
lion ism by adding the
Factor," Dr. William
a specialist on Soviet
f, charges.
ka report to B'nai B'rith
ational, Dr. Korey, the
Ration's director of inter-
policy research, declares
I the coupling of the
lin's "unceasing anti-
propaganda assault,
incorporates every anti-
canard," with its media
against China "only
the anxiety of a Soviet
I community."
KOREY says the "China
was introduced in 1971
adimir Begun, the Soviet
|s Julius Streicher. Writing
Minsk journal, Belarus,
cited U.S. Secretary of
lenry Kissinger's contacts
Chinese Communist Party
I Mao Tse-tung and warned
lay were being made under
inner of the "six-cornered
David."
lause of the publication's
Ve obscurity, the "China
did not gain much
|nence until this year, Dr.
says. "Since January, the
Factor' has been in-
Jtly repeated and has
Be a central element of the
is' anti-Zionist campaign,"
erts.
opening shot was fired by
|on Jan. 8. In an English-
age radio broadcast, Tass
fed that China was
fing to establish diplomatic
ins with Israel, an act
would demonstrate
kist double-dealing in the
East."
[AN Arab-language broad-
ne same day, Radio Moscow
that "Peking supports
Is demands for annexing
feat Hank, Gaza and the
(Heights."
weeks later, Dr. Korey
the Ukrainian Communist
organ, Komsomolskoye
I. claimed that China and
were intimately linked
forces "inherent" in their
Dries: racism and
ation.
publication quoted
e Deputy Premier Kehg
is having said, "What the
and the Jewish people
common is the' fact that
\ove for their country is
er than that of any other
and contended that this
hated "open racism."
ig was also accused of
>nK plans for world
hegemony" while Israel was
charged with "trying to dictate
its will to the neighboring
countries," Dr. Korey reports.
THE SOVIET publication said
that because the Chinese were
trying to establish close ties with
the United States an issue
placed on the agenda of the U.S.
Congress it was inevitable
that Peking would seek "to
assure for itself the support of the
influential pro-Israeli lobby."
Dr. Korey reports that Pravda
put the issue in the spotlight on
Jan. 25. In a leading article, one
of the Soviet Union's principal
anti-Semitic ideologists. Vladimir
Bolshakov, contended that China
was preparing to "normalize"
relations with Israel and that the
United States was "actively sup-
porting these steps" by en-
couraging international Zionism.
He described Zionism as "one of
the shock troops of U.S. im-
[xrialism."
I What the Pope Really Said I
ROME MJTA) When Msgr. Hilarion
Capucci made a bravado declaration in an interview
after his Papal audience May 8 to the effect that the
Pope, "who fought in his country (Poland) against
the Nazis," had "understood" Capucci's "problem,"
he omitted the Pope's reply in their private audience.
ACCORDING TO reliable sources, when
Capucci told Pope John Paul II, "I defended my
people just as you did yours in Poland," the Pope
raised his finger at him and said, "In Poland we
defended morality without engaging in politics
whereas you engaged in politics without taking
morality into account."
While there has been "no comment" by the
Vatican on Capucci's statements, informed sources
reveal he is being watched very closely because of the
Vatican's honor in holding to its agreement with
Israel at the time of Capucci's release in 1977
I B
Synagogue Directory
CONGREGATION BETH ISRAEL
2111 Swann Avenue 255-6371 or 251-4275 Rabbi Nathan Bryn
Services: Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily: morning and
evening minyan
TEMPLE DAVID
2001 Swann Avenue251 -4215 Rabbi Samuel Mallinger Services:
Friday, 6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. Daily: morning and evening
minyan ,
CONGREGATION KOL AMI
885 3356 Allan Fox, President Services: first and third Friday of
each month at the Community Lodge, Waters and Ola, 8 p. m
CONGREGATION RODEPH SH0L0M (Conservative)
2713 Bayshore Boulevard 837-1911 Hazzan William Hauben
Services: Friday, 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. Daily: Minyan, 7:15
a.m.; Sunday, 9a.m.
CONGREGATION SCHAARAI ZEDEK (Reform)
3303 Swann Avenue 876-2377 Rabbi Frank Sundheim Services:
Fridoy, 8p.m
CHABAD HOUSE
Jewish Student Center (USF), 3645 Fletcher Avenue 9/1-6768 or
985-7926 Rabbi Lazor Rivkin Rabbi Yakov Werde Services:
Friday, 8 p.m Shabbos meal follows services Saturday, 10a.m. -
Kiddush follows services.
HILLEL
Jewish Student Center, University of South Florida, 13422 Village
Circle, Apt. 121 988-7076 or 988-1234 Rabbi Mark Kram Ser-
vices: Friday, 7:30 p.m.
Israel Frees 16 Arabs
As Begin Vowed to Sadat
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Less than 24 hours after
the Sadat-Begin announcement about release from
prison of a number of prisoners, Israel has freed 16
Arabs suspected and indicted for terrorist activities.
It might be the first group of freed terrorists in
accordance with an agreement for an Israeli gesture to
Sadat and two more groups might be released soon.
IT WAS LEARNED that the group of 16 includes
ten persons detained upon an administrative order (not
sentenced) and six who were sentenced by courts for
imprisonment two or three years with only one #ho
was sentenced to five years imprisonment.
It was stated that the guideline of the released
prisoners was that they do not endanger Israel's
security. Seven of the freed prisoners have crossed the
El Arish checkpoint into Egyptian-held territory. The
others preferred to stay in Judea and Samaria and the
Gaza Strip. M
Jewish Community Center
Summer Activities
2808 Horatio, Tampa, Florida 33609
AQUATOTS
Parent and child swim
together in our pool
under the guidence of
3 qualified instructor.
Open to any age
pre-schooler.
Tuesdays Thursdays
12:15-1:00 P.M.
FEES
4 Weeks:
$12.00 Member
$17.00 Non-member
8 weeks:
$20.00 Member
$25.00 Non-member
PLAYTOTS
Parent and child Par-
ticipate together in free
play, manipulative ac-
tivities, art and music
experiences.
Open to children
18 mo.3yrs.
Tuesdays & Thursdays
9:30 A.M. 10:00 A.m.
or
11:00 A.M.- 12:00 noon
FEES
4 weeks
$12.00 Members
$17.00 Non-Members
8 weeks:
$20.00 Members
$25.00 Non-members
DATES
1st Session June 19-July 12
2nd Session July 17-Aug. 9
Parents may choose either 4 week session or
full 8 weeks. Parents may choose either Aquatots
;or Playtots, or both.
For information call
Barbara Richman at the
Jewish Community Center
872-4451


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