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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( August 9, 1985 )

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
August 9, 1985

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Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00384

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
August 9, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00384

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
W^ The Jewish ^ y
FloridiaN
of South County
[Number 26
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, August 9,1965
Fndsnochti Price 35 Cents
Religious Leaders
...page 12
Ion Dateline
>st...
Name
>age3
Envoy...
Take Second Look at Recent Vatican 'Notes' on Jews
titute
For
[Union
tRNBAUM
- (JTA) -
Weiss, na-
of the Stu-
for Soviet
upon Jews
lizations to
lemands for
jrning any
Interests in
jn as they
|g for South
Page2
Top
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Catholic and Jewish leaders
engaged in Jewish-Christian
relations held an all-day con-
sultation here last week to
discuss a new set of Vatican
guidelines on Catholic
Jewish relations which had
been sharply criticized by
five Jewish organizations
comprising the Interna-
tional Jewish Committee on
Interreligious Consultations
when the guidelines were
issued in June.
The Jewish and Catholic leaders
at the meeting here, which was
convened by the American Jewish
Committee, agreed on the need
for more ecumenical dialogue to
clarify the issues the AJCommit-
tee reported in disclosing that the
meeting was held as a follow-up to
the criticism of the guidelines by
IJCIC.
THE GUIDELINES. "Notes
on the Correct Way to Present the
Jews and Judaism in Preaching
and Catechesis in the Roman
Catholic Church," were issued on
June 26 after three years of
preparation.
Although the Notes were
greeted with some praise as an ef-
fort to overcome ignorance of the
history and traditions of Judaism,
IJCIC said the Notes were a
regression from the historic
Nostra Aetate (Our Times) which
emerged from Vatican Council II
in 1964 and 1974 "Guidelines and
Suggestions for the Application of
the Declaration Nostra Aetate."
IJCIC said in a statement in
June that the Notes failed to
acknowledge the religious
significance of Israel and referred
only briefly and superficially to
the Holocaust. IJCIC member-
agencies are the AJCommittee,
Israel Interfaith Committee,
World Jewish Congress, Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, and the Synagogue Council
of America, representing the con-
gregational and rabbinic agencies
of American Reform, Conser-
vative and Orthodox Judaism.
THE IJCIC criticism warned
that the "Notes may undermine
the gains we have achieved
through dialogue, joint study and
joint action in recent years." The
statement asserted that the Notes
were "totally inadequate in pro-
viding Catholics with sufficient
guidelines on how to teach, preach
and understand" the Holocaust
and the creation of Israel, the two
events which have "decisivelv
Continued on Page 15
Zionism Erased from 'Racist' List
By NANCY LIGHT
NAIROBI, Kenya -
(JTA) The United Nations
End of the Decade Women's
Conference adopted a con-
sensus final document on
strategies for women to the
year 2000 which after days
of acrimonious debate,
wrangling, and anti-Israel
and anti-Zionist rhetoric,
was free of any explicit
reference to Zionism as a
form of racism.
Jewish Forum Takes
Stand On 'Who Is a Jew'
[Jewish Agen-
des decided in
rish religious
took a stand
issue; yet,
hardly men-
according to
overwhelm-
for two
> this effect.
j elements in
Assembly,
one Israeli
the strong
vociferous opposition many of the
delegates had expected to
encounter.
Jim Baer, former president of
the South County Jewish Federa-
tion and Florida state chairman
for Project Renewal, felt the im-
portance of the Assembly was far
beyond that accorded it by press
coverage. "Apart from reinforc-
ing the agreement with the Israeli
Government not to change the
Law of Return without consulting
with the Jewish Agency, the
Assembly stated that any changes
in the law would be divisive for the
Jewish People, and may create
division between Israel and the
Diaspora," Baer pointed out. "In
addition, the Jewish Agency
resolved to fund and provide its
facilities and services equally to
all who qualify, regardless of
religious affiliation."
(The Law of Return is the basis
of the controversy over "Who Is a
Jew." The Orthodox elements, for
have souqht to have it
years.
Continued on Page 3
ins To Co-Chair Assembly Reps
delegation
rish Federa-
smbly this
isband-and-
lir per sons.
iman. M.D.,
president of
rish Federa-
^ppointment
last week,
lumans will
est delega-
I community.
j aee a young
nans so en-
png to keep
deration in
Duth Coun-
8obick said.
lbly takes
this year,
[to Sunday
Bst gather-
|p in North
than 200
rish com-
ld Canada
is an
This was clearly a victory for
Israel and Western democracies
which had indicated that they
would not vote for or agree to any
document which included the for-
mula equating Zionism with
racism. It was also a victory in
contrast to the two previous UN
women's conferences, in Mexico
City and in Copenhagen, where
documents including the equation
were adopted, both in opposition
to Israel, the United States and
some Western countries.
BERNICE TANNENBAl M.
chairperson of the World Zionist
Organization-American Section, a
delegate to this conference who
had attended the mid-decade con-
ference in Copenhagen, said that
the Israeli and Jewish delegates
here were better prepared this
time to prevent unduly virulent
attacks on Zionism.
She asserted that the American
delegation, led by Maureen
Reagan, supported the Jewish and
Israeli delegates all the way and
cited as evidence a Senate resolu-
tion passed two weeks ago that
called for the repudiation of
Zionism as racism and urged
parliaments all over the world to
pass similar resolutions.
Beverly Davis, president of
B'nai B'rith Women Interna-
tional, a delegate to the con-
ference, said that if Zionism had
been attacked in the final version
in the consensus document, the
American Jewish delegation was
prepared to walk out of the
gathering.
She said that for the past three
years, tremendous outreach ef-
forts had been made by Jewish
women around the world to im-
part a greater understanding of
the real meaning and contribu-
tions of Zionism to issues affec-
ting women. As a result of this ef-
fort, Davis said that many non-
Jewish women here were less
hostile and more understanding.
A KEY ROLE in the wording of
the final consensus document was
played by the Kenyan delegation.
Acting as peacemaker and
negotiator in an effort to
safeguard the consensus when the
issue of including Zionism nearly
divided the conference and en-
dangered the possibility of a con-
sensus statement, the Kenyan
delegation appealed to the African
delegates, in a special meeting
called during a recess in the last
hours of the conference Friday, to
mediate with Arab delegations for
the benefit and good of the con-
ference in developing forward-
looking strategies for women
worldwide.
When the session reconvened,
the Kenyan delegation proposed
an amendment to the proposed
document that deleted the word
Zionism from the text of
Paragraph 95 that compared it to
apartheid, racism, imperialism
and colonialism. Instead, the
phrase "and all other forms of
racism" was inserted.
The first to respond to the
amendment was the Soviet
delegation, saying they would ac-
cept the new wording on the basis
of consensus, not vote. As consen-
sus began to gather momentum
the Palestine Liberation
Organization delegates said they,
too, were willing to accept the
wording, although they would
have preferred the original text
Continued on Page 8
Daniel and Barbara Schuman.
otolaryngologist (head and neck
surgeon), with a practice in West
Boca. During the past year he was
a member of the Zealots group in
the 1985 Men's Division Cam-
paign. He is a member of B'nai
Torah Congregation.
Barbara Schuman is a member
of the Federation's Board of
directors, a committee member of
the Adolph and Rose Levis JCC.
airwoman of the
Women's Division Pacesetters
committee for 1985. She is a
member of the B'nai Torah Con-
gregation board of directors.
The Schumans attended the
General Assembly in Toronto last
year, "coming back refreshed and
with a renewed dedication to help
improve the quality of Jew ife
everywhere." in the words <>, rtar-
bara. They pointed out that par-
ticipation in the General Assembly
Continued on Page 5
Soviets Said To 'Warm'
Toward Israel's Diplomats
GENEVA (JTA) It was a small sign, but possibly
a significant one, that the Soviet Union is warming toward
Israel after 18 years of bitter hostility and broken
diplomatic ties witn the Jewish State, dating from the Six-
Day War.
Sari Rauber, Swiss correspondent at the Israeli daily,
Maariv, received an invitation to dine at the home of
Evgenie Korjev, the local Tass Bureau chief.
IT WAS THE FIRST time since 1967 that an Israeli
journalist was invited to the home of a Russian colleague.
Tass is the official Soviet news agency. The correspondent
of the Swiss Telegraphic Agency was also invited.
Rauber, who was president of the United Nations Press
Association here, has been invited in that capacity to Soviet
Embassy receptions marking the anniversary >f the 1917
Revolution.


.....a...JUWJi.'i
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday. August, 1966
'Struggle' Leaders Urge Divestiture for Soviet Union
Continued from Page 1
Africa.
Speaking at the SSSJ's annual
Tisha B'Av prayer service, held
one block from the Soviet Mission
to the United Nations in Manhat-
tan, Weiss emphasized strong ap-
proval for divestiture in South
Africa while scoring those who
would neglect to exert similar
pressure upon the Soviet Union to
end its repression of Jews.
"All power to those who seek to
end racism in South Africa," he
stressed, adding immediately that
"asking for divestiture in South
Africa without calling for an equal
demand for divestiture from the
Soviet Union is a double
standard."
WEISS WAS using the occa-
sion of the day of fasting and
prayer to introduce a campaign
that the SSSJ will begin in a few
months for divestiture of govern-
ment funds in companies that deal
with the Soviet Union.
According to Glenn Richter,
SSSJ national coordinator, the
organization has found recently
that New York and other states
are moving toward divestiture in
corporations that deal with South
Africa, and is asking for similar
action regarding investments in
the Soviet Union.
Richter said he has a list of
200-300 companies that dealt in
the 1970's with the USSR.
Although there are fewer today,
in part resulting from the Soviet
invasion of Afghanistan in 1979,
many firms today still have hefty
investments in the Soviet Union,
he said. Richter cited such giants
as Occidental Petroleum and Pep-
sico, which have huge interests
there.
The SSSJ, said Richter. is ask-
ing that these corporations "not
make profit over the backs of
those who are oppressed."
RICHTER ALSO referred to a
story in last week's Wall Street
Journal on the First Chicago
Rank. The article, datelined Lon-
don, stated that "this was the first
time since 1979 that a U.S. bank
has been publicly lead manager
for syndicated credit to the
USSR."
Also speaking at the service was
Avital Sharansky, wife of Soviet
Prisoner of Conscience Anatoly
Sharansky, who left that evening
for Helsinki. Finland, to attend
the commemoration ceremonies
of the 10th anniversary of the
signing of the Helsinki accords.
The Final Act, or "third basket"
of the accords, speaks of
guarantees of human rights, in-
cluding the right to emigrate, and
the preservation of human culture
and human contacts. In 1975, the
Chinese Scientist
To Visit Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A rank
ing faculty member of the Nanjing
(Nanking) Medical College will be
the first member of the People's
Republic of China's scientific
establishment to visit Israel. Prof.
Chu Si-Ming, head of the depart-
ment of physiology, has accepted
an invitation to serve as a member
of the scientific advisory board of
the eighth World Symposium on
Cardiac Pacing which will be held
in Israel next year.
Chu was invited by Prof. Henry
Neufeld of the Heart Institute at
Sheba Medical Center in Tel
Hashomer. The advisory board
will also include cardiologists
from the Soviet Union and
Poland. The symposum, expected
to be attended by 4,000 scientists,
will be one of the largest gather-
lr% ever held in Israel.
U.S. and Soviet Union were
among 35 signatories to the
accords.
Avital Sharansky, who was in
the U.S. to speak to members of
Congress and the Reagan Ad-
ministration on the eve of the con-
clave, will try to speak in Helsinki
with Secretary of State George
Shultz as well as Foreign
Ministers of other nations on
behalf of her husband and all
Soviet Jewish refuseniks.
It is also believed that she will
try to speak to newly-appointed
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze, who recently sue-
ceeded Andrei Gromyko in that
post. The ceremonies began
Tuesday.
Sharansky said she plans to
demonstrate in Helsinki, to bring
attention to "the case of the
400,000 Jews being 'held' in the
USSR," referring to those Jews
who have already applied for exit
visas and are still waiting.
WEISS, addressing the approx-
imately 400 persons gathered for
the service, said, "There is an at-
tempt by well-meaning Jews to
weaken the Jackson-Vanik
Amendment those who like to
throw candy to the Soviet Union
... I issue a warning towards
those who are involved in negotia-
tions that they dare not do
so."
The Amendment to the 1974
Foreign Trade Act pegs emigra
tion from Communist nations to
their status as Most Favored Na-
tion (MFN) for trade agreements
and large government loans.
"Until the Soviets are true to
their obligation to human rights,
when 400,000 Jews are free and
Anatoly is in Jerusalem, then we
can talk trade," said Weiss.
"Don't talk," he continued.
"Scream, shout." Giving in on the
Jackson-Vanik Amendment
without the assurance of quid pro
quo "would be absolute bankrupt-
cy," he declared. Also addressing
the group, which included men in
talleisim and tfillin reading from
the Torah and chanting psalms
and lamentations, was Israel Frid-
man, who had been in Moscow
during Sharansky's trial.
f
Avital Sharansky
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.
Friday, August 9, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
The Jewish Name Game
YITZC HAK DINUR
|at do the names
Gordon, Ochana,
[berg, Green, Haddad,
Koletkar, Hudeida,
Silverberg, Caspi,
jndon all have in com-
[They are all Jewish
and they can all be
h Israel while walking
(the street.
vissicitudes of Jewish life
[ the world have produced a
pn f Jewish names. In
this profusion has blended
\w mellowed by the addition
rew names. The result is
ne-watching in Israel is as
a game and hobby as
Etching in Britain and, at
bs, much more rewarding.
vish name can teach you
s [lersonal history
he came from, what his
vas before, how it has
\, why it has changed. It
llustrate Jewish history.
OF the quaint Jewish
c all heard of are the
fa forcible naming process
Russian and Austro-
lan empires about 200
lo. Jews did not have and
want to take family
mainly for religious
Jesuit: they were landed
Dies which were strange,
ies laughable, derisive,
ir even downright
Some examples are:
sen (Featherbush), Fetter
Bitterman (Bitter), Son-
Itday), Montag (Monday),
(Wednesday), Dreyer
ller), Bok (Big Ox).
prick (Gallows-rope) is one
post infamous of these.
UlStro-Hungarian Empire
So is the Czar. The Jews
rived them, and so have
James which, with the
of time, have lost their
mellowed and even
[traditionally Jewish.
Jewish names indicate
[origin: Brodie (Rumania),
(Poland), Berlin (Ger-
hideida (Yemen), Al-Fasi
Morocco), Moscowitz
Shirazi, Isfahani (Iran),
(Kolet, a village in the
bhtra province of India).
Mendoza, Sevilia, Mitedulla,
Castilia are grand old Sephardic
names originating in Spain. Al-
Kudsi means that the family
originated in Jerusalem. (Al-Kuds,
"The Holy One," is the Arabic ap-
pelative of Jerusalem).
MANY ARE common names in
the Jews' countries of residence:
Rosenberg, Birnbaum, Schneider
are all from Germany. Haddad is
common among Jews from
Arabic-speaking countries; so is
Hakim (a wise man), which among
Jews from that area indicates a
rabbi somewhere along the line,
just like Rabinovitch.
Simple patronymics (son of .)
are among the commonest of
Jewish names: Jacobson.
Jacobowitz, Abramson,
Michaelovitch, Yankelewits (ewitz
is "son of in Russian, and in
Rumanian it becomes ovici),
Yacovzadeh (in Persian means
"son of"). Yacovshvili (in
Georgian, shvili means "son of).
Many names relate to trades or
occupations: Schneider is a tailor
in Yiddish, and Hayat is also a
tailor in Hebrew. Mahler is a
painter; Stoller, a carpenter;
Kremer, a shopkeeper; Kreczmer,
an inkeeper; Goldschmitt, a
goldsmith; all in Yiddish.
Some ordinary names are
Hebrew words or, more
mysteriously, the initials of
Hebrew or Aramaic words. Touro
is Aramaic for a bull; Halaf is a
slaughterer's Knife; Dayan. a
religious judge; Katz hides the in-
itials /Cohen Tzedek a righteous
priest; Shub is the initials of
SAochet U Bodek slaughterer
and examiner; Ba-abad or Babad
is Ben-Av-flet-Din a descendant
of the president of a religious
court.
Some are contractions of long
Hebrew names as written in
Hebrew letters. All persons called
Yaavetz or Javitz or Javetz are
descended from a famous 18th
Century rabbi Yacov Emden
Ben Tzvi.
ALTHOUGH ISRAEL is the
great meeting ground of Jewish
names, the unique phenomenon
has been the flowering of tradi-
tional and modern Hebrew family
names. It is considered patriotic,
progressive and a sign of Jewish
feeline to take a Hebrew name.
Many of Israel's leaders did so.
Ben-Gurion was once called
Green. Golda Meir.was Meyerson.
Levi Eshkol was Shkolnik.
There are four ways of changing
a name to Hebrew: finding a
similar sounding Hebrew name
Shertok became Sharett; Mishkin-
sky becomes Mishkan; Neiman
becomes Ne'eman or Na'aman.
Shortening a name so it sounds
Hebrew: Levinski becomes Livni;
Michaelson becomes Michaeli.
Translating a name or a portion
of it to Hebrew: Perlmutter
becomes Dar (Mother of Pearl in
Hebrew); Schneider becomes
Hayat; Goldberg becomes Zahavi
or Har-Zahav; Goldschmitt
becomes Tzoref; names ending in
Stein or Stone become Avni (even
is Hebrew for stone);
Yaacobovicz, Yaacobzadeh,
Yacobshvili all become Ben-
Yaakov. The last way is simply to
change the name to something en-
tirely different. The late Yigal
Alon's name was previously Yigal
Paicovitch.
SIMILAR CHANGES were ef-
fected in English speaking coun-
tries when Jews wanted their
names to be less conspicuous.
Goldwasser became Goldwater.
Feinlight became Fine. In a more
elegant variation, via the media-
tion of French, Goldberg can
become Ormont or Montor. (In
Top Jewish Forum Takes
Stand On 'Who Is a Jew'
^ni inued from Page 1
to apply the right of
|1" Israel to those of Jewish
converted "according to
which would mean
tc'inuing conversions by
and some Conservative
'ha ugh several major at-
It" have the Knesset pass
[<"' ndment have failed, at
a narrow margin, the Or-
\l"irties in Israel have
their determination to
I"'"tndment passed.
tJewiah Agency was the
9r m Palestine of what
the Israeli Government
idence was declared
Later, as the body
"tmg Jews in the
r" the Jewish Agency
nant with the Israel
!""' which obligates the
consult with the Jewish
[ introducing legisla-
/ the Agency's June-
[ I'utzin, chairman of
Agency Executive
""'. 'turn falls in that
'he Jewish Agency
'i n, a ry body working with
"iigration to Israel
{"""ndment of the Law of
WmW directly affect this
One-time Olympic gold medallist Mark Spitz looks for his roots at
the Bet Hatefutsoth Museum of the Jewish Diaspora computer.
French. Or means gold, and mont
mount or berg.) Wittenberg
became Mountwitten (as under
different circumstances, during
the first World War, the present
British royal family's name was
changed from Battenberg to
Mountbatten.)
With a little patience, a name
can be chased as it changes, for
example, from Silberberg to
Silverberg, to Silver, to Har-
Kessef, to Caspi.
This name watching is a pleas-
ing personal hobby. However, Bet
Hatefutsoth, the Museum of the
Jewish Diaspora in Tel Aviv,
thinks that Jewish names are of
such cultural and historical impor-
tance that it has established a
special department for names,
from which people can obtain in-
formation on the origin of their
names and to which all are asked
to contribute information on
Jewish names.
Law Professor Criticizes
ABA-Soviet Agreement
the Jewish Agency x- T" '
paneled several years ago to in-
clude so-called "non-Zionist"
groups, and that means that
Reform, Conservative and other
Jewish groups which were not
part of the World Zionist
Organization are now in partner-
ship in the Agency's work and
thus with the State of Israel
this stand by the Jewish Agency
Assembly is of paramount impor-
tance, Baer declared.
Earlier, a more strongly worded
resolution barring any change in
the Law of Return was defeated
by a vote of 102 to 72. The later
version was passed 112 to 38 after
Executive Chairman Dulzin
pointed out that the existing ver-
sion of the Law of Return was ac-
cepted in a compromise by the
Mizrahi-affiliated National
Religious Party in 1969. "What
was good for you in '69 should be
good for you now as well," Dulzin
told the orthodox delegates. He
pointed out, also, that the Knesset
had members who were non-Jews,
and the Government, therefore,
had no right to decide "Who is a
Jew" that should be a matter
left to the entire Jewish People.
The assembly passed a budget
for fiscal 1985-86 of $414 million,
and an appropriation of $48
million for Project Renewal.
WASHINGTON Noted
Harvard law professor and
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews Advisory Board
member, Dr. Alan Der-
showitz, is expressing a mix-
ture of sadness and outrage
at the recent signing of a
mutual cooperation agree-
ment between the American
Bar Association and the
Association of Soviet
Lawyers.
Speaking at a press conference
at the Washington Hilton during
the ABA's Annual Convention,
Dr. Dershowitz stated, "Imagine
the public outcry that would greet
the American Bar Association if it
had just signed a cooperation
agreement based on mutual
respect with the official legal
organization of the apartheid
regime in South Africa or Kho-
meini's Islamic Republic of Iran.
Yet the ABA has done just that
and has done so without consider-
ing the human rights impact that
such an agreement will have on
the people who are struggling for
human rights in the Soviet
Union."
DERSHOWITZ, a scholar
whose expertise includes the
Soviet legal system, went on to
question the rationale of the
agreement: "What the Soviet
Union wants most from this
agreement is international
legitimization of its repressive
legal system. And this agreement,
co-signed by the most prestigious
and largest bar association in the
free world, gives it just that."
Dr. Dershowitz continued, "But
more important than what the
ABA has given the Soviet Union
is what the ABA has taken away
from thousands of political
prisoners and religious dissidents,
human rights activists, and
refuseniks, who are oppressed by
the Soviet legal system. These
heroic hostages of liberty risk
their freedom of life on a daily
basis precisely to show the world
that the Soviet legal system
deserves no mutual respect from
freedom-loving systems like our
own. And now, in one utterly
thoughtless fell swoop, the ABA
has made a mockery of this
cause."
Dershowitz plans to work within
the ABA establishment to bring
about an abrogation of the
U.S.-Soviet agreement. He in-
tends to work also with local ABA
chapters in hopes of refuting
these actions. The U.S.-Soviet
agreement can be terminated by
either side with a three-month
written notice.
Congregation Beth Ami
(A New Conservative Congregation) will hold
High Holy Day services at the J.C.C. in Boca
Raton. Tickets available at $50 each. Send
checks to 2134 N.W. 19th Way, Boca Raton,
FL 33431. For further information call,
276-8804,994-8693 or 392-6003
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer Cantor Mark Levi
CURTIS G.LEVTNF
ATTORNEY AT LAW
REAL ESTATE, CONDOMINIUM &
CONSTRUCTION DEFECT LITIGATION,
PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH
GENERAL PRACTICE INCLUDING TITLE INSURANCE,
CLOSINGS, COLLECTIONS, CORPORATION AND
PARTNERSHIP FORMATION, COMMERCIAL LITIGATION
SERVING THE LEGAL NEEDS OF PALM BEACH COUNTY SINCE 1973
1200 NORTH FEDERAL HWY. SUITE 200 BOCA RATON, FL 33432
CORPORATE PLACE AT GLADES ROAD
(305) 393-1923 (305) 394-8020
>
KVKNINt. & KMKW.KNCY


nit- jtfwisn r luriuian >>t .>ouir
"nTTay August V. l'v
Translating What
Soviets Have in Mind
For the Soviet Union, it is always a ques-
tion of quid pro quo. Even in the cause of
humanity, nothing will be done without an
immediate reward.
At Nairobi last week, in the final hours of
the Decade of Women's conference, the
Soviets agreed to a change in the wording of
a final resolution that once again lumped
Zionism with racists and racism. The change
removed Zionism from the offensive group-
ing. The Soviets went along but only by
consensus, not by vote. This was their price.
In space, there is nothing more reprehen-
sible to the Muscovite diplomat today than
the Strategic Defense Initiative, more
popularly known as Star Wars. In effect,
these diplomats are hot for keeping weapons
out of space entirely strictly speaking, the
Strategic Defense Initiative is not a
weapons system.
But such humanitarianism as the Soviets
display here can only be understood given an
awareness that the Soviets have been
secretly working for years now on a Star
Wars program all their own. And in fact,
given such weapons as there already are in
space today, the sad truth is that they are all
Soviet.
Method to Their Madness
So the Russian method of madness is not
so mad after all not in a world of
egotistical pragmatism. I am so worried,
Moscow declares, about the future of the
Planet Earth; therefore, let's cut out all
placement of holocaustic devices in space
from now on. Translation: now that we have
a monopoly of our own there.
Or, at Nairobi: Yes, we'll agree to a rewor-
ding of the Women's Decade farewell state-
ment that Zionism ought not to be lumped
into the list of genuinely racist movements
and nations. Translation: but let's all of us
do this by consensus, not individual vote.
Further translation: so that even
representatives of the Palestine Liberation
Organization at the conference can appear
to be noble as they also agree. And so that
the Soviet agreement to the change of wor-
ding cannot ultimately be laid upon the
Soviet Union as a specific Soviet decision at
another time and in another political context
where prior Soviet agreement to eradicate
Zionism from the pariah world of racism
may later prove to be embarrassing.
Given this Soviet mania for quid pro quo,
the sudden about-face in Muscovite manners
so far as Israel is concerned becomes
eminently understandable. Suddenly, Israeli
diplomats in embassies throughout the
world are being invited by especially cordial
requests for their presence at parties and
other social shindigs given by the Soviets at
their various embassies.
Sudden Pro-Israel Move
Suddenly, Soviet diplomats are showing
great friendliness, a desire to talk and even
to share thoughts about the state of the
world generally at third-party embassy func-
tions in the major capitals where both find
themselves as invited guests.
So persistent has this change in attitude
been, that both in Israel and in the Soviet
I nion itself there is the kind of upbeat feel-
ing that caused Ambassador Arye Levin,
Israel's deputy permanent representative to
the United Nations, to suggest recently that
the resumption of diplomatic relations bet-
ween the two countries "will come about
eventually because it is in the nature of
things."
Be that as it may, although Israel insists
that it won't do anything to start the pro-
cess because, after all, it was the Soviets
who broke diplomatic relations with the
Israelis in the first place, needed here is
some more translation of the quid pro quo
language that is so integral to the Soviet
experience.
Translation: Israel has been a thorn in the
side of the Soviets since the Six-Day War of
1967, in which the then dominant Soviet
client state in Araby, Egypt led by Gamal
Abdel Nasser, was given a merciless drubb-
ing and which led the Israeli-Soviet rupture.
With Israel's subsequent experience in the
Middle East, marked by an effective
American warning to the Soviets to keep
hands off as the Israelis recouped fi JTL
initial losses and again beat the Etrvntiar^
their surprise Yom Kippur attack; ofuB
the Soviets have been effectively isoZi
from the Israel-Arab struggle save fa
Syria tie. r lls
Further translation: The Rea?
Gorbachev talks due next November 2"
give the Soviets the kind of advantage i!
which they are accustomed only if they Z
show a mending of their ways so far a
Israel is concerned and a collateral isj
Jews within the Soviet Union.
The latter is a change in strategy 0vr
which the Sovies have complete control anri
surprising resumption of large-scale Jewish
exits from the Soviet Union may well be in
the offing. But the chief prize, so far
Moscow is concerned, is a renewed role in
Middle Eastern affairs when Reagan and
Gorbachev finally get down to their now.
wow.
This is the key to understanding the sud-
den warming of Soviet diplomatic attitudes
toward their Israeli counterparts. There is
nothing humanitarian about any of it. No
concern for peace. No new light. Just pi
old quid pro quo.
Press Digest
FlowdjaN
FRED SMOCMET
Editor and Publisher
SUZANNE SMOCMET
Executive Editor
MARTY ERANN
Director ot Communication*. South County jtnn FMniiori
uMtolwd WMtrf MWliitiiiHii nvoufh Mid-May. liWMtl) balance ol yeer ] liuiai
Second Clase Pottage Paid at Boca Raton Fla USPS &S0-2S0 ISSN 0374 (114
POSTMASTER: Scad address chances to The Jewish Florid ian
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Aatacrtiaiaf Oirerter. Steel lintf, Pfcee* SSS-IMZ
Combined Jewish Appeal South County Jewish Federation. Inc. Officers President
Marianne Boblck. Vice Presidents Mar|orie Beer. Eric W Decking**, Larry Charme
Secretary. Arnold Rosenlhal Treasurer. Sheldon Jontltt. Executive Director Rabbi Bruce S
Warshai
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Out ot Town Upon Reque
Friday, August 9. 1985 AB 5745
Volume 7 Number 26
(Compiled from Israeli dailies
and the English-language Jewish
Press, by MARTY ERANN,
Director of Communications,
South County Jewish
Federation) *^r
The general press carried
numerous articles, editorials and
news items about the UN Con-
ference on the Decade for Women
in the past two weeks.
Remarkably absent from most of
these was the real story of the
conference: it. like many other
UN forums in recent yean, was
turned into an anti-Semitic, aoU
Israel forum.
Contrary to optimistic expecta-
tions by some Jewish womenl
leaders, the U.S. delegation, head-|
ed by President Reagan's)
daughter Maureen, did not put upi
much of a fight, although months
before the conference Maureen
Reagan had declared that the U.S.
delegation would stand four-
square behind Israel.
So, when Israeli delegates like
Knesset Member Sarah Doron
rose to give her speech, there |
were disruptions, shouting of
slogans (like "death to the
Zionists," and "There will be no
peace until we are free of the
Jews") and even pushing and
shoving, and as many aa one third
of the delegates walked out.
Workshops on such topics as in-!
fant and child-care; battered
women; and water purification '
were taken over by apparently
well-prepared delegates from
Arab, Third World and Eastern
Bloc countries and were
dominated by anti-Zionist slogans,
accusations and rhetoric while
Israeli delegates were not given
the floor.
Undoubtedly, some good must
have been achieved for women's
cause by getting together 10,000
of them from all over the world at
such a conference. But the UN
, continues its abysmal slide as the
"politicization" of every forum
and agency grows to the detri-
ment of their stated aims. Israel
and Jews, on the other hand, still
seem to be prone, in such interna-
tional forums, to permitting
others to retain the initiative
while trying in vain to defend and
justify their position.
< Km of the women in the Israeli
delegation to the Nairobi Con-
ferenet was Kttie Hollander an
Ethiopian .lew who was returning
to Africa after living in Israel fur
15 years. She was tM subject of a
vicious attack in the conference
forum's official newspaper. The
French-language article was writ-
ten by an Arab woman, who ac-
cused Israel of using a black
Third-World refugee for its own
purposes. Ettie. who married a
Polish Jew and lives in Herzliya,
grew up in Gondar province as the
only Jew in her village, and had
experienced hatred the At the workshop on refugee
women and children, where the
chairwoman would not let Israeli
women speak, Ettie lost her pa-
tience when an Iraqi woman
charged that Israel was at fault
for the war between Iraq and
Iran. She stood up and shouted:
"Your are lying. You are killing
yourselves in your own war!" A
fracas followed in which she was
shoved by Arab women. Ettie's
advice to Israeli and Jewish
women under similar attacks?
"Do not be gentle Answer
back in their terms." (The
Jerusalem Pott)
Following a wave of terrorist
murders of individuals in Israel,
with the latest incident involving
the brutal murder of two teachers
from Afula. an atmosphere of cau-
tion in travel through areas in
Judea and Samaria has once more
enveloped Israel.
While the State Department is
searching for ways to come up
with so-called moderate Palesti-
nian names for dialogue as part of
the "peace process' one of
those whose names were sug-
gested was Khaled el-Hassan,
chief political advisor to Yasser
Arafat. El-Hassan recently told a
Kuwaiti newspaper that in view of
the tightly sealed borders, the
PLO will once more concentrate
its military activities inside Israel,
designed to do the maximum
damage to the morale, economics
and security of the country. "We
are going to go back to the kind of
operations we carried before
1967." El-Hassan said, noting
that his group did not believe in
suicide bombings. (Ma 'ariv)
Michael Cohen of Beit Shemesh.
whose wife was one of two per-
murderd by terrorists from
a* a the "Green Line" two mon-
ths ago, reacted to the newsd
latest two murders by siyiif I
he felt there was a direct Lmkri
ween the increase of soaj
cidents and the release of 1
terrorist prisoners by the I
government. Capital
for terrorist murderers I
instituted at once, and no J
workers from the admini
territories should be per
stay in Israel after dark, hen
(Ma 'ariv)
Premier Shimon Pera
defense Minister Yitzhak
meanwhile, reportedly
move to institute i
deportation for any
those inciting to terror icttl
cording to headlines in
Aharonot, the proposed
was to be brought
Cabinet this week, after I
an opinion from Attorney (
Yitzhak Zamir on its imp*1
Apparently this move isi
to international law, ind
past Israel's high t*
reprimanded the military I
rying out such punishment* I
Cabinet ministers, bower*
prepared to defy the inter
law when it stands in dWM
tradiction to land's ""^
terests.WhenderjortaQonj-
ed, in the past, it proved i"
effective measure against i
terrorist activity.
We could not resist I
your attention the item >
New York Times which
Jews For Jesus has *
Jewish Community
Council in New York.
the latter had violated
sionary group's civil iff
ing rabbis in Long Is^
vent it from holding w^
Seder last Passover.
The San Francis*) H
sionary aW/jS!
damages of $100_p ,g
legal costs. Its suit ^,1
memo circulated tcjrJJJj
CRC and says.t^^'
result, find af^J;
Seder The Jews for
Now York recently P"
seven-stun, tajkW *
St.. near I'^rk Avenue-


ASHINGTON DATELINE
By WOLF BLITZER
Jitor'B Note: Starting with this issue, we shall carry regularly the
\valed feature column by Wolf Blitzer frirm Washington. It willcon-
ie another step xn expanding our OPED page, aUmg with features
Israel and local opinion articles. Wed like to hear from our
,, as New York's famous mayor Ed Koch says, "How are we
Wolf Blitzer, Washington
lureau chief for The
salem Post, has been
[ivering the capital since
973, and was foreign cor-
espondent for Reuters in Tel
viv before that. Blitzer has
en a frequent commentator
the nation's leading TV
fcws programs and talk
|pws as an expert on
nerican-Israel relations and
ddle East affairs.
Jlitzer has written Between
I fton and Jerusalem:
r's Notebook, which
be published this fall by
ford I Diversity Press. His
ticks have appeared in
p>st of the major American
ind are featured
Jarlj in the Jewish press
lAmerii a and abroad.
luate of the State
Bversity of New York at
I (I the Johns
)kins School of Advanced
lernational Studies in
lington, Blitzer has
\i niical Science at the
Jversity .it' Maryland.
Reagan and Israel
KSIDENT Ronald Reagan's
Istill sounds somewhat raspy
treak from his recent opera-
remove a cancerous colon
polyp. But he appears to be in
good spirits, anxious to resume a
relatively normal work schedule.
The President, during these
first four and one-half years in the
White House, was never known as
a workaholic. In marked contrast
to former President Jimmy
Carter, Reagan, from the start,
was always prepared to delegate
considerable responsibilities to his
Cabinet officers and senior staff.
Carter's style was like that of a
chief executive officer in a major
corporation; Reagan's is more like
that of a chairman of the board.
At the September. 1978 Camp
David peace talks with Menachem
Begin and Anwar Sadat, for ex-
ample. Carter was involved ac-
tively in virtually every detail of
the final framework agreement.
On more than one occasion, he sat
alone with the Israeli and Egyp-
tian legal advisers. Aharon Barak
and Osama el-Baz. to go over
various aspects of the final draft
language of the agreement. No
one in Washington can imagine
Ronald Reagan ever getting in-
volved in such technical matters.
Instead, the President likes to
make the major policy decisions,
to set a general course, but to
leave the actual implementation
to his most senior aides.
Friday, August 9. 1985/The Jewish Floridian of SguthCguntyPage j_
August 12, 1952: A Tragic
Day For Soviet Jews
Wolf Blitzer
Thus, Reagan's illness is unlike-
ly to have any major immediate
impact on his administration's
policies in a host of areas, in-
cluding the Middle East. Weeks
before the cancer was detected in
his body, Reagan had authorized a
major U.S. push forward this year
in the search for Arab-Israeli
peace.
THE WHEELS of diplomacy
spin slowly. So far. there has not
been any immediate
breakthrough. But White House
and State Department officials re-
main relatively confident that
some progress can be achieved in
the coming weeks and months
enough so that the momentum of
actual talks can carry through into
the new year
The State Department's senior
Middle East specialist, Assistant
Secretary Richard Murphy, made
clear the Administration's desire
to move ahead during a lengthy
review of the current Middle East
situation on July 24. He testified
that day for nearly three hours
before the House Foreign Affairs
Subcommittee on Europe and the
Continued on Page 6
Rabbi ShiryonIsraeli Female
Rabbi Fights Sterotype
-
By FERN ALLEN
ken Kinneret Shiryon began
Ting as the first female con-
Utional rabbi in Israel, some
Ibers of her Reform
Jogue found it hard to relate
he petite woman as their
ual leader.
hey had no problem with it on
btellectual level. But emo-
l|y they found it difficult to
)t that the title 'rabbi' came
I female body. After all, I'm
N image one has when you
p a rabbi," said Shiryon,
ssumed her post at a north
*viv congregation nearly a
P>.
^ever, Shiryon has slowly
*i down that stereotype held
ne of the 70 family members
i synagogue, and she is now
Wing her message of
pus equality throughout
Pi society. Though she
H the struggles ahead, she is
*nmed to change the rigid
?tions toward religious
ance that most Israelis
M Orthodox political
r>ly has brainwashed the
I into believing that the only
Jtic affiliation is with them.
j><" Israeli public bought it,
hough they don't agree with
1 30-year-old woman said.
yn maintains that most
1 aft like Reform Jews on a
level, without realizing
[the Sabbath, for instance.
fht candles and have family
lout Shiryon doesn't want
T>servance to end there.
Jre is a need in the secular
>n to express themselves
Fa|y. but not in the
f,,rK of Orthodoxy," she
Israelis who visit her
P* often find it "an eye
to see families sit
during services and
[Women lead prayers and
> the Torah
"When they see it they are very
impresed. People have told me, 'If
I knew that this type of religious
expression was available, I would
have been here years ago,' she
said.
She noted that religious expres-
sion is much more flexible in the
Diaspora than it is in Israel.
"Religious pluralism is a given
there. In Israel, it's like a new
strand from Mars," she observed.
"It's ironic that in the Jewish
State, where we can govern our
own lives, there isn't religious
freedom. Only a minority of peo-
ple, such as the Christians and
Moslems who live here, have
that," she said.
To her surprise, the fact that
she is a woman rabbi is generally
played down in Israel, and she
finds that she is not alone in her
quest to attain religious pluralism.
"My male colleagues face the
same battles as I do. It takes some
of the sharp edges out of the
fights," noted Shiryon, who was
ordained in 1981 by the Hebrew
Union College in New York.
Her recent television ap-
pearances and the flurry of
newspaper articles written about
her have sparked some negative
responses. "Crank calls have
started," she said. "But nothing
has happened on a serious level. I
hope it will stay that way."
"I intentionally didn't take a
congregation in Jerusalem
I K-cause there is an atmosphere of
intolerance there. I was aware
that there could be a reactionary
response, but that wasn't my main
consideration. If you believe in
something, you have to take the
good with the bad," said Shiryon,
who chose the 13-year-old Ramat
Aviv congregation because it is in
an accepting environment.
So far. Shiryon hasn't challeng-
ed the Israeli religious establish-
ment in areas such as conducting
marriage ceremonies. According
to Israeli law, such ceremonies
Kinneret Shiryon
must be held under Orthodox
supervision. Though some Or-
thodox rabbis co-officiate with
Reform rabbis, Shiryon wonders
aloud whether the same arrange-
ment would be made with a
woman rabbi.
She is also quick to point out the
inconsistencies within Israeli
religious law. "Couples I've mar-
ried in the U.S. who move here
are recognized under the Law of
Return. But any marriage that I
perform here isn't," said Shiryon,
who has served as a congrega-
tional rabbi in Wilton, Conn., as
well as in Adelaide. Australia.
Shiryon, who grew up in the
upstate New York City of
Schenectady, moved to Israel in
1983 with her husband, an Israeli
scriptwriter. At first they tried
communal living on a moshav, but
when the group's plans dissolved,
the couple decided to move to the
city with their infant daughter so
that Shiryon could practice her
profession.
She was eventually appointed to
her present congregation, which
is a mixture of Ashkenazi and
Sephardi Israelis as well as im-
Continued on Page 12
Thirty-three years ago, on
August 12, 1952, Stalin's regime
brutally executed 24 leading
Jewish cultural figures. The anti-
Jewish campaign began when
Soviet Jews were denounced as
"rootless cosmopolitans"
although their ancestors came to
Russia centuries earlier. The
Soviets initiated a campaign to
stamp out Yiddish the folk
language of Soviet Jews. Then,
Yiddish folk theaters,
newspapers, and other cultural in-
stitutions were shut down. Hun-
dreds of prominent Jews were ar-
rested and fear spread among
Jews throughout the Soviet
Union. On August 12. "The Night
of the Murdered Poets," after a
secret trial, 24 executions took
place. The violence ended only
with Stalin's death in 1953. Other-
wise, who knows what it would
have led to.
Today, again, an anti-Jewish
campaign is being waged. This
time the goal is to suppress the
Hebrew language and to crush the
Jewish emigration movement. On-
ly 36 people were permitted to
leave in June: only 830 people last
year, as opposed to 51,000 in
1979, a virtual shutdown. Today's
anti-Jewish methods are similar:
There are arrests and imprison-
ment of emigration activists,
especially teachers of Hebrew;
almost a dozen were imprisoned
this year and three arrested in
June alone. Daily media attacks
on Zionism and Israel are again
creating an atmosphere of ap-
prehension amongst Jews
throughout the USSR.
There are striking differences
between 1952 and 1985. Then,
Soviet Jews were "the Jews of
silence," too frightened to fight
for their rights. Today, however,
thousands have applied to leave;
they sign petitions and they con-
tinue to study Hebrew despite
surveillance. In 1952 we did not
know what was happening, until it
was too late. Today, we do know
about KGB arrests and trials.
Then, the Soviet Union was living
under Stalin's reign of terror. To-
day, the new Soviet leader is the
"polished" Mikhail Gorbachev,
who wants to project a favorable
image to the West. Mr. Gorbachev
is practical; he knows that he
needs to improve the Soviet
economy and needs technology
advances to modernize the sagg-
ing Soviet industry in addition to
solving the problem of alcoholism
and absenteeism. He also knows
that what we say to our President
and the Congress affects trade
and the Russians badly need
increased trade and technology,
particularly from the U.S.A.
So. today, we can do something
about the suffering of Soviet
Jews. President Reagan takes the
Soviet Jewry issue seriously, but
the President needs to hear from
us again and again! So does the
dngress! Gorbachev would do
better to impress America by free-
ing Jewish prisoners and opening
the doors again. With the summit
meeting scheduled for November
19. in (ieneva, this could be the
right time and place for move-
ment on the Soviet Jewry issue.
To help get the issue on the sum-
mit agenda, we have to make our
Hies heard. If we lived in the
I'SSR our opinion would not
count. However, we live in
America but we must forcefully
express our opinion for it to count.
Remembering "The Night of
the Murdered Poets" is not
enough. We've got to do
something about what's happen-,
mg in the Soviet Union, now.j
Freedom and rights for Soviet
lews must be a part of Geneva,
rhe time to link memory with ac-
ion is now! Send that cable! Make
hat call! Write that letter! Now!
Schumans to Co-Chair
Continued from Page 1
is open to all members of the
Federation, and urged everyone
to make an effort to attend.
So far, according to Dr.
Schuman, 30 persons from South
County have registered for the
General Assembly. The theme for
this year's gathering will be: "The
Coming of Age of North
American Jewry: Strengthening
Our Jewish Affirmation." The
agenda will highlight speakers,
panel and group discussions on
such topics as the Jewish role in
the American and Canadian
political process; the search for
peace in the Middle East; Ethio-
pian Jewry reuniting a people;
Jewish Education building our
future; Strengthening the Jewish
Family; the changing impact of
religion in North American
Jewish life; and much more.
Last year's General Assembly
made headlines throughout the
country as the subject of Ethio-
pian Jewry was brought on thet
floor dramatically, just before th$
news of "Operation Moses"'
became public knowledge, and
participants over 3,000 of them
from all over North America
became aware of the role the
General Assembly plays in shap-
ing the hinorji and course of life
for American Jewry.
REGISTER NOW
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS
54th General Assembly
November 13-17,1985
Washington, D.C.
Call Helene Eichler, 368-2737
v_



Page 6 the Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, August 9, 1985
f
Write a Refusenik!
Jewish Lives At Stake
Washington Dateline
Refuseniks believe that increas-
ing correspondence from Jews in
other countries can only help their
cause, according to activists for
Soviet Jewry. Apart from
boosting the morale of those who
have been refused permission to
leave the Soviet Union for many
years, the growing volume of let-
ters show the Soviet authorities
the degree to which Jews in other
communities care.
This, say leaders of the national
organizations working for Soviet
Jewry, is what prompts their urg-
ing every Jew to write at least
to send several Rosh Hashanah
greetings to the refuseniks.
Although the Soviet authorities
cannot be relied on to deliver mail
regularly or promptly, many of
the letters (especially those sent
registered, receipt requested) do
get through. "This is one area in
which members of the community
can mobilize their efforts without
having to reach into their pockets
for fund-raising, which means no
one has an excuse." said one local
activist recently.
The Jewixh Floridian of South
Count* began to list refuseniks
and their addresses in the last
issue, and continues the list below.
(In the issue of July 26 there was a
set of suggested guidelines -
anyone who missed it can obtain a
copy by calling Mrs. Gellert at
368-2737.) It is estimated that if
only 10 percent of the readers of
this paper were to write to 10
refuseniks. more than 20.000 let-
ters would be sent from the South
County community alone!
LONG-TERM REFUSENIK
WAITING FOR EXIT VISAS
MORE THAN 10 YEARS
RAKHLENKO. Yakov
(Radio Technician
Born 1949; Married)
Karmanitsky Per 5-33
Moscow
RSFSR. l/SSR
8HACHNOV8KY Vladimir
(Mathematician
Born 1941; Married plus 1)
Proeid Cherepanovych 70-76
Moscow A 183
RSFSR. USSR
SHKOLNIK. Isaak
(Mechanic (former POC)
Born 1936)
ul. Tamogorodskogo 23-307
Vinnit&a
Ukrainian SSR. USSR
First Application: 1973
BALBARER. Boris
(Pediatrician
Bom 1944)
Belskogo 16-1-46
Kishinev 43
Moldavian SSR. USSR
BUKHMAN. Aron
(Metal Spinner
Born 1942; Married plus 2)
Serafimovicha 13 A-16
Kiev 152
Ukrainian SSR. USSR
ESSAS. Ilya
(Candidate of Physics and
Mathematics
Born 1946; Married plus 3)
Chasovaya 26-91
Moscow 125315
RSFSR. USSR
FELDMAN. Efim
(Worker
Born 1951)
Malomoskovskaya 5-103
Moscow 1-164
RSFSR, USSR
FLOMENBLIT. Fima
(Computer Scientist
Bom 1937)
Dorothnaya St. 3-1-8
Yablonavka
Krasnodar 353222
RSFSR. USSR
KALENDARIOV. Boris
(Bom 1957. former POC)
ul. Basseinaya 12-81
Leningrad 196070
RSFSR, USSR
KHAIMCHAYEV. Isaak
(Candidate Technical Science
Bom 1937; Married plus 2)
Festivalnaya 22 2-192
Moscow 125414
RSFSR. USSR
KISLIK. Vladimir
(Physicist (former POC)
Bom 1935)
Rusanovsky Bulvar 10-122
Kiev
Ukr.SSR, USSR
KOZANEVICH, Mikhail
(Radio Engineer
Bom 1947; Married plus 1)
Pr. Bolshevikov 9-2-145
Leningrad
RSFSR, USSR
LENSKIS, Samuil
(Pensioner
Bom 1912; Married)
Churlionio 13-13
Vilnius
Lithuanian SSR. USSR
LESHCHINER. Boris
(Driver
Bom 1945)
Generala Potapova 6-85
Kiev 252157
Ukrainian SSR, USSR
LIBERMAN, Evgeny
(Construction Engineer
Bom 1946; Married)
Novatorov 40-6-1
Moscow 117421
RSFSR, USSR
LUT8KAYA-KALENDAREVA,
(Engineer Kvgeniya
Born 1923; Married plus 1)
Basseinaya 12-81
Leningrad 19607m
RSFSR. USSR
MALAMUD. Boris
(Worker
Bom 1950)
29 Bereznia 16-7
Chernovtsy
Ukrainian SSR. USSR
MENDELEEV. Oscar
(Electronics Engineer
Horn 1928; Married plus 2)
Bulvar Rainisa 16 2 184
Moscow 123459
RSFSR, USSR
NIKULINA. Ideya
(Technician
Bom 1937; Married plus 1)
Baranova 26-7
Odessa
Ukrainian SSR. USSR
ROSENSHTEIN. Grigory
(Dr. of Cybernetics
Bom 1937; Married plus 2)
Butlerova 2-1-69
Moscow 117485
RSFSR. USSR
RUDZEVITSKY. Mikhail
(Aeronautic Engineer
Bom 1949)
Khotinskaya 24 28
Beltsy
Moldavian SSR. USSR
SHCHIGLIK. Dimitry
(Naval Engineer (former POC)
Bom 1927; Married plus 1)
ul. Osipenko 17
Strunino
Vladimirskaya Oblast
RSFSR. USSR
SHOSTAKOVSKY. Ilya
(Electronics Engineer
Bom 1946; Married plus 1)
Podkovrova 7 4
Leningrad 197136
RSFSR. USSR
SHTILBANS, Viktor
(Physician
Bom 1941; Married)
Petropavlovskaya 8-29
Leningrad
RSFSR. USSR
SIMOVICH. Sara
(Nurse
Bom 1947; Married plus 2)
Verkyn 20-27
Vilnius
Lithuanian SSR. USSR
SIPEL. Grisha
(Mechanical Engineer
Bom 1947; Married plus 2)
Ramigalos 82-1
Panevezhis
Lithuanian SSR. USSR
SOIFER. Moshe
(Electrical Engineer
Bom 1926; Married plus 1)
Zorge 15-10
Novosibirsk 88
RSFSR. USSR
TARATUTA, Aba
(Mathematician/Engineer
Bom 1930; Married plus 1)
Kosmonautov 27-1-71
Leningrad 19211
RSFSR. USSR
TONKONOGY, Moisey
(Electrical Mechanic (former POC)
Bom 1952; Married)
ul. Sholem Alikheima 14-35
Odessa
Ukr.SSR, USSR
TSITVERBUT, Isaak
(Electronics Engineer
Bom 1919; Married plus 1)
Kaukazakaya 7-28
Kiev 35
Ukrainian SSR. USSR
VAINSTEIN, Leonid
(Mechanical Engineer
Bom 1947; Married plus 1)
Pr. Mira 31 95
Kishinev 32
Moldavian SSR. USSR
VAISBLIT. Ilya
(Pensioner (Radio Eninnr>
Bom 1918. Married plus 2)
Pr. Vernadskogo 11-19-282
Moscow B-3111
R8P8R, USSR
VTGDOROV, "irigory
(Former economics student
Bom 1947; Married plus 2)
Malakhitovaya 10 2-165
Moscow 129128
RSFSR. USSR
YAKIR. Evgeny
(Engineer
Bom 1931; Married plus 1)
Profsoyuznaya 96-5-35
Moscow 117485
RSFSR. USSR
YAKUBOVICH. Klara
(Bom 1924; Married plus 2)
Mukachevskaya 19
Mulkachevo
Ukrainian SSR, USSR
YAMPOLSKY. Aleksandr
(Electronics Engineer
Bom 1944)
Petra Lavrova 47-12
Leningrad 192123
RSFSR. USSR
First Application: 1974
ABEZGAUS. Aleksandr
(Engineer
Bom 1949; Married plus 3)
Volkolmokoe 6-31
Moscow 125080
RSFSR. USSR
BESPROZVANY, Ilya
(Mechanical Engineer
Bom 1939; Married plus 1)
Iskrovsky Pr. 21-269
Uningrad 193232
RSFSR USSR
BESPROZVANY, Ilya
(Mechanical Engineer
Bom 1939; Married plus 1)
Iskrovsky Pr. 21-269
Leningrad 193232
RSFSR, USSR
BLITSHTEIN. Lev
(Administrator in Meat Plant
Bom 1930)
Bolshaya Pereyaslavskaya 3-2-2
Moscow 129041
RSFSR, USSR
FURMAN, Lev
(Electronics Engineer
Bom 1947; Married)
I 'e stelia 13 15 16
Leningrad
RSFSR, USSR
GELMAN, Grigory
(Born 1946; Married)
Vasilevsky Ostrov 7-aya Linia 30-2
Leningrad 199004
RSFSR, USSR
GOLF AND. Yuri Abramovich
(Physicist
Bom 1922; Married plus 1)
Leninsky Pr. 88-3-4
Moscow 117313
RSFSR. USSR
GUREVICH. Aron
(Electronics Engineer)
Bom 1938; Married plus 2
Botaovaya 22-6-7
Moscow 107150
RSFSR, USSR
KAZAKEVICH, Lazar
(Engineer
Bom 1927; Married plus 2)
TikhoreUky Pr. 12-117
I-eningrad 194064
RSFSR, USSR
KNOKH, Vladimir
(Radio Engineer
Bom 1944, Married plus 1)
Vavilova 4-1-68
Leningrad 195257
RSFSR, USSR
KOGAN, Isaac
(Electronics Engineer
Bom 1946; Married plus 3)
Gatchinskaya 12-19
I-eningrad
RSFSR. USSR
KREMEN. Mikhail
(Radio Engineer
Bom 1937. Married plus 2)
Molostovikh 11-2-64
Moscow 111537
RSFSR, USSR
(list la oominiM Mi n*t mxikmii
Continued from Page 5
Middle East, chaired by
Democratic Congressman Lee
Hamilton of Indiana. Hamilton
has made it a practice to have such
a session with Murphy open to
the public once a month. They
have proven very valuable in
understanding the Administra-
tion's hopes and dreams in the
Middle East.
Murphy, a former U.S. Am-
bassador to Syria and Saudi
Arabia, pointed to King Hussein's
visit to Washington last May as
representing a major develop-
ment. He spoke of the Jordanian
monarch's "very positive
statements" made at that time.
"The King reiterated his commit-
ment to peace with Israel and will-
ingness to negotiate on the basis
of (UN) Resolutions 242 and 338,"
Murphy said. "In this regard, he
spoke specifically of negotiations
between Israel and a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation, which he
hoped would begin this year, in
the context of an international
conference."
MURPHY, explaining the Ad-
ministration's desire to explore
peace opportunities right now,
went on to cite Prime Minister
Shimon Peres' June 10 statement
before the Knesset, in which
Israel's position in favor of direct
negotiations was spelled out. Mur-
phy said that speech reaffirmed
Israel's "strong desire for move-
ment in the peace process."
During questioning by members
of the subcommittee. Murphy
elaborated on his assessment of
the broad situation in the region.
Most of the Arabs, he insisted,
had finally come around to accept
Israel as a permanent fixture of
life not only Egypt, this, he
said, represented a significant
"psychological change" in the
Middle East when seen over a
span of three or four decades.
"There has been a real sea change
in the Arab world," he said.
This was Murphy's way of in-
dicating that Israel currently fac-
ed an important opportunity to
achieve peace. The time is now
ripe for movement.
When Congressman Tom Lan-
tos (D-Cal.) noted that Israel cur-
rently faced enormous economic
problems and the fragile national
unity government in Jerusalem
was in no mood to take up the sen-
sitive matter of the West Bank
and Gaza Strip, Murphy replied
matter-of-factly: "Israel always
has a full plate."
But the Assistant Secretary
could not report to the Congress
that he was already in a position
to fly to Amman for a meeting
with a joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation. There are still pro-
blems in finding acceptable
Palestinians.
There are also problems in mak-
ing sure that any such meeting
which Israel basically opposes
will in fact lead to direct Arab-
Israeli negotiations.
INDEED, during the course of
the hearing, Murphy, on several
occasions, spoke openly of Jor-
dan's position that such a
preliminary U.S. dialogue with
the joint delegation will focus in-
stead on finding a way for the
U.S. to finally recognize the PLO.
The Assistant Secretary confirm-
ed that Jordan's Foreign
Minister, Taher el Masri. had put
forward during his recent visit to
Washingotn a three-stage formula
for promoting peace.
Under this Jordanian scheme,
Murphy said, the U.S. would first
talk with the joint delegation. The
major item on the agenda would
involve finding a way for the U.S.
to accept Palestinian self-
determination. In exchange, th
PLO would accept UN Resolu-
tions 242 and 338 as well as
Israel's right to exist America's
long standing conditions for ac-
cepting the PLO.
THE JORDANIAN *,
second phase would haveH
begin formal .iegotiafons2J
PLO and Jordan. uJ"J
final Btage, a JoBgM
delegation would fingfj!
direct talks with Israel '
Murphy merely r^
Jordanian concept. He maZJ
that the U.S. did not S
endorse it. I fact, he ^
specifically opposed Pal
"self-determination" q
that "in the Middle Euta
that could mean only an am
dent Palestinian state "w2|
oppose."
But still. Murphy wasnj
did m underlining what Jonfc
actly had in mind by wantj*,
down with the I'.S. and
Palestinians for this first i
discussions. Israeli offit
Washington were con
about Murphy's wiilingnea]
discuss the Jordanian viewm1
didly. It merely strenp
their conviction that Israeli
continue to hold out for i_
Arab-Israeli negotiations Jj
next stage in the peace pm
with no preliminary U.S. da
with the joint delegation.
HANGING over the ..
sional hearing was the nenl
the administration hadfualnj
mitted to Congress its i
awaited study on the Middle L
arms balance a study widen
pected to lead to net q
weapons transfers to Jordan]
Saudi Arabia in the fall. TsM
course, could spell iddtt
strains in the U.S.Im
relationship
Secretary of State
Shultz and other Adminisl
officials would very much hss|
see Jordan take some
steps to advance the peace |
cess before any formal saiesi
announced. That would
make the AdministratM
political life on Capitol
in pushing through the wa
sales.
But I'.S oifinals recogiual
dan's tenuous situation. ThatlJ
no simple solutions.
Reagan. White House
said, personally authoriad
decision to send the arms btr
study to Congress at this i
Murphy said that it had beenc
pleted several weeks ago. Bel
sisted that no final decisions**
actual sales have been made.
The President, of course,\
directed the intensified eflWJ
promote the [*ace process.r
was clearlv impressed by
Hussein had to say last
Reagan may have man)
issues on his mind theda
economy; US-Soviet res
Central America, to nan**1
His health is a new bunj
the Middle East remsinsjgj
the U.S. agenda, irrespec^J
his health. This was ag
firmed in recent days.
"We never expected*'
for mutually accepts* gc
to be easy." Murphy^
gressmen.-Butweintendw
it it. We will continue w
closely with our friends
Jordan and Egypt to nW
process forward.
Fighting Craft B*|
TEL AVIV (JTA^, ,
Isrwl Navy has unvejfl
newest fighting crsnj^lj
hydrofoil missue-btj* J
Writ" (Fin) *n*ja
fast as any otnerve-J.il
Navy. It was display*
public on Navy Day


. i

?> r.uaim, a purse oeiong-


...^.t^ / A muij, aPty .11, aw^^ t
Zionism Erased trom 'Racist List
ent
]
Continued from Page 1
with its outright condemnation of
Zionism.
SUBSEQUENT delegations to
take part in the discussion praised
the PLO for its "magnanimity"
and for its "statesmanship."
When the amendment was finally
adopted it was clear that it had
been accepted on the merit of its
implicit condemnation of Zionism,
as many delegates assumed that
the phrase, "and all other forms of
racism," alluded to Zionism.
Not until the amendment was
adopted did the conference presi-
dent, Margaret Kenyatta,
recognize Alan Keyes, the only
male on the 33-member U.S.
delegation.
Keyes, in a forceful statement,
said that "no amount of repeti-
tion, no amount, shall render that
slanderous lie (Zionism is racism)
truthful." He was greeted with
fierce booing from the floor."
Reagan denounced the "vicious
slander" that developed in 1975,
at the first women's decade con-
ference in Mexico City, against
Zionism in what she said was a
transparent attempt to link
Zionism with racism. She pledged
that the U.S. would not accept any
document that treats Zionism as
racism or any other evil.
Paragraph 96, which originally
included Zionism in a list of major
obstacles to development,
alongside racism and colonialism,
originated at a meeting in New
York last spring. It was proposed
by the Soviet Union and was
boosted by Iran and Syria. It was
met with disapproval by Western
countries.
DURING THE conference
here, delegations, including the
U.S., Canada and Britain,
declared that their full support of
the forward-looking strategies
document was contingent upon
the deletion of the word Zionism
in Paragraph 95.
Following the debate on the
issue of Zionism in the document,
the conference adopted
paragraphs dealing with ter-
rorism, apartheid, and Palestinian
women and children. The U.S.
was alone in voting not to impose
economic sanctions on South
Africa.
A recommendation to adopt the
proposed harsh text that assessed
the plight of Palestinian women
and children and that declared
that the Palestinian people have a
right to create their own state,
Israeli Injuries Continue
To Mount in South Lebanon
was proposed by Egypt in a con-
ciliatory gesture to those
delegates who earlier had voted
for the amendment on Zionism.
During the vote on this segment
of the document, 97 of the 150
delegations favored adopting the
harsher positions, 29 delegations,
mainly Western nations, abstain-
ed and Israel, Australia and the
U.S. voted for the more moderate
position.
THE FINAL piece of business
conducted just before the con-
ference ended, was ascertaining
full agreement from each delega
tion to sign the document, a feat
at any UN conference, historic at
this one."
Reagan noted that two kinds of
delegations came to Nairobi:
Those interested in women's
causes and those interested in
political causes. "I'm glad that
those who came to further
women's causes triumphed," she
declared.
The Israeli delegation expressed
relief and jubilation that Zionism
does not appear in any part of the
forward-looking strategies.
Delegate Tamar Eshel said. "The
fact that the conference took
place in Africa had a great in-
fluence on its success. Kenya, our
host country, cannot be con-
gratulated enough on its positive
role and leadership."
C 1886 Bf TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli soldier was slightly injured
when his vehicle hit a mine in
south Lebanon and an Israe
aman was wounded by shots fin-:
a suspicious looking rner-
at an Israel Saw
,! boat approaching
lection off the port of Sidon in
south Lek'in
A military an. confirm
ing the incident, said the hostile
vessel was sunk by a Navy missile
tx>at. He denied a welter of
reports from Beirut and Sidon
that as many as eight Israel Na\ \
vessels shelled Shiite militia and
Palestinian positions in Sidon and
further north along the coast from
the mouth of the Awali River to
Jiah in the Kharoub region south
of Beirut. The reports spoke of
panic in Sidon.
The Beirut reports said the
sunken vessel v. a.- a Cypriot
re^stereii freighter with a cargo
of cement from Rumania and was
set ablaze by the Israeli lK>mbar<]
ment. it.- cr-'u was rCUed, al
six of them wounded thl
report sai The mine incident occurred last
week near Kaukaba village, west
of Hasbiya. The wounded soldier
was sent home after treatment at
a hospital, a military spokesman
said.
The Boca Raton Synagogue
(Orthodox)
is pleased to announce that
High Holiday Services
will be held et the
BOCA TEECA COUNTRY CLUB
N.W. 2nd Ave., Boca Raton
Accommodations Available
FOR TICKET INFO: CALL:
368-9047

2t
ool. ft *
wtfewuxfom
R.J3140
,2DAYS/11NTCHTS $Q ....
~ Reaganites Vow No Immin
Decision on Arms to Saudis
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Reagan A tion stresses that no decision will be made before 3
on requests by Jordan and Saudi Arabia to
sophisticated American arms. "Both Jordan and %
Arabia have informed us of their current defense needi
these remain under review," State Departmenr
spokesman Charles Redman said.
HE REITERATED that the just completed i
ministration study on how Middle East arms sales fit j
U.S. policy does not recommend any specific sale. Hei
the study, which is being shown to Congressional,
tees on a classified basis was not "a decision" paper i
document which contains the framework on which
sions can then be made."
Services and Rap-Sessioi
On Tap for Collegians
College Campus." Thii t)
the first of a series of I
evening services ad
sessions to be held in tkl
County area during tat
months, to deal with tl_.
challenges of Jewish life
campuses.
The service will take
Beth El. 333 SW 4th Aft.'
Raton, at 8 p.m. with thai
session following at 9:30
Hillel. the Anti-Defamation
League, the South County Rab-
binic Association and Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton will hoat
a special Friday Evening service
for college students and their
families next Friday, Aug. 16, at
Temple Beth El.
The theme of the evening will
be "Dealing With The
Challenge: Anti-Semitism on the
Beatrice
FrUALHT!
100%/CGRNOn,
No cholesterol
.. .which is
always
good news!
100% pure...
to give you
100% delicious
fried foods!

Made by the
people famous
for trying!
100% pure
com oil-
great for
salads too!
Nothing artificial to get in the way of flavor!
THAT FRIES
LIKE WESSON
{Litt to continue in ncit ditloni
KMI~.1limillg llfllUlblOIIS li


-




..*
MEW YORK STOCK EXCHANQC COMPOSfTE TRAWSACTIOWS
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1 1 I
TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEASON ... IS IT NOW FOR YOU?
This is the Urns tor hard logic. Simply put hers It is.
Sines July 24. 1964. whs* ths Dow Jonss industrials average stood st 1076.95. to ths tlms of this
writing, It has Increaaed to 1351.61.
Many people hsve been blssssd with substsntisl percentage incressss in thslr stock values
Perhaps you didn't have one of the top performers, but again you may have some real appreciated
gains in the equities you hold.
No one really knows whether the market is at the "top of the gain." but let's suppose there is a
correction due. Why not think about the following suggestions think seriously
SET UP A PHILANTHROPIC FUND:
The Jewish Community Foundation of South County (the endowment program) will establish a Per
sonalized Philanthropic Fund in your name or the name of anyone else you wish to designate. You
can activate the Fund by contributing your appreciated stock or other property to the Foundation
and by completing a simple form. You retain the right to act as a fund advisor. Thus, the fund can
function as a valuable planning vehicle for the management of all your future charitable giving.
YOUR TAX ADVANTAGES:
An income tax deduction may be taken this year, since contributions to the Fund are treated as gifts
to a public charity
The fair market value of your appreciated long-term securities is J00% deductible (up to 30% of
your contributing base). '.
There Is no tax on the Income within the Fund.
No tax return or reports need to be filed on the Fund.
You may continue to contribute to the Fund enabling you to make larger contributions during high
income years and especially after a windfall.
There Is no cost to establish the Fund.
WHAT THE FUND CAN DO:
At any time. you. as a fund advisor, may make recommendations for distributions of income or prin-
cipal from the Fund to recognized charities, both Jewish and non-sectarian
All grants are subject to the approval of the Jewish Community Foundstion of f*****^!*"*
reserves the right to determine thst the recommended beneficiaries are consistent with the Federe
tlon 's charitable purposes.
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:
For further tnformstlon please call Arthur Jaffa at the Foundation office. 368-2737. tor details on how
^tSSYhBtrTsZonhose appreciated securities, and of course, consult your own tsx adv.sor.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
OF SOUTH COUNTY
(THE SOUTH COUWTY JEWISH FEDERATION BIOOWIVIT PtOCRAM)
336 NW Spanish River Blvd.
Boca Raton, FL 33431
368-2737
UK
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of the President s
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FIGGIE
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]
For Israel, 217
American Athletes Cop 246 Maccabiah Medals
By DAVID LANDAU
TEL AVIV (JTA) Amer-
ican athletes at the 12th Mac-
cabiah Games copped the most
medals, with a total of 246, and
Israel trailed behind, with a total
of 217. Athletes from other coun-
tries were left in the dust, with on-
ly Canada peering over the
horizon with 51 medals. These are
the final ratings as the Games
closed here last Thursday with a
festive ceremony in Jerusalem.
The official Maccabiah rating!
were: United States. 109 gold
medals, 90 silver. 47 bronze;
Israel. 62, 87, 85; Canada. 12, 15,
24; Brazil. 10,11,11; Britain. 7. 6,
',t; Holland, 7, 5, 1; Modi'in
immign
fron ,10.
8; Prance I
1; Me) 1,2,
2; W rmany, 1,
mark, 1. 0, I. Argei
and others: four silver and -
bronze.
TWO MIAMI women athletes
slugged it out for the Maccabiah
tennis singles crown at the Ramat
Hasharon tennis center, with
19-year-old Ronni Reis eventually
triumphing 6-1, 6-2.
Reis then went on to win both
the women's doubles and the mix-
ed doubles equalling a Mac-
cabiah feat last performed by
South African liana Kloss in 1978
(the ninth Maccabiah).
Reis' partner in the women's
doubles was Eileen Tell, and in the
mixed doubles it was Jonathan
Kamiaaar both also Americans,
as were all the losing finalists
Reis. who (days for the Ufl
sit> of Miami, is ranked amoi
world's besl 200, although h<
ent in the single!
Col.;.
higher than Re
put* TA chart
IN THE
triumpl i bj
3-0, ugh! game
winning hit wai I Neu Kabinoff
Incitement Traced to U.S.
By DAVID LANDAl
JERUSALEM iJTA) -
Jewish Agency chairman Leon
Dulzin accused "certain circles in
Canada and m Chicago" of "in-
citement of Ethiopian im-
migrants against halachic re
quirements laid down by the
Israeli chief rabbinate.
In a lengthy radio interview
here last week. Dulzin said these
circles, which he did not identify,
had in the past falsely maligned
the State of Israel for ostensibly
failing to bring the Ethiopians on
aliya. And now these same circles
were active in inciting the
newcomers on the matter of the
.rr, c rei nant
ceremony, he said.
Du hief Ral
who he said had been sym-
o Ethio
pian and had thus
dispensed with the requirement of
a syn circumcisi
Recircumcision, through a
drawing of drop of Wood, had
required of Cochin Indian
Jewish immigrants to Israel 26
years ago. Dulzm noted
credential-and-an tecedent
checking.
According to the Jerusalem Post's
softball reporters, the U.S. team
was probably the best Jewish soft-
ball squad ever assembled.
The paper said the team had
been sponsored by B'nai B'rith.
which budgeted $60,000 for train-
ing and preparation. The coach
was Villanova University's Larry
Shane, one of the best in the
United States. Among the star
players were Mary Rubinoff and
Pave Blackburn who have both
played for CamariUo Kings, the
1982 world champions from
southern California. Neil Kabinoff
named to the all-American
junior college team.
Blackburn of Los Angeles and
Chicago shut out the Canadians in
e, allowing only three
It was his fourth victor)
of which were over Canada
other two touroej w ii
, Rubinoff, also of Los
Ang '
THE U.S. and Canadians met
three times, with Canada winning
first game 8-2 and the
Americans tha last pair. ^-1 and
3-0. They were by far the most
outstanding teams in the tourney.
The other teams competing were
Argentina, Mexico and
Venezuela. The Americans crush-
ed them 17-0, 6-1, 9-0, respect-
ively, and downed Israel 18-1.
Kabinoff of Philadelphia led all
the hitters, slamming three home
runs, two of them against Canada.
According to coach Shane of
Philadelphia and Steve Bloom of
Cleveland, chairman of the B'nai
B'rith U.S. Maccabiah Games s-
oftball committee, the American
team dedicated the championship
game to Eddie Rosenblum of
Washington, who died July 19.
Rosenblum. 92. was a member
of the B'nai B'rith U.S. Maccabiah
sottball team committee and the
U.S. Olympic Committee, and was
a founder of the Jewish Communi-
ty Center of Metropolitan
Washington.
Among the rooter-- for the
American- were Hollywood actors
Gabe Kaplan and Lou Co
both of whom s;it on the team's
bench. Goaaett cancelled his flight
Lack U) the 1 'nited Suites to cheer
the B'nai B'rith players on to the
title.
ANOTHER celebrity at most of
the games was Dr. William Wex-
ler. honorary president of B'nai
B'rith International. Wexler
-*ving lived b^
in America and the U
Israel. ^
R"rd crowds of lJ
U.S.-Canadian gam *'
ly. even though the fofi
few seats. *'
The American com,
most sweeping 8uccesg7
pool where they took ilL
the medals. Every aiS
the 25 American Xii'
medal of some k~Jl
Americans won every nil
every American woni.
finished up with anew 1
record.
The two youngsters j-m
the outstanding swimrn^
12th Maccabiah were
Kreigsman of Lot Ai
Rick Aront.ergofNewy!
aged 17.
KREHJSMAN won -
dividual and two relni
American coach N
Goldbloon said after tin
both Kn /-man and Si
would sv, in in thi
and aho i d able to cast
!'I:|" US. Seoul
learn.
An.i r thjpjj
golds and one May ~m
sul.-If, minute time for 1
metei
But topping the medalsi
the pool was 21 -year-o
Baron of Auburn l'n
Alabama, with three
golds and three relay p
I
^
A
i
Today's two Chiefs Rabbis,
Mordechai Eliahu and Avraham
Shapiro, had ruled that the Ethio-
pians were fully and entirely
Jewish for every halachic purpose
hwt if they wished to get married,
they would have to undergo the
very same examination of their
Jewishness as every non-Israeli
coming on aliya and wishing to
marry is required to undergo.
In fact, Dulzin said, the Chief
Rabbis' requirement that Ethio
pians immerse in the ritual bath
prior to being permitted to marry
was a dispensation since it
simplified this process of Jewish
Hepatitis
Outbreak
TEL AVIV (JTA) Health
authorities are concerned- over a
possible outbreak of hepatitis, a
contagious disease of the liver.
The Health Ministry announced
that more than 7,000 children ag-
ed 5-10 in the Haifa Bay area were
innoculated this week.
The concern stems from the
discovery of the hepatitis virus in
the Haifa Bay area water supply
which was contaminated recently
by leaking sewage. The water was
tested after an outbreak of
dysentery in the region.
km
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H! At '



rab Youths
letained in Murder Of Two Teachers
Friday, August 9, 1985/The Jewish
ish FTorid'km of South Gourfty Pag*11
HUGH ORGEL
AVIV (JTA) -
West Bank Arab
[have been detained
ineclion with the
of two Afula school
rs whose missing
^ere discovered July
\ed into a cave on the
fof the Bilboa Hills
?king the Jezreel
n i -aspects, aged 17, 18
[re family members from
b( Hank village of
some five kilometers
[ofjenin, near where the
tare found, Israel Radio
I. They participated Sun-
police reconstruction of
:K MINISTER Haim
| sail I that two of the
have confessed to the
I, and the third suspect ad-
i having helped the other
bodies. Barlev said the
were not part of an
group. The Mukhtar of
ge was quoted as saying
Ire village opposed the
tr Shimon Peres sent a
of praise to the police
Shin Bet, the Israel
fcecurities service the
pice for the speed
ch they solved the crime,
^y the victims were to be
ie said he hoped the
olution to the murder
^ter other similar acts of
vs of the murder set off
rotests in Afula where
chanted "death to ter-
knd shouted support for
leir Kahane. Some 650
kre on duty in Afula Sun-
lere a large crowd
ated outside the Afula
ktion.
WDIES of the two school
i Yosef Eliahu, 35, and
|makais, 19 were
ed by a resident of an
ettlement and a Bedouin
cker stuffed into a cave
little more than a crack
cks on the Gilboa Hills.
disappearance on July 21
ping their school to drive
off a huge manhunt in-
police, border police,
|and civilian volunteers
both Jews and Arabs
rounding villages sear-
I area between Afula and
rhere Eliahu's car had
und abandoned with a
lllet and blood stains on
learlier in the week.
jo persons who discoverd
les were following what
lough t were suspicious
>d were reported to have
Joss an abandoned private
list bearing Elmakais'
hey were attracted to the
[the hillside by the stench
es of flies at its entrance.
[police some time to ex-
he bodies because the
1 too small to crawl into,
bodies must have been
' by force.
JU LEAVES a wife and
"en, some of whom he
due to take to music
Uid whose lateness home
Rfc to report his absence
|"ce. Teachers said he had
7Vl"g a lift home to
|. a student teacher doing
onal service as an
"i the school.
"rder weapon, police said
was a carbine stolen
veeks ago from a fanner
P** area. When the three
w*re detained the gun
K'rtedly found in their
[n, together with a pistol
Miahu, a purse belong-
ing to Elmakais, a two-way radio
and binoculars. The binoculars has
been used to keep a watch on the
area where they held up the car
and on the area of the cave.
Police sources said the suspects
held up the teacher's car at gun-
point on the outskirts of Afula and
made Eliahu drive it into the
Gilboa Hills, where the two were
murdered and their bodies hidden
the next day, after having been
left in the car overnight
NEWS OF the discovery of the
bodies set off a violent demonstra-
tion in Afula where police were
forced to break up a rowdy
demonstration of enraged
residents who massed outside the
police station and the municipality
building. Several Arab looking
bystanders were beaten, and
police detained at least eight
demonstrators.
Security continued to be
massive and tight in Afula to pre-
vent any incidents during Sun-
day's burial of Eliahu. The funeral
of Elmakais took place at the
same time in her native town of
Hadera, where the atmosphere is
quieter but still tense. Both vic-
tims were given full state funerals
with ministers representing the
Cabinet attending both burials.
Deputy Premier David Levy,
representing the government at
the funeral for Eliahu, said he
would press for implementation of
the death penalty for terrorist
murders. His remarks were
greeted with satisfaction by the
large crowd of mourners.
BUT BARLEV, representing
the Cabinet at the funeral in
Hadera, was met with hostility
when he said that while stringent
measures would be taken to halt
terrorism, the perpetrators would
receive a fair trial. He was inter-
rupted with cries of "death to ter-
rorists." Reporters and television
cameramen reporting the funeral
were attacked at graveside by the
family of Elmakais. Police in-
tervened to prevent violence.
Kahane, meanwhile, appears to
be reaping benefits from this
latest act of terrorist murder. The
angry crowds in Afula and near
Hadera have been shouting
"Kahane, Kahane" as they de-
mand death sentences for ter-
rorists and the expulsion of Arabs
from Israel. Kahane had earlier,
last week, been prevented from
visiting Afula. The family of
Eliahu appealed on the radio to
Kahane not to visit them before
the funeral as he said he would do
with his Kach supporters.
Observers say that every
murder or terrorist act increases
the potential vote for the ex-
tremist Kach Party. The murder
of Eliahu and Elmakais was the
latest in a number of cases involv-
ing the disappearance of in-
dividuals and couples whose
bodies were later found, apparent-
ly killed by terrorists.
Tehiya MK Geula Cohen im-
mediately blamed the government
for the murders, as the Cabinet
had recently released to their
homes in Israel and the West
Bank hundreds of convicted ter-
rorists in the prisoner exchange
for three Israel Defense Force
soldiers captured in the Lebanon
war.
Gush Raps Dismissal
Of Arab Workers
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Gush Emunim condemned a coali-
tion agreement reached in Kiryat
Arba which provides for the mass
dismissal of Arab workers
employed by that municipality and
hiring restrictions based on race.
Daniella Weiss, secretary
general of the militant movement
of West Bank settlers, said that
while it was proper to favor
Jewish labor, there was no
justification to fire Arabs already
employed by the local council or
organizations.
The agreement in Kiryat Arba,
a Jewish township adjacent to
Hebron, was signed by the United
Kiryat Arba list and the Kach list,
comprising supporters of Rabbi
Meir Kahane. It has been de-
nounced in Israel as tantamount
to apartheid.
Weiss told the Voice of Israel
Radio that she personally favored
the closure of Arab universities in
the West Bank and the appoint-
ment of Jews to head town coun-
cils in Arab towns in the territory.
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One of the children who was attacked at a downtown bus stop in
Jerusalem by a 22-year-old Arab student is seen here waiting for
medical treatment. The Arab succeeded in slashing the faces of
five children and a youth counsellor before he was apprehended.
The children were part of a summer camp group of about 50 from
the Musrara neighborhood, who were on their way to a swimming
pool by bus together with their leaders. (JTA/wzn News Photo)
Legacy-Endowment-Planned
Gift Director
Tha Tampa-Oriindo-PlnaiiM (TOP) Jawlah Foundation aoafca a full-
tlmo dlractor for Ha andowrmant dovatopmont program. Challanglng.
position tor tha right Individual who will coordinate admlnlatar and
promota andowmant dovtopmant for throa participating Fadaratlona.
J.D., M.B.A.. C.PJL or a combination prafarrad. Exparlanca In Jawlah
Community activity haipful. Companaatlon packaga, mld-fortlaa/
nagotlaMa. Pfoaaa rapty In confldonca to Paraonnaf ftaarch Commit
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WHAT: Daily stimulating programs along with
delicious, nutritious kosher lunches.
JCC of Palm Beach and the Jewish
Family & Children's Service of South
County work on various programming
components to make this a fantastic
activity!!
WHERE: CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA,
16189 Carter Road, Delray Beach
WHEN: Monday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to
1:00 p.m.
There is no set fee for the Hot Kosher
Lunch Konnection, but participants are
encouraged to make a contribution at each
meal. For further information, please
,0811495-0806.
Kosher meals are also available, on a
limited basis, for those persons who are
homebound. For more information about this
program, please call 395-3640.
This program it funded in pan by Tula III of tha Older Americans Act and tha JCC ol Palm
Baach. tha South County Jewish Federation and the Jewish Family Service, and chant
contributions


J M
Page 12 The Jewish FTondiaii of Sooth County/Friday. August 9. 1985
*&
_________THE ADOLPH and ROSE LEViS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
HAPPENINGS
Camp Maccabee Spot Shots
- *"*** AmdramSandier and
the JCC camm audv
Camp Maccabee Lnrector Davia Sheriff recently celebrated
lu 70th frirthdaf icnM rate' d* help of the campers and staff'. .
^gSgftgg** -*** **w w

Were JsVfesV with his daughter Mr, rmyiyxng the pool during cent "PooLside in the Islands" party future pool parti,.* an
planned for Aug. 18 and Sept. 8.
FOR SINGLES 35-55
Poetry Night
At Mark's
Saturday. Aag 10. 7:3
Come with your favorite poem or
create one and enjoy good com-
pany and refreshments. Members:
$2.S'on-Members: $4 RSVP to
Center toda-
FOR SINGLES 21-39
Beaeh Day
Sunday. Aag 11 Nooa Meet
across from Bostons in Deirav
Beacr A.A South of Atlantic
Avenue Bring your own picnic
ranch, look for Mickey Saxe as
Group Leader
FOR SINGLES 21-39
Bowling at
Doa Carter Lanes
Taarsda*. Aag.
Wm* Trail
15. 8:45 p.
just v" itr
of
jlades in Boca Raton: $1 60 par
game: 75 cent* for shoes .
RSVP to Center by Aug. 15
FOR SINGLES 21-55
Back By Pspalsr desaaad!!!
Speakeasy
Saturday. Aag. 17. 9 p.a. A
mi meal rerue including many hits
from recent Broadwav Shows
presented by CaldweU Playhouse
Cast at the Sheraton Gallery Cafe
11 95 at Glades Road). $10 per
ticket (Show onlvi. Limited tickets
available DONT MISS!! Send
cheek to JCC Look for Mickev
Saxe at entrance to Gallery Cafe
FOR SINGLES 21-55
Smack A ad Swiss
At Holiday laa
Sunday. Aag. 25. 11:30 mm.
Located on A1A Highland
Beach: $9 14 per person to include
pool afterwards. RSVP JJ
by Aug 22 l
^RPRLMETIknl
Stages .Sat Csuia
Ages: 55 Phs
dwerse progran to *-1
m MM-AagBst Sonwtn
upr owing events ... wf]
caienda
Pnm* lamen bnuai
Taaaaaq c^jj^
^ ;rjidj
Wedne--: 13 IIj
Prime T en taaal *&!
'- "'' ':-
Three-ia;. Epcw Ceatw]
Walt I' r..iaur.|
Sunda;.
I
?%
o
' 11
(
Four-year-old campers and their counselors
greet Shabbat with Bim-Bom." snapping
their fingers Hassidie
"SALUTE TO SABBATH-
ENDS CAMP SESSION
The Camp Maccabee end-of-
First Session Review entitled
The Seventh Day"' was
presented by all of our full day
campers, ages 3-13. to an
auditorium full of proud parents.
The performance, directed by
Camp Maccabees Drama and
Music Specialist Etissa Grynspan,
included musical numbers like .
The Charleston. Israeli Folk sing
ing and dancing, chassidic
melodies. Shabbat blessings and
much more!!!
The players were accompanied
by Russ Grabski and Elissa on the
Guitar. Erik Persoff played the
Casio Keyboard and one group
even accompanied themselves on
rhythm instruments. Other
talented staff involved in the pro-
duction included Julie Bennett,
who choreographed a Jasz
number depicting The Creation,
and Lisa Blodinger who led her
break-dancing group to the
Biblical story of Noah. Charles
Augustus, the Senior Arts and
Crafts specialist designed the
beautiful backdrop as well as
costumes and props.
The performance was a Tribute
to Shabbat in song and dance.
The show was based on a record
album "The Seventh Day" with
original music written by Jackie
Cytrynbaum and Fran Avni, who
also have to their credit other well
known children's albums.
and
FOR ALL JCC
P VRTICIPANTS!!
End Of
The Summer Pod! Party!!
Sunda v. Aag. 18. 1-4 p.m.

Try Seye? &
Live Music. Soft Drinks Hot
Dogs Members: $4/Non- j
Members: $6. RSVP with check /
bv Auir IS (Memhershin .!. "rmony in a musical numoer entitled THe Shabbat March.
nJ^preJ^^LZZ %+ \ ^U Jennifer Bowman, Carly Markus. Rachel Croft.
to receive Member Rates.) Tara ***- Courtney Heeae.
Ima's" demonstrating the Shabbat Candlelighting
eremony in a musical number entitled "The Shabbat March."
and Hamentasnen
Matzo."
TheS*-.rr,:hDay"tookti
dience on a 24-hour jourwjj
ning with The Creation ail
day Evening CandlehghaajJ
the wav Saturday t"
Havdalah wits lots of l
surprises a* -rig the way.
Rabbi Shirya|
CantinaedmnaPs|t5
migrants from the VS.,'
South America. Eim
Sweden.
Her husband, who is ofta]
ed with rebbetzt* Jok ,"
supportive o( her wort m
equally committed to i
rehgious pluralism in thee
Shiryon acknowledge JJJ
the publicity iurnuUz!rM
pointment ha.* slowljncoJJJ
to revolutionizing ^M
women. During a t*wjl
pearance. sne jointed o*^]
Hebrew word tor husband 1
- had disparaging; cost"
because it lilir*"L|
"owner." Soon *&*
overhearing Isrse"
criticizing the vrm.
Though the ^^^ta\
haired woman i-iaiiw ** -^
"political zL
theless hopsi her wsj
women's nghts and ^
plurality will -^^H
-I realize 1 m ;^*?l
whole genf ration olis^ tf
said ..Maybe ,>ne of Vy
13-year-oW student^ (
ly become a Knesw
Who knows*"


[)...
19
km Israel Envoy
Says U.S. Seeks 'Deal' With Egypt
YORK (JTA) gon' Council- Parent body of the why a preliminary meeting bet-
Pickering, the new hranizktinn Llberatlon wen "s and a joint Jordanian-
imhassador to Israel ur^anizatlon Palestinian delegation is being
Conference of f ^^LKing "^in ?^Jtir,^^?u*
toward a renewal of diplomatic
relations between Jerusalem and
Moscow the subject of recent
news stories following a reported
meeting between the Israeli and
Soviet ambassadors to France
Pickering replied that this was
"Israel's decision to make."
The United States, he said, had
"no view on the matter, and we
wish in no way to prejudice
Israel's decision one way or
other." Generally speaking, he
observed, the United States
favors diplomatic relations among
nations.
[the comereiice ox for F.20 jet ^^ Stinger
idents 01 Major missiles and other lethal weapons,
can Jewish Organiza- Pickering said the White House
. that the Reagan was considering a position paper
istration is seeking to on request but had not yet
[out a "package deal"
sn Israel and Egypt
lould return the Egyp-
(Ambassador to Tel
]ind warm up the "cold
between the two
fies.
friendly meeting his sole
ance liefore a Jewish group
. his departure for Israel
nj; also said that the U.S.
limif to help promote
alks among Israel, Jordan
(representative Palestinian
on.
main objective is to pro-
bred Arab-land talks" he
Iding, "We are here to help
|e understand that the
decision must be made by
ilries themselves."
JSIDENTS Conference
an Kenneth Bialkin, in in-
|ing the new American en-
raised him as "a wise and
enced diplomat, a warm
I of Israel and the Jewish
and a man who I believe
Dve himself to be a worthy
or to the distinguished am-
or whom he succeeds, Sam
75 representatives of
Bnts Conference member-
ations took part in the
j. Many of them said later
ere impressed with the new
ior's grasp of issues and
|histication in dealing with
ensitive questions as U.S.
les to Jordan and U.S.
fs with the Palestine Na-
imania's MFN
Is Approved
SHINGTON (JTA) The
ence of Presidents of Major
m Jewish Organizations
dorsed a one-year extension
Jst-favored-nation (MFN)
status for Rumania,
one Jewish leader noted
ish emigration so far this
is been disappointing.
| Presidents Conference has
Bsurances from Rumanian
(Is that the number of Jews
Wing for Israel this year will
" last year's total. But dur-
first six months of 1985,
43 Jews left, according to
Spitzer, honorary president
B'rith International.
testifying before the
international Trade Sub-
tee. called this a disap-
ent. Nevertheless, "we
y believe that Rumania's
sl^tus is important to
e/' he said. He explained
"provides a significant
ork for discussing emigra-
ror dealing with specific
nd
Rector Named
. AVIV (JTA) Prof.
1:1 H.nshaul, Vice Rector of
'Diversity, will assume
"! Rector this month,
rof. Yoram Dinstein.
come to a decision.
RESPONDING to a question on
the composition of the Palestinian
delegation at the proposed
U.S.-Jordanian-Palestinian talks,
Pickering said there was "no
change in the U.S. position that
our country will not meet with the
PLO unless and until it accepts
UN Resolutions 242 and 338 and
recognizes Israel's right to exist."
He said that "intensive con-
sultations" were now taking place
between the U.S. and Israel on
who would participate in any talks
among the U.S., Jordan and a
Palestinian delegation. He stated:
"Our purpose is to move to
direct Arab-Israel talks that is
a meeting will lead to direct
negotiations, because it is our in-
tention that only those committed
to peace will be invited to such a
preliminary meeting."
IN ANSWER to a question, the
new U.S. envoy who formerly
served as American Ambassador
to Jordan said he believed that
King Hussein had come "part of
the way toward direct talks, fur-
ther than ever before but not yet
far enough." He added that he
had "no doubt that King Hussein
accepts Israel's right to exist."
Asked why President Reagan
had omitted Syria from a list of
countries that support terrorism,
the American diplomat replied
that the U.S. hoped Syria would
lie helpful to returning the seven
American hostages still in ter-
rorist hands in Lebanon.
On Washington's attitude
For The Discerning Buyer
Burgundy-Kings Point, Defray Beach, Florida
This mint condition 2 bedroom 2 bath 1st floor garden
view condominium must bo seen by the SELECTIVE'
buyer to be appreciated.
Situated near pool and golf course, this professionally \
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wall unit In den/2nd bedroom, Kitchen Aid dishwasher,
ceramic tiled kitchen & dining room floors, vertical
blinds throughout, custom mirrored living room wall,
custom built furniture, and wall paper throughout.
'The location affords easy access to 3 clubhouses
| offering a variety of entertainment and recreational
facilities as well as to superior new shopping areas.
For the price of $60,000 this lovely home could not be
duplicated. SERIOUS buyers are invited to call owner
collect 8:30-5:30 p.m., Mon-Fri. at (201) 285-0446; 8:00-
10:00 a.m. or 3:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m., Sat -Sun. at
(216)228-4555.
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
DANISH
BAKERY
Publix
Publix Baker... open at 8:00 A.M.

Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Dutch Apple
Crumb Pie
$159
each
It
Avasebkt a>Pubh\ Stores wtth
Fresh DaWh Batteries Only.
A Flaky, Creamy,
DeWctous Dessert
Napoleons
2.89
Available at Publix Store* with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Baked Fresh Da
Pum
leaf
Available at AN PuMx Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Chocked Full of Blueberries
Blueberry Muffins.........SM*
Topped wtth Fresh Pecans
Danish Pecan Ring.......ach$199
Delicious j-.
Yellow Cupcakes......... box5!49
Quantity Rights Reserved
Available at Publix Storee with Freeh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Carrot Bar Cake...........* $249
Prices Effective
Aug. 8 thru 14. 1985
McCairs
COOKBOOK
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 17
Cocktail-Time
Cookbook
and
VOLUME 18
Picnic and Patio
Cookbook
1.79
Watch for
New Books Weekly
I


wra
K It
ine'Jewisn r ionaian 01 south County/Friday, August 9^ 1985
In The Synagogues
And Temples ...
B'nai Israel Marks First Anniversary
The Friday evening service
tonight (Friday, Aug. 9) at Con-
gregation B'nai Israel in Boca
Raton will be devoted to a celebra-
tion of the congregation's first
anniversary.
It was a year ago that Con-
gregation B'nai Israel, the fastest-
growing Reform synagogue in the
world, first met to hold services at
the Center for Group Counselling
on Boca Rio Road. B'nai Israel has
invited prospective members to
join in this anniversary service
and share the congregation's joy
and enthusiasm.
B'nai Israel now boasts a
membership of more than 175
families, and has opened registra-
tion for its religious school star-
ting this fall.
The congregation will hold
membership coffee meetings on
Tuesday, Aug. 13, and on Sunday,
Aug. 18, at 8 p.m. At these
meetings, interested persons can
meet Rabbi Richard Agler and
members of the congregation, and
have all their questions answered.
More information on services, the
congregation, the religious school
or the meetings may be obtained
by calling B'nai Israel at
483-9982.
New Conservative Shul Set to Start Sept. 6
Congregation Beth Ami. the
10th synagogue to be organized in
South County, has reached a
membership of nearly 50 families
after three successful meml>ership
meetings in June and July, accor-
ding to president Joseph
Boumans.
As of last week, the new Con-
servative congregation has engag-
ed a cantor, Mark Levi, for the
High Holy Days services, which
will be held in the auditorium of
the Adolph and Rose Levis Jewish
Community Center. Regular Sab-
bath services for the congregation
to be held Friday evening and
Saturday morning will commence
on Sept. 6, in rented facilities at
the Levis JCC, under the leader-
ship of Rabbi Nathan Zelizer.
Boumans explained that the
purpose in establishing the new
congregation was to provide ;i
Conservative BVnagOUgC with a
more traditional outlook; also MM
which would not operate a
religious school and thus keep its
budget down Tickets for the High
Holy Days services for non
members will be sold at $50 each
up to the capacity of the
auditorium, which can seat 350.
The pre-Rosh Hashanah
Selichtt services will be held on
Saturday evening. Sept. 7.
Beth Ami is planning two addi-
tional memlK-'rship meetings in
August one on Monday, Aug.
12, at the Boca Teeca Lodge (5800
NW 2nd Ave.). the other on Aug.
29. More information may be ob-
tained by calling 276-8804;
994-8693; or 392-6003.
Temple Sinai Holds
First of Four Concerts
Temple Sinai of Palm Beach
County will hold the first of four
concerts scheduled for the
1986 1986 season on Sunday.
Nov. 17. at 8 p.m.
The all-new Cameo Musicale
presented by the Gold Coast
Opera will open the concert
season. The Cameo Musicale
features offerings from Gilbert
and Sullivan's "H.M.S. Pinafore.
the Broadway Musical Classic
"Kismet," and Franz Lehar's
"The Merry Widow."
This concert will be fully staged,
choreographed, and sung by ar-
tists from the Gold Coast Opera
Company.
For choice seat selection, early
reservations should be made at
the Temple Sinai office, 2475
West Atlantic Ave., or phone
276-6161. All seats are reserved
the donation is $5 each.
B'nai Torah Brunch
For Newcomers
B'Nai Torah Congregation
hosted an invitation brunch on
Sunday. July 21. in the Clubhouse
at Parkside. Boca Raton.
Anshei Shalom Gets Kosher Catering
Steve Greenseid Caterers have
been appointed caterers at Tem-
ple Anshei Shalom in Delray.
temple president Edward Dorf
man announced. They will take
over the ultra-modern meat and
dairy kitchens at the recently
completed building on Atlantic
Avenue.
Dorfman said the kosher cater-
ing facility will be supervised by
Rabbi Mark Dratch of the Or-
thodox Boca Raton Synagogue.
Rabbi Dratch was ordained by the
Isaac Elchanan Theological
Seminary at Yeshiva University,
and is the son-in-law of Dr. Nor-
man Lamm, president of Yeshiva
U.
Greenseid Caterers has
established an office at the tem-
ple, and has invited the public to
visit the facilities, which can ac-
commodate 400 comfortably, for
weddings, Bar-Mitzvah or
organizational functions.
Beth Shalom
Temple Beth Shalom
Sisterhood, Century Village
West, will hold their next meeting
Monday, Aug. 26, 10:30 a.m. in
the Administration Building. A
special program is planned and
refreshments will be served.
Arranged by membership
chairperson. Carolyn Shapiro and
aides. Barbara Extein and Diane
Marcovitz, the event offered new
area residents an insight on the
Conservative synagogue and its
activities.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman and
president Sheldon Jontiff outlined
the precepts and growth of B'Nai
Torah, established in 1977, now in
its eighth year. A spacious, new,
$4 million building with expanded
facilities is scheduled for construc-
tion next year.
Temple Emeth
Remodels Bimah
Temple Emeth is renovating its
worship facilities, with the Bimah
being remodeled in stone and
wood by Frank Marcucela III and
Surrounding Designers of the
Sanctuary of Boca Raton.
Completion of the remodelling
is scheduled for Sept. 1, so that
the new decor will be done in time
for the High Holy Day serivces.
Miriam Blinder, who has had an
extensive career in interior design
here and in New York, is in charge
of the project on behalf of the
temple.
Observe The High Holy Days With
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
Of Boca Raton
A Conservative Synagogue
In The Grand Ballroom Of The New
Deerfield Hilton, Hillsboro Blvd. At 1-95
Services Conducted By
Rabbi Theodora Ftldman, Hazzan Donald Roberts
Rosh Hashana
Monday, Sept. 16th
Tuesday, Sept. 17th
Junior Congregation
Services
Supervised Nursery
Available
Kol Nidre
Tuesday, Sept. 24th
Yom Kippur
Wednesday, Sept. 25th
Facilities For
Pre-Schoolers
Hotel Accommodations
Available On Request
For Information Call 392-8566
B'nai Mitzvah
LARRY ABBO
On Saturday, Aug. 10, Larry
Abbo, son of Eva and Freddy Ab-
Ikp. will be called to the Torah at
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton as
a Bar Mitzvah. As an ongoing
Temple project, he will be "Twin-
ning" with Vitaly Eliashberg of
the Soviet Union.
Larry is an Hth-grade student at
Boca Raton Academy, and at-
tends the Temple Beth El
Religious School. Family
members sharing in the aimcha
are grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Jacobo Lederman of Miami Beach
and Mrs. Regina Abbo of
Maracaibo, Venezuela. Mr. and
Mrs. Abbo will host a Kiddush in
Larry's honor following Shabbat
morning services.

m
Wa
*
Larry Abbo
,
Shabbat, 23 AB 5745
Weekly Sldrah: Ekev
Candle Lighting 7:41 p.m.
Sabbath Ends 8:53 p.m.
Next Shabbat 30 AB 5745
Weekly Sldrah: Re'Eh
Candle Lighting 7:36 p.m.
Sabbath Ends 8:47 p.m.
Religious Directs
CONGREGATION BETH AMI
2134 N.W. 19th Way, Boca Raton, Florida 38431. Consem
Phone (305) 994-8693 or 276-8804. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
dent, Joseph Boumans. Services held at the I.evis JCC,336N|
Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conserw
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Hazzan
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m.. Saturdayi
a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101, Boca Raton,:
33433. Orthodox services held at Verde Elementary
Cafeteria, 6590 Verde Trail, Boca, Saturday morning 9:301
For information regarding Friday, Sundown services Mm
Maariv. call Rabbi Mark Dratch. Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd.,
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. I
Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m. I
hath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class5|
Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling. 22445 Boca Riol
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler.'
bath Services Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday at 10:15 a.m. MaN"
dress: 8177 W. Glades Road. Suite 214. Boca Raton, FL33|
Phone 483-9982. Baby sitting available during services.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
7099 West Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach. Florida 33446.^
vative. Phone 495-0466 and 495-1300. Rabbi Jordan H.iWF
Cantor Louis Hershman. Sabbath Services Friday at ^
Saturday at 8:30 a.m. Daily services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue. Boca Raton. Florida 33432. MJ
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer. Assis^Vri
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve'fTm
8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday"
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015. Boca Raton, r'L^s8,J
servative. Located in Century Village. Boca. Daily Njr "i
and B p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sun(!a>. Jtf
and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone I
M. Pollack. Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
r.7h. Wed Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Floi i da J844*! ^
vative Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot .1 u '^i ...s-tfi
Cantor Sabbath Sorvieta: Friday at K p.m.. Sal
Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ji^jj,
Road). Delrav Beach. Florida 33445. Reform *aW
vlna, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat.. 10 a.m. RaN*
phone 276-6161.


Mormon Activities In Israel
Friday, August 9, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 15
Local Clu
Organization
By GIL SEDAN
[RUSALEM (JTA) -
(odox Jews who bitterly
[se plans to build a Mor-
educational center at
Scopus have found new
is among Christian
as who claim the Mor-
are not, in fact,
sntic Christians.
tesentatives of eight Chris-
lenominations held a press
lence here last week to de-
a planned extension of
Wi Young University next
Hebrew University Mt.
campus and to attack the
Dn Church and its motives in
to Jerusalem.
tiam Young University, in
ike City, Utah, seat of the
Mi faith, is named for the
Prophet of the church
was founded in the early
entury by Joseph Smith Jr.,
as the First Prophet. The
Mt. Scopus extension on five acres
of land, will contain housing and
catering services for nearly 200
students, a 400-seat auditorium
for cultural events and classrooms
for academic programs.
IT WAS designed by Jerusalem
architect David Resnick and
Frank Furguson, an architect
from Salt Lake City. The project
was approved as long ago as 1977
by the Likud-led government of
Premier Menachem Begin which
was especially solicitous of Or-
thodox sensibilities, and by the
Jerusalem municipality.
Speakers at the press con-
ference claimed the real purpose
of the Mormon center was to pro-
selytize Jews and warned that
many young Israelis would be con-
ditioned to leave the country to
join the Mormons. This is precise-
ly the argument of the Orthodox
establishment, headed by the two
Chief Rabbis. It has been
vigorously denied by spokesmen
for the Mormon Church here.
The West Bank
Will Not Be Changed
[A! RICK SAMUELSON
IDON (JTA) -
le Arens, Israeli
rter-Without-Portfolio,
ed here that having
Ireunited with the rest
in 1967, there was
to be no change in the
is of Judaea and
ia.
ressing a dinner to com-
ite the reunification of
lem in the Six-Day-War,
irmer Likud Defense
Jr also called for an inten-
n of Jewish settlement in
erritories, especially in the
I Hebron.
ibing Hebron as one place
ds to be redeemed, Arens
a great effort so that
three other holy cities of
- Jerusalem, Safed,
6 it will again be what it
be in former days.
E STRONG approval of
ence, mainly supporters of
ut movement, he scoffed
I'T
at suggestions that territories
could be exchanged for peace and
that the return of Jews to a place
like Hebron was an obstacle to
peace. Almost the contrary, he ad-
ded. The more settlements there
will be in Judaea and Samaria, the
greater the chance that King Hus-
sein of Jordan will one day be able
to make peace.
In a somber reference to the
40th anniversary of the end of*
World War II in Europe, Arens
recalled that when the Nazis
crushed the revolt in the Warsaw
Ghetto and then proceeded to ex-
terminate half a million
Hungarian Jews, the tide of war
had already turned strongly
against them, with the Nazi ar-
mies broken at Stalingrad and the
Allies already in Paris.
Had the Allies so wished, they
could then have done a lot to
thwart the Nazis' mass exter-
mination of the Jewish people,
Arens said. But it was not one of
the Allies strategic objectives,
otherwise it could have been done,
he said.
ligious Leaders
Continued from Page 1
the way Jews define
Ives."
her IJCIC criticism was
Notes were published
Jit prior consultation with
fish community."
[agreement for further
came after the all-day
htion held last Wednesday
Jie AJCommittee said was
[such meeting of Catholics
s since publication of the
"g "to evaluate the docu-
both its positive and
' aspects," the par-
[ agreed that "strengthen-
' years of progress in our
ps, we have learned
can face genuine dif-
>and still retain a spirit of
mutual respect."
[PARTICIPANTS agreed,
^l statement, that, "Had
J^n prior consultations
Jewish community along
p of these clarifications,
we cnticism which con-
| now might have been
L '^statement said that
!s should have been read
"ion with more positive
hs about Jews and
Judaism made by Vatican of-
ficials, including Pope John Paul
II.
The participants said they
agreed that the Notes "do not
preclude and indeed appears to us
to invite further scholarly explora-
tion of the basic relationship bet-
ween the Church and the Jewish
People." A spokesman for the
AJCommittee told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he did
not know when future meetings
will be held.
Rabbi A. James Rudin, the
AJCommittee's director of inter-
religious affairs, said that Jews
continued to have reservations
about the notes but that he hoped
they could be resolved in future
discussions.
Concerning the IJCIC criticism
that the State of Israel and the
Holocaust were inadequately
handled in the Notes, the joint
statement said the participants
committed themselves to "con-
tinued dialogue between our two
communities." They agreed that
Catholics, as well as Jews, needed
to grapple with the significance of
the Holocaust for Christians as
well as for Jews.
Dave Hunt, author of several
books on religious cults, called the
press conference. He and other
speakers charged that the Mor-
mons pretended to be Christians
but subscribed to beliefs that were
far from Christianity.
THEY CLAIMED the official
name of the church, The Church of
Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints,
was a misnomer and that the Mor-
mons believe Jthey must take over
the world before Jesus can return.
Hunt charged that the Mt. Scopus
center was part of that plan.
Another speaker, Rev. Jim Can-
talon of the Jerusalem Christian
Center, accused the Mormons of
trying to deceive Israel. But a
shade of embarrassment hung
over the press conference.
Recently, the Mormon Center
located in the consular district of
East Jerusalem was vandalized.
Hunt opened his remarks with a
condemnation of the vandals.
Mormon representatives were
present at the press conference
but remained silent. Afterwards,
however, Dr. Ellis Rasmussen,
former Dean of Religious Educa-
tion at Brigham Young Universi-
ty, told reporters that he was
shocked by the allegations which
he said were falsities and half-
truths.
THE PURPOSE of the
academic center of Mt. Scopus is
to enable Mormon students to get
to know Israel, he said. He reaf-
firmed the Church's pledge not to
engage in missionary activity in
Israel.
The Mormon Church in the U.S.
has been especially sympathetic to
Israel and Jews. Last November,
thousands '%ihfl Mormon' school
children along with their parents
and teachers, gathered in Cedar
City, Utah to participate in a
"Jewish Week" sponsored by the
Southern Utah State College, a
Mormon college.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi
Chapter will take a trip to Epcot
Center, Oct. 23-25. The cost will
be $175 per person. Call now for
your reservations, 499-6409 or
499-9502.
ORT
Women's American ORT Boca
Century Village Chapter will
celebrate Rosh Hashanah at the
Sonesta Beach Hotel, Sept. 15-18.
Make your reservations now by
calling Alice 487-2458 or Gert
482-1785.
JWV
Delray Ladies Auxiliary 266,
JWV of the U.S.A. will hold a lun-
cheon and fashion show on
Wednesday, Aug. 14, at 12 noon
to be held at Barnacles Sea Food
Restaurant, Shopping Center,
Southwest Corner of Atlantic
Ave. and Military Trail, near
Phar-Mor.
Donation $7 per person includes
tip and tax. For tickets and infor-
mation call Rose Bromberg,
498-9038: Marlene Brier,
499-4040; Augusta Dukoff,
499-1071.
Obituaries
COHEN
Albert, of I^isureville. Delray Beach, was
originally from New York. He is survived by
his wife Ethel, son Robert, daughter Adele
LePow, sisters Minnie Sugar, Sylvia
Sanders and Rebecca Rosenberg, and four
grandchildren. Beth Israel Rubin Chapel.
HELDEMAN
Morris, 85, of Kings Point, Delray Beach
was originally from Rumania. He is survived
by his wife Rose, son Marvin and daughter
Regina Lerner. Beth Israel Rubin Chapel.
KANE
William, 74. of Century Village. Boca
Raton, was originally from Illinois. He is
survived by his wife Rose, son Norman,
daughter Karol, sisters Rae Lucas and
Bessie Mark and six grandchildren. Beth
Israel Rubin Chapel
LEVINE
Robert N., 68. of Leisureville, Delray
Beach, was originally from New York. He is
survived by his wife Marilyn, son Neil Jay,
daughter Laurie Begleiter, brothers Louis
and Morris, sister Charlotte and four grand-
children. Beth Israel Rubin Chapel.
LOWIT
Selma, 88, of Boca Raton, was originally
from New York. She is survived by her son
Al. Gutterman-Warheit Chapel.
PEACE OF MIND
Warmth and Comfort
Sensitivity and Consideration
Compassion in your time of need
We understand
We honor all pre-need programs
- HUKIX
A Family Protection Plan Chapel
5808 w. AllantU Avenue
Delray Beach. PL 33445
305-400-8000
Pre-Neeo" <: KS78 W AllantU Avenue
ix-lrav Rearh. R. 33446
YOU HAVE A CHOICE IN
SOUTH PALM BEACH
COUNTY. MAKE THE
WISE ONE!
Professional, courteous, qualified counselors.
100% refundable pre-arrangement policy.
Cemetery planning and counseling.
Serving all Jewish cemeteries in South Florida.
Out of state transfer throughout the U.S., Canada,
and Israel.
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Gutterman
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ManhattanQueensBrooklynBronx
N


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, August 9, 1985
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