The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00381

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
1 The Jewish ^^ ?
FloridiaN
of South County
,7_ Number23
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday. June 28,1985
f id Shochti Price 35 Cents
Inside
Bouncing Bingo...
Page 2
Press Digest...
Page 4
Soviet Jewry Update
|... Page 6
'Mass Bar Mitzvah"
..Page 11
|Federation/UJA
|llpdate ... Page 7
ICC Happenings...
'age 8
Unlike S. African Case
Rabbi Protestors To Be Tried
By THEO STONE
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Twenty-one rabbis were
arrested in front of the
Soviet Embassy here while
protesting the plight of
Soviet Jews and showing
solidarity with 24 rabbis and
one Lutheran minister who
were arrested last month at
the same Embassy.
The protest and arrest are part
of an organized effort by the
Soviet Jewry movement using the
same techniques that have proved
so successful in the anti-apartheid
protests in this city at the South
African Embassy.
There is, however, a bitter twist
to the Soviet Embassy protest
)onn Urged:
Publish File on Mengele
.KW YORK Tuviah
(iedman, the Nazi hunter
tracked down Adolf
chmann for 15 years, has
led on the Federal
)ublic of Germany to
)lish the entire file of the
les committed by Josef
kngele against the Jewish
fiple. Slavs and Gypsies.
V'hether or not Josef Mengele
ead," Friedman said, "there
| vast amounts of documenta-
tion in the hands of the German
government that provide the basis
for a profound moral instruction
for the German people and the
world community about the
murderous acts committed by this
'Angel of Death,' who presided
over the killing of a million Jews
and other human beings. That
record of bestiality and systematic
violation of human rights must
not be discarded nor suppressed
for the benefit of future genera-
tions of Germans and mankind."
FRIEDMAN made his appeal at
Temple Anshei Shalom
Gets New Cantor
)uis Hershman, tenor, has
appointed cantor of Temple
Shalom-Oriole Jewish
?r in Delray. The appoint-
. was announced last week by
[Dorfman, president of the
relation.
itor Hershman served at
regation Beth El (Conser-
ve) in Levittown, Pa. for 23
and, more recently, for
[years he was cantor at Tem-
rniora in Coral Gables. In
congregations he directed
and will do so at Temple
ri Shalom as well.
Jrrhman is a native of
pelphia, where he studied at
iva Etz Chaim. His vocal
emerged at the tender age
en, when his uncle, Cantor
[H'-rshman heard him sing at
lj gathering. Uncle K'sil
"ung Louis to an audition by
famous Cantor Shmuel
fky, who immediately ac-
' ;he boy as a student. After
|ei.rs of study, at age 12, Can-
ershman was deemed ready
fon.lucted his first full Sab-
Brvice at Congregation Bnai
run in Philadelphia. A year
he celebrated becoming a
Mitzvah at the same
*>gue, with Cantor Melavsky
'he Hershmans and their
f'>r the occassion.
rt'>r Hershman was married
and in 1943 was sent
as a combat infantry
?rgeant. He was wounded
n in Germany during the
' Hershman is alBO a
civil engineer. He and his
vlvia have two daughters
f .mdcliildren.
Cantor Louis Hershman
He is one of the rare Jews who
celebrate their birthdays in a dif-
ferent day every year on the
Gregorian calendar; Cantor Her-
shman was born on the eve of
Rosh Hashana, and so he
celebrates his birthday on that
day, which falls on various dates
of the Christian calendar each
year.
As Cantor Hershman joined
Rabbi Jordan Shepard and the
choir for his inaugural service on
June 14, the congregation also
welcomed for the first time their
newly installed Holy Ark and eter
nal light.
a press conference sponsored by
the International Relations
Department of the American
Jewish Committee. Rabbi Marc H.
Tanenbaum, AJC's International
relations director who just return-
ed from addressing the Kirchen-
tag Assembly in Dusseldorf,
presided as chairman.
Friedman also called on the
West German government not to
allow the remains of Mengele.
should he be dead in Brazil, to be
returned for reurial in Germany.
"Should Mengele's remains be
returned to Germany," Friedman
said, "his former colleagues in the
Nazi SS, of whom there are many
in Germany, will surely seek to
make his burial site a place of
veneration and pilgrimage. For
Mengele to be made into a hero
would be an horrendous final in-
sult to the memory of the millions
of Jews and others whose lives he
so ruthlessly destroyed."
RAPORTING on his ex-
periences in West Germany last
week, Rabbi Tanenbaum stated
that the Kirchentag Assembly in
Dusseldorf, which he addressed,
was attended by an estimated
130,000 Germans, 80,000 of whom
were beneath the age of 30.
Following his address, the Kir-
chentag, which was sponsored by
the Evangelical Lutheran Chur-
ches of Germany, adopted a
resolution unanimously presented
by its Working Group of Chris-
tians and Jews that criticized ef-
forts "to suppress an honest treat-
ment of the events from 1933 to
1945 in Germany and their pre-
history."
The unprecedented resolution.
Rabbi Tanenbaum said, added,
"The commemorations in Bergen-
Belsen and Bitburg on the occa-
sion of May 8 in terms of the way
they came about and the discus-
sions pertaining to them let this
be clearly known. To want to
honor the murdered in the same
breath as those who covered
Europe with war and annihilation
denies their sacrifice any worth.
In the comparison there lies at the
same time a falsification of history
which leads the German people to
a dishonest relationship with their
own past and attaches heavy
shadows to them."
REFERRING to the
"Auschwitz lies" that Nazi sym-
pathizers have been promoting in
Germany to deny the realit I he
Holocaust, the Kirchentag resolu-
ken also declared that "broad
Continued on Page 13
which has not marred the anti-
apartheid arrests. Whereas the
U.S. Attorney for the District of
Columbia has not prosecuted the
South African Embassy pro-
testors, the 24 rabbis arrested last
month along with the Lutheran
minister, are going on trial.
THE TRIAL, scheduled to
begin on June 11 at the Superior
Court of the District of Columbia,
was postponed at the request of
the court. Evidently, when the
court clerk scheduled the rabbis'
trial for this date, he did not
realize its importance and
scheduled 28 other cases for the
judge on this date.
The attorney representing the
rabbis agreed on the new trial
date of Sept. 4 and also requested
two additional hearing before the
trial date. At one hearing, set for
July 26, the court will hear a mo-
tion filed by the defense attorney
challenging the constitutionality
of the D.C. law prohibiting pro-
testing within 500 feet of an
embassy.
At the second hearing, schedul-
ed for Aug. 6, the defense will
argue to receive documents to
discover why the U.S. Attorney is
selectively prosecuting the Soviet
protestors and not the South
African protestors.
Thirty-three Congressmen have
signed a letter addressed to At-
torney General Edwin Meese III
asking him why the U.S. Attorney
for the District of Columbia is pro-
secuting 24 rabbis and one
Lutheran minister who where ar-
rested last month for protesting in
front of the Soviet Embassy.
The letter, which is dated June
11, 1985 and was sent on the sta-
tionery of the House Judiciary
Committee, was signed by the en-
tire committee with the exception
of three members. It asks the At-
torney General why the rabbis and
the minister are being prosecuted.
The 25 men and women were ar-
rested on May 1 and accused of
violating a law which prohibits
protesting within 500 feet of
embassy.
THE RABBIS, who were pro-
testing to dramatize the plight of
Soviet Jewry, were using the
same technique which has proved
so succesful in the anti-apartheid
protests at the South African Em-
bassy. Whereas more than 2,000
protesters have been arrested at
the South African Embassy on the
same charges as the rabbis, the
U.S. attorney has decided not to
prosecute the South African
protesters.
The letter said, "these members
of the clergy were protesting the
difficult plight and discriminatory
treatment of Jews in the Soviet
Union. Like the more than 2,000
people who have demonstrated in
front of the South African Em-
bassy, the 24 rabbis and one
Lutheran minister's demonstra-
tion was peaceful and did not
disrupt the conduct of business at
the Embassy."
The letter asks Meese, "Why
has the government decided to
prosecute these members of the
clergy when it has dropped the
charges against all of those who
have done the same thing at the
South African Embassy?"
THE LETTER goes on to say.
"The behavior of both groups was
identical. Absent of a sound ex-
planation, the decision to pro-
secute in these cases appears to be
arbitrary and discriminatory.
Even if the Soviet Union has re-
quested prosecution, we believe
that the decision whom to pro-
secute and whom not to prosecute
for exercising their First Amend-
ment rights to demonstrate
should not depend upon the re-
quests of representatives of
foreign governments."
The office of the Attorney
General has refused comment on
the Judiciary Committee letter.
Meanwhile, the Rabbinial
Assembly has also sent a telegram
to Meese protesting what the rab-
binical group charged was the
denial of "basic rights" by the
police to a group of 21 rabbis ar-
rested outside the Soviet
Embassy.
(See story Page 61
Nazi-Hunter Klarsfeld Says
He Remains Very Skeptical
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Nazi-hunter Serge Klarsfeld is still
skeptical of reports that war criminal Josef Mengele, the
Auschwitz death camp doctor, died in Brazil six years ago.
He said he might consider that Mengele is dead "only
after the Israeli police will have confirmed this possibility '
in a few months time. Klarsfeld was commenting on the
statement by Mengele's son, Rolf Mengele, that he had
been informed of his father's death in 1979.
"ACTUALLY, I shall never be certain that he is dead.
My doubts will persist forever," Klarsfeld said.
The French-Jewish lawyer and his German-born wife,
Beate Klarsfeld, are waiting to hear from Israeli and
American investigators before taking anyone's word that
the remains of a man buried near Sao Paulo, Brazil in 1979
after drowning are those of the wanted war criminal. The
remains were exhumed and are undergoing forensic tests
to determine identity.
His (Mengele's) family obviously want? to convince
the world that he is dead." Klarsfeld said.


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Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
three days a week at the Kingo
fing<> facility, attributes the suc-
BSs of the games to the fact that
hey generally pay more in prize
D'ney than other charitable
imes in West Palm Beach.
More than one charity has clos-
jta doors because they can't
ftmpete with us, and others, chur-
H and the like, are losing
tamers because they don't pay
be prizes we pay," he said.
Referring to the Miami Herald
des, Taines said, "What the
Drter tried to do is use innuen-
es and half-truths to make me
like I'm some ssort of under
orld character. He's twisted a
aritahle venture into some scam
It would be farcical if only I
; involved, but it makes Jewish
deration and Rabbi Warshal
Dk had. and that I don't like, not
i bit."
Taines explained that he ac-
lircd the Grand Union lease in
79 and subleased the facility to
Jewish War Veterans Post
|>. 408. Referring to that ar-
ngement, Taines said, "There
fere all sorts of problems with the
ky they were operating the
nes. which I really can't coiti-
on t on right now, but I cancelled
lease and evicted them in the
timer of 1983. Even on this
lint, the Herald story tries to in-
flate there was something else,
nething wrong in the eviction,
there wasn't. ."
The Long Delay
Vhat most troubles Warshal,
wever. is that the State At-
ney did not contact him for the
10 months, since the in-
stigation began, but, instead,
cided to "leak" information to
press.
fOn August 24, 1984, I wrote
Ddworth's office a letter in
rich I urged a meeting so that
l could state our position on the
operations. I expressed the
^ration's hope to resolve all
differences and suggested a
eting to do so. But since then,
one from Bludworth's office
called me The next thing
now is that the Miami Herald is
to do a story about an in-
timation that I thought had
^n long gone," Rabbi Warshal
Ivig presents a different in-
pretation of what occurred
br the past 10 months. In an in-
teform Rabbis
Question
Ban Against
Israeli MK's
fEW YORK (JTA) Of-
Js of the Association of
arm Zionists of America said
had adopted, on behalf of the
erican Reform movement, a
Wution taking issue with a
j>lution approved by the Con-
vative rabbinate, which
red 51 Knesset members
welcome as speakers to
lerican Conservative
?ogues.
action by members of the
al Conference of American
sis (CCAR), the association of
arm rabbis, was adopted in
ponse to those Knesset
ibers, mainly from Likud and
National Religious Party
recently in support of
"ps of the Law of Return
en would have discredited the
ty of Conservative and
urm conversions of Jews plan-
1 settle in Israel. The
^*t again rejected that pro-
last January.
Be ARZA resolution said there
a need "to educate Knesset
"wrs about America's non-
ndox community" and that
wuld not be possible if the
**t members were "excluded
American synagogues.**
terview last week, Selvig denied
leaking any information to the
Herald.
Moreover, explaining the long
delay in the investigation, the
Assistant State Attorney said,
"We delayed taking any legal ac-
tion against Federation because
we learned last fall that the Palm
Beach County Commission would
be considering a new ordinance
that would have prohibited bingo
parlor operations for more than
two days each week. If the Com-
mission had adopted that or-
dinance, the whole question would
have become moot, so we decided
not to take any action until after
the Commission met and decided
what to do."
Two weeks ago, however, the
Commission voted 4 to 1 against
the proposed ordinance, Selvig
recalled, and the State Attorney's
office then decided to reinstate its
investigation of the Federation.
In response, Rabbi Warshal
said, "Selvig's position is ab-
solutely ludicrous. What he's say-
ing is that the State Attorney's of-
fice has been willing to tolerate an
illegal activity for the past 10
months based on some wild hope
the County Commission would put
us out of business ... I would re-
mind him that if there is an illegal
activity being conducted, he has
the obligation to end it promptly,
not to hope for a legislative
change."
Asked about the remedy the
State Attorney might seek in a
lawsuit, Selvig responded, "We
haven't yet decided on the
remedy, although we can seek
both criminal and civil remedies.
In other cases, we've asked for in-
junctions to stop the practices, as
well as for an accounting of the
funds. But we haven't yet decided
how we'll handle the Federation
or its sublessees."
In a conversation last summer
between Rabbi Warshal and
Selvig, Warshal said, Selvig
agreed that what is at issue bet-
ween the State Attorney and
Jewish Federation are technical
questions over which lawyers
could reasonably disagree.
"If Selvig wants to resolve
these differences, let's go to court
and ask for a clarification. What's
so upsetting to me is his use of the
Miami Herald to smear and
defame a charity," Warshal said,
adding, "But I'm willing to suffer
from Mr. Selvig's innuendoes that
try to make us look like under-
world figures because our bingo
operations provide $100,000 an-
nually for Jewish education. For
that I can take anything Selvig
can throw at me."
Smnmerat
With day camp for the kids, a
teen program, and computer education
seminars, everyone enjoys Grossinger's in the
summertime. Full American Plan three meals daily.
ffe JULY4th WEEKEND. July 47
r 2 Starring Helen Reddy July 6
l4 W ALL SPORTS MINI-CAMP. July 10-12
k t Featuring: NY Giants stars Rob Carpenter and
Jim Burt. all-time-great F.arl "The Pearl'"
^Sk Monroe, and All American Chris Mullin.
SOAP OPERA WEEKEND. July 12-14
John Gabriel [Dr. Seneca Beaulac of RYAN'S HOPE).
Janice Lynde I Laurel Chapin of ONE LIFE TO LIVE I and
Candice Earley I Donna of ALL MY CHILDREN). They'll
perform in a musical revue on Sat. night. Also: Kim Zimmer
[Reva Lewis of GUIDING LIGHT). Chris LeBlanc
[Kirk McCollofAS THE WORLD TURNS) and soap
columnists Dorothy Vine. Seli Groves and Toby Goldstein.
-LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL"
SINGLES WEEKEND. July 18-21
Starring: "MEMBERS ONLY" HAPPY TOGETHER '85
TOUR Featuring The Turtles, Gary Lewis and The
Playboys, The Buckinghams, and The Grass Roots. Also
appearing: Thurs., 7/18-The Marvelettes. Fri.. 7/19-
The Clovers. Special parties and programs for singles.
OTHER STARS SHINING THIS SUMMER AT GROSSINGER'S:
Larry Storeh -July 13 Sha-Na-Na -July 27
Red Buttoni August 10
Allen & Rossi August 17
The Sptnnera August 24
Pearl Bailey-Sept. 1
Nrryt.ur ir.vrt *trm < c all our KcwrviiK.n-1 Mliir Inudr NY Slalr OulMdr MY Stair ral toU (nr 18001431 300. Or wrltr Groaalnftrr v CriNiingrr NY 12714 19141292 SOOO
Thr lir*i IjmiK ul hmpilalm
**. where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at PuMx Stores wtth^
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Try This Dietinctlvely
Different Pfe
Cherry
Crumb Pie
$929
ch (km
Available at Publix Storet with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Packad with Goodnaas
Peanut Butter
Cookies
FREE!
dozan
I Whan you buy ona doz. for
.
Availabla at Publix Storas with
Fresh Danish Bakarias Only.
Hamburoaror
Hot Dog Rolls
49
fret
pfcfl.
A vailabla at All Pubfix Storas
and Danish Bakeries.
Sweat, Extra Moist
Gourmet Brownies....... PkS.$ 159
Made with the Freshest Ingredients
Golden Loaf
Pound Cake..................aam $149
Cheese Ring.................^h $169
Prices Effective
June 27 thru July 3.1985 Available at Publix Storas with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Kaiser Rolls................6 for 69*
Mini Bagelettes.......12 ** 99*


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*..<


Israel's Miracle
ran' Whose Hands
Are Said To Cure
Friday, June 28, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
By LILI EYLON
| His appearance is far from
[uisual: short, thin, in his
j-ly fifties, softly-spoken
ad wearing dark sunglases.
,. his plain appearance is
ceiving, for he is known
p the "miracle man" who,
ith a simple touch of his
M so simple hands, can rid
Use suffering from severe
[igraine, paralyzing
ckache or pains in the
ts from their distress.
'or Cairo born Joseph Algaser
s a mysterious power that
ione till now has been able to ex-
lin: he has "electric hands."
sign on his door in a Tel Aviv
3urh says simply, "Joseph
pser Physiotherapist." That
iis regular job, head of the
ysiotherapy department of one
country's major clinics. It is
after hours that Algaser
eives patients in his tiny room
ilv big enough to hold the ex-
ination couch on which he
brks.
)NE SUCH patient, an elderly
kman who arrived with her
lighter, is suffering from severe
bes in her back. "I've had to
in bed for three weeks, and I
barely move. I have seen
doctors and have now
taking pain-killers and
nquilizers, although none gives
i relief. When I stand up, it is as
bone is sticking in my raw
Bh. and the pain moves down to
tegs."
Llgaser listens carefully, tells
that she does not need to
nove her clothes, rubs his hands
slowly brings them close to
ankles, without touching her.
woman cries out, "It hurts!
^e a white-hot needle!" Algaser
M his hands away; then a mo-
il later begins to massage the
Jan's legs. During the
Mage, the woman feels no
i. but as soon as the healer's
nes a mask of concentra-
tion, and he moves his hands
toward her ankles, the woman
begins to emit sounds of pain.
Algaser explains, "When I
touch and massage her legs, she
does not feel anything unusual.
But the minute I begin to concen-
trate, she starts to feel the elec-
tricity in my hands," which
miraculously seems to have the
power to heal. He himself does not
know the source of his special
powers, but as a professional
paramedical practitioner of high
standards, he seeks out scientists
with the hope that they might be
able to find an answer.
HE REPORTS that he was ex
amined with various instruments
at the Israel Center for Nuclear
Research at the Nahal Sorek
laboratories, where he was in-
structed to stand in the middle of
a room while the instruments
were placed some 4 meters from
his body. He says that the in-
struments reported a rate of
10,000 electric movements per 1
millisecond emanating from his
body. "In another test, they
discovered a wavelength of about
1 to 10 kilocycles, and the scien-
tists speculated that this must be
some kind of an unknown electro-
magnetic or biological wave."
He was also examined at the
laboratory of the Department of
Physics at Tel Aviv University by
electrical engineer Dr. Jacob
Dagan in the presence of Dr. Dan
Demedina, a physician and resear-
cher in brain functions. They tried
to determine whether Algaser's
was an electrostatic current of a
direct or alternating current, "but
we were unable to diagnose the
phenomenon. We witnessed cer-
tain phenomena which we were
unable to explain, and I surmise
that they are to be found between
that which is scientifically known
and the unknown," said Dr.
Dagan.
He speculated that science
might not yet have the tools to
deal with this type of phenomena,
"although, on the other hand, it is
Joseph Algaser has been examined by
instruments of a nuclear research center.
possible that the phenomenon is
so simple that it does not even oc-
cur to us that the explanation is
right at our fingertips," stated
Dr. Dagan.
HEALTHY PEOPLE are not
affected by Algaser's hands. For
the afflicted, one or two
treatments suffice to rid them of
their ailments. While these
ailments are generally related to
the spinal cord, at least one pa-
tient was "magically" cured of a
growth in her abdomen.
"For about six months I felt as
if I had a fc-eign mass in my ab-
domen, and the doctor discovered
that it was the size of a fist," says
Rachel Berkovitch of Tel Aviv. At
Tel Hashomer Medical Center.
Evangelicals
they were unable to diagnose it
and assigned me for another
examination."
In the meantime, she met
Algaser who told her to come for a
treatment. Fully dressed as she
was, he touched her lightly on her
legs, face and abdomen. "I felt
heat at these spots and a pricking
sensation. When I returned to Tel
Hashomer a week later, three doc-
tors examined me and could find
no trace of the mass. A month
later, I underwent an ultrasound
test, and nothing was found. That
was four years ago, and I've been
fine ever since," Mrs. Berkovitch
told this reporter.
"HE SUCCEEDS in most of
the cases he treats." was the at-
testation of a medical man, Dr.
Sheferman of Tel Aviv. Algaser,
who was recently "shown" to doc-
tors in clinics in the Federal
Republic of West Germany,
believes that his powers are a
divine gift, and therefore it is his
duty to offer them where needed
for free.
He receives remunerations for
treatments at home only from pa-
tients who are able to afford the
cost. And he has a rule that on cer-
tain days of the month, determin-
ed by him, he will not charge any
fees from any patient, rich or
poor, for only in this way, he
believes, will he be able to retain
his special powers of healing.
View Israel, Jews, Very Favorably
s>
rerry Falwell stands for
values of the family.'
NEW YORK -
Evangelicals have a
favorable view of Israel by a
3-to-l margin and view Jews
favorably by a 5-to-l
margin, according to an
authority on the political
and social attitudes of
evangelical groups.
On the question of Israel,
"born-agains people who attend
church more frequently, Biblical
literalists and people for whom
religion is 'extremely important'
in their daily lives" indicated
greater support for the Jewish
State than "their less religious
evangelical colleagues" from
"high status" denominations such
as Congregationalists,
Presbyterians and Episcopalians.
"High status" evangelicals,
however, have a far more
favorable attitude toward Jews.
THE DIFFERING views were
pointed out to national leaders of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith in an address entitl-
ed, "Who Are the Evangelicals?"
made by Dr. Stuard Rothenberg,
director of the Institute for
Government and Politics of the
Free Congress Research and
Education Association. Dr.
Rothenberg is co-author of "The
Evangelical Voter Religion and
Politics in America," published by
the Institute.
Speaking at a session of ADL's
National Commission meeting at
the Grand Hyatt hotel here, last
week, Dr. Rothenberg emphasized
that there is "a great deal of
diversity" among evangelicals
despite "misimpressions" based
upon erroneously treating them as
if they were "a homogenous group
which is somehow alien to tradi-
tional American values."
Going on to say that such treat-
ment "serves only to create crude
stereotypes and to make
evangelicals seem very threaten-
ing," he declared that "Jews
should be sensitive to that sort of
distortion and caricature."
The only issue on which there is
near unanimity, he said, is school
prayer, "with 90 percent of
evangelicals favoring voluntary
school prayer in the public
schools."
IN AN attempt to define
evangelicals. Dr. Rothenberg
described fundamentalists as
"a sub-daw of evangelicals
that is all fundamentalists
are evangelicals but not all
evangelicals are fundamen-
talists."
He cited the following as being
among the issues on which
evangelicals are split:
A bare majority favors tax tui-
tion credits for education;
Slightly more than half favor
the ERA;
More than two-thirds favor
providing birth control informa-
tion in the public schools;
Equal numbers favor and op-
pose legal abortion in all cir-
cumstances while a plurality
would accept it under certain
circumstances;
In foreign policy, equal
numbers favor and oppose a
nuclear freeze, aid to El Salvador
and high defense spending.
DR. ROTHENBERG said that
even fundamentalists of the
Religious Right do not see eye-to-
eye on all theological matters. As
an example, he pointed out that
"fundamentalist Bob Jones won't
go on the same stage with
Catholics or Jews, while fun-
damentalist Jerry Falwell has
made it a point to reach out to
non fundamentalists.''
Similarly, he observed that
ContUMerfaPagel2


'ai.'iifbb
rage ft The Jewish Flondian of South County/Friday. June 28. 1985
Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
ALEKSANDR KHOLMIAN-
SKY ended his eight-month
hunger strike last month at the
urging of his parents. GRIGORY
and ROSALIA, who visited him
shortiy after he ceased his pro-
test. Kholmiansky. in extremely
weak condition, was released
from an isolation cell on May 29.
and is due to be hospitalized At
the Sverdlovsk camp, authorities
hinted to the Kholmianskys that
Aleksandr could be eligible for
early release on the grounds of
amnesty "if he behaves himself."
Kholmiansky is the only Jewish
Prisoner of Conscience to be con-
sidered for amnesty, since he was
sentenced for allegedly possess-
ing ammunition.'* which is not
viewed as a crime against the
State.
from the draft, because of a
kidney ailment, a represent,
of the induction office came to
Gorodetsky's home and demanded
that he start his military service
within a half-hour Although the
order was not implemented.
Yakov suffered a kidney attack
the next day. In support of
Gorodestky. 30 Jews from Len-
ingrad. Moscow and Riga cabled
Soviet leader Gorbachev, asking
"why. in spite of the peace policy.
was Yakov asked to join the army
for reserve military service, when
he was excused from such service
by a medical committee*"
The threat of armv induction in-
creased for YAKOV GORODET
SKY of Leningrad, who was
ordered to register at the district
induction office. Gorodetsky. who
already completed regular army
service, was notified that he was
being recruited for reserve dul
a high security camp. After he
showed the officials his discharge
papers, he was forwarded to a
municipal draft office and inform-
ed that "past military records of
men who applied for exit visas and
have been warned by the KGB are
invalid." While a medical commit-
tee dtermined Yakov is exempt
SIMON SHNIRMAN schedul-
ed to complete his second three-
year labor camp sentenc<
January 1986. but faces prolonged
incarceration, according to recent
Soviet legislation which pen-.::.-
the authorities to arbitrarily
lengthen the punishment of "per-
sistent offenders against camp
regulations." Shnirman has -
ed seven periods of isoiati
punishment cells, often cite
grounds for an ad I
sentence His wife. ELIZAVETA
has not received a letter in
four months. She recently appeal-
ed to the Chief Administrator of
the Labor Camps, seeking her
husband's transfer to a different
camp, on grounds that he is being
victimized. She was told,
however, that "a transfer to
another camp will not help as Ion*
Rabbi Ted Feldman, 20 Others,
Jailed In D.C. Soviet Protest
Rabbi Theodore Feldman of
B'nai Torah Congregation, chair-
man of the Southeast Region of
Rabbinical Assembly and
president of the South County
Rabbinica] Association, was ar-
rested last week in Washington,
together with 20 other Conser-
vative and Reform Rabbis
They knew they would be ar-
rested they had prepaed for it.
counting on spending an hour or
two in jail, paying a small bond
and later meeting with Senator
Lawton Chiles to discuss their ac-
tion and related issues.
Their plans did not work out ex-
actly as they wanted. The
Waahmgtn police did not exactly
cooperate with them the ar-
resting officers were much har-
sher than on previous occasions.
and they were held in jail for six
hours, making the meeting with
the senator impossible.
The rabbis were arrested during
an effort to demonstrate in front
of the Soviet Embassy against its
treatment of Jews in the USSR.
More than that, however, they
In Poor Condition
NEW YORK (JTA) Unof-
ficial Hebrew teacher Yuli EdeJah-
tein, who is serving a three-year
labor camp term on charges of
lleged "drug possession," is in
poor condition after being beaten
by unidentified assailants in the
Vydrino labor camp.
Gas Prices
TEL AVTV (JTA) Gas sta-
tions throughout the country
apart from a small number owned
directly by the oil companies
were dosed last Thursday, to
press their demand for larger in-
creases in their commissions on
their sale of fuel

were also demonstrating solidari-
ty with 24 rabbis and a Lutheran
minister who were arrested in a
similar demonstration last month,
charged and given trial dates for
September.
The protests and arrests, in
both cases, were part of an
organized effort to point up not
only the plight of Soviet Jewry,
but also the discrimination shown
against such protestors in com-
parison with those protesting in
front of the South African Em-
bassy against that country's apar
theid policy. A law in the Capital
forbids demonstrators to ap-
proach within 500 feet of an em-
bassy, but protestors at the South
African Embassy who did so have
not been prosecuted, while those
approaching the Soviet Embassy
have been charged.
According to Jesse Jacobs, a
spokesman for the Union of Coun-
cils for Soviet Jews, prosecution
for violating the 500-foot boun-
dary is at the discretion of the em-
bassy involved; while South
Africa's has not pressed for pro-
secution, the Soviet one has. Said
the Washington Board of Rabbis:
"We believe it is especially unfor-
tunate that ... the decision made
by the U.S. Attorney to prosecute
us is dictated by the Kremlin."
At last week's solidarity
demonstration, police reportedly
attempted to block the
demonstrators from walking in
front of the Soviet Embassy, and
tried to push them as well as the
press across the street When the
arrests were made, they were con-
ducted in an alley next to the em-
bassy, while the press and camera
were kept away, so pictures could
not be taken Last week's
group were also charged and
given trial dates. Both groups of
demonstrators will fight the
charges on the question of con-
stitutionality of the 500-foot law,
and on the discriminatory applica-
tion in the cases of the two
embassies.
as Simon does not change his en-
tire outlook on life." Elizaveta has
now appealed to Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev.
EVGENY AISENBERG. ar-
rested on March 19 on charges of
allegedly "cirulating fabrications
known to be false which defame
the Soviet state and social
system." will be tried in Kharkov.
Aisenberg. the only Hebrew
teacher in Kharkov, was arrested
following a year-long investiga-
tion of his activities launched after
his participation in a Purim Shpiel
in 1984. If convicted, he faces a
maximum sentence of three years
in labor camp.
According to an official at the
Chistopol prison. IOSIE BEGUN
will be prohibited from meeting
:th his family for his first two
months there, since he is to be
placed under a "strict regime."
Iosifs wife. INNA. was told that
she may be permitted a short
late in June, but she is fearful that
she will not be granted a longer,
pwswnil visit until the end of
f's three-year stay at
Chistopol. Such harsh treatment
would mean that it will have been
five and a half years since the cou-
ple had such a meeting.
SAVE THE DATES
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS
54th General Assembly
mm
November 12-17,1985
Washington, D.C.
More Information Soon

In Israel Colleges.
.. And Local Friends
Donoff To Chair TAU
Seminar Associates
AHARON MUNBLIT of
Kishinev was recently threatened
with imprisonment because of his
"connections with foreigners and
placement of overseas telephone
calls." The warning came during a
KGB interrogation days after he
and his wife, ALLA. phoned
friends in Israel with In-
dependence Day greetings. The
officer claimed that "while the
content of such conversations may
not be hostile to the Soviet Union,
the foreigners may give the con-
versations hostile interpreta-
tions." and warned that Munblit
would be held responsible. He also
claimed that studying Hebrew is
"not hostile in and of itself, (but) it
may contain anti-Soviet
component-
Although he has actively sought
employment since returning to
Novosibirsk in March. FELIKS
KOCHUBIEVSKY has been
unable to find a job. and fears ar-
rest on charges of "parasitism."
He reapplied for an exit visa, and
was promised an answer within a
month Despite his unstable
health. YAKOV MESH returned
to work in Odessa VLADIMIR
RAIZ of Leningrad was again
denied permission to emigrate to
Israel.
Craig Donoff. a tax attorney
and a partner in the Boca Raton
law firm of Donoff and Kern, has
been named chairman of the
Seminar Associates of the
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University at Boca Raton.
Donoff was born and raised in
Miami. He received his BA from
the University of Maryland, and
was graduated from American
University, Washington College
of Law. Washington. D.C; he
holds Masters degrees in Estate
Planning and in Taxation from the
University of Miami School of
Law. Donoff teaches a course on
Estate Planning at the University
of Miami and at Florida Atlantic
University, and is president of the
International Association of
Financial Planners, South Florida
Chapter.
Craig Donoff and his wife MiUi
reside in Boca Raton and recently
became the proud parents of a
daughter. Lindsay Haley
The Seminar Associates is a
gn .up of individuals who share the
conviction that the highest priori-
ty must be assigned to increased
investment in higher education to
improve Israel's quality of life,
economic development, national
security and search for peace.
The group recognises Tel Aviv
University as one ot Israel smut
?minent institutions of higher
education because of the extrw-
linary scholarly achievements,ill
world-class scientific research,*
reponsiveness to Israel's lirgot
population center and iti
phenomenal growth that la
made it, in a mere 20 vein,
Israel's largest university
The Seminar Associates n
organized primarily to become a
intellectual cadre from which tk
university will draw, over tine,
members qualified to partiapite
in the development of eductiol
policies that will jjuide the uniw
sity through this century and at
the next.
It is intended that its membeB
will be talented, articulate leaden
from a variety of enterprises win
will enjoy open discussions iroonj
themselves.
This past year, the AssodiM
hosted Gen. Aharon Yam.fort*
head of brad's military *
telligence and currently the Diree
tor of Tel Aviv University's WJ
Center of Strategic Studies. V*
Seminar Associates will meet*
proximately four times during*
coming year.
For further information aboj
Td Aviv University, please ca
3929186.

I
HISTORICAL ARCHIVES
of the Jewish community of South County are being compiled by the
South County Jewish Federation
VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED
To work on these archives
Call PENNY PRAIS, 368-2737
The South County Jewish Federation is collecting photographs.
documents and other memorabilia which relate tothehistory of the
Jewish community in South Palm Beach County. Copies will be made
of items when owners wish to keep the original.
Please help to make the archives complete
by making material available.



Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Federation/UJA Campaign '85 Update
Hamlet Campaign Reaches Milestone
lie Federation/UJA Cam-
for 1985 at the Hamlet
)elray Beach reached the
i.OOO mark for the first
in history. This was
orted by Larry S. Charme,
1985 Men's Division
fcrman for the Federation.
the same announcement,
Charme thanked Hamlet
firman Seymour Rappaport
his outstanding work,
pjr with his experienced
imittee. This committed
i], of men consisted of:
rrence Mills, Oscar Kosh,
Rudolph Lidsky, Sam Fox,
Phil Rosenblum, Jerry Baron,
Marty Karn, Dave Saft, Mur-
ray Wolitz, Saul Bradburd,
Maurice Friedman, Joe
Rosenblum, Dr. Eugene Zinns,
Sanford Simon and Henry
Cohen.
"Without the tireless effort
of Seymour Rappaport, it
would not have been possible
to achieve this goal," Charme
said. This represents an almost
10 percent increase over last
year's Hamlet Campaign,
itself a notable achievement.
Coco Wood Lakes
Exceeds 1984 Total
fCoco Wood Lakes of Delray
wh has gone over the top this
lr and exceeded the total
piev raised during the 1984
opaign," according to the 1985
lily Division Chairman for the
1th County Jewish Federation,
Djamin Bussin. Nearly $25,000
raised in this Family Division
for the Federation/UJA
paign.
ird Westerman spearhead-
fthe Campaign and served as
irman for the first time. He
o Woods during previous cam-
This campaign was run
pout the annual breakfast, a
lit ion at Coco Wood Lakes. In-
the committee approached
|r friends and neighbors in-
Jually about their commit-
Itto Israel, to Jews around the
and to Jews locally as well.
lition, Operation Moses was
Injr place at the time and
| ind gifts were obtained to
iopian Jews migrate to
ird Westerman and his
imittee are to be con-
1 ed for their fine achieve-
8t said Family Division
in Bussin. "Without their
I :forts, this money could
not have been raised." The Com-
mittee consisted of William
Aronoff, Bertha Berger, Samuel
J. Berger, Marion Berger, Samuel
Berger, Hyman Birnbaum, Leo
Bookspan, Bernard Brager,
Albert Brier, Barney Buchalter,
Louis Chipkin, Samuel Cohen,
Alexander Fleisher.
Others on committee included
Robert Gisser, Max Herzog, Rae
Kimche, David Kirshenbaum, Ber-
nard Klein, Charles Kopan, Mar-
tin Lapidese, Buddy Lax, Don
Maslov, Ernest Moskowitz, Leon
Neuschatz, Isadore Schor, Joseph
Steinberg, Sol Stern. Powell Sum-
merfield, Lester Weinberg, Helen
Weiner, Hyman Weiner, Jack
Weisel, Tania Westerman,
Monroe Werblin, Sidney Weston
and Lillian Young.
Peace Demonstration
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
Thousands of people marched
through downtown Jerusalem in a
Peace Now-led demonstration
against pardon for the alleged
members of a Jewish terrorist
underground presently on trial or
already convicted and serving
sentences.
tA The Boca Raton Chapter
American Friends of
Tel Aviv University
extends its condolences to
! Lester Entin
on the passing of
his beloved father
Solomon Entin
One of the outstanding
Jewish leaders of our time,
fames H. Nobil Lauren Azoulai
Chairman Executive Director
MWmiM ItWHWMHIIWWIHSSIIIMU'tWHIIWfe
Part-Time" Instructors
NEEDED
Painting and Sculpture Class
Int. and Adv. Ballroom Dancing
Aerobics and Yoga
Local Delray Beach Country Club
Community Needs You! 1
[Please send qualifications, hours available,
Salary desired and phone number to:
E. Qoldblum
Box 293
Harrison, Wtf.1052i -
''''iiiii'ittiiiiniiiiimnitniiiiiinniimmiinniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniinimiiiiii
Palm Greens 1985
Campaign A Success
Seymour Rappaport
Leonard Westerman
Palm Greens residents will be
pleased to know that they were
once again part of a very suc-
cessful campaign for the South
County Federation/UJA. Ben-
jamin Bussin, 1985 Family Divi-
sion chairman for the Federation,
recently announced that this
Delray family division community
raised about $60,000 this year, a
sizeable increase over 1984.
This was due in no small part to
efforts of the co-chairmen for the
UJA drive, Dr. Saul Anton (Sec-
tion I) and Ben Karpen (Section
II). "These two men display the
best qualities that Judaism has to
offer. Without their dedication
and hard work, these kinds of
dollars are not raised," said Fami-
ly Division head Bussin.
According to Anton and
Karpen, "This is a monumental
task and it is not possible to cover
all areas without a large, hard-
working committee." Both co-
chairmen indicated that their
respective committees for 1985
were excellent. The volunteers for
Section I were: George Brown,
Max Engelson, Milton Feinberg,
Harold Fried, Oscar Glaser,
Simon Glaser, Murray Goldman,
Robert Goldman, Irving Golds-
tein, Ceilia Golinko, Harry Korn,
Morris Leshner, Samuel Lipton,
Sol Marder, Samuel Milgrim,
Valeska Picker, Ben J. Richmond,
Harry Roeberg, Kitty Rosen,
Seymour Roth, Gertrude
Shankman, Diane Silverman,
Daniel Swyer, and Bernard
Weiss. Those volunteers who
worked in Section II were: Sydney
Atkin, Alvin Chase, Ted Fagin,
Norman Friedman, Sol Goldberg,
Morris Morris, Michael Schwartz,
Dr. Henry Sherwood, Dr. Morris
Tear, and Jack Wurtzel.
Kruger Named
Hebrew U.
Chairman
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Harvey Krueger, chairman of
Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
Executive Committee, was
elected chairman of the Board of
Governors. Krueger, of Shearson
Lehman Brothers, was instrumen-
tal in founding the United Jewish
Community in Bergen County,
N.J.
He is a member of the board and
executive committee of the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee as well as being
active in the board of the Wurz-
weiler School of Social Work of
Yeshiva University.

EXPERIENCE
INCREDIBLE
ISRAEL
October 12-22,1985
Pack your bags for the most rewarding experience of your life. Don't let another year go
by. Join South County Jewish Federation on our Florida Regional Mission to Israel.
You'll explore places and meet people most tourists never see. You'll go beyond
statistics, speeches and headlines to see, touch and be touched in a way that will broaden
your perspective on Israel, deepen your commitment to her people and strengthen your
own Jewish identity.
Gala welcoming presentation in Israel
Confidential briefings by top Israeli
government officials
Home hospitality on a kibbutz
Explore Jerusalem's Old City and
ancient bazaar
Discover the excitement of Tel Aviv
Inspiring visit to Kfar Saba,
South County's Project Renewal
Sister City
An in-depth look at UJA
funded programs
IMPORTANT FACTS
Cost of the mission will be (950 per person. This unbelievable price is for first time
mission participants only.**
A JafaMBB tax-deductible gift of $1,500 per person to the 1986 South County Jewish
Federation/UJA Campaign is required of all participants.
Extensions in Israel are available and can be arranged through the Federation office.
Bucharest Pre-Mission available. Cost $700 per person.
For further information, call Geri Gellert (368*2737) or return sheet below.
Prica-object to eaaaga-
YES1!
I (we) would like to learn more about the South County Jewish Federation Florida
Regional Mission to Israel.
NAME.
PHONE
ADDRESS
ZIP
Please Retain To:
Please Return To: Geri Gellert. South County Jewish Federatioi
338 N.W. Spanish River Blvd.. Boca Raton, FL 33431


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County /Friday, June 28, 1985
-&
-. :
THE ADOLPH and ROSE LEVIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENT R
HAPPENIN
G S
!0
An Agency of the South County Jewish Federation
FIRST ANNUAL
JCC POOL PARTY
A SMASHING SUCCESS
On Sunday, June 9. the Levis
Jewish Community Center held its
First Annual Pool Party. Over 150
people, of all ages, attended this
exciting event.
A super Calypso band, good
food and nice people contributed
to a beautiful day of fun at the
Center.
The event was planned by the
Center's Adult Committee,
chaired by Linda Meker. The
responsibility of this Committee is
to formulate programs geared to
adults and familie.-
The Center will host future pool
parties on both July 21 and
August 18. Don't miss the fun .
Save These Dates'
For further
tact Marianne
at the Center.
information, con-
Lesser. 395-5546.
p.m.
COPACABANA
SUPPER-CLUB
TRIP PLANNED
On Sunday. August 4, the Levis
Jewish Community Center is
sponsoring a trip to the
CopaCabana Supper Club in
Miami.
You will enjoy a lavish nightclub
with gourmet dining to include
lively, colorful and fast-paced
entertainment. A full course din-
ner with a versatile menu is
included.
The cost is $22 per person to in-
clude the bus ride from the JCC.
The bus will leave at 6:15
from the Center.
For further details, contact
Marianne J. Lesser at the Center.
Reg. Deadline: July 19.
ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE
Marc Linden, M.D. and Kathy
Cohen, M.S., will present various
aspects of Alzheimer's Disease.
The lecture will include informa-
tion on diagnosis, treatment, cop-
ing methods, long term effects,
and a question and answer period.
The lecture will be held Thursday,
July 11,7 p.m. at the Levis Jewish
Community Center. No charge for
Members, cost for Non-Members
is $2. Refreshments will be
served.
SCRABBLE CLUB
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will hold a Scrabble Club
starting Thursdays, July 11 to
August 29, from 1-3 p.m. Anyone
interested in improving their
Scrabble skills is invited to join.
Refreshments will be served the
first day. BYOB (Bring Your Own
Board). No charge for Members -
Cost for Non-Members: $5.
Deadline for registrafion is July 5.
Call for more information.
KNITTING FOR BEGINNERS
Learn the basics of knitting
while creating your own designs.!
This course will be taught at the
Levis Jewish Community Center
on Tuesdays, from July 9-30. Time
of class will be 7-9 p.m. Cost for
Members is $15. and $25 for Non-
Members. The registration
deadline is Juh 2.
JOY OF
YIDDISH CONVERSATION
The Levi. Jewish Community
bold a club entitled
"Joy of Yiddish Conversation."
Blossom Cooper, former Yiddish
ructor of the Sholem
Aieichem School and College of
Jewish Studies, will be the C
Director Open to everyone with
some knowledge of Yiddish, the
Club will start Thursdays. July 11
to August 1. from 10 a.m. to 12
noon. Cost for Members. $7 and
Non-Members $10 Deadline for
registration is JuJv 5
The Adolph and Rose Levis Jewish Community Center
wishes to acknowledge their Contributory Members and
welcome all New Members who have recently joined:
KM MIK.K.-
Membership cards must
be presented at all functions
to receive member rates.
Also cards must be
shown on entry to the pool.
I Mo
and Itoana AbraaUbr
MM Mai Ajpenr
M M Sydne* A Altmar.
M M JtiM B Bar?
M M F.toert Hagu
M V >~nor. BemjUwi
MM Hanld Riahaw
V M Kdward Bntark
MM J..arpr. h- .mar
M M Henn Brenne-
'- Mn Inn Brut
> Mi MUtofi Hrumrr
I apt Mr. R.*ier! Byrne*
- v-> Larn -w
M M Mr ayraan
Mn 1 Ha :ngn
MM WJharr I**
M M Leater rJ.UT
> Mr Robert Fiahmar
M M Kir-j- F-eedmar.
Mn name* Fuller
'ioldmar.
MM Martin (.oodinar
* aim GofOufi
1- Mr. Jonathan t.reenr
Mr> Paal Grata*
MM Mrrwir. Groaberg
MM Barry Halpenr
MM Mai Halpert
MM Imnald Heinoe.
Or Tin Hyman HrndVr
MM Herman Her*
MM Robert Judeiton
MM Arnold kagar
Ifr. try and Italia Kala
M M Peter Kamim
M M Bernard Kaminaky
M M She,. Kaufman
MM IftmdKend
M-M Edwrn Krauar
MM Garr Lebtar
MM Wgk
MM Ma*
MM Herbert'
MM AbaerLrnae
MM RiraardI' Ler>
Dr Mr, Steven Litaiaky
If Mn IiameiMar
M M Juaaph Marry.
V V BjaaV) M ~-
M M Robert Mufaon
aa
M M I^arern-r l'aie>
M M Maiaet. Paaermar
MM Innald Pnaer
M M Kenjanun Pnaaw i
MM l.w I
M M Richard nwnrr
M M Hamld K. -er
MM Allan Roamberc
laid Rum-
MM In Saraauhr
M M Roy Saraaohn
M M Bernard Srharhman
Mrs Berenice v-hankermar
MM Slne> Schorr
M M Mei Srhwarte
tjertrude Stmiian
MM Manny Seideman
MM Richard Siement
MM Sanford Sim*
MM Saul Sioaaberc
MM Kerrey Solar
MM Eugene B Squire*
MM band Stein
MMNormanI Stone
MM Onnald Strata*
Temple Beth El
MM Marnr. Waldman
MM Mayer Wemahank
MM Leonard Weuanbarg
Mn Edith Wetchler
M M Frank Watte
MM Andrew Whiter,,
MM Philif' Zmman
PATRONS
M M Buddy Hunber
M- F.thrl Kretaky
MM Stephen Mfiear
Dr Mn Gerald Rotwuun
FKIENDS
M M Ninfred Br___
M M < Ivde t apanr.
Mn Violet (oner
Molly Fraaber,
Alice Juaa.
MMSamKorn
MM Ham Kottier
M M Arthur Labrnfeld
Shirley C Levm
M M Jerome Meter
Jame* Nobtl
Kahraatn Joarpr Pollark
lr Mr Stephen Srhar
RahraMn Merle Singer
Walter Warhnt
RaMaMn Brure araha
warn mi me-W|s
i>i.. '.*-,
M M Btaan I
M* Rrt Bogaar,/-
Oabra Frar
M"M DaMl
M M K-r..
Harry Mime.
MM Mar. I.
Ir Mr* J,"-.
M/H Sortnar
M/MChuraT-...
MTIMar. v.
SkaaaLrro,
Bag^aj M
Barn Potte-
Man B
BMM
A-atra, Waiaator.
Ph*p Wnmtack
Ban Stewart
Suaan Werner
1" Jark Hoflent-rr
M/M Bnar
M-M Bnac I
I* Mn Stuart Frwaaar
JJWSSSSft
I
1

For information on all
JCC programs, call the
Levis JCC at 395-5546.

SOMETHING IS BOUND TO
HAPPEN TO THE MAXIMUM
TAX RATE WHAT WILL IT BE?

OF COURSE, NO ONE CAN BE SURE OF THE FINAL
OUTCOME AFTER COMPROMISE. BUT AGAIN ONE
THING IS CERTAIN IT'S COMING.
SO HOW DO YOU TAKE STEPS TO GET THE MOST OUT
OF YOUR CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS UNDER
EXISTING TAX LAWS?
BY SIMPLY SETTING UP A
PHILANTHROPIC FUND WITH
APPRECIATED ASSETS NOW
DO IT NOW AND PREVENT GET-
TING CAUGHT SHORT UNDER THE
PROPOSED CAPITAL GAINS' TAX
CHANGES IN THE FUTURE (AND
THE FUTURE NEED NOT BE TOO
FAR OFF).
WITH A PHILANTHROPIC FUND IN
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUN-
DATION YOU CAN SUGGEST
WHERE YOU WOULD LIKE YOUR
CHARITABLE DOLLARS TO GO WHILE THE FUND CONTINUES TO GROW THROUGH
SOUND INVESTMENT AND FUTURE CONTRIBUTIONS FROM YOU.
JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
OF SOUTH COUNTY
336 N.W. Spanish Raver Blvd., Boca Raton, PL 33431
MARIANNE BOBICK
PRESIDENT
SOUTH COUNTY
JEWISH FEDERATION
GARY BERNSTEIN
CHAIRMAN
JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
RABBI BRUCE S. WARSHAL
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
SOUTH COUNTY'
JEWISH FEDERATION
For more information please call
ARTHUR H. JAFFE. FOUNDATION DIRECTOR. 368-2737
The Foundation is the endowment program of the South County Jewish Federation.


Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
"We love to say yes."
Now
from
only
On the
largest
lake in
Broward
County.
A SPECIAL "YES" PACKAGE HAS BEEN DESIGNED WITH YOU IN MIND.
YES... We have SPECIAL DISCOUNTS on Fall, '85 deliveries.
We pay your CLOSING COSTS. ((#
We include a quality name brand APPLIANCE PACKAGE.
UPGRADED LUXURY CARPET in a
choice of 50 colors included.
You can have IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY
on a limited number of lakefront locations.
You can enjoy the luxurious LIBERTY
CLUB, a million dollar clubhouse on the shores
of the largest lake in Broward County.
You can own a home at Independence Bay with a
DOWNPAYMENT OF LESS THAN $3,000.-
VISIT OUR DESIGNER DECORATED MODELS ^ TODAY.
YES...
YES...
YES...
YES...
'V
INDEPENDENCE M BAY
A Joint enterprise involving Otympia & York, Ronto DIRECTIONS: Take 1-95 to Hillaboro Boulevard, west to ;
Development Corporation and Chase Development Powerline Road, south to S.W 10th Street, turn right to g
Corporation. Sales Pavilion.TELEPHONE: 305-421-1776, Broward -
305-527-1776 or CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-336-1776. ST*


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday. June 28. 1985
Live in our
Premier Golf
GRAND
OPENING
and Country Club
Community
for Very Little Green.
Gardens from *65,900, Villas from *84,900
The Villages ofParkwalk
announces the
GRAND OPENING
of the models
at its newest village,
The Moorings.
The Moorings at the Villages of Parkwalk has just
opened its luxury two and three bedroom model
villa homes. These are the last villas to be built in
Parkwalk before the completion of the new
18-hole championship Aberdeen Golf & Country
Club and the prices reflect it.
Now is your opportunity to live in this magnificent
Gorf & Country Club community at a price which
will be unheard of when the golf course and
country club are completed
The villa homes at The Moorings provide the
lifestyle that fits any fancy. Homes with garages,
volume ceilings, gourmet kitchens with bright
breakfast areas, spacious living and dining areas,
large screened-in patios, and master suites all
available for a life of luxury
The Villages of Parkwalk is a 1,400 acre
community featuring the premier Aberdeen Golf
& Country Club, a separate tennis and swim
club, and a 55 acre nature preserve. Choose
homes to fit your lifestyle.
Visit our sales center today and let us show you
our outstanding designer models. Gardens from
$65,900. Villas from $84,900.
p|P>The Villages Of
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5795 Parkwalk Circle West, Boynton Beach, FL 33437/(305) 734-8511
LANTANARO
HYPOLUXO RO
BOYNTON BEACH
BOCA RATONl
Satm Hours
3Sm-5:30pmd*
Corporation
PrtoMtnd
iuD*ctto change
w*houtnotK*


IT
J'nijiMl^ueim. uitiwft
Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
mi
^'ni
f m
Ji
.W
*. A
//w crowd of boys who celebrated a
\Bar Mitzvah" in Jerusalem under
sponsorship
Federation.
World Sepkardi
Bar Mitzvah "packets" being handed out to participants in the
mass celebration last year.
Couple Joins Sephardi Annual 'Mass Bar Mitzvah'
n begun five years ago
id Sephardi Federation
by a Boca Raton couple
Solonrm Fima and his
will 1h> joining 50 boys
later this summer, for
f the boys' Bar
ong with several hun-
jon
dred other boys.
The Fimas have personally
undertaken to sponsor the
celebration for the 50 boys, at a
cost of $300 each. They have also
asked friends, acquaintances and
others in the community to help in
sponsoring an additional 50 boys,
B'nai Mitzvah
hi) DOCKSWELL
Dockswell, son of Barry
ill Dockswell of Boca
I become a Bar Mitzvah
ay morning, June 29, at
tion B'nai Israel of Boca
lull read portions of the
norning service in addi-
^nducting the congrega-
dy of the weekly Torah
t (Numbers 20).
ill be sharing his Bar
lymbolically with Ed-
, his "twin" in Vinnitsa
ainian Soviet Socialist
I who is prohibited from
M" practicing his religion
olicies of the Soviet
tion to brother Jeffrey,
include grandparents
Shirley Levine of St.
\m York, and Henry and
^swell of Cranbury, New
la student at Loggers'
He School, is a soccer and
enthusiast, and is a
I f the SARA Soccer
fl'l.K BETH SHALOM
PLE BAT MITZVAH
ken of Temple Beth
iry Village West,
on. celebrated becoming
zvah at a special Friday
and Oneg Shabbat
vomen were trained in
ew Literacy Program of
fading by Mrs. Marie
[eteran Hebrew teacher,
ck Rosenthal, a master
i teacher.
nultiple Bat Mitzvah
was the third in an
Mies, and Dr. John M.
* Shalom's Director of
"fowling Education, said
[forward to a steady pro-
n this program. "We ex-
h and fifth celebra
ke place in December
fuary. Our president,
"nan, has strongly
I and supported several
to bring our women
uito more active Dar-
in synagogue prayer
I these efforts have also
7 supported by our Rabbi,
fdDD-Grain, our Cantor,
Pollack, and our Ritual
as well as the Temple
1full Congregation."
'not Mitzvah were
jAltman Rose Garelick.
David Dockswell
Lilyan Monoson, Sarah Rosenfeld,
Rose Tobias, and Esther Wein-
shenker. After a full Sabbath Eve
service led by Rabbi Crain and the
Cantor, the celebrants chanted
the Haftarah blessings and the
prophetic message of the week
from Zechariah. They were then
charged on their new communal
and individual responsibilities by
Rabbi Crain, presented with their
Bat Mitzvah Certificates by Presi-
dent Saltzman and gifts by Sylvia
Weiner, president of Beth
Shalom's Sisterhood. The evening
ended with a festive Oneg Shab-
bat to which relatives and friends
of the celebrants and the full con-
gregation were invited.
at a mass ceremony sponsored by
the Sephardi Federation on
August 12. This year, for the first
time, the mass celebration will in-
clude a large number of Ethiopian
Jewish boys.
The project was started in 1980
by the Sephardi Federation's
social commission, for boys of
Sephardi underprivileged families
from Israel and Europe, under the
patronage of federation president
Nissim Gaon, a well-known Swiss
millionaire. Apart from transpor-
ting the boys and catering the oc-
casion, the sponsorship also
means providing the boys with a
Bar Mitzvah package which in-
cludes a set of tephillin
(Phylacteries) and a taUit prayer
shawl); a gift such as a watch; the
privilege of bringing two guests
(parents, or other relatives, usual-
ly) with their trip paid for; and
new clothes for the occasion.
Besides the boys and their
guests, numerous dignitaries of
the Sephardi communities and
Israeli leaders take part in the
celebrations, part of which are
held at the Western Wall in
Jerusalem. Last year Solomon
Fima's uncle, David Bouskila of
Pompano, was one of the chief
sponsors, when he took his own
son to Israel for his Bar Mitzvah,
and it was he who got Fima in-
volved in the project. (Bouskila
was the South Florida Jew who
single-handedly financed the erec-
tion of a large dome over the tomb
of "Baba Sali", the late famous
Rabbi Abuhatzeira of Netivot,
Israel, to whom hundreds of
thousands of Sephardi and
Ashkenazi Jews alike have at-
tributed powers of miraculous
blessings.)
Solomon Fima, a wholesale art
dealer whose family hails from
Morocco, said he would approach
everyone he knows to help in the
project, and would very much like
to have anyone who is interested
contact him at 994-3979. (Receipts
for contributions are issued by the
World Sephardi Federation's U.S.
branch and are tax deductible.)
First we created
the complete
summer vacation*
Then Wperfec*
That's a big statement. But Kutsher's is a big
vacation. Even by Catskills' standards. We're
big enough to offer poolsindoors and out
ft
,_Jf, racquetball, tennis, indoor ice-skating, a
supervised day camp, two nightclubs with new
shows nightly. .and that's just for starters! If .
you want to find out just how complete a sum- C
mer vacation can be come!
NHL SEOAKA JULY 4TH WEEKEND DAVID BRENNER
FRANKIE \ ALU THE FOUR SEASONS
LOLA FALANA GLADYS KNIGHT & THE PIPS
ROBERT KLEIN VIC DAMONE
BEN VEREEN LABOR DAY WEEKEND
Kutsher's
Monlicello New York 12701 (914) 794 6000
CALL TOLL FREE: (8001431 1273
Comekit Cam*Mn* Fari/iMi **v CaV fan* Hnmwtd
Boys receiving congratulations and a gift from an official of the
World Sephardic Federation following the Bar Mitzvah
celebration.
CoJofTVn*r^o'
fully Air Condition*!
Strictly Dietary L*"
Music EntartaJnmant
Socl* Program* <-'
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f BOAhVWHKHOm
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A ..*. fv t Mil A
'lullUia,i v.* ouuui ^UUllljrnuy, OUJIt: AO,
lOU
Chai-Lightc
^#^fc w4HlMv
Jewish Community Day School
An Agency of Sonth County Jewish Federation
Graduation
Barry U. Offers MA In
Judaic Studies In Boca
Barry University's Department
of Jewish Studies plans to offer
courses in Boca Raton, starting
this fall, leading to a Master's
degree.
These courses, intended
degrees from Hn\qm
University in Jeruuul
Berkeley.
A course in Biblical.,
already been scheduled
The Kindergarten of the South
County Jewish Community Day-
School held their commencement
services on Thursday. June 6 at
the auditorium of the Levis JCC.
Thirty-three students dressed in
white caps and gowns with gold
tassels sang songs and recited
poetry remembering Judaic and
secular holidays they had studied
and celebrated throughout the
year.
Their teachers Sherry Clayman
and Jewel Scheller spoke to their
families and friends of the many
achievements and the tremendous
growth that had taken place. "It is
so gratifying to watch the children
grow and mature through the
year.'' said Mrs. Scheller. "They
are wonderful children and I will
miss them."
Principal Burt Lowlicht handed
each student a graduation cer-
tificate and miniature Torah
scrolls as were received as gifts to
honor this joyous occasion.
While kindergarten graduation
was not until June 6 officially, the
kindergarteners in Mrs. Scheller's
and in Ms. dayman's duaes
began their festivities on Thurs
day, May 30, with a puppet show.
The production presented by the
"One Way Puppet Theatre' in-
cluded a marionette and stick pup-
pet demonstrate. The children
thoroughly enjoyed it!
Preschoolers' Annual
Shabbat Dinner
Beit Yeladim, the South County
Jewish Community's Day School,
(Left to right) Marianne Bobick, president of South County
Jewish Federation; Dr. Daniel Man, Mrs. Steve Martini; Steve
Martini Jr.; James Baer.
Special Guests at Minyan
Three special guests partook in
the morning Minyan of the South
County Jewish Community Day
School on Friday, June 7. Mrs.
Anne Martini, Mrs. Martha Dom-
mick. and Mr. Steve Martini Jr.
the wife, sister and son of the late
Steve Martini, were invited to a
ceremony held in memory of their
beloved one. Five scholarships
were donated to the South County
Jewish Community Day School in
the name of Steve Martini; three
by Mr. and Mrs. James Baer, and
two by Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Man.
His longtime friends, the Baers
and the Mans remembered the
brotherhood that he promoted and
shared throughout his life. A pla-
que presented to Mrs. Martini was
inscribed similarly.
After Minyan, led by Sue War
shal of the Seventh grade, the
Fifth and Sixth graders sang a
medley of many songs for the
special guests. A reception
followed.
held it* second annual Shabbat
dinner at the Levis Jewish Com-
munity Center on Friday, May 31.
Over 200 were in attendance for
this traditional Shabbat dinner
held in recognition of those
Preschool students moving up to
kindergarten as well as those
students who will be returning to
Beit Yeladin in the fall.
Like the Shabbat that the
Preschool enact every Friday, the
students led the entire dinner.
Afterwards, they entertained
their family and friends with
Hebrew and Judaic songs that
they had learned throughout the
year.
The interaction between the
parent, teacher and child is ex-
tremely close in Preschool and by
the end of the year everyone feels
like "Mishpacha" or family. That
is why Andrea Mossovitz, the
Preschool director, chose this as a
culminating activity
The success of the dinner was
attributed to parent participation
jnder the direction of Andrea
Frydman and Lenae Breger. Ms.
Mossovitz thanked her talented,
dedicated staff: Geri Mercadante.
Dorothy Snyder as well as her
aides Lisa and Kotch Drucker.
She also thanked Burt Lowlicht,
the director of SCJDS for his en-
couragement and support. She
told the parents "I was particular-
ly proud of my students for their
outstanding performance. My ap-
preciation for an excellent year is
extended to my staff and the sup-
portive parents who enabled us to
enrich our program with many
special events such as this. The
cooperation and warmth
displayed for this Family Shabbat
Dinner exemplifies the family unit
we have created in Beit Yeladim.
primarily for those who wish to jn September 9, and wiB
Sursue a career of service in the
ewish community or who are pro-
fessionally engaged in Jewish
education or community work, are
also of interest to anyone seeking
to broaden their background in
Judaism, even if a drgree is not
sought.
The program will consist of 30
credit hours with courses in the
fields of Bible, Rabbinic literature,
Jewish thought and Jewish
history. It is directed by Dr.
Jeremiah Unterman, who has
taught at Dartmouth and the
University of Judaism, and holds
Monday evenings from
9:15 p.m. at the JewishC,
ty Day School Satellite C
Cost is $555, with a 30% 4
for Jewish professk
educators, and fuUien
available in cases
Auditing is available it'|
price.
More information may j
tained directly from Dr |
man, at 758-3392 (ext!
will be glad to discuss pn
and personal goals as wtjl
ther academic pursuits it]
fields with anyone inten
Evangelicals Favor Israel
Continued from Page 5
"while fundamentalist preacher
Jimmy Swaggart attacks
Catholics, fundamentalist
preacher James Robinson has
been attacked for working 'too
closely' with Catholics."
Describing the views of Falwell
and the Moral Majority as typify-
ing those of the Religious Right,
he said they stand for "a smaller,
leaner government, a beefed up
military, a foreign policy which
challenges the Soviets and their
client states, traditional values on
issues like 'the famiry,' opposing
abortion and special protection for
homosexuals."
DR. ROTHENBERG said that
these attitudes are a reaction to
what the Religious Right views as
changes in American society, par-
ticularly over the last 20 years
"drugs, problems with our
schools, foreign policy defeats.
Supreme Court decisions which
suddenly characterized as un-
constitutional things which for
decades and decades had been
considered constitutional, and a
general ridicule of
values and lifestyles."
He said "the mini-n
revival" of the last
out of what was seen as an
reestablish a balance by i
certain values." Dr. Rod
noted, however, that his i
"did not find that eva
fundamentalists were
harangued by their minis
that they would pay a |
of attention even if their i
endorsed a candidate."
He told the ADL leadnl
the point he most wanted I
across was that "evangeli
the Jews, are a diverse |
There are some good
some not so-good ones.'
some who want to work rifl
and some who do not; some|
on which many of them <
with many of us and otheri
on which there will be
disagreement."
But, he concluded,
have to talk with them, ind
ly, before you will know
who and which is which.
"The
Brlckman
Hotel...
a catskin
resort
that lets you
stop eating
long enough
to have
some fun..r
$375-$390
Per week, per person (dbL occ.)
Every room with Private Bath,
Air Conditioning and Color TV.
When you escape the Florida heat this
Summer, escape to something more
than non-stop overeating.
Escape to the Brickman.
>bu go on vocation to do more than live
from one meal to the next That's why we're
on the Modified American Plan, serving two
sumptuous meals dairy. Breakfast (until 1130
am), and Dinner (from 630 to 830 pm).
Mid-day snacks? Magnificent Poolside
Coffee Shop.
Therewibenoarviouncementat 1pm
calling you back to the Dining Room which
you just left, no need to rush off golf course
or tennis courts. Linger at the pool all day i
you choose. We have one outdoor and
indoor (containing health club and jet
whirlpool spa). Play duplicate bridge, take
art classes, go fok dancing, jog, or work out
on our Universal mini- gym. In short enjoy a
full day of outdoor activities and sunsrwie,
and all the other fabulous things we have to
offer, including entertainment that's second
to none.
So come to the Brickman. Where the
meals are fun...not something that gets
in the way of fun!
For reservations and
information phone
TOLL FREE
1-800-431-3854
Hotel Brickman
South FaHsburg. N.Y 12779
Master Card. Visa. Amex
Overlooking a great
18 hole golf course.
Brie
Your host for three genentions,
The Posner Family


Friday, June 28, 1985/fhe Jewish Floridian of South County Page 13
No UNIFIL on Border,
Says Israel
y HUGH ORGEL
j DAVID LANDAU
JSALEM (JTA) -
I has apparently re-
i United Nations plan
nd UN peacekeeping
Jbs in south Lebanon
Israeli border.
Ministry surces said
ifen.se Minister Yitzhak
p\d I'N Undersecretary
Brian Urquhart, at a
I in Rabin's office in Tel
Lt Israel would not agree
jepl-iyment of the United
Interim Force in Lebanon
L| in the border zone. He
By insisted that UNIFIL
b activities to the region
[the security belt in south
purity belt is patrolled by
fcl-hacked South Lebanon
|LA) with support by the
efense Force. Military
[indents suggest that
jjht be willing to agree to
\L presence close to the
anal border in the coastal
exchange for UNIFIL
Ion of the SLA.
has consistently refus-
ognize the Israel-backed,
[hristian SLA, although it
es the Shiite Moslem
mn
ged
kinued from Page 1-
lour people seek still to
jir eyes against the horror
rimes and refuse to draw
psary consequences."
lonse to this movement of
[the Holocaust, Friedman
me Federal Republic of
now to institute an
fritz public trial at which
documentation of
evil deeds will be
on the public record to
the German people,
ly German youth, on the
he murders, killings, and
|e tortures that were ear-
by Mengele and his SS
|n the names of the Ger-
ple."
nan said that a West Ger-
tosecutor personally in-
pim that he had complete
1600 witnesses who ex-
Bd Mengele's terrible
>n addition to the
N of 20 to 30 SS
i who gave depositions on
b and involvement with
| at Auschwitz. He added:
EVIDENCE should
published by the German
"nent and be made
as basic documents on
Jc facts of the Holocaust
pan universities, high
libraries, and mass media,
tos of countering this cy-
nial of the Nazi Holocaust
m the moral lessons of
against tyranny and
anism."
an made public his own
[of Mengele's murderous
Te" as a file of testimonies
*s who suffered viola-
"engele's hands.
Mu.ied by saying, "Ger-
ftnorities in Frankfurt
pd one million Deutsch-
T the capture of Mengele
* is dead, I call upon
fhorities to use these
nsor the Auschwitz
*e>l as to publish these
' r the moral educa-
P'' ">erman people.
David Kimche
militia, Amal, and other non-
governmental armed groups in
south Lebanon. This has long been
a bone of contention between the
Israelis and the UN force.
There were reports last week
that Israel was considering a UN
plan to expand UNIFIL's
peacekeeping role in south
Lebanon and allow Amal to play a
part, while continuing its support
of the SLA.
David Kimche, director general
of the Foreign Ministry, met with
the envoys of countries which con-
tribute troops to UNIFIL, several
members of the UN Security
Council among them. He
reportedly informed the envoys
that "various proposals" have
been advanced by the UN with
respect to security in south
Lebanon and indicated they were
under consideration.
Defense establishment sources
said that Premier Shimon Peres
and Rabin were considering a plan
for UNIFIL to recognize the SLA
in exchange for which Israel
would agree to the gradual
deployment of UNIFIL
southward to the international
border in coordination with Amal.
This plan was to be implemented
experimentally in an area near the
Mediterranean coast not con-
tiguous to the Israel border and, if
successful, would be extended
southward and eastward.
BUT THE report of Rabin's
meeting with Urquhart appeared
to negate this. One problem is that
Amal is hostile to Israel and until
now has refused direct contacts
with the Israelis. Amal leaders
assert however that they are as
much opposed as the Israelis are
to return of Palestine Liberation
Organization fighters to south
Lebanon where the Shiites com-
prise the majority of the
pupulation.
Israel does not believe Amal has
the capability to keep the border
zone free of terrorists. It does not
control the extremist Shiite
group, Hizbollah (Army of God),
which was responsible for suicide
attacks on the IDF in south
Lebanon in recent months
For that reason, Israel is deter-
mined to keep the SLA intact for
the foreseeable future and
reserves the right to send IDF
units into Lebanon should ter-
rorists threaten towns in Galilee.
Kimche also told the e> voys that
while Israel back the SL. it can-
not dictate to it and therefc -e was
unable to secure the immediate
release of 20 Finnish soldiers of
UNIFIL who were taken prisoner
by the SLA and finally released
last week. The SLA charges that
the Finns disarmed 11 of their
men and handed them over to
Amal.
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, June 28, 1985
Local Club*
Organization News
Elaine Yam, incoming president, Betty Jackel; outgoing president.
Honey Shapiro, Dorothy Dorothy Kirschner, Betty Sxegei
Kirschner. ______________________
Obituaries
Sol Entin, 96
Sol Entin, one of New Jersey's elder statesmen and the father
of Boca Raton philanthropist Lester Entin, died in Hollywood,
Florida, May 30, 1985. He was 96.
In Passaic, Entin was extremely active in civic and philan-
thropic activities. He took an especially active role in Jewish com-
munity affairs, serving several terms as chairman of the United
Jewish Appeal. He was a prime mover in the expansion of Beth
Israel Hospital. He served on every committee of the hospital and
was president, serving for several years.
Entin was president of the Jewish Community Council and was
the forerunner of the Jewish Federation of Greater Clifton and
Passaic. He was an active supporter of the Hebrew University
and Boys-Town of Jerusalem, Israel. He was personally ac-
quainted with former Prime Ministers David Ben-Gurion and
Golda Meir and made every major mission to Israel until he was
90 years old.
Since his retirement, he resided in Hollywood, Florida. Sur-
vivors include his wife. Gertrude (Israeloff) Entin, two sons,
Lester of Boca Raton and Verona, N.J., and Horace of Little Falls
and Steven Israeloff, a stepson; seven grandchildren and 14
great-grandchildren. His son, Edmund, a former President of the
Jewish Federation of Greater Fort Lauderdale, died April 20,
1985.
BKNBACH
Anne 96, from Palm Green*. DeJrmy Beach,
wmi originally from Russia She is survived
by her son Charles Burwen, sister Rose
Farter and MoUte Litman, five grand
children and 10 great-grandchildren Beth
Israel Rubin Memorial Chapel.
SIMON
Shirley. 73. of Kings Point. Deiray Beach,
was originally from New York. She is sur-
vived by her son Seymour, daughter Bonnie
Seheres, brother Morns Goldberg, sister
Dorothy Qickaberg and five granchildren
Beth Israel Rubin Memorial Chapel
Pauline Venter, Betty Siegel,
Sylvia Breitner, Dorothy
Kirschen, Betty Judiah, in-
stalled in "Hall of Fame" (all
past Presidents).
ORT-Delray
Installs
New Slate
The Deiray Chapter of
Women's American ORT recently
celebrated its 10th anniversary at
the Boca Pointe Country Club, at
which time it also installed its of-
ficers for 1985-86.
The installation ceremony was
handled by Betty Jackel and Betty
Siegel of the District VI ex-
ecutive, with guests present from
the Region and the Del Pointe
Chapter.
Incoming president Elaine H.
Yam was installed, along with the
following executive board:
Mildred Spooner, Projects vice
president; Charlotte Diamonds-
tein, membership vice president;
Terry Shear, Program vice presi-
dent; Lillian Kobrin. Education
vice president; Florence Wallant,
treasurer; Estelle Schindler,
financial secretary; Ruth
Schecter, recording secretary;
Ann Lowinger, corresponding
secretary; and Dorothy
Kirschner, parliamentarian.
More than 100 members and
their husbands and friends took
part, and five past presidents
were also installed in the ORT
"Hall of Fame."
SENTINEL PLAN
A strong plan for a difficult time.
Unfortunately lunerals are inevitable
However it makes sense to plan lor them like any other major
decision like making out a will or taking out a hie insurance policy
In lact, pre-planning your tuneral might even make more sense
than planning many other things because when you plan your
tuneral. you're relieving your loved ones trom making decisions
at a very ditticult time
That's why Gutterman-Wdrheit Memorial Chapel has something
called the Sentinel Plan Its a program where you pre-arrange
and prepay in installments tor your tuneral You pre-arrange to
save your lamily trom ditticult decision making you pre pay to
treeze your price
We know it's ditticult but please come in to talk with us Were
Gutterman Warheit ^
We've been serving ^^
the Jewish commu f^i iHprmQn
nity tor nearly one aVi mUUH Idl
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Warheit
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL
Boca Deiray 997-9900
7240 North Federal Highway, Boca Deiray, Florida 33431
Broward 742-4933 Boynton Lake Worth W.P. Beach 683-4141
The People Who Understand
Wiesel Stunned by Aij
To Fugitive Mengelel
NEW YORK The fate
of death camp Doctor Josef
Mengele is secondary to the
issue of who helped him and
other Nazi war criminals
escape justice, says author
Elie Wiesel.
In his first public comments on
the bizarre case, Wiesel told an
American Jewish Congress au-
dience that the Mengele episode
has raised a number of broader
questions, such as how so many
war criminals managed to get help
in escaping justice. He called it
"shocking" that "so many
organizations, official and unof-
ficial, provided the assistance
needed."
WIESEL WAS presented with
AJCongress' "Voice of Cons-
cience" Award at the organiza-
tion's annual dinner last week at
New York's Tavern on the Green.
In discussing the escape of large
numbers of war criminals, Wiesel
declared that "a network of
solidarity" was created, con-
sisting of social and economic
groups, and even including church
organizations, that helped them
get away unpunished. "What an
irony, what an injustice that the
killers managed to get so much
help when their victims did not,"
Wiesel said.
He said he was "ashamed" that
intelligence communities in the
West and the Soviet Union had
sought out Nazi scientists after
the war, sheltered them and
treated them as untouchable
"guests of honor."
"How is it possible that all
morality disappeared, that cons-
cience vanished in tW,
Wiesel asked.
REFERRING
R^an's v'sit last monjj
military cemetery
where SS members art t
said he had received i
anti-Semitic mail s
celebrated While House,
urging the President not t
"I have never receivedi
hate mail as I have i
cent weeks," he
cited it as a warning
American Jewish com
rights may be in jeopardy |
suggested that Jewish a
are not taken seriously |
Reagan Administration.
But he noted that
another side to recent t
that "the tragedy of the]
people is beginning to be i
ed and heard" The Me
has provoked extraor
terest in the U.S. not I
Mengele as an indivii
because it representi
issues concerning the Naj
observed.
Wiesel declared thathee1
believe in "collective"
the killers are guilty,",
"Only their accomplice! i
ty. Not their children."
HE URGED Jews to |
sensitive to "what is L,
our own lifetime," andu
believe that as a Jew, if Ii
sitive to Jewish tragedy, |
concerns, Jewish pain, tJi
sensitive to whatever
human life, human i
everywhere, anywhere,
people "
Religious

B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conser
Phone 392-8566. Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Haoan 1
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at8:15 p.m., Saturdayi
a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101, Boca Raton,
33433. Orthodox services held at Verde Elementary
Cafeteria, 6590 Verde Trail, Boca, Saturday morning 9:3
For information regarding Friday, Sundown services
Maariv, call Rabbi Mark Dratch. Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMI NA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd.,
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. I
Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
bath and Festival Services 8:45 am. Sabbath Torah class 5|
Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio 1
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agto
bath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10:15 a.m. lum*
dress: 960 Glades Road, Suite 1C, Boca Raton. FL 3343Z.
392-9982. Baby sitting available during services.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
7099 West Atlantic Ave., Deiray Beach, Florida 33446.'
vative. Phone 495-0466 and 495-1300. Rabbi Jordan H.
Cantor Louis Hershman. Sabbath Services: Friday at o
Saturday at 8:30 a.m. Daily services 8:30 a.m. and 5 fM
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistani
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve a**
8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton. FL 33434^
servative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily **?".$,
and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., oaMLTJ
and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 4W-w
M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Deiray Beach, Florida ^^ij
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winogrsfl-* ^^
Linkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at a p ">
at 8:45 a.m. Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave_a
Road), Deiray Beach, Florida 33445. Reform **** ^ l
vices, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat. 10 am. Rbbi *""
phone 276-6161.


Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 15
The Synagogues
Temples ...
Congregation B'nai Israel
Elects Board
egation B'nai Israel of
on has reelected Joel S.
serve as president for
_erm, and has named its
and board members for
hg year.
I as officers were: Joseph
[vice president; Isidore
treasurer; and Reeda
nrt, secretary. The
linclude: Mimi Abramson,
JBorowsky, Wendy
, Howard Goldman, MD,
liman. Barbara Janus,
fMetsch, Renee Nadel,
Hock, and Michael Selzer,
Members of the founding board
of the Congregation, now stepp-
ing down after a year's service
are: Michael Abramson, MD,
James Friedland, MD, Henry
Janus, Barbara Metsch, and
Michelle Wasch.
Congregation B'nai Israel,
under the spiritual leadership of
Rabbi Richard Agler, is scarcely
one year old, and has been
recognized by the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
as the fastest-growing Reform
temple in the country.
,: TOKAH
E? 'F.Jr"
I

rations of B'nai Torah members: Dr. Jerry and Helen
I children Stacey, Evan and Paul, grandparents Tillie
red Horowitz.
B'nai Torah Fund Drive
Gets Big Push
B'nai Torah Congrega-
ted its doors in 1977, Dr.
[exler and wife, Helen,
pong the founding
V'exler's parents, Alfred
Horowitz, followed sue
fer. Today the Wexler
IE van, 12 years old, Paul
Stacey, 3Vi, comprise the
leration of the family to
Be synagogue.
owth of Boca Raton and
j of Jewish families into
I have taxed the facilities
present B'nai Torah
Be beyond its capacity.
the capital campaign
fund drive is gaining mementum
to permit construction of the new
building by the end of the year.
Elaine Ellish and Milton Blank,
are co-chairing the drive, which
has a $4 million goal, with
$1,500,000 already pledged.
Serving as coordinator for the
drive is Esther Blank, Milton's
wife. The Blanks, originally from
Roanoke, Va., became members
of B'nai Torah even before they
moved to Boca Raton in 1980.
They were recipients of numerous
awards, including from UJA, the
Red Cross, and the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews.
tlank
Esther Blank
pMPLE BETH EL
wporarfe. Wrap Up
1 By Firrt Year
My teenage musical, a
P'e bhabbat Service and a
Party under the stars
[culmination activitiea of
7 year for the Contem
r Temple Beth El.
This young couples group, form-
ed to provide service to the Tem-
ple and its Youth through fun
draising, cultural and social ac-
tivities, has had a full calendar of
events since its creation in Oc-
tober, 1984.
"Teen II: The Competition" was
the musical co-sponsored bv the
S^.^Ur*9*? Neaiie Peterson> PM Greene with Boca Raton
High s Choral Director Janet Soffer and Contemporaries' Max-
xne Arno, following the musical.
Boca Raton High School Choral
Music Department and the Con-
temporaries. It was performed at
the Boca Raton Community
Center, before an enthusiastic au-
dience of students, parents and
friends.
The story depicted the dif-
ficulties of a new student entering
High School and his attempts to
prove himself despite the teasing
of the other teenagers. Most of
the performers were freshmen
and sophomores who put all their
creative energy into this produc-
tion. Phil Greene and Nealie
Peterson as Brian and Julie
played a couple reminiscent of
Sandy and Danny in "Grease."
Their romantic problems were
presented with professionally ex-
ecuted songs and dialogue. Kenny
Croteau as David, the newcomer,
realistically portrayed a character
with whom one could easily
sympathize.
Rabbi Merle Singer with former
refusenik Nadya Cooke.
Nadia Cooke, a former Russian
refusenik, was the guest speaker
at a recent Contemporaries-
sponsored Shabbat Service at
Temple Beth El. Miss Cooke
related her experience as a Jew
who was refused emigration from
her homeland for many years. Her
dramatic presentation illustrated
the plight of Jewish families in
Russia today.
Members of the executive board
of the Contemporaries conducted
the religious portion of the even-
ing under the direction of Rabbi
Merle Singer.
Nancy-Jo Feinberg, left, and
Malcolm Wain, center, presented
with first place prizes by Bob
Tiller, chairman of the Tennis
evening.
"A Summer Happening" at
Laver's International Tennis
Resort, Del ray Beach, was the
climax of a busy weekend for the
Contemporaries. Under a
beautiful moonlit sky, the
members enjoyed a lavish Bar-B-
Que, exciting tennis tournament
and lively conversation around the
pool.
Tennis champions of the even-
ing were Nancy-Jo Feinberg and
Malcolm Wain. Second prizes
were awarded to Gail Weisbaum
and Arnie Blumberg.
TEMPLE SINAI
The new officials wil be
ceremonially inducted into office
at the Sabbath Eve Service, Fri-
day, July 5, at 8:15 p.m. Elected
to succeed Samuel Rothstein,
outgoing President was Bernard
Zeldin. Voted into office as vice
aWOWWXWWWWWWWWWWBWI
presidents were Mrs. Marjory
Aaron, Mrs. Sally Glascom, Mrs.
Leona Kaye, Col. David Klarer
and Sidney Pearce. Mrs. Marilyn
Fine was elected secretary and
Mrs. Lenore Isaacson, Treasurer.
Trustees elected included Bernard
Etish, Herbert Gluckman, Mrs.
Beverly Kamin, Philip Kays, Mrs.
Frieda Markowitz, Edwin Stein,
Abraham Yormack, Mrs. Grace
Gilbert and Milton Weisenberg.
Certificates of appreciation were
also given to officers and trustees
of the Temple whose tenure was
completed; Ned Chodach, Mrs.
Natalie Berendt, Mrs. Ann Kiers-
tein, Heinz Falikman, Jerome
Gilbert and Morris Mintz.
Throughout the summer, worship
services will continue at the Tem-
ple, Fridays at 8:15 p.m. and
Saturdays at 10 a.m. The Satur-
day service is preceded by a 9 a.m.
study session and followed by a
collation and another study
period. The public is invited.
BETH SHALOM
Temple Beth Shalom
Sisterhood of Century Village
West will hold their monthly lun-
cheon/card party, Monday, July 1,
12 noon. Please contact Ann
483-4964 or 483-1315 for informa-
tion and reservations. On July 4,
plan to attend the annual picnic at
Spanish River Park from 9 a.m.-4
p.m. For car arrangements and in-
formation, please call Ada
483-1016 or Sylvia 482-7207. All
are welcome. The next sisterhood
board meeting will be held, Mon-
day, July 8.
W!W&&^^
j:j: Graduating kindergarten class at Temple Beth El Religious ::
1 School. :>
I A Preschool class performs at Temple Beth-El graduation |
:'. ceremonies. ::
;
v:W:WSSx-:;SSxWSw
PLO Talks With U.S. Feared
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A senior security source ex-
pressed concern that current moves for peace negotiations
with Jordan may bring the U.S. together with the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
The source, briefing political correspondents here, said
if the U.S., as a result of future negotiations with joint
Jordanian-Palestinian delegation, agrees to negotiate with
the PLO, Israel may find itself in a new relationship with
the U.S.
ACCORDING TO the source, Washington believes
there are good prospects for negotiations between Israel
and King Hussein of Jordan over the future of the West
Bank. The American also believe PLO chief Yasir Arafat
may accept several of their conditions, including recogni-
tion of Israel's right to exist in return for official U.S.
recognition of the PLO, the source said.


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installed
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ALL STORES OPEN
7 30 AM
CORAL GABLES ............Bird & Douglas Road 446
CUTLER RIDGE 20390 S Dixie Mwy 233
DAVIE St. Rd 84 just west of Univ. Or 473
DEERFIELD BEACH .......2265 W Hillsboro Blvd 427
FT. LAUDERDALE 1740 E Sunrise Blvd 463
HIALEAH PALM SPRINGS MILE 1275 49th St 822
HOMESTEAD 30100 S Federal Hwy 247
KENDALL DR HIGATE SQUARE 13872 SW 88th St 387
N KENDALL DR S.W 88th SI and 107th Ave 595
MIAMI AIRPORT N W 25 St & Milam Dairy Rd 593
MIAMI BEACH 1454 Alton Road 672
f \0 N.R1T.M.M,AM' 13360 NW 71h Ave. 681 -8541
5241 N MIAMI BEACH 1700 NE 163rd St 945 7454
4700 PEMBROKE PINES H llyw d Blvd west of Un.v Or 435-1383
8800 PLANTATION M1 N Sut. M 7 57-2186
7^8 ^2MPANO BEACM 3151 N. Federal Hwy 943-4200
2500 SOUTH DADE 9001 S Dixie Hwy 667-7575
1622 TAMARAC N Umv Dr 4 McNeb Rd 721-4700
0128 TAMARAC 441 & W Commercial Blvd 735-2772
1545 W HOLLYWOOD 497 S State Rd 7 987 0450
1191 WEST MIAMI Bird 4 Galloway Rds 552-6656
5353 WTAMIAMITRAIL 12520 SW 8th St 551-1141
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VISA. MASTERCARO AMERICAN EXPRESS. DINERS CLUB


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