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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( July 12, 1985 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00382

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
July 12, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00382

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
W^ The Jewish ^ ?
FloridiaN
of South County
iber24
Serving Boca Raton, Oelray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, July 12. 1985
Frd shocntt Price 35 Cents
Leaders Assured
7
rt...
lieges...
9
>rs...
>ws Tied
page 4
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An official of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Ma-
jor American Jewish
Organizations said Sunday
that the Reagan Ad-
ministration did not exert
pressure on American Jews
to press Israel to release the
same 700 Shiites held'at the
Atlit prison camp.
"There was no government
pressure on American Jews to
pressure Israel," said Yehuda
There Was No Pressure From Washington
isad Chief
Hellman, executive vice president
of the Presidents Conference.
"And there was no pressure of
American Jews on Israel whether
government inspired or
autonomously inspired."
Hellman was responding to an
inquiry from the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency about a
Washington Post report in which
an unidentified "well informed
White House official" was quoted
as suggesting that American Jews
pressure Israeli Premier Shimon
Peres to release the Shiite de-
tainees it holds in order to
facilitate the release of the
American hostages in Beirut.
"WE FIGURE that Peres can
read our minds," the official was
quoted as saying. "Peres knows
what is happening here. He can
understand the delicacy of the
situation." The official was also
quoted as saying that "certainly
there are enough people over here
of the Jewish faith who can read
. .. who must be telling people
over there (in Israel) 'for God's
sake, look what you're doing to
public opinion' in the United
States.
Jewish leaders here were clearly
concerned that Israel's position on
the release of the Shiite detainees
could result in a backlash of anti-
el Refuses Verdict Mengele Died in Brazil
EDAN
(JTA) -
as former
was in-
capture of
jnal Adolph
51, insisted
Auschwitz
*tor Josef
live despite
[of a report
Eil that a
;d from a
was un-
that of
tion issued a separate report con-
cluding that the bones were those
of Mengele "within a reasonable
scientific certainty."
The U.S. Justice Department
has said that it supports the con-
clusions of the international group
of experts. "Based" on the infor-
mation available from the forensic
examination, these experts have
concluded that the body exhumed
by Braziliarvauthorities is in fact
Josef Mengele.
"Representatives of the United
States government took part in
the examination of the remains
and concur in the conclusion. It is
my sincere hope that this will be
the final chapter in a tragic and
horrible part of world history. We
should never forget the horrible
crimes," Attorney General Edwin
Meese III said in a statement
issued in Washington.
THE EXPERTS told a news
conference that their evidence
Continued on Page 4
Israel May Be Heading For
Showdown With Shiites Rabin
icial govern-
It a Justice
said Israel
^w the report
/olved in the
[police force's
Menachem
ill that he
lings of the
ithal Center
iwhile, said
[they agreed
tientific cer-
lins found in
ibu, Brazil
ele, the so-
i," and chief
where he
medical ex-
lates.
jed in Sao
itemational
the United
st Germany
Bs exhumed
fare those of
delega-
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin warned that Israel
may be heading for a
showdown with the Shiite
Moslems in Lebanon
because extremists in that
community appear to be
taking control.
Addressing a symposium at Tel
Aviv University on the aftermath
of the war in Lebanon, Rabin ex-
pressed concern that units of the
Shiite militia, Amal, loyal to their
leader, Nabih Berri, may not be
able to withstand the extremists
in their ranks.
The latter, believed responsible
for hijacking TWA Flight 847 on
June 14, are holding 40 of its
American passengers hostage in
Beirut. Berri, who is Justice
Minister in the Lebanese govern-
ment a government most
observers agree exists only on
[at European Airport
(JTA) The first synaoggue at any
/as dedicated at Brussels International
the Minister of Communications, Her-
I said it symbolized Belgium's respect for
m, especially at an airport which is a
le of all faiths.
SYNAGOGUE is located in the main
Catholic and Protestant chapels, the
s and VIP lounge. It was built in
by the Jewish community to which the
linistry and the airport authority readily
prt is an important transit center for
I United States and Israel.
paper has undertaken the role
of go-between in the hostage
crisis.
ALTHOUGH the hijackers have
demanded that Israel release
more than 700 Shiite prisoners in
the Atlit detention camp in ex-
change for the hostages, many
observers here and abroad believe
this is not the central issue.
The hijack crisis "is in effect a
test for Amal and its leadership in
their rivalry with the extremist
elements," Rabin said. He observ-
ed that it came at the "least op-
portune time" as far as Israel's
relations with the U.S. and Amal
are concerned.
The hijackers' demands have
been addressed to Washington
with the intent to force the
Reagan Administration to
pressure Israel to free the Atlit
detainees. Both the U.S. and
Israel have maintained publicly
that they will never make conces-
sions to the hijackers or ask
anyone to do so.
RABIN NOTED that Israel has
had little trouble with Amal in
south Lebanon since April 1. At-
tacks directed at the Israel
Defense Force in the security zone
near the international border
caused no military or civilian
fatalities, he said. But the leader-
ship struggle within the Shiite
community could worsen the
security situation and could even
result in an Amal alliance wit1 the
Palestine Liberation Organization
which it has fought bitterly in re-
cent weeks, Rabin said.
was not based on one test but on
an overwhelming accumulation of
data and the fact that all the
evidence was consistent with the
assumption that the body was that
of Mengele. One test involved
comparison photos of the exhum-
ed skull with other pictures of the
Nazi war criminal.
Furthermore, beyond the skull
comparison and a comparison of
other areas such as the eyes,
mouth, nose and chin, there was
the fact that the tests discovered
that the bones were of a white
male of medium build between 64
and 74 years of age. The height
was that of a man in life calculated
at 174 centimeters or about 5 feet,
10 inches. Mengele's SS file listed
his height as 175 centimeters. The
body was also right-handed, as
was Mengele.
The experts indicated that den-
tal tests failed to provide con-
clusive evidence that the body was
that of Mengele, although
reconstruction of the jaw and
teeth concluded that the body
found in the grave had a wide
space between the upper incisors
an unusually wide gap that was
one of Mengele's distinctive facial
features.
Yehuda Hellman
Israel or anti-Jewish sentiments.
A Washington Post-ABC News
poll last week suggested that
might be weakening due to the im-
passe over the hostage drama.
Nonetheless, the Washington
Post quoted a senior White House
offical over the weekend as
describing the words of his col-
league as an "unfortunate
remark," but he did not elaborate.
The Post also reported that
representatives of some six
leading American Jewish groups
had been contacted by the White
House and assured that the White
House official's comment does not
reflect the views of the President.
This however could not be in-
dependently confirmed at press
time.
REAGAN HAS during the
hostage drama repeatedly assured
Israel that it will not ask
Jerusalem to bow to the demands
of the hijackers and release the
Shiite detainees. In fact, Reagan,
in response to a reporter's ques-
tion in Chicago, said he would not
ask Israel to give into the
demands of the hijackers.
"I only know that none of us,
any country, can afford to pay ter-
rorists for crimes that they're
committing because that will only
lead to more crime," Reagan said.
Reform Rabbis Refuse Plaut's
Plea To Quit Friday Eve Prayers
MINNEAPOLIS (JTA)
- Delegates to the 96th an-
nual convention of the Cen-
tral Conference of
American Rabbis rejected
strongly by a voice vote a
proposal made by the CCAR
president, Rabbi W. Gun-
ther Plaut, that the late Fri-
day evening service, long
established in Reform
Judaism, be eliminated "as
the centerpiece of Reform
religious expression."
The outgoing CCAR president
proposed that Reform rabbis en-
courage congregants to observe a
traditional Sabbath dinner at
home on Friday evening and then
attend worship services on Satur-
day morning.
MANY OF the delegates ex-
pressed vigorous objections to the
idea in a debate following the
Plaut address. When the matter
came to a vote, the strength of the
opposition shocked Plaut so much
that a motion was approved to
refer his proposal, without recom-
mendation, to the CCAR Commit-
tee on Reform Jewish Practices.
In proposing the elimination of
Friday evening service, a Reform
staple for more than 100 years,
Plaut said low attendance at Fri-
day evening services indicated
that "our people are telling us
something by their very absence."
Many of the delegates disputed
Plaut's analysis.
He said he opposed having the
rabbis expend their energy "on
the self-defeating exterprise of
organizing Friday night services
measured not by its intensity of
prayer but by the number who
come to attend it."
HE PROPOSED also that the
synagogue should be redirected
into a "bet midrash" (house of
study) where Jews go to study. He
emphasized that Jews should lead
a life of good deeds and thus the
chief good deed (mitzvah) is not
"come to the synagogue"
rather to "lead a Jewish life."
,1


J *
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, July 12, 1985
Press
(Compiled from Israeli dailies
and the English-language Jewish
Press, by MARTY ERANN.
Director of Communications,
South County Jewish
Federation)
Israel is besieged with economic
and security problems. Were not
for these, most Israelis will readi-
ly tell you, the biggest problem
they would have to contend with
would be religious strife.
A poll, recently commissioned
by (^sher and reported in The
Jerusalem Post last week, found
that most Israelis feel the tensions
between religious and secular
Jews there are growing, and this
conflict is more serious and persis-
tent than the problems in rela-
tions between Ashkenazi and
Sephardi ethnic groups.
(Israelis, we believe, do not need
-. the poll to confirm this, though the
real news, perhaps, is that this
problem has surpassed the ethnic
group tensions in scope. In a way.
this is actually good news
although there are no polls for
comparisons, it is more than just
an impression that educational
levels of' 'Sephardi'' Jews have im-
proved in Israel; that there are
more of them in Government, in
senior army posts and in every
echelon of civilian life; and that
the new generation of Israelis do
not appear to give a hoot when
marrying whether their partner is
of the same ethnic origin. M.E.)
According to the poll, 52 per-
cent want more hours of Jewish
studies added to the school cur-
riculum. However, when broken
down by religious indentification,
88 percent of those who said they
were "religious" wanted this, 66
percent of those who said they
were "traditional" agreed, and 38
of those considering themselves
"secular" went along with that.
At the same time, only nine per-
cent of the secular Jews said they
wanted the time spent in schools
on Jewish studies reduced.
Geaher, an organization which
attempts to bring together
religious and secular Jews for
seminars, dialogues and Jewish
study courses, was founded by Dr.
Daniel Tropper. He concedes that
the poll had some limitations its
1,192 respondents were limited to
adults over 18, and it did not com-
pare the views of the Zionist
religious Israelis to those of the
Ultra-Orthodox non-Zionists. But
Gesher will have additional
studies made, according to
Tropper.
Rabbi Gunther Plaut, outgo-
ing president of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis
(CCAR). believes a reformation
is taking place in the Reform
movement and he'd like to
help it along by abolishing the
Friday night services which are
central to worship in Reform
templet.
The National Jewish Post And
Opinion last week carried moat
of Rabbi Plaut's address to the
Reform rabbis, in which he said
that the Reform movement has
become the "gathering place of
the least committed and most
Marginal Jews," and urged the
gathered rabbis to take the lead
in prompting their congregants
to observe mitxvot in their
homes, and not to make
synagogue attendance the most
important aspect of Jewish life.
Instead of Friday night ser-
vices, the synagogue should
move more toward being a place
of study and learning, and away
from a gathering place for
prayer. Abandoning the Friday
night services would allow the
synagogues to redirect the fnmdm
used for acker things. Rabbi
ut
He also attacked the Pitt-
sburg Platform, which was
adopted by the Reform move-
ment 100 years ago. That plat-
form, with its eight-point
resolution, did not mention the
Jewish People, and glaringly ab-
sent from it were also "the men-
tion of halachah, mitzvah,
Hebrew and any assertion of
Jewish particularism." said
Plaut. The Reform movement
has already abandoned much of
the platform's spirit, he added,
and suggested a new direction
in "the struggle against the
challenge of freedom and iU in-
evitable by-product the
danger of assimilation."
In our last issue (June 28) we
mentioned a study on the growing
popularity of Rabbi Meir Kahane
and his KACH party, which had
been conducted among teenagers
by the highly respected Van Leer
Institute of Jerusalem. Sure
enough, a few days later Yediot
Aharonot reported that study -
as well as some it conducted itself
extensively. It considered the
findings "astonishing."
The Van Leer study asked a
sample of 600 teens, aged 15-18, if
they agreed with Rabbi Kahane
and KACH, concerning the Arab
minority in Israel. The results: 42
percent said they agreed, 58 per-
cent disagreed. More than 11 per
cent said they would vote for
KACH were Knesset elections to
be held now. The proportion of
those who agreed with Kahane
was higher among Sephardi
groups, and especially among the
religious students.
In the Yediot study, which ques-
tioned three samples totalling 97
students, 53 percent said they
agreed with Kahane, and 27 per-
cent said they would vote for him.
(In the Yediot study, just as in the
other, there was higher agree-
ment among Sephardi students
than among Ashkenazi, but there
was greater proportions of
Ashkenazi students agreeing with
Kahane). Kahanism, says Yediot.
is no longer a marginal
phenomenon, and cannot be ex-
plained as a result of disaffection
on the part of underprivileged
ethnic groups. "The writing on
the wall from a year ago, at the
time of the Knesset elections, has
turned into a red warning light.
Another episode from "Chelm":
The city council of Ramat Gan a
mid-size city adjacent to Tel Aviv
- sat for a three-hour stormy
meeting last week, at which
members of the Likud opposition
party rolled a toy car on the table,
and demanded that the city sell off
the 1985, 2000cc Volvo which it
bought for the mayor, Uri Amit,
at a cost of $46,000.
A couple of weeks ago, some of
the Likud councilmen chained the
controversial car (bought in con-
travention of the directives of the
Interior Ministry and the Govern-
ment budget guidelines) to trees
outside City Hall, as a gesture of
protest against the expenditure
The council session was a sequel
to this protest, with members of
the Mayor's Labor Patty and the
Likud opposition exchanging
invective.
The meeting actually started
earlier in the streets, as the Likud
members circulated a petition call
ing for resale of the car. The
mayor opened with a speech, con-
stantly interrupted, saying the
publicity on the Volvo was full of
lies to which one of the Likud
members responded: "what, you
really did get a Volvo?" and the
Mayor said: "What's the problem,
the Cabinet ministers drive
around in a little Autobianchi?"
One of his deputies called to the
Likud members: "Are you jealous;
do you want to take a ride in it?"
Called Moshe Perry of the
Likud: "In your election platform
you accused (former mayor) Dr.
Peled of riding a horse while you
walked now you ride around in
a luxurious Volvo and Dr. Peled is
walking."
At the end of the meeting, a
vote: 14 coalition members
against selling the Volvo, six op-
position members for. (Item from
Ma'Ariv)
One out of every two Jewish col-
lege students who will marry this
decade will wed a non-Jew, Rabbi
Alexander Schindler told the Con-
ference on Intermarriage in New
York last month. The figure used
to be one out of three meaning a
50 percent increase.
Only one out of three of the non-
Jewish partners will convert to
Judaism, Rabbi Schindler. presi-
dent of the Reform Union of
American Hebrew Congregations,
added. There are now some
500,000 offspring of such inter-
marriages in America, he told the
conference, in which nearly 200
persons from all streams of
Judaism, specializing in outreach
programs, took part.
The goal should be to try to con-
vert the non-Jewish partner, Rab-
bi Schindler said but "if we fail
in this goal, we must not exile our
children We must embrace
them, bringing them closer to our
hearts ..."
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Local Man Takes Soviet Jews
Plight To 3 European Cities
Friday, July 12 1985/TV Jewish h of South County Page 3
e of the many facets of the
ggle for Soviet Jewry is the
rjnal involvement of people
ng to give of themselves, as
nplified by Ernest Goldblum
)el-Aire, a member of Con-
cation Anshei Emuna in
^ldblum, accompanied by
Penzer, took two weeks in
to travel to Geneva, Vienna
|London, at his own expense,
ing the case of some of the
prisoners of conscience in
JSSR to the Red Cross, to the
^Soviet talks and to Amnesty
national; to insist that their
\t be put on everyone's agen-
nd that something be done
it.
tfore making the trip,
blum mobilized the help of
influential Congressmen:
liltun Fish, Jr.; Joseph
fuardi; and Benjamin Gilman.
ed with letters of reference
them, Goldblum and Mrs.
ier met with Jacques
^illon, one of the three direc-
of the International Red
l. as well as with a number of
krganization's experts on In-
ktional Law and on the issue
jviet Jewry. Goldblum and
er provided the Red Cross
!* with updated information
ki conditions of eight of the
|niT^ ol Zion who have been
leaten and some of
on hunger strikes.
nrprised to learn that
row did not possess
(of the information.)
1 isa officials explain-
ler to obtain informa-
ol the prisoners, the
r COflM from relatives
M prisoners. Even then.
were often far from
factory: inquiries remain
^wtreci or take many weeks
replies are received. They
bed that in the near future,
when Alexander Hay, Interna-
tional President of the red Cross
travels to the Soviet Union, he
would make personal inquiries in-
to the fate of the prisoners on the
list.
(The list included Yosef Beren-
shtein, who lost most of his
eyesight from beatings; Yosef
Begun, on hunger strike since
March; Alexander Kholmiansky
who was on hunger strike since
September; Ya'acov Mesh, who
has kidney problems and has suf-
fered beatings; Dan Shapira, who
has a heart condition and faces
"hospitalization" in a psychiatric
ward; Anatoly Shcharansky;
Nepomniashchy; and Zunshain.)
A similar meeting was held with
Zia Rizvi, executive secretary of
the Independent Commission on
International Humanitarian
Issues, headed by Prince Sadrud-
din Aga Khan, who promised the
Aga Khan will use his good offices
to help.
Next, Goldblum and Penzer
travelled to Vienna, where
Secretary of State George Shultz
was to meet with Soviet Foreign
Minister Andrei Gromyko. They
presented papers on the prisoners
of conscience to Miss Judy O'Neil,
assistant to Bernard Kalb, with
the request that the matter be
taken up in the talks between
Later, Goldblum and Penzer
met in London with Marjorie Far-
quharson, a researcher for
Amnesty International, who was
surprisingly well-informed on
each of the names presented. This
meeting was also attended by
several members of London's
35-Women's Campaign for Svoiet
Jewry, who added information on
Ida Nudel, one of the most famous
prisoners of conscience.
Goldblum, who formerly served
as chairman, Weschester County,
of the New York Jewish Con-
ference, believes the kind of effort
he made, coupled with a strong
campaign to make public opinion
informed on the status of the
prisoners of conscience (of which
there are thousands), are the keys
to solving the problem of Soviet
Jewry. His efforts, he assured The
Jewish Floridian, will continue
when he is in South County, which
he shares as his residence with
Westchester, New York.
Ernie Goldblum, (right) with Jacques Moreillon, Director of
General Affairs of the International Red Cross (center) and Anita
Penzer, in Geneva.
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Cholesterol Hue 8t% M Egg
Product
1 teaspoon almond tlract
Margate* beat MAP) FlEBCtaaVal S Nanjmra suoar EGG Bf ATEFIS ChoW
an* trea PUN r Egg ro0uel almond otract and amen per unw *" HenUM S
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WHEN VOU BUY ANY Ote POUND Of
FlElSCHMANN S. MARGARINE
\
LJ'


r
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, July 12, 1985
Editorial
Blaming Israel
According to a skewed Washington Post-ABC News poll,
42 percent of 555 Americans polled agree with the state-
ment that "the United States should reduce its ties to
Israel in order to lessen the acts of terrorism against us in
the Middle East.''
It is a disturbing finding although it is one that might
very well be reversed if the question were asked different-
ly. Lee Miringoff, director of the respected Marist College
Institute for Public Opinion in Poughkeepsie, Ne\* York,
says that by having placed the words "lessen terrorism"
next to the words "reduce ties to Israel," the pollsters
predetermined their results. After all. he says, we are in
the midst of a terrorist attack against the United States.
Virutally anything that is offered as a means of reducing
terrorism will receive significant support.
Miringoff says that if the Marist Institute had conducted
the poll, it would have offered the respondent a number of
choices as to how the United States might best lessen the
terrorist threat. He thinks that such a poll might have pro-
duced a very different response than a poll which sug-
gested just one alternative. In the case of the Post-ABC
poll, the respondents merely agreed to the one option they
were offered. They agreed to it even though the assump-
tion which is implicit in the question that reducing sup-
port for Israel would reduce terrorism is completely
specious.
The skewed poll is more than matched by the overall tone
of media coverage of the TWA hostage crisis. The press
repeatedly suggests that the Israelis are resonsible for the
Shi'ite terrorism that is now taking such a heavy toll. The
facts tell a different story. Lebanon's Shi'ites (the largest
religious group in the country) have long been victimized by
the various cliques which have "governed" that country.
Both the Christians and the mainstream Sunni Moslems
discriminated against the majority Shi'ites, and the PLO
(which held sway in south Lebanon until the Israeli invasion
of 1982) oppressed them brutally.
The Shi'ites are an angry people, and their anger has
been fueled by both Syria (which is the prime instigator of
anti-American violence in the Middle East) and Iran (which
has become the political center of world Shiism since Kho-
meini came to power). It would seem almost impossible to
find fault with Israel in all this. Israel is the main opponent
of Syrian expansionism and is obviously no friend of the
viciously anti-Semitic regime in Tehran.
Still the anti-Israel crowd points to Jerusalem. Free the
700 Shi'ite detainess they cry, as if these 700 were the
cause rather than the pretext. Others say that Israel should
soften its position on the PLO, that a Palestinian Arab
state would eliminate much of the terrorist menace. But
that is patently false. The Shi'ite hijackers hate the Palesti-
nian Arabs and have massacred hundreds of them in the
Sabra and Shatila camps. The Shi'ite terrorists don't want
a PLO state. On the contrary, such a state would merely in-
flame them.
In cssense, there is no Israeli connection to the current
crisis. Israel's release of the 700 Shi'ites will not end the
terrorist threat to America. That threat is directed against
the United States not because of anything we do but
because of an envious and pernicious anti-Americanism
that is prevalent throughout the Third World (and not just
the Middle East). This may be hard for Americans to
stomach. As a people, we want to be liked and it is hard
to accept the idea that some people hate us not for what we
do, but primarily for what we are. Selling out our ally in
Jerusalem wouldn't reduce the threat of terrorism. It
would, in fact, let terrorists know that there is nothing we
wouldn't sacrifice if they just put another gun to our head.
If the terrorists prevail, Israel will only be the first victim.
Editorial from the "Near East Report," July 1, 1985.

The Jewish
RID]
of South Count*
171 The Jewish ^y
FloridiaN
FHEDSMOCMET
Edito' and Publish*'
SUZANNE SHOCHFT
Eiscutlv* Editor
MARTYERANN
Director of Communications. South County Jewish Federation
ftJMMI Weekly MM Baaasr throat* MM-May. Bi Week!. baiaaca tfrwrlU iaaaaa)
Siiii< Claaa PeeUux* Paid at Bora Kate*. Fla
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian,
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Ha. 33101
BOCA RATON OFFICE 330 Spanish River Blvd. N W Boca Raton. Fla 33431 Phone 366-2737
Main Offlca Plant 120 N E 6th St Miami. Fla 33132 Phona 373-4605
Adrertuinc Director. Stari Leeeer. Phone SS8-1U2
Combined Jewish AppaalSouth County Jewlah Federation Inc.. Officers President
Marianne Bobick. Vice Preeidents. Mar|orle Beer, Eric W Decklnger, Larry Charms
Secretary, Arnold Roaenthal; Treasurer. Sheldon Jontiff; Executive Director Rabbi Bruce S
Warshal
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kaahruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $3 50 Annual (2 Vear Minimum S7); by membership South
County Jewish Federation, 336 Spanish River Btvd N.W Boca Raton, Fla 33431 Phone
36*2737
Out of Town Upon Request
Knday.Julyl2.19Sr,. MTAMl
Volume 7
KOCH VISITS ABSORPTION CENTER.
New York's Mayor Edward I. Koch greets
Ethiopian Jewish immigrants at the
Mevasseret Zion Absorption Center near
Jerusalem. Later, the Mayor told the UJA
Press Service that the visit "made clear why
support of UJA and Federation is very impor-
tant because they fund then projects. M
said American Jews should provide oJ
through the UJAfFederation Companl
despite some disagreements with I*r policies and needs at home. Photo)
Koch: Fate of All Jews Tied To Israel
Number 24
By DR. GERALD NAGEL
Editor. UJA Press Service
NEW YORK He's partly
known for his directness and his
ability to slice through hyperbole
and pretense with a sharp tongue,
quick wit and fingertip recall of
facts. But on the subject of Israel,
which he asserts all Jews must
support, New York's Mayor Ed-
ward I. Koch can also be
philosphical.
In a special interview here with
the UJA Press Service, Mayor
Koch was uncharacteristically
low-key, as he penetrated deeply
beyond recent events to find
underlying messages of impor-
tance to Jews everywhere.
His answers to many questions
disclosed a well thought out,
perceptive understanding of
Jewish life. He is convinced that
Israel's survival is critical to the
fate of Jews everywhere; that
criticism of Israel is often a cover
for attacks on Jews; and that
American Jews must financially
aid Jews overseas even if they
disagree with Israeli policies and
are confronted by charitable
needs at home.
The Mayor's commitment seem-
ed strikingly beyond his interest
in the votes of Jews as he seeks his
third four-year term in November.
He is far ahead in the polls.
"The absorption by Israel of
Ethiopia's black Jews is the very
raison d'etre for the existence of
Israel," said Koch, looking relax-
ed in a black easy chair in his of-
fice. "No other country wants any
Ethiopians, Jews or non-Jews.
The only country willing to accept
them, gladly, is Israel."
Koch found some symbolism
about Israel's reason for being, on
his most recent trip to Israel in
May. at the Mevasseret Zion Ab-
sorption Center near Jerusalem.
There, he met three children play-
ing together; an Ethiopian boy
who had fled to Israel for his life; a
Moroccan boy whose family came
after fearing a pogrom in Moroc-
co; and an Knglish ^irl whose
family made aUyah to fulfill a
religious: dram
"They eill for different
reasons." the M i "Yet,
the) all had aplaa
Israel should be available for
those who want to live there, and
for those who must live there
because of persecution in the
countries of their birth. If Israel
had existed in the '30s and 40s,
millions of Jews would have been
saved.
"And they are all in this absorp-
tion center," he noted. "For me
that was a very exciting visit. And
it made clear why support of UJA
and Federation is very important
because they fund these
projects.
"Today there are over 100
million Arabs thirsting for their
blood and their land." Koch said,
and criticism of Israel is often a
ruse for anti-Semitism. Shiite
Muslims, who had hijacked a TWA
727 near Athens June 14, spirited
away passengers with Jewish-
sounding surnames and did not
only seek those with Israeli
passports, he noted. "Some of
them aren't Jews, and one is a
Lutheran pastor," Koch pointed
out. "And they're not Israelis.
The hatred is directed at Jews.
The fate of Jews worldwide is tied
up with the fate of Israel."
This doesn't mean he agrees
with every Israeli policy. In fact,
as the man chiefly credited with
bringing New York City from the
precipice of bankruptcy to fiscal
stability, he thinks Israelis can
sacrifice still more to rebuild their
economy. However, he doesn't
think aid should be contingent on
particular policies. "Israel makes
mistakes like everyone else," he
said. "Israel is not above
criticism. But all of us have an
obligation to keep Israel strong.
So I give to UJA. notwithstanding
my criticism.
He admonishes Jews to be open-
ly proud. "I am proud of my
Jewishness and I think that has
enhanced respect for Judaism,"
he asserted. "Do you arouse anti-
Semitism by Iwing up front, by be-
ing Jewish, by indicating devotion
to causes that Jews are concerned
about? The answer is. categorical-
ly, 'No.' You gain respect for Jews
and Judaism when you're up front
and show your pride and
concern."
It i < us for any American
fee! any conflict what-
I r in aiding Jews overseas
in also general com-
munity needs at home, he i
"When Catholics give
Bishop's Fund to propagat*!
faith, and to save Catholics i
others from famine, partici
in Africa, are they
something that's immoral ori
American?" he asked.
ridiculous to think that yoo I
limited to providing only hj
America your chari'
contributions.
"No other group believes I
nor should they. And why f
Jews believe that,
when, if they don't
these Jewish communities -
of Israel and in Israel -
will?"
Harel
Continued from Pig*1
criminal had died in 1979 **\
pathologists could have easily 1
ven the dead man was in V\
Mengele. He also asked why
they decide to confirm the a
Mengele's death at this time,
ting Jews and other Nan-M*
search in vain for Mengele.
The report brought to a coH
sion two weeks of mtenseH
vestigatory efforts and tesa
experts of the body found U
bu under a grave of wo
Gerhard, the identity
Mengele is said to have J*J
in 1975 while living in and JI
Sao Paulo, sheltered forJJ
years by two couples. NoWJ
and letters said to he"
Mengele's have been fow
handwriting *f**J*
that they were authentic^*
drowned at a ^.,3
Paulo on Feb. 7,1979 at the V |
nearly 68.
HABBLSAIDinUjijJl
that he believed effort to
an impression that M K ^|
iused b)'
died "were ^^JjLrestJ
awakenings of ,;uhhcm^
Mengele, particularly u*
public trial in Jerusalem L
He said that stones rfani
national conspiracy o>
criminals are a great
tion. They tend **&
in Latin An.. *, ,
ly guarded homes i*
keitha- $
said. "A local i


miyH?
opaifl county rage 5
Editor Note: Starting with this issue, "The Jewish Flori-
iian of South County" will feature articles by FERN ALLEN
from Jerusalem. Some will be syndicated features, while others
will be written especially for our paper.
Fern has been living in Jerusalem for the past four years,
wrking as the Israel correspondent for "The Jewish Week" of
few York. Her syndicated features and news columns have ap-
peared in several major U.S. Jewish papers, including the
^Baltimore Jewish Times" and "The Jewish Exponent" of
Philadelphia.
A member of Sigma Delta Chi, the society of professional
urnalists, Fern is a graduate of Syracuse University's
Vewhouse School of Public Communications. She is a native of
teens. New York. Fern won the 1985 Simon Rockower Award
r- the feature writing, for an article she did on the 10th anniver-
sary of the Yom Kippur War.
Fern Allen
Police Sappers
Robot, armed with weapons and TV cameras used by police sap-
pers to inspect and dismantle bombs.
Israel's Unsung Heroes
By FERN ALLEN
5RUSALEM A bag left in a
kstore suddenly draws the at-
lon of a clerk. "Whose is
[" she yells frantically.
hen no one answers, she
kly calls the police. Within
ites bomb-squad sappers ar-
Police evacuate the premises
the explosives experts can
nine the suspicious object.
Ice many other calls the bomb
receives, this turns out to
list- alarm just a forgetful
)mer who will later sheepishly
to inquire about the bag.
light of the tragic terrorist
fcks Israel has experienced in
st, no one wants to take a
l with an unattended object.
er a bombing, the Jerusalem
unit is besieged with calls
i citizens and security guards
have spotted suspicious ob-
such as packages on the
Bt. a bicycle left unattended
long time, a car that hadn't
moved for days, an unusual
in a garbage can or an at-
case left on a bus.
h don't want a bomb to ex-
even once a year," said
no, commander of the sapper
in Jeruslaem. "We have
live activities from time to
That way the enemy never
h where we are.
["his is an effort on everyone's
Itecause we can't check
ything. We try to find the
lie road so that people can live
bally. We don't want to put
frficial impositions on the
i, but we do want to do all we
prevent injury."
blic awareness has paid off
>y times. Once a man
fvered a bomb inside a loaf of
He knew immediately that
iod was suspicious, because it
during Passover, when
is scarce in Israel.
nbs aren't always planted by
terrorists. About a half the
explosives are planted by local
Jews or Arabs from the criminal
underworld. The bomb squad can
often determine who planted the
bomb by analyzing whom it was
meant to kill.
"Criminals are out to get so-
meone specific. Arab terrorists
plant bombs in public places like a
bus where they don't know who
will be hurt," Shlomo said. Either
way, sappers are exposed to the
same danger.
With the help of technology,
sappers are able to reduce the risk
by using a robot to dismantle most
bombs. But many times they have
to dispense with the robot because
it simply cannot reach very high
or low places. The sappers then
perform their race against time to
save their lives as well as the lives
of civilians.
It' o job that requires intensive
training and steady nerves. Of the
100 recruits who begin each five-
month course, only 20 make it into
the police sapper unit. Most sap-
pers join after their army service
where they usually have. bad. ex,-.
perience dismantling explosives.
They generally stay in the unit for
three to four years until they
marry and establish families.
"Once a sapper gets married, he
usually decides that he doesn't
want to do this any more because
he is afraid he might do it too long
and then he won't be able to do
anything else," Shlomo noted.
"It's also rare that someone
leaves a good job to join the bomb
squad. They don't want to look for
trouble."
Commanding officers are sen-
sitive to the pressure sappers and
their families are under. Their
hours are long six shifts a week,
with at least one overnight shift
and two evening shifts a month.
Although their pay, about $500 a
month, is high in relation to most
Israeli salaries, it doesn't compen-
sate for the danger they en-
counter every time they hold a
suspicious object.
SAVE THE DATES
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS
54th General Assembly
November 12-17,1985
Washington, D.C.
More Information Soon
"We'll notice if someone isn't
relaxed enough to work properly.
We won't let them continue to
work," Shlomo said.
He noted that during the past
year four sappers have been
removed from their jobs because
they couldn't take the pressure.
"I'm glad we haven't had to do
this often," he said.
Sappers wear protective
headgear, vests and leggings. At
the scene of a bomb scare, the
regular police are in charge of
c IMSImMmCMMMM inc
clearing the area of curious
onlookers so sappers can concen-
trate on the technical aspects of
dismantling the bomb.
During the past few years there
have been eight injuries in the
Jerusalem bomb squad. Two sap-
pers were killed when bombs they
were working on exploded.
While having a son work as a
sapper is not what most Jewish
mothers dream their children will
do, sappers' families generally ac-
cept their decision to work on the
bomb squad.
"No one is very satisfied with it,
Beatrice
but they make peace with it,"
Shlomo said.
He noted that in order to com-
fort the families, the sappers hold
many social gatherings so that the
bomb squads feel like family units.
The families are also briefed on
precautions sappers take so that
they feel involved in the work.
Despite these gestures, the ten-
sion of having a loved one work as
a sapper remains. But as long as
terrorist and criminal bombs re-
main a bitter reality of Israeli life,
someone's son or husband will
have to be on hand to dismantle
them.

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V *'

^s.
THE ADOLPH and ROSE LEVIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
HAPPENINGS

COPACABANA
SUPPER CLUB
TRIP PLANNED
On Sunday. Aug. 4. the Levis
Jewish Community Center is
sponsoring trip to the
CopaCabana Sapper Club in
Miami.
You will enjoy a lavish night
dub with gourmet dining to in-
clude lively, colorful and fast-
paced entertainment. A full
course dinner with a versatile
menu is included.
The cost is $22 per person to in-
clude the bus ride from the JCC
The bus will leave at 6:15 p.m
from the Center
For further details, contact
Marianne J Lesser at the Center
Registration deadline: July 19
ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
Marc Linden. M.D. and Kathy
Cohen. M.S.. will present various
aspects of Alzheimer's Disease.
The lecture will include informa
bon on diagnosis, treatment, cop-
ing methods, long term effects,
and a question and answer penod
The lecture will be held Thursday.
July 11. 7 p.m. at the Levis Jewish
Community Center. No charge for
Members, cost for Non-Members
is $2. Refreshments will be
served.
AN AFTERNOON AT
LION COUNTRY SAFARI
IN WEST PALM BEACH
For Singles: (Ages 20-40) for
single parents and children (other
singles are welcome |
Sunday. Jmly 14. 11 a.a. (Met-
al Center) RSVP with check for
$2 per person for Van transporta-
tion: Entrance to park is $6.36 per
person. Bring or buy lunch.
SECOND SIMMER
POOLSIDE
IN THE ISLANDS
FOR ALL AGES
the JCC on Sunday. July
: 4p.m hot dogs, soft
drinks, live music. Come
alone, bring a friend or come
with your family!! Members:
$4. Non-Members. $6 RSVP
with check by July 18.
Membership cards must be
presented at all functions to
receive member rates!
.
Birthday Party
JERUSALEM iJTAi The
founder and longtime head of the
America-Israel Public Affairs
mine* (AIPACt I I. Kenen.
ah- honored here btf i ;th a
planted in his name in the
Ittdmptnitmtt t '>< near
Jerusalem Jewish National Fund
Chairman Moshe Rivhn and JN'F
U.S. President Charlotte Jacob-
son were among the many guests
at the ceremony, which marked
Kenen's 80th birthday.
$250 Million Aid
Going To Jordan
WASHINGTON (WNS) -
The Senate voted to authorize the
$250 million economic aid for Jor-
dan requested by the Reagan Ad-
ministration. But it will be spread
over 27 months, rather than the
15 months the Administration
requested.
Hammer Group
Eyes Oil in Israel
JERUSALEM (WNS) The oil
exploration group belonging to
American oil magnate Armand
Hammer will invest some $19
million in their search* for oil in the
Negev beginning this month.
___
For iaformatioa oa all
JCC programs. U Ue
Levis JCC at 395-554$.
ATTENTION
PRIME TIMERS!!
We are seeking office
aides. The position is twenty
(20) hours a week at an hourly
rate of $3.35. You must be
over sixty (60) years of age.
For further details, contact
Marianne Lesser at the
Center. 395-5516
ATTENTION SINGLES!!
The JCC is seeking a pro-
gram assistant to coordinate
and implement singles pro-
grams for all ages, (position
to begin September. 1985).
Contact Marianne Lesser.
395-5546. if interested.
The third annual Speakers
Bureau cocktail part)- was
held recently to express ap-
preciation to its members for
their time and commitment to
the goals of the South County
Jewish Federation's
Speakers Bureau and for
m e-
enriching the lives of others.
Frances Sacks, outgoing
chairman, presented awards
for Outstanding Speaker of
the Year one to Rose
Rifkin. the other to Philip
Warshafsky.
SINGLES GET-TOGEThJ
For Singles <55-p||i
get-together on Sundiv -.
July 21 at 7:30 p.m' J
House. Enjoy coffee anj,
learn about Shiatau mai
guest speaker Victoria I
registered massage
RSVP with check by S
Directions will he provkWi
RSVP. H
ISRAELI DANCING
WITHYAAC0VSASS1
For Singles: (Age* .
Israeli Danc-.ng with Yi
Sassi. Refresh mente, con
the fun:! Members: $2
Members: $3
Date of event Tuesday J
7:30 p.m.
It Costs So Little
And It Means So Much.
Southern Bell Long Distance Is a great
way to stay in touch with friends and
family at reasonable rates.
A 10-MINUTE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO
Ft. Lauderdale $1.89
Boca Raton $1.89
Miami $2.49
Ft. Pierce
$1.89
Cat on weekends or after 11 p m and save oven more
RaSeslisled above are m effect 5-11 p m Sonda^FnoSy
1 ,'.'
w 1
<
v I t
Southern BeN Long Distance
@ Southern Bel
^^ musou** con***
ALREADY IN TOUCH WITH THE FUTURE?
SU^a^TeVa^ffl^^
^-^f^"2!!**l^",d
to MrfrLATA tang , ,on*


i^lewIsinTonaian of South County Page 7
"Caravan" of Israeli Boy and Girl
s, during a stopover at Camp Maccabee,
IP MACCABEE "85"
UNDERWAY
AND ROLLING!!!
hundred of our children
vo to 12 are attending the
Bsion of Camp Maccabee at
)lph and Rose Levis Jewish
unity Center. With just
i staff members, the JCC's
[Maccabee offers the best
Ir-Staff ratio around.
activity from Swimming
|>r Hockey is being enjoyed
camp participants. There
een special performances
[Israel Caravan, a group of
id Girl Scouts from Israel
Host recently, by a local
yi. The children will be put-
their own variety show
psion and on July 17 they
participating, along with
|ier Camps, in a Maccabiad
rort l.audordale JCC.
JCC is also happy to unveil
impers a new playground
<"<>urse. It will be put to
this summer and for
come.
lore information concern-
up Maccabee or other pro-
pr Toddlers and Children
JCC. PLEASE CALL
fe
I PRIME TIMERS
BARBEQUE
I Timers Committee
JCC hosted their first
Barbeque, Sunday June
event was chaired by
Kink. Sam and Blanche
km co-chaired. In spite of
^uds. the crowd enjoyed
jers, hot dogs, coleslaw,
|ellon, homemade cookies
to Katie Broock) potato
eer and soda. Yaacov Sassi
ff the afternoon with
pnging. The Prime-Timers
ft other social events this
piinjr a breafast, brunch
anr.ukah Latke Party.
HAPPY HOUR
rEQUILA WILLIE'S
Singles: (Ages 20-60). On
July 16, 5:30-8 p.m.
[Hour at Tequila Willie's,
Glades Road (Just West
[on Glades, turn right on
ve Drive). Hors d'oeuvres
ish bar; Please tip!
rs: No Charge, Non-
rs: $3.
where they put on a musical show for the
campers.
The little ones during the Kabbalat Shabbat ceremony.
Friday's Oneg Shabbat at camp starts with candle-lighting,
demonstrated, above, by Karen Albert.
During the "Caravan" show, portraying the Israeli Yemenite
community in song, dance and traditional costume.
Swimming a daily actiinty enjoyed by all, including swim
instruction.

Counselors welcome children as they check into camp on the first
morning.
Horseback riding one of the special activities offered to the
older children of Camp Maccabee.
STEERS HONORED
Mert buffet party wa
lat the Levis JCC
>rium recently, to
(the many volunteers
ive come forward to
[their time regularly at
"ices of the South
Jewish Federation,
Uar {Connection pro-
Pf the Jewish Family
Mldren Service, and the
ption's Chaplaincy
event, organized by
fcrrano of the Family
K. was a pleasant
tion of the activity
Nth a marvelous enter-
pnt highlight provided
F High Steppers of
(Point.
. anal
Some of the volunteers honored by the Federation and its
at the party.
agencies
Anne Pollack, left, honored as outstanding office volunteer, and
Barbara Gimelstob, coordinator, enjoying the show.

The High Steppers of King Point
fum^dF^' CTd'^tr JfvPlunteersfor the Federation,
w'ho^red **"" "^ **vidual volunteer


i.UUIIlT'l nut; juiv 1-. l^Oi)
In Israel Colleges ...
... And Local Friends
Emergy Expert New President
Of Ben-Gurion University
Prof. Chaim Elata. former chiel
scientist <>f Israel's Ministry ol
Energy and Infrastructure, has
been elected acting president of
Ben-Gunon University of the
Negev in Beersheba.
Elata. who is also rector of the
oniversity. will serve as president
hrough August 1986. according
to Robert H. Arnow of New York,
hairman of the University's
Board of Governors.
Following his election as rector
last August. Elata was called on
to make the tough decisions need-
ed to balance the University
budget while retrenching for the
1984-85 academic year, following
severe cutbacks in government
funding of universities.
"The future of this university
must be re-examined, and
priorities have to be set in accor-
dance with the financial
possibilities." Elata said. He em-
phasized the need for review of all
'"niversity activities, weighing
their relative importance to the
nation, the region and the Univer-
sity. He also sees the need to
budget for investment in R&D
and for resources to create a com-
puter sciences department, which
he considers necessary to main-
tain Israel's industrial excellence.
A specialist in hydrodynamics.
Elata joined Ben-Gunon Univer-
sity's Department of Mechanical
Engineering in 1973. He was
Dr. Chaim Elata
elected department head one year
later, then elected dean of the
Faculty of Engineering Science
the following year.
As chief scientist for Israel's
Ministry of Energy and In-
frastructure from 1980 to 1983,
he was responsible for energy con-
servation and the ministry's RAD.
Elata was born in Amsterdam.
Holland in 1929. During World
War II. disguised as a half-Jew. he
was hidden with a family after his
parents were deported to Bergen-
Belsen. His parents survived the
war and Elata, at the age of 18.
went to Palestine, where he work-
FIRST VISIT TO A DENTIST A group of 120 immigrant
children from Ethiopia recently paid their first visit ever to a
dentist when they were examined and treated at Tel Aviv Univer-
sity's School of Dental Medicine. This newly- arrived Ethiopian
girl says "Ah" as Prof. Haim Sarnat instructs her to "open
wide." Hr younger brother (right) seems apprehensive. The
younsters, who live in the Kiryat Tivon Absorption Center near
Haifa, were individually examined and received tooth brushes
along with instruction in proper dental care.
ed as a kibbutz truck driver.
Later, he was one of the first
civilians to settle in Eilat. Conin-
cidentally. his name means "To
Eilat."
After receiving his bachelor's
and master's degree from the
Technion in Haifa and his doc-
torate from MIT. Elata taught at
the Technion. He then worked for
the US R&D company
Hydronautics. and later joined the
staff of Ben-Gurion University of
the Negev.
Ben-Gurion University
Associates in the U.S. is headed
by president Jack J. Spitzer. with
it's national office at 342 Madison
Ave.. Suite 1924. New York. NY
10173. The South Florida office at
6635 W. Commercial Blvd.. Suite
104. Tamarac. FL 33319.
telephone 722-6100.
Teachers
On Strike
Year's End
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israeli school year ended Sunday
in the heat of labor strife which
has plagued it for the last few
months and could affect the
resumption of classes when the
summer vacation period is over.
Elementary school teachers,
members of a Histadrut union.
. were on strike, forcing the schools
lose. They said they would
engage in partial work stoppages
until last Friday and another full
strike on Sunday, the last day of
school. High schools were not af-
fected. Their teachers belong to a
rival union independent of
Histadrut.
The teachers' action means that
pupils in the lower grades will end
the term without their certificates
of completion. The teachers said
they will not participate in
preparations for the next school
year. One issue is the dismissal
notices the Education Ministry
sent to more than 1,000 non-
tenured teachers. They have not
been rescinded.
The Ministry said they were
forced by budgetary constraints
and maintained that they could
have been avoided had the
teachers' union agreed to forego
part of their salary and working
conditions demands for one year.
HISTORICAL ARCHIVES
of the Jewish community of South County are being compiled by the
South County Jewish Federation
VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED
To work on these archives
Call PENNY PRAIS, 368-2737
The South County Jewish Federation is collecting photographs,
documents and other memorabilia which relate to the history of the
Jewish community in South Palm Beach County. Copies will be made
of items when owners wish to keep the original.
Please help to make the archives complete
by making material available.
Prof. Barnett Rosenberg
Prof. George B. Dtatnj
Technion's '85 Harvey Prizes
In Science and Human Health
To Two U.S. Scientists
Professor George Bernard
Dantzig, Professor of Operation
Research and Computer Science
at Stanford University, a world
renowned mathematician, and
Professor Barnett Rosenberg,
Professor of Chemistry at
Michigan State University, an in-
ternationally acclaimed chemist
and biophysicist. were recipients
of the 1985 Harvey Prize of tht
Technion Israel Institute of
Technology at award ceremonies
last month.
Prof. Dantzig was awarded the
Harvey Prize in Science and
Technology in recognition of his
outstanding contributions to
enginering and the sciences
through his pioneering work in
mathematics programming and
his development of the simplex
method. His work has permitted
solution of many previously in-
tractable problems and made
linear programming into one of
the most frequently used tools of
modern applied mathematics.
Prof. Dantzig was previously
honored with an Honoray Doctor
of Science Degree conferred by
the Technion in 1973. He served
as a member of Technion's Inter-
national Board of Governors from
1972-1983 and is currently a
member of tht- Academic andl
fessional Advisory Committal
the American Society
Technion.
Prof. Rosenl>erg was a
the Harvey prize in Hu
Health in recognition of
outstanding contribution!
medical research through
pioneering discovery of the i
of platinum-based comp
notably cisplatin. in the l
of testicular. ovarian, and i
cancers, and his persistenal
proving their effectivenea I
Rosenberg co-founded the I
ment of Biophysics at
State University and servaj
President of the Barn* I
Institute, concentrating on i
research.
The Harvey Prize Fund
established by the late Leol
Harvey of Los Angeles, OHL\
recognize major cont/il
toward human progress in o*^
more of four fields: Science I
Technology, Human Hell
Literature of Profound InsigWj
to the Life and Peoples of thelT
die East, and the AdvancemeiJ
Peace in the Middle East."
prize bears a cash award
$35,000.
Private Jewish School
... Seeks Professional to establish develop-!
ment office. Responsible for fundralsing anfl
Public Relations. Position available Septf
1985. Deadline for applications, July 25,19 I
Send Resume to: Director
5801 Parker Ave. ,
West Palm Beach, FL334W
For The Discerning Buyer
Burgundy-Kings Point, Delray Beach, Floridi
This mint condition 2 bedroom 2 l*th 1st *>*[
viow condominium must bs seen by ths SElf*""
buyer to bs appreciated.
Situstsd near pool and golf course, this Pr0,ef8S
decorated unit features Jalousied, pfa*f"JI
room, laundry room with Maytag wssher otjjj
Casablanca fans, dehumldlfler, color TV and do
wall unit in den/2nd bedroom, Kitchen Aid d"8""1!^
ceramic tiled kitchen A dining room floo^r?"l|i
blinds throughout, custom mirTored living room *
custom built furniture, and wall paper througbot"
The location affords easy sccess to 3 clubjjjj^
offering a variety of entertainment snd recre*
facilities as well aa to superior new shopping j
For the price of $60,000 this lovely home couior*
duplicated. SERIOUS buyers are Invited to cj" ^
collect 8:30-5:30 p.m., Mon-Frl. at (201) 28W>*\ |t
10:00 a.m. or 3:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m., *
(216)228-4565.


Friday, July 12, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
Ben-Gurion U. Founders Award
To Elsa and Joseph Maharam
and Joseph Maharam,
rly of Boca Raton, recently
a Founders' Scroll from
Jurion University of the
at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Leonard Schub in Tamarac.
Ben-Gurion U. Associates direc-
tor, Jerrold Posner, said it was "a
distinct pleasure to welcome the
lewis, left., and Premier Shimon Peres, right, on receiving
rary degrees from TAU president Dr. Moshe Marey, center.
Peres, 5 U.S. Prof.,
Get Kudos From Technion
Maharams into the University's
distinguished family of
Founders."
Noted supporters of many
Israeli and American-based
charitable institutions, the
Maharams have been residents of
Florida for a number of years and
currently reside in Tamarac.
Joseph Maharam headed
Maharam Fabric Corporation, an
internationally known supplier of
fabrics to the theatrical industry.
Walt Disney Productions, Radio
City Music Hall, Florenz Ziegield,
Irving Berlin and Billy Rose were
among the better-known clients of
Maharam.
Maharam, deeply committed to
Judaism, has supported a host of
organizations affecting Israel and
world Jewry, including the State
of Israel Bonds Organization,
UJA, B'nai B'rith and the Anti-
Defamation League.
In 1960 he formed the Joseph
Maharam Foundation, which
makes monetary awards to
outstanding scenic and costume

Technion Israel Institute
pchnolojry honored Prime
er Shimon Peres and a
ler of ilistinguished
(can scientists and corn-
leaders at special award
lonies last month at the
sity'- convocation.
orarv Doctorates were con-
I on Prime Minister Peres in
pition of his outstanding
ship and service to Israel
^e Jewish people, as well as
Laureate Dr. Robert
kdter; Max H. Stein, Pro-
j of Physics at Stanford
psity; Dr. Samuel Karlin,
ar of Mathematics at Stan-
university; Martin Kellner of
Ingeles, President of the
can Society for Technion;
lr. Ascher H. Shapiro, In-
Professor of Mechanical
^ering at MIT, in recogni-
their extraordinary con-
Ions to science and the
Ion.
Technion bestowed
try Fellowships on ATS
Max Dresher of Chicago;
Finkelstein of Los
I; Joseph H. Jackier of
It: and Martin Jelin of South
, N.J., in appreciation of
badership and dedicated ef-
bn behalf of the Technion,
Jewry, and the State of
lAviv U. also accorded an
py doctorate to Premier
Peres, along with outgo
|.8. Ambassador Samuel
UJA Hits
!3% Increase
By GIL SEDAN
tUSALEM (JTA) The
1 Jewish Appeal has record-
23 percent increase in
fs toward its 1986 target of
ilion, the largest ever for a
year, UJA chairman Alex
told the Jewish Agency
poly meeting here.
fs said about $48 million has
p been raised to fund
Ption Moses," the immigra-
Ethiopian Jews to Israel.
'iil/in, chairman of the
I Agency and World Zionist
dilation Executives,
that Project Renewal,
nabilitation of slum
ds, should be com-
[w this decade. Fie said the
Ajfency would allocate
1 million this year for the
I raining of youngsters
f "ent towns.
Joseph and Elsa Maharam
designers, as well as to cultural
and educational institutions. He is
listed in "Who's Who In American
Theatre" and Joseph Maharam re-
counts with special pride the
names of those theatre greats who
have personally presented his
awards names such as Helen
Hayes, Joseph Papp, Cornelia
Otis Skinner, and Zero Mostel.
Ben-Gurion University of the
Negev is Israel's youngest univer-
sity and the only one establish-
ment by a vote of the Knesset.
The Israeli government charged
the University with the task of
spearheading the social,
agricutural and industrial growth
of Israel's vast arid region to the
south, an area constituting 62 per-
cent of the country's land area.
Current enrollment at the Univer-
sity is 6,000. One-third of its
students are of North African and
Middle Eastern origin, the largest
percentage of Sephardic and
Oriental students at any Israeli
university.
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publlx
Publlx Bakeries opsn at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publlx Storaa with
Fraah Danish Bakeries Only.
Great for Sandwiches
Croissants
aach*T%#
Available at PubHx Storaa with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Serve Buttered for
a Special Treat
Semolina
Bread
3.*1
AvaHaMe at PubHx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Made wtth Freeh, Juicy
Applet end Cinnamon
Apple Pie
n29
Available at AN Pubix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Filled wtth Plump, Juicy Raisins
Cinnamon
Raisin Rolls...................2 $159
An Old Time Favorite
Banana Nut Loaf...........each $159
Delicious
Chocolate Chip i^t
Cookies......................... bgz$159
Quantity Rights Reserved
It's the little things that make
the difference at Publix.
Prices Effective
July 11 ft thru 17th, 1985.
Mc( airs
COOKBOOK
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 11
Vegetables A to Z
$1.79
ch
Watch for
New Books Weekly


Page 10 The Jewish Flondian oi >>ouit\ County/Fndav. July 12. 1985
CHAITo Help Animals In Israel
A group of local animal lovwi
.as embarked on a mission to help
he SPCA in Israel by developing
.i local chapter of CHAI Con-
cern for Helping Animals in
Israel.
CHAI is headquartered in
Virginia, and is headed by Nina
Natelson. who founded the group
last year after a vacation trip to
Israel. She had just won a sex-
liscnmination lawsuit against the
federal government, and had in-
tended to lie on the beach in Eilat
and relax.
However, seeing the plight of
the stray dogs and cats there mov-
ed her, and when she got in touch
with Hilda Friedstein, director of
the Israeli SPCA. she learned that
the situation was even worse then
she had observed.
While the Jewish ethic teaches
kindness to animals as a religious
edict, the many cases of unusual
cruelty to animals in Israel
worsen a situation already bad
because of economic conditions,
Natelson learned. In addition,
Israel has done a great deal to pro-
tect its national wildlife, but very
little to protect domestic animals.
Both she and Friedstein have
emphasized that priority must be
given to numan life and relief of
human suffering, which in war-
torn Israel is a constant concern.
Yet. this does not excuse cruelty
to animals, says Natelson. The
five existing animal shelters in
Israel are not only inadequate in
number, they are poor little
shacks in comparison to the
shelters one is used to seeing in
America. And while an injection
for euthanasia costs pennies in the
U.S., in Israel the same shot costs
about $10.
So Natelson and CHAI are rais-
ing funds, recruiting members
its advisory board includes such
people as Cleveland Amory. Rep.
Tom Lantos of California, and
author Isaac Bashevis Singer
and doing what they can to
educate people here about the
needs, and people there about
prevention.
In South County, the group's ef-
forts are spearheaded by Amy
Horn, who is active in local animal
rights, and would like to see more
people from the Jewish communi-
ty join CHAI. She may be reached
at 994-0142.
Women Rabbinical Candidates
hold First Meeting On Status
NEW YORK (JTA) Thirty
women rabbinical students from
three Jewish seminaries have met
to discuss some of the challenges
and concerns they face in the first
such meeting since the Reform
movement began the process of
ordaining women as rabbis more
than a decade ago.
The conference, held at the
Jewish Theological Seminary, was
B'nai Mitzvah
Adult B'not Mitzvah elau nt Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
this spring included (left to right, foreground): Dolly Bot-
nick. Karen Zeitlin. Miriam Rich and Paula Forbes. They
are seen abow with (left to right/ Cantor Martin Rosen, Rab-
bi Merle E. Singer and Rabbi Gregory S. Marx.
attended by women candidates
from the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion,
which trains rabbis for the
Reform movement; the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical Col-
lege in Philadelphia; and the JTS,
which ordained the first Conser-
vative woman rabbi in June.
Loti Forman, JTS rabbinical
candidate and conference coor-
dinator, said, "Women see the im-
portance of building bonds bet-
ween each other and our
movements. We are working to
strengthen these bonds."
Obituaries
POX
Louil BT, of Boca Katun was originally fan
Romania He is survived by his daughter
Doris Keierman (lutterman Warheit
CfcSfMl
QKBFF
Hersrhel, 87. i.f IJelru aorigtall)
from Ohio \\v is survived hy hi* *tf Ann
and brothers Irww Greff and Dot A .
Kubin Chapel.
GRBKHBIBfi
I "Hra> Heach w orginaliv
from Nr* ': til H. I nil ft
Dorod nan Warheit <'hapel
LEVY
'har. rtora Raton W originally
from Pmnayhrajua. He it survived t>> his
wife Alma, son Robert, brother Jack I L**J
and sister Mabel Kamens Beth Israel Rubin
Chapel.
WAPNICK
Samuel. It, of Boca Raton was originally
from New York He is survived by his wife
Roberta, daughter Nanci. son Joel and two
grandchildren (Jutterman Warheit Chapel
SENTINEL PLAN
A strong plan tor a difficult time.
Unfortunately funerals are inevitable
However it makes sense to plan tor them like any other major
decision like making out a will or taking out a lite insurance policy
In tact pre-planning your tuneral might even make more sense
than planning many other things, because when you plan your
tuneral you're relieving your loved ones trom making decisions
at a very dillicult time
That's why Gurterman Warheit Memorial Chapel has something
called the Sent.nel Plan It's a program where you pre-arrange
and prepay in installments tor your tuneral You pre-arrange to
save your family from difficult decision making, you pre pay to
freeze your pnce
We know its dillicult but please come in to talk with us Were
Gutterman.Warheit a
We ve been serving ^^
the Jewish commu f*. rflormon
nity for nearly one V^LJlId Id I
hundred years and we
understand
\Aferhert
MEMORIAL
CHAl
Boca Delray 997-9900
7240 North Federal Highway, Boca Delray, Florida 33431
Broward 742-4933 Boynton Lake Worth W.P Beach 683-4141
The People Who Understand
In The Synagogue
And Temflbs
B'nai Torah High Holy Days Ser
In Deerfield Beach Hilton
B'Nai Torah Congregation of
Boca Raton has arranged to hold
its High Holy Days services in the
new Deerfield Beach Hilton Hotel
on Hillsboro Blvd. and 1-95, accor-
ding to Sheldon Jontiff, president.
The spacious Grand Ballroom of
the hotel will accommodate B'nai
Torah congregants for Rosh
Hashana beginning Sunday even-
ing Sept. 15, and continuing Mon-
day and Tuesday morning and
evening, Setp. 16 and 17.
Yom Kippur services will start
Tuesday evening, Sept. 24 and
continue all day Wednesday, Sept.
25. Rabbi Theodore Feldman and
Hazzan Donald Roberts will
officiate.
Special room rates in the hotel
will be available to those who
prefer not to drive during the Ho-
ly Days. Junior congregation ser-
vices have been arranged, as well
as facilities tor pre-i
For information, c
Torah office, 392-8566.
BETH SHALOM
Temple Beth Shi
Sisterhood, Centary n
West, will hold their neith
ing, Monday, July 22, lO-JM
in the Administration BlU
special program is plujjl
refreshments will be semi!
ANSHEI SHALOM
Anihei Shalom Sii
Oriole Jewish Center am
ing a weekend at the.
Spa, Bal Harbor, Nov. Ill
cost is $143 double occupin
$165 single. Round triphj
$10. The price includes i
tips, entertainment, gym,!
and more. Reservation]
limited, call now Mary
499-0296 or Rose Weiss 4S
Shabbat, 24 Tammuz, 5745
Weekly Sidrah: Pinhas.
Candle Lighting 7:55 p.m.
Sabbath Ends 9:08 p.m.
Religious Directoi
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.. Boca Raton, Florida 33432 Conservani|
Phone 392-8566. Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Don!!
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m.. Saturday atMf
a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101. Boca Raton.
33433. Orthodox services held at Verde Elementary
Cafeteria. 6590 Verde Trail, Boca, Saturday morning 9:30u
For information regarding Friday, Sundown services M
Maariv, call Rabbi Mark Dratch. Phone: 368-9047
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd.. Dejl
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. W
Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m. w|
bath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class spx
Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio m\
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler
bath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10:15 a.m. MJjifinrl
dress: 950 Glades Road, Suite 1C, Boca Raton, FL 33432 rw|
392-9982. Baby sitting available during services.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
7099 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33446. Conjl
vative. Phone 495-0466 and 495-1300. Rabbi Jordan H. mm
Cantor Louis Hershman. Sabbath Services: Friday at P-
Saturday at 8:30 am. Daily services 8:30 am. and 5 pjn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. R<*J
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer. AssisWKJJ
Gregory S. Marx. Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve i^J\\
8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FcLj^glJ
servative. Located in Century Village, Boca Daily *>fno* ^
and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:46 am. and 5:16 p.m.. Sunday* J
and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 483-w-
M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida ^^i j
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograa n -^
Linkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Servicas: Friday at 8 p.*-.
at 8:45 am. Daily Minyans at 8:46 am. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI ^m
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Avaland #
Road), Delray Beach, Florida 88446. Reform, of***, ft*
vim, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat, 10 am. Rabbi awn-
phone 276-6161.


Friday, July 12, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
'Silent no more'
viet Jewry update
Local Club&
Organization News
After a brief trial on June 6,
IGENY AISENBERG was con-
led of allegedly "defaming the
Ciet state and social system,"
sentenced to two-and-a-half-
krs in a labor camp. Charges
te brought after a year-long in-
stigation of Aisenberg's ac-
Ities as a Hebrew teacher and
Lral activist in Kharkov. The
Eor evidence against him was
text of three Purim skits in
|ich he participated last year.
nied his own lawyer, Evgeny
given a court-appointed at-
ney. Marina, who recently
rned she is suffering from
_ist cancer, has appealed for
jreny's release on humanitarian
Kinds, but has had no reply.
farmed by news that YULI
HCLSHTEIN is increasingly
timized at the Vydrino labor
np where he is held, Senators
vard M. Metzenbaum (D-OH)
Paul Sarbanes (D-MD), and
kresentative Lawrence J.
Jith (D-FL), joined with Jewish
Christian leadership at a
kss conference to speak out on
half of Hebrew teachers cur-
ftly under attack in the USSR,
tcifically Edelshtein, IOSIF
{RENSHTEIN, EVGENY
ISENBERG and DAN
|APIRO. The appeal came only
H after it was learned that Yuli
beaten by assailants at the
drino camp, noted for being
Specially oppressive." Yuli, a
Jscow Hebrew teacher, is serv-
a three-year sentence on
fiped-up charges of alleged
possession."
fter a visit, where she found
husband in "schocking condi-
i," Tanya Edelshtein appealed
|the Supreme Soviet regarding
"cruel treatment" of her hus-
nd. In reply an official told
nya that Yuli has been pro-
fited from returning to his room
rest after work, and is forced to
his assignment earlier than
ber workers at the camp, in an
|ort to "exorcise his religious
aticism." He has been assigned
work as a railroad laborer,
[airing tracks.
lie actions against Edelshtein
Ire seen as the latest in a series
[continuing pressure on Hebrew
chers. After a similar attack,
enshtein was nearly totally
nded.
Speakers at the conference,
kich was held in Metzenbaum's
See, included NCSJ Executive
rector Jerry, Goodman; Dr.
ftgene Fisher, Director of
Itholic-Jewish Relief of the U.S.
Itholic Conference; Reverend
karles Bergstrom, Lutheran
funcil in the U.S.A.; Rabbi Irwin
ank. Synagogue Council of
nerica and Theresa Heinz, who
Khairs the Congressional Wives
" Soviet Jews.
Vlthnugh his arrest delayed
Bir plans for nearly 10 months.
UCOV LEVIN and YEHUDIT
W)MNIASHCHY were finally
IrrieH. A brief ceremony took
}** on June 7 in the Donetsk
or camp, where Yakov is serv-
t a three-year term for allegedly
|efaming the Soviet state and
cial system." Levin and Nepom-
ashchy, who both taught
>rew in Odessa before Yakov's
est, were permitted a three-
l>' visit after the wedding, which
>s attended by Odessa's DAVID
[HECTER and other friends
&m Moscow.
^n array of anti-Jewish pro-
fanda, from "satirical" car-
pns equating Zionists with Nazis
feature-length "documen-
Portraying Jews who wish
leave the Soviet Union for
B' m "traitors," was viewed
a Symposium on Soviet Anti-
Zionism and Anti-Semitism. The
event, co-sponsored by the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJ) and the Jacob Goodman
Institute of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America (ZOA), was term-
ed a "response to the vitriolic
campaign in the USSR which
vilifies the Jewish people, the
Jewish religion, Zionism and the
State of Israel."
"Anti-Semitism in the form of
anti-Zionism and anti-Israel pro-
paganda is repeated in the Soviet
Union with increasing frequency,
permeating all aspects of the
media," stated Dr. Joseph P.
Sternstein, NCSJ Vice Chairman
and former ZOA National Presi-
dent, who chaired the event. "It
reverberates with familiar themes
geared toward discrediting in-
dividual refuseniks and Soviet
Jews as a whole, and delegitimiz-
ing Israel as the historic Jewish
homeland." Much of the campaign
was credited to the "Anti-Zionist
Committee of the Soviet Public,"
which has figured prominently as
an outlet for Soviet anti-Jewish
propaganda since its inception in
April 1983.
ORT
Women's American ORT Boca
Century Chapter will attend a
luncheon and show at the Carillon
Hotel, Sunday, Aug. 11. For fur-
ther information call Florence
487-3920 or Betty 482-1231.
JWV
Jewish War Veterans Snyder
Tokson Post 459 Ladies Aux-
iliary has announced that July
14-19 has been declared National
Awareness Week by the National
Ladies Auxiliary Jewish War
Veterans of the U.S.A. Inc. This is
the week set aside for ceremonies
honoring our serivce men "miss-
ing in action." The Ladies Aux-
iliary plan to write to
Washington to push for the
release of prisoners and informa-
tion on these missing men. The
Ladies are plannig to wear a red
ribbon Sunday, July 14 to register
their feelings in this matter.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Women's League for Israel,
Mitzvah Chapter will proudly
present "Liza Minnelli" on
Wednesday evening, Nov. 27. A
beautiful evening is planned by
the one and only "Liza." For in-
formation, please call 483-3645 or
483-0876.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women Boca will
hold a card party and Chinese lun-
cheon at the On Luck Restaurant,
8177 W. Boca Place on Glades
Road, Boca, Wednesday, July 17,
11:30 a.m. Contribution $8.50.
Reservations and information call
Gert 482-3390.
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi are
planning a card party and lun
cheon at the Birds Nest
Restaurant, Delray. Cost $5.50
per person. For reservations and
information call 499-1382 or
499-2180.
*
Your Courteous and Professional
Manner Deserves to be
Complimented.
Warmth and Comfort Sensitivity and Consideration
Compassion in your time of nwf\ We understand
We honor all pre-need programs
mwrm tmmAK*
-mm mum
A FamMy ProUctton Plan Chap*
5808 W. ,\Hatiin Avenue
Drlray Bea<-h. Fl. 33445
3O5-40B-8OOO
Pre-Need Conference Center
6578 W. Atlantic Avenue
Drlray Beach. Fl. 33446
"There Are Two Sides To
Every Story"
****.
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&* C.KV,
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Owncr/Dlrcclor Jimcph Kubln
A Fumllv.

Come and talk with us.
CHAPEL
5808 W. Atlantic Ave.
Delruv Bach, FL 88445
(305) 499-8000
PRE-NEED OFFICE
Kings Pt. Shopping Center
6578 W. Atlantic Ave.
Delruv Bcuch, FL 38446
(305) 498-5700



Dlrcctor/Prc-Xccrl I'nmrum
I'hll Wlshnu A Fumllv


ii7
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, July 12, 1985
-1
NORTON
TIRE CO.
TsjsvicJ
TIRE
Since 1924... your car's best company on the road.
mimm mf-usxw mmm&z
IFGoodrich
FLORIDA'S LARGEST FACTORY AUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTOR
WHITEWALLS
CUSTOM POLYSTEEL
Somequal

CLM WHITEWALLS
SIZE
PRICE;
SIZE
P155 80B13 25.95 P21S 75814 34 95
P165 80613 26.95 P225 75B14 36 95
P175 80613 28.95 P165 80615 29 95
P185 80613 29.95 P205 75615 34 95
P205 75814 33.95
P175 75614 30.95 P215 75615 35 95
PRICE
P185 75814 31.95 P225 75615 37.95
P195 75814 32.95 P235 75615 38 95
..... ^~ 1- -------------------
An .. GT-4 Lttes.ivo XLM WHITEWALLS
YOUR CHOICE
SIZE PRICE SALE PRICE
P155 80R13 34 95 P205 75R14 48 95
P165 80R13 37 95 P215 75R14 49 95J
P18580R13 39 95 P225 75R14 57.95
P175 75R14 41.95 P205 75R15 51.95
P185 75R14 4295 P215 75R15 53 95
P195 75R14 46 95 P225 75R15 54 95
P2O5 70R14 46.95 P235 75R15 59 95
We will not
be undersold on
BF Goodrich
tires
SIZE
P155 80-13
P18S80-13
P18575-14
P19575-14
P205/75-15
P215 75-15
P225 75-15
P235.75-15
Extra hours to serve
umi t" W.Tamiami Trail
******** Kendall Dr.
on.-Fri. 7:3)0 AM-9 PM
Sat. 7:30 AM-5 PM Sun 10 AIM*
P15S80812
BBTEDCLM
P-METRIC. POLYESTER CORO
FIBERGLASS BELT WHITEWALLS
BUY DIRECT
FROM THE FACTORY
AUTHORIZED
DISTRIBUTOR
COMP T/A
available in all stores.
'JT/AHIGHTECH
I/M+RADIALS
WE MAKE CARS PERFORM
IRELLI
VILE /
WRITTEN LIMITED / v*.
.VABRAN' .-.' E3*u-:
P77 BLACKWA11S
P19570R14
P20570RM
64.95
69.95
MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE
lew**
IUMMi
car w Ma tav Irwi Nsrfta Ttrt Co rstom I
irnrnn *******oUteMttXpur
issM*MltoieMMMliaM fUMhitwttaM
Mlwilclii
/O OFF IF WE DO NOT
HAVE ANY TIRE IN THIS AD
IN STOCK AND WE HAVE
TO GIVE YOU A RAINCHECK
EXPIRES 7 7 85
FREE 14-POWT
SAFETY CHECK
TIRES BALANCE
BRAKES HOSES
BELTS BATTERY
SHOCKS 6 MORE
Monarch
WHITEWALLS
BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RHNNG ON YOUR TIRES
TRX 6LAC*WALL
18055-390 78.95
22055-390 QA WHITE "-90
LIGHT TRUCK TIKES
XCT 185x14 6 pry 64.23
700-1SXCAT6Pty79 95'
750-16 XCAT 8 Py 106 95
l7S-HSXCATipfy1115
9SO-H.S XCAT 9 Mvttl 95
We will not
be undersold
on Michelm
tires
XZXorMXL
(ctapanding on avaitobitity)
TUBELESS BLACK
SIZE PRICE
155-12 33.95
145 13 30.95
155-13 34.95
ALL SEASON RADIAL
XH' WHITEWALLS
sag ; PRICE
185/80-13 XH 54.95
185/75-14 XH ; 56.95
195/75-14 XH | 62.96
205/75-14 XH 67 95
205/75-15 XH 66.95
21&75-15XH 71.96
22S/75-15XH : 73.96
235/75-15 XH 77.95
------------------ 165 13 39 95
-^ 165-14 45 95
l/CA175"14 47 95
^yi85-i4 54 95
f 165-15 44 95
J 16670-13 38.95
-f 175/70-13 4195
A 18570-13 40.95
Zj 18570-14 49 95
_______tS rmct P17S80FI13 6195 P18S7SR14 | 94.95
P195/7SR14 98.96
P20&70R14 P20S.7SR1S 79.95 75 95
P21570R15 77.95
P2iy7SRt5 I 79.95
P22S/7SR1S | 11.98
P235/75R15 97.95
18505-15
X7JCTU6HBS
79.95
WHITE
9m 9WCE
P155O0-13 39 95
P16S80-13 40.96
NEW CAR CHANGOVCRS
T
BRAND NEW
205/75-14 XZ4
STEEL-TRACK
BELTED RADIALS
WITH NO-COST 40.000 MILE
WRITTEN LIMITED WARRANTY
Fuel economy
Tread for every climate
lough steel belts
Quiet, smooth ride
SIZE PRICE
P165 80R13 43.94
P185 80R13 45.62
P185 75R14 P195 75R14 P205/75R14-' P205/75R15 51.06 55.50 56.96 58.39 62.16
P21S75R15
P225/75R15 64.02 68.62
P23575R15
POLY BIAS PtY
P165/80D13 21.50
P175/80D13 24.48
P185/75D14 25.14
STEEL-BELTED
RADIALS
SIZE PRICE
P16S80R13 31.50
P18580R13 32.57
P18575R14 [ 37.42
P19S75R14 36JS
~^B&iJ
Jr3 M
P4&P44
BLACKBALLS
p,re

eve'
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
26.95-
33.95
36.95
41.95
17570SR13
43.95
18570SR13
45.95
185 70SR14
195 70SR14
4M5*
53.95
Complete selection
of world-famous
HreUiMandP-7
high peftorTnance tires.
P-3 prices and tread design orty_
SAFETY SERVICE
CERTIFIED MECHAMCS M EVERY STORE
Mom 91 our mtima MM 9MR TESTED and CERTIFIED
by NMMnM MMMjM to Ssrvo 1
17.95
lit. OK CHANGE.
RUBI m* LUBE
UPTO5OTS0F
PRE MM* OS-FOR
GAS OR DIESEL ENG-
NEW f *TER COMP
LUBE
POR MOST US PAS-
SENGER CARS AND
LIGHT TRUCKS

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AJR CONOmOfOWQ CHECK-4JP
MODERN. FULLY EQUIPPED BAYS
NATIONAL ACCOUNTS WELCOME
CORAL GABLES Bird 4 Douglas Road
CUTLE R RtOGC...............20300 & Oiiie Hwy
0AV1C St.Rd.84NistweMolUniv.0r.
OEERFIELD BEACH 2265 W Hrttsboro Blvd
FT LAUDERDALE 1740 E. Sunrise Blvd
HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE 1275 49th St
HOMESTEAD 30100 S. Federal Hwy
KENOALLDR HrGATE SQUARE 13872 S.W 88th St
N KENDALL OR SW 88th St and M)7th Ave
MIAMI AIRPORT N.W 25 St 8 Milam Dairy Rd
MIAMIBEACH 1454AI1onRoed
CLEAN AIR-CONDITIONED WA'TfNG ROOMS
448-8101
233-5241
473-4700
4274000
463-7588
822-2500
247-1622
387-0128
595-1545
593-1191
672-5353
8hW.]JM:lJ.!.MM
a^ 1334WN.VU71hAv.
N MIAMI BEACH 1700 NE M3rdS(
S.EM2225LP,MCS "*- Bhrd. weatol unht Dt.
PLANTATION 391N Stats Rd 7
ff^H*0 9001SWleMw>;
TAfAWAC N.UmvDr.MeMebRd.
TAMARAC 441 A W CommerciM Blvd
W HOLLYWOOD ....... 497SStaleRd7
WEST MIAMI BUrd* Gateway Rds
WTAMIAMITRAM. 12520 SwlthS
SflT"
881-8841
948-7484
435-1383
587-2188
943-4200
687-7575
721-4700
735-2772
997-0450
552-0856
551-1141
VS05TQMSW
TlMP1
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LAM RMES Mi" **"
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