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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( September 9, 1983 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
September 9, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00368

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
September 9, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00368

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
tUewlsti Florid'at?
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
Volume 5- Number 28
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, September 9,1963
f ffd SAocft*
Price 35 Centa
High School Student Program Announced
Organizational MeetingSeptember 15
The South County Jewish Fed-
eration, in conjunction with Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion, is sponsoring a unique, in-
novative, and important pro-
gram, announced Burt Lowlicht,
education director of the Fed-
eration.
"Tenth, eleventh, and twelfth
grade students will be able to
study various topics in Judaica,
meet other Jewish students, and
receive college credit to boot,"
commented Lowlicht. As in the
past, all Judaica High School
courses offered are the academic
equivalent of a campus course
and listed in the Miami-Dade
Community College catalogue,
credited towards MDCC degrees.
MDCC credit is transferable to
almost any college in the country.
Each course is taught by a state
certified teacher appointed by
CAJE and approved by the col-
lege. "It is conceivable that a
student who enters this program
in grade 10 and continues on
through grade 12 can complete a
semester of college before they
set foot on campus," said Low-
licht. Future plans for this pro-
gram include specific courses de-
signed to certify students as
Sunday school teachers. These
courses will include Hebrew lang-
uage instruction as well as
Educational Methodology.
If there are any specific ques-
tions regarding this program,
please call Burt Lowlicht at the
South County Jewish Commu-
nity Day School, 395-3212.
Other plans involve integration
of the Judaica High School with-
in the Jewish Community Cen-
ter's Youth Program. "Many
exciting possibilities will be
opening to high school students
by our new Jewish Community
Center. Naturally, those who get
in on the ground floor, will have
the first crack at the new pro-
grams as they develop," com-
mented Lowlicht.
An organizational meeting will
be held on Sept. 15, 7:30 p.m., at
Temple Beth El, 333 S.W. 4th
Avenue in Boca Raton. At this
meeting, a day will be chosen for
the fall semester and the topic
course. Students who are in-
terested in the program are urged
to attend the meeting.
Men's Division Welcomes
Dr. Charme As 1984 Chairman
PRIME MINISTER BEGIN
Begin Postpones
Indefinitely' Writing
To President Herzog
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- Israels Prime Minister
Menachem Begin made it
official when he resigned
his office as Premier on
Tuesday. His original an-
nouncement of his decision
procedure that is more than a
formality. For the Prime
Minister's resignation to become
truly official no if s, and's or
but's the Premier must make
his intentions clear in writing and
submit it to the President. Since
he has declined to do so, his
to resign came at a Cabinet supporters now see hope that he
meeting Sunday. Almost may yet change h,s mind.
Dr. Larry S. Charme has been
appointed chairman of the Men's
Division for the 1984 Federation
Campaign by Gladys Weinshank,
this year's general campaign
chairman. Mrs. Weinshank
expressed both excitement and
pleasure regarding this appoint-
ment.
Dr. Charme relocated to Boca
Raton two years ago from
Dayton, Ohio, where he was
highly active In the Jewish
community. This activity has in-
creased here with the total sup-
port and encouragement from
Phyllis, his wife, who is very in-
volved in Women's Division.
Having served on the National
Young Leadership Cabinet, Dr.
Dr. Larry Charme
Charme is this year's chairman of
the Florida Region for Upgrade
Training. This June, the entire
Charme clan, including his grown
son and daughter, are leading a
family mission, Larry's third to
Israel.
"I am grateful to medicine for
what it has allowed me to do,"
says Larry Charme. "As the
prototype Jewish community,
this year's campaign goal for
Men's Division is to raise con-
sciousness of Jews to become in-
volved and committed; then the
money will follow. The beauty of
the age in which we live, is that
Jews have a knowledge that we
control our own destiny. We are
powerful!"
immediately, under heavy
pressure, he declared his
willingness to postpone
temporarily a final decision
on the resignation. Now, it
ihas been made, and irrev-
ocably.
However, there's a hitch. As of
late ruesday. Mr. Begin post-
poned indefinitely" tendering
I Jus resignation
Chaim Herzoii
to President
This is a
Earlier, stunned delegations of
Likud activists came to Begins
office, together with representa-
tives of Begins Likud-led coali-
tion, and begged Begin to stay in
office to assure continued Jewish
settlement of the West Bank.
They also told the Premier that
the majority of the people wanted
him ^o stay in office.
SOME OF the delegations
Continued on Page 10-
Benjamin Bussin: New Family Division Chairman
White House Calls Begin
Decision an 'Internal Matter'
WASHINGTON (JTA) The White House
Spokesman said Sunday that Premier Begin's announced
Iintention to resign was considered "an internal matter" of
[Israels government which appeared to be unrelated to
President Reagan's reiteration Saturday of the
Administration's oft-stated view that Jewish settlements
| on the West Bank are an obstacle to peace.
LARRY SPEAKES said the Begin announcement
"is an internal matter with the Israeli government," that
jjje Reagan Administration saw no link with the
.President's reiteration of his view that the settlements
nindered peace and that the White House would have no
other comment.
Speakes said the Reagan Administration was not
pven any advance knowledge on the Premier's statement
> the Cabinet and that the White House learned about it
Ithrough a telephone call from Ambassador Meir Rosenne
Israel. The statement by Speakes was issued in Santa
Barb
ara where Reagan is vacationing.
Gladys Weinshank, 1984 gen-
eral campaign chairman, is proud
to announce the appointment of
Benjamin Bussin as the 1984
Family Division chairman. In
making the appointment. Mrs.
Weinshank stated, "The Family
Division has made a great impact
on the South County Jewish Fed-
eration's previous campaigns. In
order to meet their specific needs
in this year's campaign, a
separate Family Division chair-
man is definitely required. Benja-
min Bussin's experience and abil-
ities make him the right man for
the position."
Bussin has been a resident of
Delray Beach since relocating
here with his wife Evelyn in 1978.
He is a practicing CPA still
active in New York and New Jer-
sey as well as Florida. Ha brings
with him many years of active
service in the community of
South Orange, N.J. Some of his
activities have included, treasur-
er of Temple Beth El of South
Orange; member of the Board of
Directors of Temple Beth El;
active member of the Jewish
Community Council of Essex
County; past president of Temple
B'nai Zion of Bloomfield. N.J.;
past president of Bloomiield
Rotary Club; past district secre-
tary of District 747 of Rotary In-
ternational; and a member of the
Board of Directors of the Bloom-
field Chamber of Commerce for
Sinai; secretary-treasurer of the
Delray Beach Rotary Club: and
continually active in each year's
campaign for South County
Jewish Federation.
Accepting his new position
with excitement, Bussin explain-
ed, "There has been a tremen-
dous increase in population in the
Family Division areas. People are
more conscious of our needs
today than ever before. They
know we must give because we
are giving to life. That is our
Family Division slogan this year
..'Give to Life'."
Ben Bussin
over 20 years.
Bussin has bean honored with
awards from the Rotary Club,
Bloomfield, N.J. Department of
Transportation, and the B'nai
B'rith Century Club. Ha is also a
member of the New York and
New Jersey State Societies of
CPA's as well as the American
Institute and Florida Institute of
CPA's.
Bussin has been active in the
South Coaaty Jews* community
since his arrival in lf/78. Ha is co-
chairman of the Ways and Means
Committee of the new Temple


Page 2
th. .
Tte Jewish Floridian of South County
f'riday, September 9.
He Stunned His Cabinet
Likud Leaders Appeared Dumbfounded by Begin's Decision
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
In a move that shocked
the Cabinet and stunned
the nation, Premier
Menachem Begin announc-
ed Sunday that he intended
to resign. He made the
announcement at the end oi
a relatively brief Cabinet
session. Likud leaders and
spokesmen appeared
dumbfounded by this un-
expected development.
Begin surprised the ministers
at the end of the Cabinet session
when he asked to make a "perso-
nal statement." He declared: "I
came to the Cabinet session this
morning to tell you about my
intention to resign. This an-
nouncement has nothing to do
with today's session or with other
sessions that took place recently.
The reason for my resignation is
personal." The other sessions he
was referring to were those deal-
ing with the government's new
economic austerity budget.
THE MINISTERS were
visibly moved. Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir reportedly was
trembling when he told Begin:
"We have followed you through
thick and thin. Everything you
had asked for. we did and we
shall do." Other ministers spoke
about Begin's special place in the
State of Israel and among the
Jewish people. The ministers
enumerated the achievements of
the present government, and
added: '' There is more to do."
The ministers told Begin that
he was the only person who could
rule the country at this time. But
Begin reportedly made no com-
mitments. "I will consider your
stand, but I do not promise any-
thing." he reportedly told the
ministers. According to one
report. Begin told the ministers
after the Cabinet session: "I do
not feel I function the way a
person who holds a job as respon-
sible as mine should function."
Begin did not indicate when he
would submit his resignation to
the President which by law is
mandatory to make the resigna-
tion legally binding. The Premier
agreed to meet with the leaders of
all the parties that comprise the
Likud coalition Monday morning
before making any further an-
nouncements.
BEGIN'S associates said that
his decision was not sudden, but
was formed gradually within the
past few months. The first
substantial indication that
"something was going on" was
Begin's surprise decision to
cancel a visit to Washington to
meet with Reagan in July for
"personal reasons." It was also
recalled that Begin had declared
a long time ago that he would re-
sign at the age of 70. His 70th
birthday took place several weeks
ago.
Since the death of his wife,
Aliza. last November, Begin has
been in a state of depression and
has gradually tapered off involv-
ing himself in day-to-day activi-
ties. He has spoken out less
f frequently in public, and when he
J has done so. he has appeared
g tired and withdrawn.
The Premier is also known to
be depressed over the stalemate
in Lebanon and the continuing
toll of dead and wounded Israeli
soldiers there. He has also been
buffeted by the mounting econo-
B mic crisis and the growing
f> animosity between the Sephardk
I and Ashkenazic communities. In
addition, he is known to be dis-
heartened by the Reagan
Administration's persistent
criticism of his government's
West Bank settlement policy.
WITH PRESIDENT CARTER: triumphant achievement.
Only Saturday, President
Reagan, in his regular Saturday
address to the American people,
reaffirmed that Israel's West
Bank settlement policy posed
"an obstacle to peace" in the
Middle East. In his address,
delivered from his ranch house
near Santa Barbara. Calif.,
Reagan declared that "the future
of these settlements can only be
dealt with through direct nego-
tiations between the parties to
the conflict. The sooner these
negotiations begin, the greater
the chance for a solution."
REAGAN ALSO made it clear
that he feels his Mideast peace
initiative, which he offered last
year and which has been viewed
in diplomatic circles here and
abroad as having failed, "is
definitely alive and available to
those parties willing to sit down
together and talk peace."
That initiative, rejected by
Israel, called* for negotiations
involving Israel and Jordan and
leading to the eventual establish-
ment of an autonomous Pales-
tinian entity in the West Bank in
association with Jordan. The
initiative, which also criticized
the West Bank settlements, was
considered moribund since
Jordan refused to participate last
April.
Shortly after the Cabinet
meeting Sunday, Cabinet Secre-
tary Dan Meridor issued a state-
ment which said: "At the
Cabinet meeting today, after
discussion of several issues, the
Premier informed the Cabinet of
his intention to resign from
office. After the announcement of
the Premier, all the ministers
asked the Prime Minister to
retract his announcement, and
stay in office.
LEGALLY, the resignation of
the Premier once it is submitt-
ed officially to the President is
at the same time the resignation
of the entire government. From
that moment on, the government
is considered a care-taker govern-
ment. Although such a govern-
ment is by nature transitory, it is
politically stronger in that it can-
not be toppled by a vote of no
confidence, nor can any minister
resign. A fcare-taker government
v.w.ttv.-.vAvv;v.v
remains in power until it is re-
placed by another government.
A new government can be
formed by one of two ways: the
President can ask any Knesset
member, including Begin, to try
and form a new coalition; or the
Knesset can pass a law calling for
new elections. Traditionally, the
President has asked a
representative of the largest
party in the Knesset to form the
coalition.
Presently it is the Labor
Alignment which, since the last
elections, has been enlarged by
two defectors from the Likud.
But given the general disarray of
the Alignment and its lack of a
clear program on vital issues, it is
not clear that the Alignment
could actually form an alterna-
tive coalition.
This makes the option of new
elections a greater possibility. It
is assumed that if Begin decides
on new elections he could rally
sufficient support in the Knesset
to pass a law calling for new and
early elections. Begin's an-
nouncement of his intention to
resign did not make it clear
whether he would remain politi-
cally active after he leaves office.
SOURCES CLOSE to Begin
said Sunday that he would not go
back on his decision. Begin left
the Premier's office shortly alter
the Cabinet session and drove off
to his residence. He made no
statement and would answer no
questions.
The assumption that Begin's
decision was final was buttressed
by Science Minister Yuval
Neeman of Tehiya. He told
reporters that Begin's move was
motivated by "an unexpected
personal reason," and therefore
he would not reconsider his move.
All efforts to persuade him to
remain in office would be useless,
Neeman said. He did not explain
what the "unexpected personal
reason" was.
However, Education Minister
Zevulum Hammer expressed the
hope that Begin would recon-
sider. He said the National
Religious Party, of which
Hammer is one of the leaders,
would continue its partnership
with Likud even if Begin resigns.
But he did not rule out a future
partnership with the Alignment.
Deputy Foreign Minister
Yehuda Ben Meir, also of the
NRP, said: "Whatever happens,
our party will remain loyal to the
partnership with Likud, because
this is the mandate which it
received from its electors."
LABOR PARTY leaders meet-
ing in Tel Aviv said they would
watch the situation closely and
try to weigh the political options
ahead. Because of the number of
question marks surrounding
Begin's next steps. Labor Party
leaders said thay would refrain
from making any further im-
mediate public statements, until
further consuiations which were
to begin between party leader
Shimon Peres, Yitzhak Rabin,
Haim Barlev and Victor Shemtov
of Mapam, an Alignment par-
tner.
The most likely group for ,,
immediate partnership with th.
Alignment would be the three!
member Tami Knesset faction It
was Tami's threat last week to
leave the government because of
its discontent with the Finance
Ministry's latest economic cut
back package that hung heavily
over the Cabinet. In fact Tami
leader Aharon Uzan, who is also
Labor and Social Affairs
Minister, said he did not attend
Sunday's Cabinet session!
because he anticipated Bean's'
resignation, and he did not want
to be blamed for it.
The crisis with Tami might
very well have sparked Begins
decision. It is possible -
although there is no clear evi-1
dence that Begin saw no way
out of that crisis. Rather than
have a three-member Knesset
faction cause his government's
fall by reducing its present majo-1
rity to 61 members in the 120-
member parliament. Begin might
have decided to create a situation!
whereby Tami could be out-
maneuvered.
The report on Begin's action]
instantly prompted pro-and-anti-
demonstrations. A gathering in
support of the Premier, urging
him not to resign, developed
Sunday outside Begin's residence
in Jerusalem's Talbiye quarter.
Peace Now demonstrators as-
sembled, urging Begin to stick to I
his planned resignation. PoliceJ
created a separation zone bet-1
ween the two groups of
demonstrators to avoid clashes!
between them.
ACCORDING TO one report,
a movement of "Citizens for
Begin" was quickly formed,
which organized free transporta-
tion to Jerusalem to demonstrate
solidarity with the Premier.
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Friday. September 9,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
Patrilineal Descent?
Rabbinical Leader Declares 'No'
Reform Judaism's recognition
that the Jewishness of both the
father and the mother can be ac-
cepted in the case of a mixed
marriage has been challenged by
the president of the Rabbinical
Assembly, Rabbi Arnold M.
Goodman of Atlanta, the inter-
national organization of Conser-
vative rabbis.
"The Rabbinical Assembly
does not agree that a child born
of a Jewish father is presumed
Jewish nor do we view this issue
in terms of whether Jewish status
is conferred matrilineally or pa-
trilineally," Rabbi Goodman de-
clares. "The issue is to be seen in
the context of Judaism's percep-
tion of the consequences of a
mixed marriage: a marriage be-
tween a Jew and a gentile where
there is no conversion."
Rabbi Goodman, spiritual
leader of Congregation Ahavath
Achim of Atlanta, in commenting
on the statement on patrilineal
descent adopted by the Central
Conference of American Rabbis
at its annual convention in Los
Angeles this year, asserted: "The
survival of the Jewish people
and of the Jewish religion is
not to be achieved by extending
Jewishness on a wholesale basis
but in defining it in terms of its
uniqueness as a 'boh/ nation and
a kingdom of priests'. "
"White politicians and voters
still seem mesmerized by two
myths: the Machine's invincibil-
ity and the 'natural' political
languor of black citizens. It
squares with both of these
stereotypes to 'explain' Harold
Washington's victory in the
primary as a fluke resulting from
the division of the normal vote
between two white contenders.
But nothing could be farther
from the truth."
This is a major conclusion of a
comprehensive study of Chi-
cago's mayoral election, commis-
sioned by the American Jewish
Committee and prepared by Paul
Kleppner, Presidential Research
Professor of History and Political
Science at Northern Illinois Uni-
versity.
Some 150 presidents and key
executives of major American
corporations will participate in
the fourth Jerusalem Economic
Conference t be held in May, 1984
under the sponsorship of the Is-
raeli Ministries of Finance,
Economics, and Trade and In-
dustry.
More than 300 business leaders
from all parts of the world are ex-
pected to attend.
Former Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger and Prof.
Lawrence Klein of the University
of Pennsylvania, Nobel laureate
In an NBC-Eternal Light High Holiday special, "The Two
Chaims,' author Chaim Potoh (seated left} and sculptor Chaim
Gross (right) discussed the spirit of Judaism in art and in life on
NBC-TV last Sunday.
Finger challenged the FCC's
point that rebuttal to a personal
attack which focuses on vindicat-
ing the individual's reputation
does not necessarily clarify a
public issue.
Israel-bound tourists have a
new opportunity to combine their
vacation in the Holy Land with a
stopover in Europe as a result of
the opening of direct air service
between Spain and Israel.
El Al, Israel's national airline,
is operating weekly flights from
Tel Aviv to Madrid (and vice
versa). Iberia, the Spanish na-
tional air carrier, is operating
weekly flights from Tel Aviv to
both Madrid and Barcelona.
Increasing numbers of Ameri-
can travelers elect to combine
their trip to Israel with a stop in
another Mediterranean, or a Eu-
ropean destination usually on
the way home. Until now,
Athens, Rome. Paris and T^wiAjn
have been favorites and the
opening of the direct flights from
Israel to Spain offers another
choice to American vacationers.
H. Paul Rosenberg is the
newly-appointed chairman of
the Fall President's Mission of
the United Jewish Appeal
The Mission will visit Israel
Oct. 2-7.
in economics, will be among the
Seat speakers during the five-
y meeting in Israel's capital.
Other speakers will include
economic experts from Japan and
the European Economic Commu-
nity. Israel's President Chaim
Herzog will open the conference
at a reception in the President's
House in Jerusalem.
H. Paul Rosenberg of Kansas
City, Mo., a United Jewish Ap-
peal national vice chairman since
1979, and chairman of its Over-
seas Programs Department since
1981, has been appointed chair-
man of the Fall President's Mis-
sion, UJA National Chairman
Robert E. Loup announces. The
mission will visit Israel Oct. 2-7
and be hosted by Israel's Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog.
Rosenberg is a member of the
Board of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee,
UJA constituent agency, and of
the Executive Committee of the
American Associates of Ben Gur-
ion University. He also has
served as chairman of the West
Central Campaign Cabinet.
Israel Bond cash receipts for
1983 have passed the $300 million
mark, it was reported at the Isra-
el 35th Anniversary Internation-
al Israel Bond Conference in
Israel that concluded in Tel Aviv
last Wednesday. The results rep-
resent an increase in sales results
as of the same period last year.
Previously, years which fol-
lowed Israel's wars, as in 1968
and 1974, showed a drop in Bond
results. "This cycle has not been
repeated as world Jewry demon-
strates its determination to con-
tinue to strengthen Israel's
economy," said Conference
Chairman Kabbi Leon Kronish.
of Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach.
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry has designated
Sept. 15 as National Sharansky
Day in recognition of the half-
completed sentence served by
Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Consci-
ence Anatoly Sharansky since his
arrest in March, 1977. Activities
around the country will include
special programs in support of
Sharansky held by state and local
officials.
NCSJ Chairman Morris B.
Abram said that Soviet law pro-
vides for review and early release
of prisoners. Soviet leader Yuri
Andropov duly noted this fact in
a letter he wrote last January to
French Communist Party head
Georges Marchais in response to
Marchais' appeal on behalf of
Sharansky.
Abram has called upon Soviet
authorities to "honor your legal
procedures by releasing Sharan-
sky and allowing him to join his
wife in Israel."
"Personal attack" and "politi-
cal editorial" broadcasting regu-
lations "are vital tools for ensur-
ing that the public remains in-
formed on controversial issues
and should not be repealed," ac-
cording to the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
The League is objecting to the
Federal Communications Com-
mission's proposal to lift the two
rules under which air time is
granted for opposing viewpoints.
In a letter to the FCC, Justin
J. Finger, director of ADL's Civil
Rights Division, said the public
access rules guarantee diversity
of opinion and the free and open
discussion of ideas protected by
the First Amendment.
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, September 9,1933
Marine Deaths, Begin Resignation Spell Tragic Irony
The tragedy of the deaths of two U.S.
Marines in Beirut may at least be an object
lesson to Washington that its arrogant
assessment of the Middle East condition
has been wrong all a long. And it is ironic
that the man whom the Reagan
Administration used without mercy as its
punching bag to blame Israel for
everything possible that is awry in that
area of the world, Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, resigned from his high
office only days after the two young
Marines were killed in their duty.
For one thing, while the White House
played the resignation with a coolness that
was almost supercilious, the fact is that
deep shock waves hit it with cold concern.
Never mind that the President, his State
Department and a bevy of Cabinet officials
repeatedly demanded the withdrawal of
Israeli forces from Lebanon while barely
mentioning the need for Syrian forces to
withdraw first as stipulated in the Israel-
Lebanon agreement. Never mind that the
U.S. military establishment has been
putting all of its eggs into the Egyptian
basket in its recent joint maneuvers there
while ignoring Israel as a military partner.
The fact is that when the Begin
resignation hit the fan, the U.S. was quick
to react and in a strange center. For it
was the military establishment in
Washington that called the President
somewhere around 2 a.m., Saturday night
in California to tell him the news. Urgency?
Yes, of course.
Way of All Flesh
What happened, suddenly, to the old
image of Prime Minister Begin as a pariah?
We suspect a good deal of that went the
way of all flesh when the two U.S. Marines
died, and at once it became clear that the
tempestuous Arab Middle East is not quite
as simple as the Administration and the
State Department had been leading the
American people to believe it is.
Or that, if only old Menachem Begin
would quit, things would be different. Or
even, if only Israel weren't around at all,
we'd have a rosy life with Araby.
Nonsense, and although nobody in the
Administration is saying it, now they know
better. At least, they know it well enough
to be begging the Israelis not to quit their
forward positions and withdraw back to the
Awali River so soon. They know it well
enough finally to see the Syrians for what
they are, a nation bent on annexing
Lebanon at the urging of the Soviet Union.
Although they won't say so.
They know it well enough to come just
short of speaking with rancor about the
Syrians and President Assad's plans for a
"Greater Syria."
But they are not saying that either. For
now, there are only the tears over the
deaths of the two Marines. But the object
lesson is beginning to take hold.
Too Soon to Speculate
Prime Minister Begin said he'd do it
resign on his 70th birthday. And although
it is a few weeks after that date of his
septuagenarian's status, it has come
withal.
It is much too soon to speculate upon his
own motivations. The foolhardiness of this
is demonstrated by the wide range of
"explanations." They range from ill-health
to nefarious plans Begin has promulgated
to whip his opposition into shape so that he
can come back with a major election victory
in hand and reign, truly, as King of
Israel.''
The better part of discretion is instead to
recognize the heroic stuff of which Mr.
Begin was made from the time he entered
office in 1976 until now. If we can take issue.
with him at all, it was the speed with which
he returned the Sinai to Egypt without so
much as a single quid pro quo. In fact, with
little more than a promissory note on a
piece of paper that Egypt signed in which it
vowed to "make friends." Since the Camp
David Accord, this never did, in fact, take
place. With increasing arrogance and in-
transigence, Egypt has actually broken a
prime condition of the accord by with-
drawing its envoy from Tel Aviv at the
outset of the war in Lebanon.
This apart, we see Mr. Begin as one of
the most courageous leaders Israel has ever
had. He has endured much criticism both
abroad and at home some of it perhaps
on target, but most of it launched by
ideological opponents who could not best
him.
We are saddened by his decision.
BEGIN AND SADAT: what will history say?
No 'Trickle Down'
Poor Mob Agency for Assistance
By BEN GALLOB
Not only have recent
improvements in the
American economy not
"trickled down" to those at
the bottom served by the
Jewish community's key
agency for New York City's
Jewish poor and homeless,
but the agency has been
"deluged" with appeals
from individuals and fami-
lies "who simply cannot
make ends meet," an offi-
cial of the agency said.
Jewish Floridian
Menahem Shayovich, presi-
dent of the Metropolitan New
York Coordinating Council on
Jewish Poverty, made that
comment in reporting on a grant
of $200,000 from the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) to operate emergency
shelters and food facilities for the
city's homeless, most of whom
ire expected to be Jews, in-
cluding kosher faculties for Jews.
ogMoeeNBcjw SHAYOVICH said the Co-
-a.mm .,.., ......,. ig,.<4>jy*'0f ordinating Council was working
bocaniRm i abo72tttt&!!%?%Zm.mi ST!w\E2S i"cooPen,tion
Mam otiic* Punt 120 n.e. h St.. Miami. Fia. 33101 ** i-374aos """ with the Federation Employment
P~mm"r- *^7^^SU^^T^.^S^m^ "*""' ^d Guidan<* Servke. Joseph
ComMnad Ja V.ca Praudanta Martona Saar. Eric W. Oachingar. Milton Krttaky, Sacralary Arnold Roaanthai chairman. Said the $200 000 must
Traaaurar. Baran.ca Scnan*man. Eacul.va Oiraetor. RaOO. Bruca S Marshal. a -net kx, Mo. it u -j
Ja*isriFiorKjiandoaanoiguarantaaKar>ruthofMarchafKiaaAdvartiaad sPenl "J ar. Jl. Me Said
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Araa $350 Annual (2 Ya*r Minmum IT); by mamba'Sh.p South Count, there are few Conditions attached
^^f^:Z^^VM''^^m^^'F,t "**-< to use of the federal funds, other
than that their use must be
FREO SMOCMET
Editor and PuMiahar
IWaaaJyMmaaii
of South County
SUZANNE SMOCMET
Exacutiva Editor
iFratfS/tocnaf
Rabbi David Cohen, co-
ordinating council executive
director, stressed repeatedly the
difficulty of defining what a
homeless person is. But, he
added, the Council is getting
hundreds of "what we call, for
lack of a better name, transient
homeless."
Cohen said these have included
Jews coming to Brooklyn's Boro
Park section from Israel seeking
a possible marriage "for their
rapidly againg adult children";
Jews who live in boarding houses
or room occupancies "whose
public entitlements last only two
or three weeks;" and immigrants
coming without funds or friends
because they still believe New
York streets "are paved with
gold."
ADDING THAT the process
of determining just who the
homeless in New York City are
has been started, as the basis for
implementing the goals of the
FEMA grant. Cohen said there
re three Jewish programs
providing housing for the home-
less, mostly the elderly, which
began in the late spring' in this SaabJv '
year one SDonaorfvi hv t.h r. a,"DUy-
in the late spring of this year and
the number of persons needing
shelter was expected to be relati-
vely small during the warm
summer months. But both the
Dorot Project and Respite
House, each with a 14-bed capa-
city, have been housing an
average of 10 persons per night.
COHEN SAID the Co
ordinating Council project,
consisting of three rented apart-
ments in Brooklyn's Crown
Heights section and a room in
Brighton Beach, started in early
July, "currently offers 11 beds, of
which we have been filling an
average of six to nine beds a
night." He said the agency had
the capacity to develop more bed
space and would do so "in the
near future."
Cohen reported that initial
results, as case records are built
up for the coming winter months,
"are confirming expectations."
He said "we are finding homeless
Jews, many of whom are between
20 and 60, most of whom are
unemployed and some of whom
exhibit signs of mental
Friday S^picmbar 9,1983
Volumes

!>tlRI5744
Number 28
restricted to providing emergen-
cy food and shelter.
year one sponsored by the Co-
ordinating Council, one by
Project Dorot and one by Respite
House.
Dorot is a volunteer college
student group, organized on
Manhattan's Upper West Side,
aided by the Jewish Association
for College Youth (JACY), an
affiliate of the Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
The three projects were started
He said that during the height
of the "homeless season," the
recent winter months, there were
in New York City some 50 reli-
gious institutions providing
shelter for homeless persons and
that five of them were
synagogues, using volunteers
and each housing five to eight
people each night. He reported
most of the religious institution*
Continued on Page 9


^v, September 9,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Pae5
On This and That
By RABBI
BRUCE S. WARSHAL,
Executive Director,
South County Jewish Federation
/ admit that what I hnow
nhout Central American foreign
SJy can hardly fill a thimble. I
Uve problems distinguishing be-
wen Honduras and El Salva-
dor. I ftrmly believe that both
countries are somewhere south of
Mexico and north of South
America. Hence, I read all of the
teneral news concerning the
ivrious wars in this region with
the same glorious ignorance
exhibited by most Americans.
But when something crosses my
desk concerning Jews, my intelli-
gence tentacles reach out and
grasp the situation. I share with
you a memorandum that I
received from ADL this past
Keek concerning a briefing
session at the White House
involving the Jewish community
in Nicaragua. A group from ADL
with Nicaraguan Jews, met with
President Reagan. The following
it a statement that Isaac
Stavisky presented to our presi-
dent. It says a lot about the
Sandinistas as well as the fragile
nature of Jewish life.
On behalf of all members of the
Nicaraguan Jewish community, I
wish to express our appreciation
for your interest and thank you
for this opportunity to speak
about the suffering which we
have experienced at the hands of
the Sandinistas.
The Jewish community has
always been small, numbering
about 50 families at its peak.
Jews began coming to Nicaragua
in the late 1920s from Eastern
Europe. They dedicated them-
selves to farming, manufactur-
ing, and retail sales and made
significant contributions to the
country s economic development.
Nicaraguan Jews never en-
countered anti-Semitism, until
the Sandinistas started their
revolution. Even before the
Sandinistas came to power they
began threatening Jews. A
favorite tactic was to
anonymously phone Jewish
homes with warnings that "We
are going to get you Jews,"
claiming that we are responsible
for the killing of our people by
guns sold to the Somoza regime
by Israel. Graffiti by Sandinistas
was widespread, with attacks on
Jews and their religion. One was
Death to the Jewish Pigs." The
initials KSLN in red and black
left no doubt as to who was res-
ponsible.
Once the Sandinistas came to
Power in July, 1979 they moved
s*iflly against Jews. Jewish-
owned properties were among the
nrst to be confiscated, and Jews
*ere forced into exile.
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A few specific cases might best
illustrate the situation which we
confronted.
Freddy Luft came to Nica-
ragua from Rumania after the
Second World War, running
away from the Russians. By hard
work he became the owner of a
textile plant and two retail
stores, in partnership with an
Oscar Kellerman. Freddy Luft
never participated in politics.
A young man by the name of
Mauricio, whom he appointed
general manager of his business,
was a member of the Sandinista
party. Mauricio was very active
and used his position to have a
valid excuse to stay around the
synagogue and write down the
license plates of the vehicles in
which the Jews arrived for
prayers. Mauricio warned Luft
that as soon as the Sandinista
Revolution took power, all his
businesses would be confiscated
and that he would be thrown in
jail. A few weeks before the
Sandinista victory, Luft went to
the German Embassy in
Managua and was evacuated
with other members of the Ger-
man community.
Max Najman, who was the
Honorary Consul of the State of
Israel, had to leave Nicaragua
one year before the Sandinistas
came to power. He fled because
the Sandinistas clandestine
radio had announced they would
execute Max Najman because he
was the Consul of Israel.
He left his plastics factory in
the hands of his son, Jimmy. He
ran the factory for approximately
one year, and then the Sandinis-
tas came to his factory and
plainly informed him that the
plant was being confiscated.
When he was handed the decree,
he noticed that it had been dated
one year before. He protested, to
no avail. He then approached the
newspaper, La Prensa, which
carried his complaint publicly.
After that publication, the
Sandinistas came looking for
him, but he was fortunate enough
to cross the border on foot to
Costa Rica.
Abraham Corn's factory was
Happy New Year
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burned. When the Sandinistas
came to power, they collected the
insurance money from London.
While the fighting for power was
going on, Gorn left Nicaragua.
When the Sandinistas came to
power, he returned to Nicaragua
because he felt that he had done
no wrong to anyone. As soon as
he returned, he was accused of
stealing land and was sent to jail.
Gorn was 70 years old at that
time. During the jail sentence he
was made to sweep the streets.
After his release he went back
to his business. He was running
the factories for six months when
the Sandinistas took away every-
thing that belonged to him,
forcing him to seek asylum in the
Costa Rican Embassy, where he
remained until he was taken to
Costa Rica in a private plane. The
reason that the Sandinistas gave
Gorn for the confiscation was
that he had sold Israeli arms to
Somoza. Since when do two
governments need a civilian to
make an arms deal?
The Sandinistas confiscated
the synagogue. When they were
asked by Rabbi Morton Rosen-
thai the reasons for such an act,
the Sandinistas responded that
the synagogue belonged to
Abraham Gorn! This of course is
not true; we have the deed that
certifies that the synagogue
belongs to the Jewish community
of Nicaragua. It seems that the
Sandinistas are creating the Gorn
case as an apparent parallel with
the well known Dreyfus case.
Permit me some words about
my personal situation. I, together
with my brother-in-law, Saul
Retelny, ran a complex of fac-
tories manufacturing textiles and
candy which employed, at peaks,
over 1200 heads of families. For a
period of 18 months prior to July,
1979, anonymous callers would
contact Retelny and threaten his
life and that of his wife. These
calls came to his business office
and to his home, now also confis-
cated, at all hours of the night.
One favorite tactic was to call
around three in the morning and
tell my brother-in-law that I had
been shot and killed! At the same
time, I would get a telephone call
claiming that my brother-in-law
was shot and killed.
In addition, there were
writings on the walls inside and
outside the factories: "Death to
the Jews; Isaac will be killed.
Beware of Sandinista Justice."
Dry runs of abduction attempts
were made. In one instance, I was
stopped, with my son inside the
car, and at gun point my life was
threatened. I was warned that
my businesses were to be taken
over when the Sandinistas came
to power. Although Retelny and I
were both born in Nicaragua, we
never participated directly or in-
directly in politics.
In 1978, the Sandinistas sent a
strong message to the entire
community when the synagogue
was attacked by five Sandinistas
wearing face handkerchiefs. They
set the building on fire by
throwing gasoline in the main en-
trance doors, shouting PLO
victory slogans and anti-Jewish
defamatory language. This direct
attack on the synagogue showed
the PLO influence on the San-
dinistas. As the doors caught
fire, two members of the com-
munity, at prayer during Sab-
bath Services, ran through a side
door. The Sandinistas met them
with show of automatic
weapons and ordered them in-
side.
The two men who were con-
fronted by the Sandinistas as the
synagogue doors burned were
both survivors of Nazi concentra-
tion camps Lazlo Gewurstx
and Gyula Pinkes. This was a
traumatic experience for them
and other survivors, because it
evoked terrible memories which
they thought they had put
behind them when they fled from
Nazi terrors and found refuge in
Nicaragua.
The Sandinistas threatened to
take our property, and they did.
They threatened our lives, and
for that reason we left our
country. We want to return to
Nicaragua and live with our
fellow countrymen under a demo-
cratic government which respects
human rights. We hope that we
will be able to do that soon.
Permit me a final word of
warning to Jews and other people
of Central America. Beware of
the Sandinista threat!

M
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Pa*6
1*_ F--
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, September 9,
Organizations In The News
PIONEER WOMEN
Pioneer Women-Beersheeba
will hold their opening meeting
for the new season on Tuesday,
Sept. 13 at 1 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank, Kings
Point Plaza, Delray. The coffee
tour will start at 12 noon. Rabbi
Samuel Silver of Temple Sinai
will speak on The Significance of
the High Holidays. Guests are
welcome.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Women's League for Israel-
NCJW Bring Holiday On
Wheels To Nursing Homes
The Boca-Delray section of the
National C-Hindi of Jewish
Women will bring their ongoing
community service project
Holiday on Wheels to several
area nursing homes. The Holiday
on Wheels Program will celebrate
the Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur holidays with residents.
On Monday, Sept. 12 and
Wednesday, Sept. 14. Rabbi
Theodore Feldman and Cantor
Donald Roberts of Temple B'nai
Torah will accompany NCJW
volunteers.
The Holiday on Wheels Pm-
Singles Groups
Activities
Continue
SINGLES 21-60
The Jewish Singles group, age
21-50 sponsored by the Jewish
Community Center, which is an
agency operated by the South
County Jewish Federation, an-
nounces the following events:
Monday, Sept. 12, 5:30-8:30
p.m.: Happy Hour, upstairs at
the Wildflower. 551 E. Palmetto
Park Road, Boca Raton. Hors
d'oeuvres. good musk and
dancing, cash bar. Donation:
WOO
Sunday. September 18, 11
a.m.: "Bathe and Brunch" Cost
$6.00. For directions, please
R.S.V P by Sept. 14 at 368-2737.
Monday. Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m
Planning Meeting, South County
Jewish Federation office, 2200 N.
Federal Highway. Boca Raton,
Suite 206.
Tuesday. Sept. 27. 7.30 p.m :
Discussion Group. Topic: "Sex
and the Single Person." Group
leader Nancy A. Feldman.
A.C.S.W., Clinical Social
Worker-Jewish Family and
Children's Service. Place to be
announced.
SINGLES OVER 45
Tuesday. S*pt. 13. 5:30 p.m.:
Planning meeting. South County
Jewish Federation Office. 2200 N.
Federal Highway. Boca Raton,
Suite 206.
Tuesday. Sept. 20.7:30 p.sm.:
Discussion Group led by Harold
Cohen. Director. South County
Jewish Community Center. B'nai
Torah Congregation. 1401 N.W.
4th Avenue. Boca Raton. Dona-
tion: S3.00 R.S.V.P. 368 2737.
Sunday, Oct. 23.11 ajn.: Sun
day Brunch, place to be announc-
ed
Youths Off
gram will bring blessings, tradi-
tional songs, and food to the resi-
dents of Boca Convalescent, The
Fountains, and St. Andrews
Medical Center.
On Tuesday. Sept. 13. the
NCJW volunteers will bring their
Holiday on Wheels program to
Abbey Delray North and Abbey
Delray South.
The Boca-Delray Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women is a 400-member organi-
zation whose goal is to improve
the quality of life for individuals
in the local community and in Is-
rael. NCJW is an educational,
community service, and social
action organization, that works
in the five priority areas of wom-
en's issues, aging, children and
youth, Jewish life, and Israel.
Mitzvah chapter will hold their
first meeting of the season on
Monday. Sept. 19 at 10 a.m. in
the Administration Building,
Century Village West. All are
welcome.
ANSHEI EMUNA
"Light and Salvation" will be
the all-embracing subject of the
series of sermonic messages to be
preached by Rabbi Dr. Louis L.
Sacks during the Yom Kippur
Day of Atonement services. The
Kol Nidre service on Friday,
Sept. 16 will commence at 6:30
p.m. with the Yom Kippur
services on Saturday, Sept. 17
beginning at 8:30 a.m. Cantor
Alexander Wieder will chant the
liturgy. The Yizkor Memorial
services will commence at 12
noon.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
Boca Delray Chapter
The Boca-Delray Section of the
National Council of Jewish
Women will hold its first general
meeting of the year on Wednes-
day. Sept. 14, 1983 at 8 p.m.
This first meeting entitled,
"The Jewish Mother's Dilemma:
Chicken Soup or Burger King?"
will feature mother-daughter
members exploring traditional
and contemporary approaches to
life.
For further information, call
368-1256.
B'NAI BRITH WOMEN
Integrity Council
Integrity Council of B'nai
Brith Women, wishes to an-
nounce that Workshop Meetings
were held in July and August,
1983 to plan future programs for
the coming season. Plans are be-
ing formulated for the Council's
Donor Luncheon coming up in
February, 1984. Integrity
Council consists of Chapters in
Boynton Beach, Boca Raton.
Delray Beach and Deerfield
Beach.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI
WOMEN
"The American Mizrachi
2m -****** Chapter
will have their welcome G
meeting on Wedenesday. Sent li
1983 at 12 noon at th. America^
Sayings Bank, Atlantic Avenu?
Delray Beach. Friends and neS
members are welcome.
TEMPLE BETH EL SOLOS
"The Solos of Temple Beth El
will meet for brunch on Sunday
Sept. 18, 1983 at 10:30 a.m
Singles 50 and over are invited to
hear Rabbi Agler speak about hii
recent experiences in the USSR
Please contact the following
members as this will be a reser
vations only event. Thank you
Esther 499-8325. Millie 499.3771
Ray 499-1207. Shirley 427-88lo'
Solo members: 11. Guests: $3.
MiTinni miii 11 in 11 iti o in niiinimiiiHrn
Happy & Healthy New Year
Come In A Help Us Celebrate Our Grand Opening
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The Management and
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wish our passengers,
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everywhere,
Health, Prosperity ti'Peace
in 5744.
To Israel
For Work
BONN (JTA) Some 70
unemployed youths from Bremen
in north Germany will come to
Israel in the near future in the
framework of a special program
called "Preparation for Jobs."
They will stay in moshavim for
three months.
The program was initiated by
the local authorities and an as-
sociation for promoting un-
derstanding called "Shalom
Salaro." The 400 thouaand Mark
project is financed by the Nurem-
berg-based federal labor office.
El^ML7/tZ"EL7JL7A'^-EL7Mai.'7//1
ML7/^rELVjL^JrElStML?^EL5
Hal


Lftid>y. Septembers, 1083
The Jewish Floridian of South County
PC7
VANTAGE
THE TASH O
GreatTaste
with Ultra LowTan
That's Success!
Warning: The Surgeon Generel Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
6M9.^^0.6^.notm.|ct|)irMnbyFTGiMthQd.


Page 8
?FT"^^^^^**
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, September
9.1983
35th Anniversaru
A Historic Milestone for Brandeis
By JERRY ROSENWAIKE
WALTHAM, Mass. -
(JTA) When Brandeis
University inaugurates
Evelyn Handker as its fifth
president Oct. 9 at Boston's
historic Symphony Hall, it
will also be celebrating
another university mile-
stone its 35th anni-
versary .
"You know, most people are
amazed when you remind them
that Brandeis is so very young,"
said Dr. Abram Sachar, Bran-
deis' founding president who was
inaugurated at Symphony Hall
Oct. 7. 1948. "It is as if they
cannot believe we have come so
far, so fast."
The university is named for
Louis Dembitz Brandeis, "the
people's lawyer," and the first
Jew to sit on the U.S. Supreme
Court. The nation's only Jewish-
founded, nonsectarian liberal arts
institution of higher learning,
Brandeis today is widely
recognized by leading educators
as one of the country's finest
private liberal arts universities.
ALTHOUGH it has no medical
school. Brandeis students
consistently are accepted at
medical schools at a rate that far
exceeds the national average.
Although it has no law school.
Brandeis students have
historically been sought after by
the best law schools in the nation.
And although it is a small
university enrolling about
2.750 undergraduates and 700
graduate students Brandeis
combines the breadth and range
of academic programs usually
found at much larger universities
with the intimate educational
atmosphere of an undergraduate
college. The student-faculty ratio
is approximately 10 to 1.
The Brandeis success story is
one that, ironically, was born of
failure the dissolution of a
medical and veterinary college,
Middlesex University in
Waltham, Mass., that previously
occupied the Brandeis site.
Fortuitously, at the same time
insolvency loomed for Middlesex,
a committee of public-spirited
Jews in New York City were
seeking a campus for their plan to
establish a Jewish-founded
university.
AFTER HEARING about the
plight of Middlesex, and
following a series of negotiations
between the two parties, the
campus and the charter passed to
the committee with no purchase
investment.
Although the group had to
assume many of Middlesex's out-
standing obligations, Jews in
America could be "a host at last"
to gifted young men and women
scholars. But the committee
there were eight founding
trustees had no money, no
constituency, and no educational
objectives except the conviction
that the school represented a gift
from the Jewish people to
American higher education.
"In the past 35 years, the
precious gift has been sustained
by Jews and non-Jews alike,"
said Sachar, who served for 20
years as president and for many
years thereafter as chancellor.
In order to represent a lasting
bequest to America by the
"people of the book.'' Brandeis
felt it had to epitomize the best.
It had to strike boldly for the top
rank immediately, using as
models the Harvards. the Prince-
tons, the Stanfords. and others of
the traditional elite.
"That was a conscious decision
by the eight founders.'- explained
Sachar. They wanted the best
students, the most distinguished i
faculty, and the most adequate
facilities. They were not about to
accept anything less.''
Brandeis' first entering class in
1948 the same year Israel was
founded consisted of 107 intre-
After School Program
Fall 1983
Sponsored by:
South County Jewish Community Day School
South County Jewish Commmunity Center
WHAT: A new after school program
WHERE: South County Jewish Community Day School
414 N.W. 35th Street, Boca Raton, Florida
WHO:
WHEN:
For children 3 years old thru 6th grade
Monday thru Friday, 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
(Beginning August 29 for students of the South County
Jewish Community Day School. October 3 for all other
students)
STAFF: Lead staff members are from the Day School
Weekly
Jewish Community
Day School Student
Costs:
5 Days 11.25
4 Days 10.00
3 Days 8.00
2 Days 5.50
1 Day 3.00
Hourly (Day School 1-50
Students only)
3:30 p.m. 4:10 p.m.
PROGRAM: 4:15 p.m. 4:45 p.m.
4:20 p.m. 5:30 p.m.
AllOther
Students
15.00
13.75
10.50
7.00
Activity Period I
Supervised Study
Activity Period II
Foe futher information call Burl Lowlicht at 305-3212 or
Harold Cohen at 368-2737.
pid young men and women and
13 equally adventurous faculty.
Today, the nearly 3,500 under-
graduates and graduate students
scholarly legatees of the 1948
pioneers freely choose an ener-
getic intellectual atmosphere, a
distinguished and international-
ly-known faculty, and an insti-
tution that has, from its in-
ception, maintained the highest
academic standards.
BRANDEIS' commitment to
excellence was swiftly recognized
by Phi Beta Kappa, the national
honor society, which granted
recognition to Brandeis just 13
years after the university was
founded the youngest institu-
tion so honored in over 100 years.
Recently, Brandeis was one of
only 12 universities in America
ranked among the top 10 in the
country in three or more of six
undergraduate disciplines
surveyed.
Similarly, several of Brandeis'
graduate departments have been
rated among the nation's best,
and the most recent survey of
professional school deans ranked
its Florence Heller Graduate
School for Advanced Studies in
Social Welfare fourth in the
country among schools of social
work.
The university's multi-million
dollar Rosenstiel Basic Medical
Sciences Research Center, built
in 1973. enhanced Brandeis'
growing reputation in the
physical sciences and attracted
leading researchers to probe
areas in the bio-medical field.
The four schools in the under-
graduate college at Brandeis
Science. Social Sience, Humani-
ties, and Creative Arts offer
about 900 courses in 32 fields of
concentration and several
specialized programs. Brandeis
undergraduates men and
women of diverse ethnic, reli-
'gious and racial backgrounds
come from virtually every state
in the union and over 40 foreign
countries. They are able to parti-
cipate in research normally of-
fered only in graduate programs
at other leading colleges and
universities.
IN ADDITION, under-
graduates receive part of their
training from senior faculty
members. From the beginning,
Brandeis felt that its academic
"stars" which have included
such giants as historian Henry
Steele Commager, composer
Leonard Bernstein, psychologist
Abraham Maslow, and Judaic
scholar Nahum Galtzer should
enrich the undergraduate ex-
perience.
At a time when many
and universities have abando
or cut back their commitment
liberal arts in favor of teeK
training Brandeis haaTcS
strengthened its traditional mitment to the liberal arts "A.
our society becomes mo7e
complicated and increasing
technologically oriented," ^id
one Brandeis administrator
"the ability to learn how to learn'
and apply knowledge both
hallmarks of a liberal
training will become
more valuable in the future.
arts I
even!
For the overwhelming majorij
of the nearly 17,000 men
women who are Brandeis alum
such a philosophy has equipn,
them for leadership positions
business, medicine, the law, tl
arts, and nearly every other]
professional endeavor.
Attention New Residents!
You art cordially Invited
to attend a
SHALOM SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION
Wine and Cheete Gathering
for
Newcomers to the area
Piice: South County Jtwith Federation Office
2200 North Federal Highway, Suite 206
Boca Raton. Florida 33432
Call Federation Office 368-2737 for details.
J
0
I
N
U
S
Put Yourself In This Picture
JerusalemTemple Mount
Overlooking the Temple mount of the historic old city of Jerusalem on
UJA Mission to Israel
NEXT MISSION: OCTOBER 9-19
Join the people from South County already committed to this mission
$1000 per person mission cost.
Minimum contribution of
$3000 family gift or $1600 for s single to the 1964 U J A/Federation
campaign will be required for all participsjits on the mission.
For information call Helene Eichler st
The South County Jewish Federation
at 368-2737


September 9,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
teJiom
the Federation and ia co-
sponsored by JBFCS and Altro.
The Metropolitan Council's
affiliations include "direct
Poor Deluge Agency for Assistance
|C(IBUiiuedfroinPage4
I offering their programs
PL spring "but intend on
I up again in the winter
HE RAW details of the treat-
Tof the Jewish homeless were
in a separate report,
^ by Cohen and Andrew
ik the Coordinating Council
'0ns director, in which
jce was made to a recent
, by the Federation's Task
a on the Homeless which
.timed results of two studies
lonsored by the New York State
fejof Mental Health and the
m Resource Administration
A declaring that 2 percent
JU percent, respectively, of
ledty's homeless were Jewish.
"Based 0n overall estimates of
Ifltvwide homeless population
Ibetween 12.000 and 36,000 this
nts for approximately 240
|W0 Jewish families," accord-
L the Cohen-Frank report.
Ifliey also reported that field
i on the Jewish homeless
"claim that many of their
clients" have never used
municipally-operated facilities for
the homeless "due to the horren-
dous reputation and fear that
these facuities engender."
SOME SPECIFIC information
about privately-operated shelters
in Manhattan cited in the Cohen-
Frank report included an
estimate that 33 percent of the
users of the Goddard-Riveraide
Church outreach program were
Jews. The Oliveri Center for
Homeless Women estimated 10
percent of its population was
Jewish.
The Mid town Outreach Pro-
gram-Manhattan Bowery Corp.
claimed that from November,
1981, to July, 1982, from 139 to
159 persons, or around 40 percent
of users over 60 were Jews, and
that 56 persons or 80 percent over
70 were Jews.
A Federation report said the
Jewish Board of Family and
Children's Services (JBFCS)
serves an average of six homeless
persons a week or 300 a year. The
Happy and Healthy New Year
We have the best Rates in
Auto, Homeowners, & Condo Insurance
Southeast Underwriters, Inc
Delray West Plaza Nr. Winn Dixie
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Call Chuck Miles, 495-2500
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Villa Del Ray
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High Point of Delray Builders
relationships" with the com-
munity councils, JASA, the YM-
YWHA and Jewish community
centers in aU five boroughs.
Happy New Year to our Friends A Clients
IRichardson Greenshields
Jewish Association for Services
for the Aged (JASA) reported a
caseload of between 65 and 86
annually.
SHAYOVICH SAID. "Crisis
intervention and case manage-
ment services" will be provided
to beneficiaries of the FEMA-
financed project by 20 locally-
based neighborhood Jewish
Community Councils affiliated
with the Coordinating Council
and "long-term case planning
and follow-up will be the respon-
sibility of the FEGS Homeless
Project."
Crisis intervention was defined
as dealing with the immediate
problem, getting the homeless
person housed and fed, doing an
initial intake and assessment of
the person's problems and needs,
and starting, where appropriate,
the process of application for
public entitlements.
Case management was
described as coordinating the
provision of a package of services
to a needy person receiving such
services from a variety of sources
"and maintaining contact and
ensuring adequate follow-up on
whatever plan of service is agreed
upon" for the needy Jews.
COHEN SAID most of the 20
Jewish Community Councils,
located throughout the city's five
boroughs operate store-front,
walk-in multi-service centers. He
said all of them have helped
homeless persons at one time or
another. He said some councils
provide crisis intervention
services and daily checks on
persons located in shelters near
their offices.
The Federation recently
allocated $110,000 to implement
its Federation Homeless Project,
handled by FEGS, Altro Health
and Rehabilitation Services and
the JBFCS.
Cohen said this was an out-
reach and case-management
program which does not directly
operate shelters for homeless
Jews but the Coordinating
Council project, co-sponsored by
FEGS "now provides them with
direct access to shelter and they
in turn provide their services to
our clients."
IN A JOINT statement on the
FEMA grant, Alfred Miller,
FEGS executive director, and
Cohen said the effort was "the
result of collaborative under-
takings by the organized Jewish
community to deal with this most
urgent problem."
They added that the FEGS
Homeless Project is funded by
Boca Raton Office
Peter Ganyard. Manager
856 South Federal Highway
Talephoo. 392-2002
South Florida's Oldest
Chrysler-Plymouth Dealer
Wishes
AU Their Friends & Customers
HAPPY & HEALTHY
NEW YEAR
CHRYSLER PLYMOUTH
Pompano Beach. 2300 North Federal fiighway
Directly across from Fashion Square
OPEN Til 9 DAIl Y SATURDAY Til S 942 5100
Happy New Year
To Our Friends A Customers
American
Brake & Tire, Inc,
Harvey I. Stein
2997 No. State Rd. 7
Lauderdale Lakes, FL 33313
486-2245
320 No. Congress Ave.
Delray Beach, FL
278-8088
W**
'...V.V.V.V.V.V.'
1^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^.^^^^^^^^^V^^^^^^^^-...........:
A
COMMUNITY
NHGHBOR.
Joseph Rubin is a dedicated man. devoted to his
family, his business, his community. For many years he
has been actively involved in fraternal, civic and temple
organizations ... helping and supporting people with
sensitivity and integrity, as a community leader, as a
neighbor and as a friend.
He brings these same caring qualities to his position as director and owner of Beth
Israel. South Palm Beach County's only Jewish Funeral Home.. .thoughtfully attend-
ing to every detail in his own very personal and compassionate manner. Joseph
Rubinalways there as friend of the community ...as well as friend in time of need.
The io,se person thinks about BETH ISRAEL 'RUBIN
making funeral pre-arrangements
...the thoughtful and considerate fflClllOMAL CHAPCL
person does it' Ask about the Famty
Protection Plan which provides se-
curity and peace of mind for you and
your loved ones
" -1 '- '---------------'-.' :----------------------'^rrr^
499-8000/732-3000


^WA
"...I..... I W .'!'
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, SeptemhproJ
A Rabbi
Comments
Rabbi Joseph S. Noble
The following is brought to Floridian readers by the South
County Rabbinical Association. If there are topics you would like
our Rabbis to discuss, please submit them to the Floridian.
By RABBI JOSEPH S. NOBLE
Almighty God, we stand before You .
This is the time of the yeas when we "take stock of the souL"
Stock-taking is commonly recognized as indispensable to the
very life-blood of business. Periodic inventory is accepted
practice in our highly developed commercial civilization. Stock-
taking in business will reveal its strengths and weaknesses, its
profits and losses, and will determine future policy. No business
could long exist without knowing the direction towards which it
was heading.
What about the human soul how often do we take stock?
How often do we go through life without plan, without purpose,
without analysis?
We have beeninade conscious of our physical well being. We
plan our physical and dental check-ups periodically, for our-
selves and our family. We study our symptoms, and we follow
through with the prescribed treatment. What about the human
soul do symptoms of spiritual sickness go unnoticed and
unattended?
Rosh Hashanah is the gentle reminder we receive each year
from our Spiritual Doctor that we are due for our "spiritual
check-up." On this day, man must answer not only to the Divine
but to his conscience, to himself. On Rosh Hashanah and
through Yom Kippur we must take inventory of our souls; each
year we must review our plan, our purpose and direction we had
set for ourselves the previous year. We stand in judgment of our
selves; we review our strengths and weaknesses and decide
future direction and policy.
As we pray on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, our minds
wander over the past year. Mentally we list our assets and
liabilities, our debit and credit. How will we appear before God?
What will our inventory show? Have symptoms of spiritual
sickness gone unnoticed during the year? This is the time for
spiritual review! As we stand before God, we answer not only to
Him but to ourselves.
There is a story about the Rabbi of Mezereah and an eager
student. The student asked the Rabbi what he must do to fulfill
his commitment to society. The Rabbi instructed him to go out
and change the whole world and report back to him in six
months. The student returned and bemoaned the fact that he
could not change the whole world The Rabbi then asked him to
try to change his own community, and this would make the
world a better place of living. The student returned in six
months again, crying that he couldn't even change his own com-
munity. The Rabbi then instructed him to change himself, and
that would automatically make the world a better place in which
to live.
Another selection appropriate for this season of the year
Each Year.
Each year should be the best year we have yet lived.
Each year u Each year we are wiser than the year before.
Each year our eyes know better the sights we seek.
Each year our ears listen with a finer tuning.
Each happening is a jewel, wrought about the fancy of time.
All that we understand of the universe is the setting for each
sight and sound of the day.
The child looks with gladness each year to be one year older.
Should not this welcome pursue us all our years?
The piling of the years is a richness like the piling of gold.
Our years are coins with which we can pursue more wisely at the
bazaars of each new season.
Our love is more pliant and patient having been taught by time.
This New Year is one year older than the last.
The earth is more abounding in its growth.
The creatures have moved another step in their unfolding.
Mankind has left us one more year of art for our contemplation.
History is one year more resonant with lessons.
The sunrises are one year more familiar and promising.
The sunsets are one year less fearful, and the peace of the night
is one year closer.
K'tivah Vachatima Tova.
May we be inscribed in the Book of Life, Health, and Hap-
piness.
"Dedicated to Serving our Jewish Community"
BETH ISRAEL -RUBIN
mcmomm. chapcl
5608 W. ATLANTIC AVENUE DELRAY BEACH, FL 33445
DELRAY (305) 4994000 WEST PALM (305) 732-3000
JOSEPH RUBIN. OWNER
Begin Quits
But He Postpones Indefinitely'
Presenting His Decision to Herzog




Continued from Page 1
blamed the Cabinet ministers for
placing obstacles in Begins way
and with having made life for him
as Premier "unbearable." Begin
indicated he was not convinced
by these remonstrations, but
agreed to postpone his answer.
Avraham Shapiro, chairman of
the coalition, who attended the
meeting with Begin, emerged to
tell reporters that Begin had
made no comments on the ap-
peals but simply had listened.
Shapiro said no mention had been
made of a possible successor be-
cause the assumption of those
Hollings Raps
Reagan
'Errors'
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Sen. Fritz Hollings (D.,
S.C.) told the Conference of
Presidents of Major Ameri-
can Jewish Organizations
that the Reagan Adminis-
tration had made "funda-
mental errors" which have
"dissipated the advantage
gained by the signing of an
Egyptian-Israeli peace
treaty."
In the first of a series of Presi-
dents Conference forums with
Presidential candidates, Hollings
charged that United States
policy in "refusing" to activate
the United States-Israel agree-
ment on strategic cooperation, its
resistance to establishing nec-
essary liaison between United
States and Israeli forces in Leb-
anon, and withholding delivery of
long-promised F-16 fighter planes
had sent "the wrong signals" to
the Arab world and the Soviet
Union.
"I HAVE warned for many
years against the danger of
giving even the merest impres-
sion of wavering in our commit-
ment to Israel's security, and
have said repeatedly that if Israel
were allowed to appear weak in
the eyes of the world, grave
consequences would ensue,"
Hollings said.
The Senator, in answer to a
question following his talk, said
he had supported for the past five
years the moving of the United
States Embassy in Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem. "Our country should
treat Israel not as a client state
but as a sovereign nation,"
Hollings declared.
Tribute at
JNF Forest
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
interfaith group led by
Americans now living in Israel
paid tribute to Martin Luther
King and to his life's work as a
civil rights leader on Aug. 28, the
20th anniversary of King's
historic "I have a dream" speech
in Washington, D.C.
The Committee for the Dr.
Martin Luther King Memorial
Forest in Israel announced that
the tribute took place at a Galilee
hillside near Nazareth. The in-
terfaith group recalled that King
had expressed a desire to visit
Israel, and voiced his admiration
for its democracy and progress.
making the appeals was that
Begin should remain. An Aguda
Knesset member, Menachem
Porush, was more optimistic, de-
claring that Begin had "opened a
gate of hope."
SHLOMO LORINCZ, another
Aguda Knesset deputy, said the
trouble was that no one knew
why Begin had decided to resign.
Lorincz said he had told the Pre-
mier that "rather than that we
spoke for hours," Begin "should
have told us what he thought."
He said he also told Begin that an
explanation would have made it
easier to persuade him to with-
draw his planned resignation.
But, Lorincz reported, "Begin
laughed when I said that and
would not disclose his reasons for
resigning." The Premier told the
Cabinet he intended to resign for
"personal reasons."
Despite Begin's indication
d^notatfu-stgoimmediui
President Chaun Herzog to 0
cjally subnut his MrigSi
*Z*2ZL analy8t8 here
nevertheless reported to be
vmced that he would do so
Uri Porat Begins pre*
viser, said after a meeting
Begin had been deeply impL
by the arguments for his stay
and had simply asked for m
time to think it over. Eh
Oimert, a Likud deputy
after the meeting that he tho
Begin intended to proceed
his resignation but that the in*
tence of his supporters that j
remain Premier had created!
heavy dilemma for him.
The dilemma was resoh
shortly thereafter wl
the dilemma was. The
Minister is now an "ex."
Community Calendar
September 11
B'nai B'rith Integrity Council, 9:30 a.m. meeting
September 12
Brandeis Women-Boca, 9 a.m. Board meeting Anshei Shalom-
Sisterhood-Oriole Jewish Center, 9:45 a.m. Board meeting*
Hadassah Menachem Begin, 12 noon Board meeting
September 13
Pioneer Women-Beersheba, 12 noon meeting Zionist
Organization of America-Century Village Boca, 8 p.m. meeting
September 14
Hadassah-Aviva, 10 a.m. Board meeting National Council
Jewish Women-Boca, Delroy, 8 p.m. meeting Temple Emtth-
Singles, 1 p.m. meeting
September 15
Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 12:30 p.m. Board meeting Women's
American ORT-Oriole, 1 p.m. Board meeting
Religious Directory
B'NAI TOKAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.. Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative!
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald I
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Minyan on Monday and Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road^ 1 block south of Linton Blvd., Delray i
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks.1
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:46 a.m. and 5 p.m..
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:46 a,m. Sabbath Torah class 5
p.m. Phone 499-9229.
1K.MPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan I
Association Office, West Atlantic, corner Carter Road, Delray
Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m.
and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 499-6687. Temple
Office 14600 Cumberland Drive, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446,
Phone 495-0466. Rabbi Emeritus Jonah J. Kahn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
Month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015. Boca Raton, Fla. 33434.1
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m., Sunday 9 a.m. Reuben
Saltzman, President. Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-5557.
TEMPLE EMETH
57HII West Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach. Fla. XM4&. ln,
servatiye. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A Silver, Rabbi; Nafuly
A. Linkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m..
Saturday at8:45 a.m.. Daily Minyansat 8:45a.m and5p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Cason United Methodist Church, 342 N. Swinton Ave. (corn*
Lake Ida RdJ, Ddray Beach, FL Reform. Mailing Address: P.O.
Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:16 p.m. Rbb
Samuel Silver, President Samuel Rothstein, 276-6161.


Liv. September 9,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
The seventh annual Sea of Galilee Marathon runners from throughout Israel and the
will take place around this beautiful site in world are expected to participate.
northern Israel on Dec. 21. Some 1,000
1,000 Runners
They Eye Sea of Galilee Marathon
TIBERIAS, Israel A thousand
runners from Israel and around the world
are expected to participate this
| December in the 17th International Sea
[of Galilee Marathon. The race is open to
all amateur athletes in possession of
medical certification of their fitness to
compete in a marathon.
The marathon follows a route around
the shores of this legendary lake starting
I from Kibbutz En Gev on the lake's
eastern shorev En Gev Is main industry is
fishing and was founded in 1937 by
immigrants from Europe, one of whom,
Teddy Kollek, is now Mayor of
Jerusalem.
Five-hundred athletes from around the
world participated in the 1982 marathon,
the winner of which was Rafi Saltzman of
Israel. Sally Strauss of the United States
won the women's competition.
Details of entering the marathon, as
well as travel arrangements, may be
obtained from International Travel
Planners, 14 East 28 Street, New York
10016.
Russell Named to Top UJA Post
NEW YORK Robert
Russell of Miami, has been
named chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal En-
[dowment Program by Her-
schel W. Blumberg, UJA
I national president.
In making the appointment,
Blumberg described the new
chairman as "a forceful leader
with a superb grasp of UJA's
goals and policies. Russell brings
deep experience and dynamic
(ergy to his new role, and I
'know his expertise will
strengthen UJA's philanthropic
outreach."
RUSSELL, a national vice
^airman of the UJA and mem-
ber of its Board of Trustees, was
the initial national chairman of
Project Renewal. In that posi-
Jjn, he was instrumental in
shaping and implementing the
JK'ghborhood and human reha-
Mtatkm program in Israel,
? Blumberg declared.
Nations Urged to Boycott
Palestine Conference in Geneva
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) All nations which
believe in the "rule of law"
and the founding principles
of the United Nations were
urged by B'nai B'rith
International to shun the
UN Conference on Pales-
tine convened m Oeneva,
under a cloud of controver-
sy, starting last Mondav.
Philip Lax, chairman of the
B'nai B'rith International
Council, made that appeal when
he released a report he said in-
dicated the Geneva conference
would be used as "a staged at-
tempt to discredit Israel and
undermine its right to exist."
LAX STRESSED that, at a
time when Israel is demon-
strating its strong desire for
peace by its pact with Lebanon
and its planned troop withdrawal
while the PLO and the other
Arab states are "intransigent
and hostile," the conference
should not get serious attention
from the west.
The report, prepared by Dr.
Harris Schoenberg, director of
the International Council's
Geneva office, charged that the
conference's preparatory com-
mittee already had taken steps to
exclude pro-Israel groups and
viewpoints and that the com-
mittee had formed a "mini-
Robert Russell
As chairman of the UJA En-
dowment Program, also known
Army Keeps Secret Details Of
Redeployment to Awali River
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Wmy is keeping completely
cret all details of the date of its
deployment from the Shouf
nountain area of Lebanon to its
Lp hne along the Awali River.
Moshe Levy, the Chief of
t*H, said last week that the
ve would begin "within a
matter of days" and be com-
w n one operation, within a
*ort Period.
The Israel Defense Force has
jened an earlier report from
>mt that the withdrawal would
"*ffo Sonrtayf alWn assu^Hs
"ytneeveofRoshHashanah.
THE IDF declined any
comment on a report that the
IDF had agreed to a 72-hour
postponement to allow the
Lebanese army more time to
arrange to take over from the
withdrawing Israelis to avoid a
clash between warring Druze and
Christian Phalangists in the
mountain area where Druze
villages are situated close to and
alongside Christian villages.
The redeployment is not far
off. However, IDF soldiers in the
area are no longer living under
conditions of any comfort but are
back on a "frontline .wartime
drMdttfotr
working group" which has
censured and rejected more than
half of the background papers
submitted so far to the con-
ference.
The report indicated that on
June 14, the preparatory com-
mittee adopted a proposal,
demanded by the PLO, requiring
that all non-governmental
organizations (NGOs) wishing to
attend the Geneva conference
submit material documenting
.heir sympathies.
He said he was "disturbed" by
the formation of an "Anti-Zionist
Committee" in the Soviet Union
and said he had written repeated-
ly to Soviet leaders including
the late President Leonid Brezh-
nev, his successor Yuri Andropov
and Constantin Zotov, whom he
described as director of immi-
gration in Moscow supporting
Jewish refuseniks and Prisoners
of Conscience and protesting
their "harassment and punish-
ment" by the Kremlin.
IN RESPONSE to a question
on public funds for parochial
schools, Hollings said it was
"bad public policy" for the gov-
ernment to do anything but leave
the private schools alone and give
public funds for public schools.
Anything else, he said, was
"excessive entanglement" and
harmful both to the cause of
religion and to the cause of public
education.
May You and Your Families Enjoy a
New Year with Peace, Health and Happiness.
Camp Mountain Lake
Hendersonville, North Carolina
P.O. Box 4450
Miami Beach, Fla. 33141
ALVIN AND NANETTE SAVAGE
/T
as the Covenant tor Continuity,
he will help to expand the nation-
al leadership cadre that has been
active in promoting the program
throughout the United States. At
the same time, he will create a
"strong and vital endowment
program that enables partici-
pants to carry on, beyond their
lifetimes, the humanitarian tasks
they have undertaken as Jews,"
according to Blumberg.
Under Russell's leadership, the
Convenant for Continuity Pro-
gram "will underscore the satis-
faction to be gained from estab-
lishing a personal link with Isra-
el's future through UJA's sup-
port of resettlement, absorption,
youth service and educational
programs."
In addition to his new respon-
sibilities, Russell will retain his
present position ss president of
the Israel Education Fund, a
UJA program that underwrites
capital construction of educa-
tional institutions in Israel.
RUSSELL ALSO serves on
the Board of Governors of the
Jewish Agency, and has been
designated by Jerold Hoffbergei,
chairman of the Board of Gov-
ernors of the Jewish Agency, to
be responsible for the Jewish
Agency International Project
Renewal Committee. Currently
chairman of the Jewish Agency
Committee on Immigrant
Housing, Russell is a member of
the Board of Directors of the
UJA constituent agencies, the
United Israel Appeal and the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee.
In- Miami, Russell has held
every top post in the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, in-
cluding president, general chair-
man, and member of the Execu-
tive Committee.
Tishman Chiropractic Centre
Dr. Jerry Tishman Dr. Constance Tishman
announces the opening of their office
dedicated to the practice of
Straight Chiropractic
8177 W. Glades Road
Suite 24
Boca Raton, Florida 33434
(One Block West of the Florida Turnpike)
L
Office Hours
By Appointment
Mon. thru Sat.
Telephone
(305) 487-7200
-
Happy New Year
to all of our friends from
h-/Tsj
FOUNTAIN OF
HEALTH ^M SPA t CLUB
"9/otu/a'd Dineit cHtaCtk CCul "
5660 North Federal Highway
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(305) 997-2300
After the Holidays come and visit us. The area's only
full service health spa & club with Indoor, heated
swimming pool.


P**&
Page 12
Tl-
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, September 9,
NORTON
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CHOOSE YOUR RIGHT TIRE
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QUALITY VALUE PERFORMANCE
P-METRIC I "g
TUBELESS P155/80R13 41.46
X WHITEWALL P165/80R13,46.54
ELT
1 50
1 64
P185/80R13i58.16h90
2 00
P185/75R14 62.01
WaA P195/75R14165.11 12.13
#$M P205/75R14 70.73 2 34
P215/75R14 73.66 12 49
P205/75R15|71.95i2 44
P215/75R15 74.98
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
77.48
86.45
2 59
2 74
296
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
145x13
155x13
165x13
175x14
185x14
165x15
165/70-13
185/70-13
1185/70-14
MXL
PRICE F.E T
36.26
41.39
1 63
1.42
46.45
53.18
57.35
1.55
2.08
2.15
51.36
44.76
55.24
1.72
1 55
1 78
58.94 m 99
THE NEW GENERATION RADIAL
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
PRICE
165/70-365
180/65-390
77.08
F.E.T.
1 72
90.301194
-*
190/65-39C SOLD OUT! 09
220/55-390
WHITE
107.49
2.37
XCA LIGHT TRUCK
TUBELESS BLACK
700x15
6 ply
750x16
Bpty
800x165
8py
875x16.5
8v
950x165
8 ply
10x16.5
8 ply
PRICE
77.70
F.E.T
2 97
101.18
4.15
104.33 3 79
112.90
455
128.83U95
134.261
476
I TUBELESS BLACK
195/70-14 205/70-14, IMP0RT TRUCK8
81.85 87.33 michelin
FET2.27 FET2.40 XCT 56* -V
PREMUM4PLY
POLYESTER CORD WNfTEWALLS
_Ui_
pnici
f.Ll
A78x13
2526
C78x13 28.20
C78 x 14 i 28.83
E78x14
30.03
F78x14
31.48
1 60
1 77
1 89
2 05
MAXI-TRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
PCE
rrr
P165/80R13 I 35.62
1 67
P175/80R13 38.39 I 164
P185/80R13 I 40.09
1 78
2 16
G78x14 33.18
H78*14 i 34.74
G78x15
33.26
H78x15
34.96
L78x15
36.94
2 28
246
238
2 55
280
- Available m 2 Pty only
P185/75R14 4125 193
P195/75R14 42.62 | 2 06
P205/75R14 43.90
2 31
P215/75R14
45.89
2 47
P215/75R15 I 4628 I 2 49
P225/75R15 48.77
2 70
llRELLI
40,000 MILE
LIMITED
WARRANTY
LOW COST HIGH
MILEAGE. OUT-
STANDING VALUE
BLACK RADIAL
SIZE
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
PRICE
F.E.T.
39.50
1 19
34.85
1 15
41.24
1 24
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
44.73
1 53
51.12
1 81
54.02
i2 11
52.28
1 71
P3/70
BEST SELLING RADIAL
DUAL STEEL BELTS
ilFGoodrich
SIZE
P155/80B13
P165/80B13
P175/80B13
P185/80B13
PRICE
31.97
33.81
F.E.T.
1.52
1 58
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC, POLYESTER
CORD, FIBERGLASS BELT|
WHITEWALLS
35.7511"
37.93
P175/75B14 38.79
P185/75B14 39.88
P195/75B14
41.82
P205/75B14 42.92
P215/75B14 44.25
1.79
1.70
H55/8oB'
Bi2
1.86
2.00
'"^eTl
2.11
50
2.24
P225/75B14 46.57 2 45
P155/80B15 35.75 1 67
P165/80B15 37.44 1 H
P205/75B15 44.14
P215/75B15 45.60
213
2 37
SIZE
SALE PRICE F.E.T
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
47.78 2 M P165/80R13
50.10 I 272 P175/80R13
^Goodrich P185/80R13
43.46
45.02
46.28
UFESAVER XLM513 *711
STEEL BELTED RADIAL P205/70R14
WHITEWALLS
P175/75R14
52.76
46.39
165/70SR13 43.871
175/70SR13
185/70SR13
185/70SR14
195/70SR14
PWC^
Efi
1.26
49.49J
1 32
1.57
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
48.57
52.76
1 83
IN
1 95
2.24
1.17
2 00
2.13
P205/75BH
1 65
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
P20S/75R15
P215/75R15
1 88
llRELLI
WIDE
RADIALS
MJ&$
P77'
SPEED RATED
THE ONLY DUAL TREAD
DESIGN. DUAL COM-
POUND TIRE
STEEL BELT IN SIDE WALL
FOR ADDED STRENGTH
ff
195/70HR14 86.1
205/70HR14 96.
PWCg
P235 75R15 I 53.61
2 89
OTHER SIZES AVAILBLE 185SR14
WE ALSO CARRY I65SR15
P5,P6,P7andP8
SIZES TO FTT MOST
AMERICAN A IMPORT CARS
AT MOST STORES
P225/75R15
56.10
59.97
55.37
57.25
59.45
P235/75H15
61.63
2.34
2 49
2.17
2.21
2.44
2.M
2.74
66.13
2 96
HIGH TECH
RADIALS
SO, 60170 SEMES C0MPT/*|
YOKOHAMA
H ^rReAD,AL **" M,LE UM,TED WARRANTY
Y865 STEEL BELTED RADIi
FOR FORE IGN 4 MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL t INTERMEOMTE CAM
SIZE
55SR12
145SR13
75SR14
PRICE
31.18
3L9T
33,97
36J3
44.
F.ET.
1.36
^***Ei
MALL TRUCK SPECIALJi^0SR74|S~5cT-----~
w._ 600x14 6 ply 2^7^Zr-~~4^i^^ 2 09 j
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WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
7H?ittSirM 507-1174
OAYTOMAPMACM
00?VaMa*>t 25S-744
MAW. W