<%BANNER%>

The Jewish Floridian of South County ( January 13, 1989 )

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
January 13, 1989

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00328

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
January 13, 1989

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00328

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
,*^/n
/Vco3
w^ The Jewish -^ y
FloridiaN
of South County
Volume 11 Number 1
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, January 13, 1989
Price: 35 Cents
Knesset Rejects
PLO Talks
Opposes Palestinian State
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Knesset issued a statement
ruling out the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization as a negoti-
ating partner and affirming
Israel's rejection of a Palestin-
ian state.
The statement, which wound
up a session on political mat-
ters, including the PLO's
recent peace offensive, had
wide support from Likud,
Labor, Agudat Yisrael and the
National Religious Party.
But some Labor doves and
members of leftist opposition
parties accused the govern-
ment of not wanting peace.
Divisions in the Knesset
deepened when 32 right-wing
members signed a letter urg-
ing the law enforcement agen-
cies to prevent four of their
colleagues from going to a
meeting in Paris that will be
attended by PLO representa-
tives.
The Knesset statement,
adopted by a substantial
majority, made clear that poli-
ticians here believe the PLO
still aims at Israel's destruc-
tion, American opinions to the
contrary not withstanding.
It stated that Israel is pre-
pared to negotiate with Pales-
tinian representatives who
recognize Israel, reject terror-
ism and accept UN Security
Council Resolutions 242 and
338.
The United States main-
tained that the PLO met pre-
cisely those conditions when it
decided last month to open a
dialogue with the PLO.
The Knesset insisted, how-
ever, that "the PLO, which is
based on the Palestinian Cove-
nant, and any other organiza-
tion which negates the exist-
ence of Israel and the national
existence of the Jewish people,
or which exercises terrorism,
cannot be partners to negotia-
tions."
According to the Knesset
statement, "Israel will insist
that the solution of the Pales-
tinian problem be within a Jor-
danian-Palestinian frame-
work.
"Israel negates the estab-
lishment of an additional sep-
arate Palestinian state in the
territory between Israel and
the Jordan River," the state-
ment said.
Foreign Minister Moshe
Arens told the Knesset he
believes 1989 will be a year of
progress in the peace process.
He said Israel is preparing a
series of proposals to advance
the process.
Arens said at a reception
here for foreign ambassadors
that Israel is considering a
number of peace initiatives,
none of which has yet passed
through the decision-making
channels.
The right-wing members'
letter, addressed by 32 Knes-
set members to the minister of
police, the minister of justice
and the attorney general,
refers to a trip planned by Ora
Namir and Arieh Eliav of
Labor, and Shulamit Aloni and
Yossi Sarid of the Citizens
Rights Movement.
It urges the authorities to
bar their departure from the
country on grounds that the
law forbids Israelis from hav-
ing contact with the PLO.
Eliav told reporters that the
Paris meeting would not
violate the ban.
He said the four Knesset
members do not intend to
negotiate with the PLO, only
to participate in an interna-
tional conference that would
also be attended by Palestini-
ans, including PLO represen-
tatives.
Three other Laborites,
Knesset member Haim
Ramon, former Knesset mem-
ber Abba Eban and Haim
Zadok, reportedly are consid-
ering an invitation to a confer-
ence in The Hague that will be
attended by two members of
the Palestine National Council,
Edward Said and Walid Khal-
idi. The conference is titled
"The Palestinian-Israeli Prob-
lem From A European Point of
View."
Re-examination Of Plastic Bullets
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Attor-
ney General Yosef Harish will
re-examine the use of plastic
bullets to quell disturbances in
the West Bank and Gaza Strip,
in view of the sharp increase in
Palestinian fatalities since
they were introduced, Davar
reported.
Harish informed the defense
establishment of his inten-
tions, the Israeli newspaper
said.
Plastic bullets were
approved to prevent the loss of
life. The orders governing
their use were issued to Israel
Defense Force officers and
ranks only after they were
examined and approved by
Harish, Davar recalled.
During last July, before the
bullets were introduced, seven
people were wounded in the
Gaza Strip. In August, when
their use began, seven were
killed and 90 wounded in the
region.
AMERICAN JEWISH AND ISRAELI LEADERS MEET at a dinner in Jerusalem. From
left, are: Israeli Finance Minister Shimon Peres; Morris Abram, outgoing president of the
Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations; Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir; and the conference's new president, Seymour Reich. (APIWide World
Photo)
Supreme Court
First Menorah/Creche Case
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) Amer-
ican Jewish organizations are
getting involved on both sides
of the first case to come before
the U.S. Supreme Court that
examines the display of a Jew-
ish religious symbol on public
property.
The high court will probably
hear oral arguments in the
case during the spring session,
according to Samuel Rabinove,
legal director of the American
Jewish Committee.
Arguments in the case
almost certainly will be heard
before the court recesses for
the summer, he told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency.
The plaintiffs in the original
case, the American Civil Liber-
ties Union and the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai-
B'rith, are asking the Supreme
Court to affirm a U.S. Court of
Appeals decision barring pub-
lic displays of a Christmas
nativity scene and a Chanukah
menorah on government prop-
erty in Pittsburgh during the
holiday season.
Friend-of-the-court briefs in
support of the plaintiffs have
been filed jointly by the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee and the
National Council of Churches,
as well as by the American
Jewish Congress on behalf of
the National Jewish Commun-
ity Relations Advisory Council
and itself.
The Supreme Court in
recent years has dealt with
complaints against the display
of a nativity scene or creche on
public property, but never a
menorah or other Jewish reli-
gious symbol.
The menorah in question
belongs to the Chabad-Luba-
vitch organization, a Hasidic
movement. The creche is the
property of the Holy Name
Society, a Roman Catholic
organization. Both are seeking
to overturn the lower court
ruling.
Nathan Lewin, a Washing-
ton attorney, is representing
Chabad. Lewin is a vice presi-
dent of the National Jewish
Commission on Law and Pub-
lic Affairs, widely known as
COLPA.
COLPA informed JTA it,
too, has filed a friend-of-the-
court brief on behalf of several
national Orthodox Jewiih
organizations in support of the
Continued on Page 6


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, January 13, 1989
On board the cruise ship 'The Holiday,'' members ofNa 'amat USA's Palm Beach region sailed the
Caribbean as they raised money for their organization's day care centers in Israel. Among those
enjoying the ship's various amenities were: seated, Palm Beach Council President Sandra Cohen;
Frexdel Frank, president and cruise chairperson of Sharon Club, Royal Palm Beach; Rose
Kreiner, cruise chairperson, Zipporah Club, Delray Beach; standing, Marge Tepperman and
Sylvia Goldstein, cruise chairpersons. Beersheba Club. Delray Beach; Harriet Herfield, cruise
coordinator; Elsie Meyers, cruise chairperson and Ella Nadrtch, president, both ofEzrath Club,
Lake Worth; Tess Teller, Palm Beach Council Jundraising vice president; Raye Shaya, president,
Cypress Lakes Club, W. Palm Beach; and Esther Alper, cruise chairperson, Rachel Ben Zui,
Maryland.
Community
Concern For
Armenia Victims
The Jewish community of
South Palm Beach County will
gather at the Armenian
Church, 2300 Yamato Road,
Sunday afternoon, Jan. 15, to
demonstrate concern for the
victims and survivors of the
recent earthquake and their
relatives in the Boca/Delray
area.
Sponsored by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
Theodore Herzl Institute, in
cooperation with the Commun-
ity Relations Council of the
South Palm Beach County
Jewish Federation, the musi-
cal program, 3 4 p.m., will
feature Cantors Karen Bloom
of Jupiter; Elliot Rosenbaum,
Wellington; and Elaine Shap-
iro, Delray Beach. Also partici-
pating will be the Kings Point
Glee Club, with Iz Siegel,
director and soloist, and Yid-
dish singer Nat Zumoff.
Is Aronin will moderate the
program which will also
include speakers Esther Adler,
Rev. Dr. Zaven Arzumanian,
Dr. Abraham Gittelson, Tom
Katz, Dr. John Lowe, Albert
E. Ostrick, Rabbi Samuel Sil-
ver, Rabbi Bruce Warshal and
Marvin Zale.
Donations for the Armenian
Relief Fund will be taken at
the door.
TODD McFLIKER RYAN COLKER
Todd David McFliker, son of Ryan Matthew Colker, son
Penny and Henry McFliker, of Elaine and Terry Colker,
will be called to the Torah of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
was called to the Torah of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
as a Bar Mitzvah Saturday,
Jan. 7.
as a Bar Mitzvah Saturday,
Jan. 14. As an ongoing Temple
A seventh grader, Todd also Project he will be "twinning"
attends the Temple Beth El with Vladimir Gnnberg of the
Religious School.
Cruising the Caribbean and raising funds for youngsters in
Na'amat'8 day care centers in Israel were, from left, Naomi
Frankel, cruise chairperson and Blanche Gottlieb, co-president of
Kinneret Club of Delray Beach; Florence M. Kaufman, president
ofShoshonna Club in Delray Beach; and Pearl Epstein, president
ofPenina Club, Boca Raton.
Cruise Raises $ 15,000
For Na'amat
More than 360 members,
husbands and friends
of Na'amat USA Palm Beach
Council cruised the western
Caribbean last month aboard
Carnival's "The Hobday."
The more than $15,000
raised by the event will be used
for the children in Na'amat's
800 day-care centers in Israel.
The project was chaired by
Fund Raising Vice President
Tess Teller and coordinated by
Program Vice President Har-
riett Herfield.
Chairpeople of the partici-
pating clubs were Sylvia Gold-
stein, Beersheba Delray
Beach; Betty Sider, Cypress
Lakes West Palm Beach;
Elsie Meyers, Ezrat Lake
Worth; Naomi Frankel, Kin-
neret Delray Beach; Sally
Lebovitz, Penina Boca
Raton; Esther Alper, Rachel
Ben Zvi Maryland; Ida
Rosenzweig, Sharon Royal
Palm Beach; Emelia Davidoff,
Theodore Herzl West Palm
Beach; and Rose Kreiner, Zip-
porah Delray Beach.
Family members sharing in
the simcha were his sister,
Nancy; brother, Dean; and
grandparents, Eva and Joseph
McFliker and Judith and Mor-
ris Baker, both of Winnipeg,
Canada. Mr. and Mrs.
McFliker hosted a Kiddush in
Todd's honor following Shab-
bat morning service.
JASON WAHL
Jason Scott Wahl, son of
Sherri and Sandy Meade and
Jonathan Wahl, was called to
the Torah of Temple Beth El
of Boca Raton as a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday, Jan. 7.
An eighth grade student at
Boca Raton Community
School, Jason also attends the
Temple Beth El Religious
School.
Family members sharing in
the simcha were his brothers,
Martin and Robert; sister,
Lauren; and grandparents,
Edythe and Nat Tollner of
West Hempstead, NY and
Sara and Isadore Krassen of
Margate.
Jason's parents hosted a kid-
dush in his honor following
afternoon service's.
Soviet Union.
A seventh grade student at
A.D. Henderson School, Ryan
also attends the Temple Beth
El Religious School.
Family members sharing in
the simcha are his sister, Wren
and grandparents, Jean and
David A. Colker of Ft. Lauder-
dale, and Eleanor and Frank
P. Rothstein of Forest Hills,
N.Y.
Mr. and Mrs. Colker will
host a kiddush in Ryan's honor
following Shabbat morning
service.
DANNY WURTENBERGER
Danny Wurtenberger, son
of Kenny and Mara Wurten-
berger of Plantation will be
called to the Torah on the
occasion of his Bar Mitzvah
Saturday, Jan. 21 at Temple
Kol Ami of Plantation.
A student at Nova Middle
School, Danny's hobbies are
tennis and basketball.
Sharing in the simcha will be
Danny's brother, Michael; and
his grandparents, Seymour
and Martha Gross of Lyn-
brook, NY and Sylvia and Fred
Wurtenberger of New
Rochelle, NY.
Temple Coffee For Membership
Boca Temple, Black
Church Joint Service
B'nai Torah Congregation,
1401 NW 4th Avenue, Boca
Raton, will sponsor the first in
its series of winter member-
ship coffees, Monday, Jan. 16,
8-9:30 p.m.
Non-affiliated members of
the community are invited to
attend the informal gathering
at which coffee and dessert
will be served.
For information: 392-8566.
For
will be represented by Deacon
Edie Ceasar and a selection of
lay ministers. Rev. Anthony
Holliday will also be present.
The two groups have agreed
to meet together to maintain a
dialogue that would help to
revive their faith and trust in
* Rabbi Richard Agler, spiritual one another, joining in song
r leader of B'nai Israel, will con- and prayer in expression of
their yearning for peace and
| peace and understanding
? between the two groups. The
~ Ebenezer Church, which is
_ currently between pastors,
the fifth consecutive
year, Congregation B'nai
Israel of Boca Raton will hold a
joint service with the members
gof the Ebenezer Missionary
2 Baptist Church at 11 a.m. Sun-
sday, Jan. 15, during Martin
Luther King Weekend.
From the church pulpit,
abbi Richard Agler, spiritua
w leader of B'nai Israel, will con
vey his sentiments for eternal
S
understanding.
Ebenezer Missionary Bap-
tist Church is located at 200
NE 12 St., on Glades Road.
WILMINGTON, Del. (JTA) Richard Karfunkle has
been elected president of the National Federation of
Temple Brotherhoods, the national organization of brother-
hood affiliates of Reform congregations.
Deluxe
G/att Kosher
"HPD ON1?}
PASSOVER
VACATIONS
1^ Don't gamble
wrthyour
Passover vacation
"Feel the personal touch of professionals with 30 years of experience."
3 FRESHLY PREPARED MEALS DAILY >2 TRADITIONAL SEDER SERVICES ? TOP NAME ENTERTAINMENT
Acapu/co
ACAPLUCO PLAZA
California
PALM SPRINGS RESORT
Palm Springs
Colorado
TAMARRON RESORT
Disney World Orlando
Choi Harmed Package/tin MM
Caribbean Cruise
Florida departure and return
Spend your ENTIRE vacation
in the warm sunshine!
Florida
FONTAINEBLEAU HIL TON
INNISBROOK RESORT
SHERATON BAL HARBOUR
SANSSOUCI
Bmhmmma
AMBASSADOR BEACH
Puerto Rico
LA CONCH A
packages rmom $699
LOW COST AMFAJII AVAtLABLM
N.Y. Arrnm
TAMIMENT RESORT
Pocono Mfs Pennsylvania
RfE TOWN HILTON
Westchester. N Y
Hungary
BUDAPEST with
JEWISH HISTORY TOUR
1999
PAY IV JANUAftr 15 AND SAVE $300
KolK supervision restricted to out food service AM meats are OatttromNY Ootov tts/oarf upon request
ATLAS AMBASSADOR KOSHER TOURS
25 W. 43Street NYC 10036. (212) 57b 8840 OutstdeN Y Slate TollFrte Huu 752 8000
w


Synagogue o\fcu/
Friday, January 13, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Organizations
viuuiaumtmi
CONGREGATION BETH
AMI
On Friday, Jan. 13,
8:15 p.m., Rabbi Nathan Zel-
izer will deliver a sermon titled
"Society and the Individual."
An oneg will follow the ser-
vices.
On Saturday, Jan. 14, 9:30
a.m. Rabbi Zelizer will teach
the weekly portion, Bo and
deliver a sermon on "Time and
the Jewish People." Kiddush
will follow services.
Services on Friday evening,
Jan. 20, will begin at 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Zelizer will deliver a
sermon titled "A Time To Be
Silent and a Time To Speak."
An oneg will follow services.
Saturday morning, Jan. 21,
at 9:30 a.m. services, Rabbi
Zelizer's sermon will be "The
New Year For Trees." Rabbi
will teach the weekly portion,
Beshalach and kiddush will fol-
low the services.
Congregation Beth Ami ser-
vices are held at the Mae Volen
Senior Center, 1515 W. Pal-
metto Park Road, Boca Raton.
For information: (407) 276-
8804.
ANSHEI EMUNA
Sabbath morning service
Saturday, Jan. 21, will start at
8:30 a.m. Rabbi Dr. Louis L.
Sacks will preach the sermon
on the theme "The Divine
Symphony." Kiddush will fol-
low.
Daily classes in the "Judaic
Code of Religious Law"
(Schulchan Oruch), led by
Rabbi Sacks, begin at 7:30
a.m., preceeding daily minyon
services, and at 5 p.m., in
conjunction with daily twilight
minyon services.
A D'var Torah in Yiddish is
presented by Rabbi Sacks in
conjunction with the Seu'dat
Shli'sheet celebrated each Sab-
bath between the twilight ser-
vices.
Anshei Emuna Orthodox
Congregation is located at
16189 Carter Road, Delray
Beach.
For information: 499-9229.
TEMPLE EMETH
Sabbath services Friday
evening, Jan. 27 and Saturday
morning, Jan. 28, are desig-
nated as "Sisterhood Sab-
bath" and the women will par-
ticipate in the service.
Temple Emeth of Delray
Beach is located at 5780 W.
Day Care For Elderly
Shared Care, an interfaith
day care program of activities
for the elderly, is open to the
community by registration.
Sponsored jointly by Temple
Beth El, St. Joan of Arc Parish
and First Presbyterian
Church, all of Boca Raton, the
program which also offers
respite for caregivers of the
elderly is run at Temple
Beth El, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
Area Deaths
SCHULMAN
Estelle, a resident of Delray Beach,
died Saturday, Dec. 81. She is sur-
vived by three sisters, Rose Fischer,
Elsie Winter and Evelyn Schwartz;
and a nephew, Jerome Nudelman. A
graveside funeral service was held at
Ht. Nebo Cemetery under the direc-
tion of Riverside, No. Miami Beach.
Atlantic Ave.; for information:
498-3536.
TEMPLE KOL AMI
On Friday evening, Jan. 20,
services will begin at
8:15 p.m., under the leadership
of Rabbi Sheldon J. Harr and
Cantor Seymour Schwartz-
man.
On Saturday, Jan. 21, ser-
vices will begin at 10:30 a.m.
At that time, Danny Wurten-
berger, son of Mara and Kenny
Wurtenberger, will be called to
the Torah in honor of his Bar
Mitzvah.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Friday evening services,
Jan. 20, will begin at 8 p.m.,
following a Shabbat family din-
ner for Grade 6 at 5:45 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton is located at 333 S.W. 4
Ave. For information: 391-
8900.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Cantorial Soloist Karen
Blum of Miami will lead Shab-
bat evening services Jan. 13
and 27.
Temple Beth Am is located
at 759 Parkway St., Jupiter.
For information: 747-1109.
B'NAI B'RITH
The B'nai B'rith Women's
chapter of Boca Raton will hold
its ninth birthday celebration
Monday, Jan. 16, 12:30 p.m.,
at Temple B'nai Torah. The
entertainment part of the pro-
will feature Bert Shel-
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
Branch 1051, Delray Beach,
meets the second Wednesday
of every month, October-May,
1 p.m., in Temple Sinai, 2475
W. Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach. For information: 499-
3433 or 499-7155.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
OF ISRAEL
Nathanya South chapter will
hold its annual paid-up mem-
bership brunch Tuesday, Jan.
17, 10 a.m., at Patch Reef
Park Community Center, Boca
Raton. A brief business meet-
ing will precede the brunch,
which will be followed by a
program. Information: 495-
2230. :.:>.'
HADASSAH
The Boca Raton Aviva Chap-
ter is sponsoring a night at
Royal Palm Dinner Theater
Thursday, Feb. 9, for a per-
formance of "Gigi." Dinner is
at 6 p.m.; the show at 8 p.m.
Cost is $33 per person. Infor-
mation: 391-7995 or 483-1164.
The Aviva chapter's paid-up
membership luncheon will be
held Wednesday, Jan. 25, at
Patch Reef Park Clubhouse,
Boca Raton. Couvert is $5 plus
paid-up dues and there will be
entertainment.
Reservations, by Jan. 18:
395-9533 or 392-7745.
The Shalom Chapter of Del-
ray is planning a theater party
at the Sheraton Bal Harbour
to see "Masquerade" Wednes-
day, Jan. 18. The price of $33
per person includes show tick-
ets, bus transportation, and
gratuities. For information:
738-5868.
The Shalom Chapter will
hold its annual "Hadassah
Medical Organization" lunch-
eon Tuesday, Feb. 7, noon, at
Boca Golf & Tennis Club.
Luncheon, entertainment and
a national speaker will be on
the program for a donation of
$25 per person. Information:
499-4194.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Lakeside Chapter will hold
its annual paid-up membership
luncheon and auction Monday,
Jan. 23, 12:30 p.m., at the
Boca Raton American Legion
Hall. For information: 276-
1524, 272-4336, 243-0391 or
276-5812.
Oriole Chapter will hold
their meeting on Thursday,
Jan. 26, 12:30 p.m., at Ameri-
can Savings & Loan on West
Atlantic Avenue, Delray
Beach.
Youth Super
Bowl Party
BOFTY, the senior youth
group of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton, will hold a Super
Bowl party Sunday, Jan. 22, 5
p.m., in the BOFTY Lounge.
Men's Club Meets
The Men's Club of Temple
Anshei Shalom, Delray Beach,
will sponsor a breakfast meet-
ing Sunday, Jan. 15,9:30 a.m.
Guest speaker will be Joan
Braler of the Rand Eye Insti-
tute.
For information: 495-0466.
Generations of Jewish families
have enjoyed the wholesome goodness of high protein
WOLFFS KASHA... roasted buckwheat kernels with a tasty
nutlike flavor. Chances are your grandmother made Kasha
Varnishkes, buckwheat blintzes, or Kasha pilaf. You
remember! Jewish families all over America have enjoyed
WolfPs Kasha for over 100 years.
S)fy it today Because-
gourSFieritage isffarever!
For a FREE reap* leaflet, write to:
The Birkett Mills, Penn Yan, N.Y. 14527
and discover the world of UNSUNG FRUIT.
15< OFF
15* OFF
STORE COUPON
TO THE DEALER: TWi coupon
"ill b. i.d.m.d only
ply H lot mM. pmMUS
to
I
on any one package of Wolffs KASHA I
ROASTED BUCKWHEAT KERNELS I
I
I
SOncto*. Coupont wo non
tromlon-oMo nd ooM II m to WJ
pfOIMDHOO, lOMOOt fOOIftClOd Of ^
Mcomo to ro stilus. CyoUnw n
mmi pay **y ''" Caok jS!
rooompltoK votwo l/IOOo. FOR _
REDEMPTION. PRESENT TO \2
ova mrowN on man. to v
the mmiii Mua, ram 5
VAN. NEW YORK MSfT. OFFER
OOOO ONLY IN IU.A. UMT
ONLV ONI COUPON MAY M
REDEEMED PER UNIT OF
FAOOUCTS PURCHASED.
The Birkett Mills. Pta> Van. New York 14527
Limit one coupon per purchase. This coupon expires Dec. 31, 089
19* OFT


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, January 13. 1989
Viewpoint
Tightening Resolve;
Changing Resolve
While the new Israeli government is
attempting to tighten its collective belt in a
move toward fiscal austerity, the Israeli peo-
ple seem to be loosening their resolve vis-a-vis
the Palestine Liberation Organization.
A new, and reportedly surprising, poll just
released suggests that the people of Israel are
moving forward faster than their administra-
tion toward dealing with the PLO.
A slight majority of 54 percent believes that
the State of Israel should negotiate with the
PLO as long as its chairman, Yasir Arafat,
abides by his renouncement of terrorism. Of
those, 21 percent strongly support the move
and 33 percent are in favor of doing so.
Whether or not the resumption of contact
between the United States and the PLO
affects the national Israeli attitude is immater-
ial.
What is worthy of note is that, after a year
of the intifada in the administered territories,
there is some movement toward approaching
new avenues of dialogue between the adver-
saries in the Middle East.
That the U.S. made the first bold move
and is still considered an honest broker can
be considered catalytic.
While not endorsing the PLO, Israelis are
acknowledging that practicality and neces-
sity both may be the mother of reinventing
the peace process.
Good news, bad news
Good is that international pressure on Israel
has lessened as a result of the renewed
identification of Palestinian terrorists with the
threats against world airlines and airports.
Although there is not definitive evidence that
Palestinian extremists destroyed an American
airliner, they are the principal suspects.
In addition, greatly tightened security provi-
sions for all western airlines call attention to
the ongoing linkage of Palestinians and terror-
ists.
Bad news of course is that hundreds are
dead and the costs of the belated security will
mount into the millions of dollars.
Of course, PLO leader Yasir Arafat is being
looked to for assistance in bringing to justice
the Palestinian factions which oppose both
Arafat and recognizing Israel and UN Resolu-
tions mandating ti;e 1967 borders as the
highest possible goal of an Arab state in the
one-time Palestine Mandate.
Arafat knows that even if he knows which
Palestinian terrorists are involved in specific
acts, he cannot inform on them without sign-
ing his own death warrant.
m "y I he Jewish ^^ y
FloridiaN
OTA
Diffusing Potential Conflict
After the annual church/state conflict of
every December fought on city hall lawns
across the country, there is a refreshing
approach to mixing religion and public schools
being advanced.
Scholars are suggesting that while the wall
of church/state separation cannot be breached,
further consideration of learning about reli-
gion could be appropriate to a school syllabus.
The Supreme Court, in fact, validated that
approach while rejecting prayer in public
school.
Perhaps, the new move afoot to put religion
in its proper cultural and historical perspec-
tive might well diffuse the particularistic
efforts of fundamentalists whose sole goal is to
put their version of God in the schoolhouse.
Fateful Ambiguity
By RABBI MARC H. TANENBAUM
The decision of the United
States government to legitim-
ize the Palestine Liberation
Organization through direct
dialogue is fraught with fateful
ambiguity.
It is either a crisis that could
become an opportunity for
peace, or ii is an opportunity
that could explode into an even
greater crisis.
There should be no confusion
about Jewish attitudes. The
majority of American Jews, I
believe, trust President
Reagan and Secretary of State
George Shultz. They are true
friends of the Jewish people
and of Israel.
The real issue is that prac-
tically no one trusts Yasir
Arafat or the PLO. Arafat
spent weeks working on a joint
agreement with King Hussein
of Jordan, and then publicly
rejects their written under-
standing.
Arafat, in a circus of pub-
licity, announces that he
accepts America's conditions
for a dialogue, specifically re-
cognition of the State of Israel
and a rejection of terrorism.
At the very same time, the
radical Marxist PLO factions
of George Habash and Nayef
Hawatmeh tell the Arab press
they will never give up terror-
ism or accept Israel. So wh >
does Arafat really represent?
The critical issue, as I see it,
is how to discover true mod-
erate Palestinians who will
work unambiguously for peace
and not just engage in prop-
aganda warfare.
America and the world have
a great stake in being com-
pletely realistic and in not
being trapped in verbal decep-
tions and massive hype.
LCttBFS mm m m from our readers:
Grassroot Decisions
^^^^^^^~^^~ ~i**^*n<~>r\ruT-ixn-nj-uTjv^
of South County
FREDSHOCHET h r,1 Shorhrl SUZANNE SHOCMET
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor
Pabliihed V. eekl% Mid-September tkrnur* Mid-Ma;.
Bi-W eekli balanrr of year (43 ieaaee)
Mam Office Plant 120 N E 6th Si Miami Fla 33132 Phone 373 4605
Advertising Director. Stacl Leaser. Pawns IM-IM2
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area 3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7).
Friday, January 13,1989
Volume 11
7SHEVAT5749
Number 1
EDITOR:
I, for one, have severe reser-
vations as to the long term
viability of the Middle East
peace which has apparently
been engineered by the major
powers and is being forced
upon the parties directly
involved in the conflict.
I feel it is no coincidence that
within the last year we have
had an end to the conflicts in
Nicaragua, Afghanistan,
Namibia, Angola, and Cambo-
dia which have been brought
about by agreements in which
the United States and the
Soviet Union have both played
a major part. If, in fact, the
Cold War is now winding
down, that the super powers
are seeking a resolution to
regional conflicts is part of
that process.
If a peace is forged on Israel
and the Palestinians which
does not have wide ranging
grass root support among the
people who would be expected
to live among one another in
peace, than that peace will not
be long-lasting. Even if the
Soviets and the Americans are
not supplying new weapons
and support for aggressions on
both sides, that does not mean
that the historic hates and
fears will disappear overnight.
Much of the U.S. positioning is
meant to put pressure on
Israel which is a change in the
long-standing U.S. policy not
to interfere with the wishes of
a democratically elected sover-
eign government.
I don't think Israel, whose
entire existence and security
relies on strong and vigilant
defense of its national interest
can afford to just depend on
the good faith of the PLO
leadership or, for that matter,
the Soviet leadership that is in
a politically tenuous position
and could be overthrown by
hard-liners within their own
regimes at any time.
I would suggest that the
U.S. and Israel wait to see if
the desire for the realistic com-
promises that must be made to
achieve a real peace will flow
down to the individual inhabit-
ants of the area who have to
live with one another every
day.
Our government should
allow Israel enough time to
wait and see how sincere the
PLO leadership really is and if
they really can speak for the
Palestinian people on the very
important issues that will have
to be decided for peace to
become a long-term reality for
Israel and her Arab neighbors
BARRY S. GOLDMEIER


Friday, January 13, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Conference Seeks
Alternative Voice
Bj
"We need a conference of presidents of
minor Jewish organizations."
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) When
1,500 Jewish progressives
^SS^n!!ren?rvnSri" t0 Ure l8raeli aVid Seemin to ** With
conference, no votes were leaders to ^ downKfor ^ those whose objects are to
undermine Israel."
no votes were
no leaders were
taken and
elected. .
Nevertheless, the "Tikkun"
conference, sponsored by the
liberal, Oakland-based Jewish
magazine, took on the air of a
political convention.
Wild applause saluted stump
speeches by such stars of the
Jewish and political left as
Irving Howe, Abba Eban,
Letty Cottin Pogrebin and
Todd Gitlin.
Back-slapping delegates
boasted of party unity, while
others bemoaned irreconcila-
ble differences.
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization. In a remark that drew hisses
But other speakers coun- ^ bs> Gordis warned par-
seled prudence in forming a tjcipants of being "branded as
new organization.
Henry Siegman, executive
director of the American Jew-
ish Congress, said he shared
many of the participants' criti-
cisms of the "status quo" in
Israel. But he wondered if the
formation of a new organiza-
tion was more than just a bid
for publicity.
David Gordis, former execu-
illegitimate because of the fel-
lowship in which they find
themselves."
Gordis was hinting at the,
kinds of criticism of the left,
including charges of anti-
Israel bias, that led many for-
mer Jewish liberals to run into
the arms of neo-conservatism.
Nan Fink, publisher of Tik-
kun, acknowledged those criti-
cisms earlier in the conference
when she said, "The left has
tive vice president of the
And special interest groups ^er|can Jewish Committee, ver fuTl/foc'ed the implied
inotioH fnr attpntinn nn a said there must be guidelines *;^^o ~t *u i i--------/a.
followed in criticizing Israel.
"The tone of our criticism
cannot partake of Israel-bash-
ing,** he said. "We have to
crowded agenda: students,
feminists, animal rights activ-
ists, gays and lesbians.
Most telling of all, there was
a "platform." Its first main
plank was contempt for what
speakers called the conservat-
ism of the organized American
Jewish community.
The second plank was a
belief that Israel's administra-
tion of the West Bank and
Gaza Strip, in the words of
Tikkun editor Michael Lerner,
"is irrational, destructive,
immoral and must be termi-
nated."
But this was no political con-
vention, and participants won-
dered again and again if the
energy of the conference could
be channeled into an organiza-
tion to rival establishment
voices, such as those within
the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish
Organizations.
"I feel that the mainstream
Jewish organizations in the
United States and the main
thrust of the organized Jewish
community in Baton Rouge
don't represent my views,"
said Steven Weintraub, 37, a
professor of mathematics at
Louisiana State University.
Weintraub's complaint was
typical of that of many partici-
pants, and so was his prescrip-
tion. "It's necessary to find a
counterweight to the main-
stream, and I have hopes of a
movement," he said.
"We need Tikkun, as a way
of unifying all the splinter
groups left of center," said
Ruth, 46, of New York, who
asked that her last name not
be used. "The Israeli right has
lost touch with reality, and
they have not been opposed"
by American Jews.
Hopes for unity on the Jew-
ish left were discussed at a
plenary session. Letty Cottin
Pogrebin, founding editor of
Ms. magazine, quoted Eban
when she said, "We need a
conference of presidents of
minor Jewish organizations."
She described some of the
institutional initiatives that
were being discussed at the
conference. They included the
Committee for Judaism and
Social Justice, which Tikkun is
promoting as an alternative
voice on Jewish public policy,
and J-PAC, a Jewish lobby to
counter the influence of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee.
Lerner spoke of organizing a
national campaign for "negoti-
anti-Semitism in the Commun-
ist Party or the degree to
which it tolerates anti-
Semitism within its own
ranks."
However, said Lerner, an
observant Jew who wears a
chest-length beard and a pie-
sized yarmulke, "This is not an
assemblage of self-hating Jews
or people alienated from
Judaism."
Commentator To
Speak on
Palestine Problem
Hirsh Goodman, a Strategic
Fellow at the Washington
Institute for Near East Policy
and a consultant for CBS Tele-
vision, will speak on "The
Palestine Problem and the
Chances of Peace" Sunday,
Jan. 22, 9:30 a.m., at Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton.
Goodman is a regular contri-
butor to The New Republic and
a special correspondent for the
Sunday Times of London. His
articles have also appeared in
the Los Angeles Times and the
Atlantic Monthly. He studied
history and international rela-
tions at the Hebrew University
and was a defense and political
commentator for the Jerusa-
lem Post, 1969-88.
Basing their criticism of
Israeli policy on a "profound
insistence of our love for the
people of Israel," he said,
"many of us will no longer
accept organized Jewry's cri-
teria for how we have to talk
or what tone to take. We are
not the periphery."
YOUR CAB IN ISRAEL
SPECIAL LOW PRICES |
For reservation Ml
prepayment through \
EUAN RESERVATION CENTER *
USA: 212-629-6080,1 -800-533-6778
Ben Giiri on International Airport
Jerusalem Tel Aviv Herzeliya Haifa
Netanya Eilat Ashkelon
SPECIAL OFFER
PER DAY
UNLIMITED
MILEAGE '
CROUP k
MINIMUM'
14 DAY RENTAL
Free Federal Consumer
Information Catalog.
Dept DF. Pueblo. Colorado 81009
For a truly unusual side dish, try this delicious
recipe tor Yams a L'Orange, its made with
Fleischmann's. Margarine so it not only tastes
great, it's good for you. Fleischmann's Margarine
is made from 100% com oil, has 0% cholesterol
and is low in saturated fat.
One bite and you'll agree: There's never been
a better time for the great taste ofFleischmann's.
F1EISCHMANNS GIVES EVERY MEAL
A HOLIDAY FLAVOR.
SAVE 15*
When you buy any package of
Fleischmann's Margarine
Aa<.22ii
RfrAlLiR One coupon per puiclujM 01 D ud HHhCilW Any other use constitutes''Jud
Consumer to Ply sues ti> Void 'I coo*d
ttjnsletieo proro>ted wed or restricted
Good only m U S A A P0 S Jnd PO S We
ii< reimburse you lor the lice niHre pius Jc
handling provided you jnd tne consumei
nave compked win tfte Oder terms Cis" jiue
l ?0C NABISCO BRANOS INC DtPI ?'
EL PASO tfXAS 79%6
'2966


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, January 13, 1989
Scholar-In-Residence At Anshei Emuna
First Menorah/Creche Case
Rabbi Herschel Schacter, a
former chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Amer-
ican Jewish Organizations, is
this year's Eleanor Goldblum
Memorial Scholar-in-
Residence at Anshei Emuna
Congregation, 16189 Carter
Road, Delray Beach.
Rabbi Schacter will speak on
Saturday, Jan. 28, at the 8:30
a.m. Shabbat service and at
Seudat Shli'sheet, 4:45 a.m.;
and at Sunday breakfast, Jan.
29, 9:30 a.m.
The Scholar-in-Residence
program is sponsored by Ern-
est Goldblum and family, and
Anita Penzer.
Simon Schwartz, national president of MERCAZ, the
Zionist organization of the Conservative movement, was
elected president of the American Zionist Federation along
with the rest of the executive slate, at the AZF's biennial
convention in Baltimore. Immediate past treasurer of the
AZF. Schwartz, was president of United Synagogue of
America 1977-1981.
Bloomfield To Head Holocaust Council
Sara J. Bloomfield, deputy director for operations of the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council since 1986, has been
appointed the council's acting executive director. More
than $55 million of a $147 million goal has been raised and
construction of the museum will begin shortly.
Discover Five Star
extraordinary
Value in Israel

Continued from Page 1
Chabad position.
The ADL, co-counsel with
the ACLU in the case of
ACLU v. County of Allegheny
(Pa.), represents Malik Tuna-
dor, a Moslem. He testified
that as an Allegheny County
taxpayer, he felt excluded by
the erection of a menorah on
the steps of the Pittsburgh
City-County Building and the
annual placement of a creche
in the Allegheny County
Courthouse.
The U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Third Circuit in Phila-
delphia ruled last March 15
that the establishment clause
of the U.S. Constitution's
First Amendment prohibits
the display of religious sym-
bols in or near buildings that
house government offices.
The Supreme Court agreed
four months ago to hear the
case.
Donald Mintz, chairman of
ADL's Civil Rights Commit-
tee, pointed out that "religious
symbols at these locations
communicate the message that
the represented faiths are
endorsed or approved by the
state." He said the message
violates the establishment
clause "because it diminishes
the political stature of those
who do not adhere to the rep-
resented religion."
Rabinove said the "constitu-
tional principle of separation
of religion and government
means the government should
not become involved with reli-
gions unless there is a religious
need that cannot otherwise be
met," such as chaplains for the
armed forces.
"There is no religious need
to place sacred symbols of any
faith in government build-
ings," he stressed.
But Rabinove recalled that
in two previous cases, the
Supreme Court decided
against plaintiffs and upheld
the display of a creche on
public property.
One, in 1984, involved a
creche in Pawtucket, R.I., that
was city property. The court
was influenced by the fact that
it was part of a larger Christ-
mas display that contained hol-
iday artifacts which carried no
religious message.
The other case, the display
of a creche on public park land
in Scarsdale, N.Y., was
decided in 1985 on freedom of
speech grounds.
In the present case, Chabad
argued that government has a
responsibility to counterbal-
ance "the overwhelming
Christian message delivered
by municipal displays that fea-
ture Christmas trees."
But the AJCongress brief
rejects this reasoning, saying
that the Christmas tree is a
secular rather than a religious
symbol and therefore not
bound by the strict rules
placed on religious arrays. The
brief also argues that by high-
lighting the symbols of the
Christian and Jewish faiths,
"other religious groups with-
out a December holiday would
be discriminated against."
$33
Per person in a double room.
* 53 per single room.
Child in room free.
Price includes full
Israeli breakfast
15% service charge to be
.. added '
Minimum of 7 nights or
more stay at either or
both hotels, valid until
February 28th 1989
* Rooms all beautifully
furnished.
* Color T.V. Video -
individual heating
controls.
Both hotels have free
entrance to heated
indoor pools.
* In Jerusalem Free shuttle
to western wall.
Dont be misled by hotel
adverts with hidden
sxtraa or required add ons.
Read ths small print.
Ramada hotels art beat
vaiua In Israel
Contact your local
fave! agent or
Ramada U.SA
IT 1-800-228 9898, or
201-587-1414
Si'C lor l/iUll'Si'lf
> Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only. Baked Fresh Daily
FRENCH
BREAD.........IS 85*
Available at All Publix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries. Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.......... liie $179
Available at All Publix Stores
and Fresh Danish Bakeries. Deep South
Carrot Cake.........^'*2W
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only. Chocolate Iced
Eclairs..................2 for $1
Available at All Publix Stores and
Fresh Danish Bakeries.
Zucchini Muffins 6 for $189
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only, Plain
Baking Powder
Biscuits..............6 ^ $129
Raisin Baking Powder Biscuits............. 6 for $1.39
*he Prices effective Thurs.. January 12 thru Wed.
January 18. 1989. Quantity Rights reserved. Only
in Dade. Broward. Palm Beach. Martin. St. I ucie
Indian River and Okeechobee Counties.


Friday, January 13, 1989/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
No Other Sessions Set:
U.S. Acknowledges
PLO Meeting
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) The United States said that its
meeting with the Palestine Liberation Organization last week-
end was initiated by a low-level PLO official who "asked to come
and introduce himself."
"There are no other meetings planned at this time," State
Department spokesman Charles Redman said. Redman had said
before the initial U.S. contact with the PLO on Dec. 16 that no
other meetings were likely before President-elect George Bush's
inauguration on Jan. 20.
A State Department source dismissed reports from Madrid
that a PLO official was to meet with the United States this week.
"That's wrong," the source said.
U.S. Ambassador to Tunisia Robert Pelletreau, the sole U.S.
official authorized to speak with the PLO, did meet for 45
minutes with Hakam Balaoui, the PLO's representative in
Tunis, Redman said.
Pelletreau used the occasion to say the United States "would
welcome any information the PLO is able to develop" on the
terrorist downing of Pan American World Airways Flight 103 on
Dec. 21, Redman said.
Pelletreau told Balaoui that finding the perpetrators of the
bombing is a "high priority for the United States," he added.
Redman refused to discuss other details of the meeting, except
to say the agenda was much smaller than that at the Dec. 16
meeting. Redman added that he will not divulge any information
provided by the PLO to the United States, citing the need for
investigators to work on a "confidential basis."
Frank House To
Undergo
Renovation
By HENRIETTA BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The
Anne Frank House will unde-
rgo extensive reconstruction
due to the ever-increasing
number of visitors. The house
has become the second-largest
tourist attraction in Amster-
dam, exceeded in popularity
only by the Rijk Museum with
its famous collection of
Rembrandts.
Amsterdam's foundation for
the protection of monuments
is concerned that the recon-
struction may damage the
original characteristic of the
house.
A house at the back of the
Anne Frank House at 263
Prinsengracht, now separated
from it by a garden, will be
connected with it and made
accessible through a covered
passage through the garden.
Because of the cramped situ-
ation, tourists now endure
long waits outside the house
before they can be admitted.
There were 534,000 visitors
to the Anne Frank House in
1987, and 560,000 are
expected by the end of 1988.
FOR CONSERVATIVE SAVERS
AUSTRALIAN BANKS ARE
PAYING 11.25Vo ON CDs,
IGUARANTEED, AND YOUR|
i CAPITAL WILL PROBABLY
INCREASE IN VALUE. IN
I THE PAST 12 MONTHS
[THE AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR]
ROSE 24/o AND IS
STILL RISING.
Call lor free report.
HERITAGE FINANCIAL
50 Vlll. La Jolla Dr.
Suite 1200
U Jolla, CA 02037
(00) 373-2450
Awarded Scholarship
Debbie Gordon, a graduate
student at Florida Atlantic
University, and a resident of
Boynton Beach, has been
selected as the recipient of the
J.E. Miklos Exceptional Stu-
dent Education Scholarship
for the 1988-89 academic year.
The amount of the scholarship,
as stipulated by the Boca
Raton Society for the
Retarded, is $500.
Established in 1981 by the
Boca Raton Society for the
Retarded, the scholarship is
named for the late Dr. John E.
Miklos, a professor of adminis-
tration at FAU. The scholar-
ship is awarded on a need and
ability basis to FAU students
in exceptional education,
whose interests are in working
with mentally retarded stu-
dents.
Gordon is majoring in FAU's
Department of Exceptional
Student Education in the
instruction of students who
are mentally retarded or have
severe/profound handicaps.
She is currently a special edu-
cation teacher at Atlantic
Community High School.
Lunch And Fashions
The Sisterhood of Temple
Anshei Shalom, Delray Beach
will hold a luncheon/fashion
show Monday, Jan. 30, noon.
Donation is $7. For informa-
tion: 495-1300.
Lecture Series
The free Monday morning
lecture series at Temple
Emeth of Delray Beach will
continue on Monday, Jan. 16,
with Uzi Garni, consul for tour-
ism affairs and director of the
Israel Government Tourist
Office, speaking on "Israel and
the Modern Tourist."
On Jan. 23, Michael Alexan-
der will speak on "The Horses
and the Handicapped."
The lectures begin at 10:30
a.m. in the Rimai Auditorium,
5780 West Atlantic Ave.
Sanz
Medical Center
Located one block from
the Mediterranean Ocean,
the Sanz Medical Center is
the only hospital in the
Israeli city of Netanya.
Within its five block com-
plex is the Jaques Tache
Out-Patient Clincs, which
treated 32,381 out-
patients during the last 12
months.
Tache's 18 clinics
include a wide diversity of
specialities, ranging from
obstetrics to plastic sur-
gery and from ophthalmo-
logy to pulmonary care.
One of its busiest units is
the Hasenfeld/Kupferman
pediatric clinic which, in
cooperation with area
schools, uses state-of-the-
art methods and technol-
ogy to maintain the health
of the city's tens of thou-
sands of children.
The Freundlich Urology
clinic is the only facility of
its kind in Israel, sensitive
not only to the medical
needs of patients but to
their specific halachic
needs. '-
The American Friends
of Sanz Medical Center
will celebrate the hospi-
tal's 13th anniversary with
a gala dinner March 26 at
the New York Hilton.
OUTLAWED PLO SYMBOLS. The "Day of Escalation"
was marked in the West Bank by such symbols as a map of
Palestine spray painted on a house in Bethlehem and the
flying of outlawed Palestinian flags. "The Day of Escala-
tion" is the anniversary of the PLO's first attack in Israel
2U years ago. (AP/Wide World Photo)
Singles Dinner
Temple Beth El's Solos, ages
49 and up, will hold a paid-up
membership dinner Sunday,
Jan. 22, 6 p.m., at the Boca
Raton temple, 333 SW 4 Ave.
Admission is $4 for members
and $10 for non-members.
Reservations are necessary.
For information: 395-2226.
Letters To The Editor!
EDITOR:
What?!
Twenty-two people were kill-
ed in Mexico!
What were their names?
What their ages?
And why did the article (in
the New York Times) land in a
short story with a tiny head-
line at the bottom of p. 4 of the
Dec. 25 edition?
Is it because the killing
wasn't done by Israeli soldiers
defending themselves against
homicidal stone-throwers?
Recommended re-reading:
the book, "Beyond Belief."
Rabbi Samuel M. Silver
Temple Sinai of Palm Beach
County
Whenyou are gone...
nothing will make it better
foryourfamti
Nobody is ever ready to accept
losing a loved one. Its a time of
deep nx)unTing; a time of numb-
ness. Certainly not the best time
to make difficult decisions.
:
Butone
phone call today will make it
easier for menu 1-800-343-5400
here is time, take care of
fetafe now at today*
with The Guaranteed
gn from tevitt-Weinstein.
your tamtty needs us
mpiete al of your pre-
tbey won't
u$e the
late*
GUARANTEED
SECURITY PLAN
Sharing the
ttwM



Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, January 13, 1989
TAKE
RICH TASTE AT 2 THE TAR
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
Causes Lung Cancer, Heart Disease,
Emphysema, And May Complicate Pregnancy.
5 mg. "tar". 0.5 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method
c IMtRJ REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO