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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( August 26, 1988 )

Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, August 26, 1988
Intolerable Proposition
There are some indications that the obvious
"leak" by the Israel government of a paper,
written by an American Jew with Palestinian
leanings, proposing establishment of some
kind of a Palestinian government-in-exile may
have been a mistake.
But arguing over the correctness of leaking
the document does little to help Israel present
a united front against any such Palestinian
declaration.
Jordan has lessened dramatically its
commitment to supporting the residents of the
West Bank (Judea and Samaria).
Israel has stated emphatically that it will not
permit the Palestine Liberation Organization
to fill any vacuum so created.
The United States and other Western coun-
tries must be on guard against being drawn
into support of creation of a Palestinian state,
homeland or entity adjacent to pre-1967
Israel.
Such an option is intolerable to the security
of Israel, and the resolution of the territorial
questions must be left for a face-to-face
negotiation on the part of the principals.
Until the PLO abandons its sworn declara-
tion of destroying all of Israel, there is no
place for negotiating with a self-proclaimed
terrorist organization.
The United States and the United Nations
should begin to apply pressure on the Arabs to
produce a Palestinian delegation able and
willing to enter direct negotiations, or even an
international conference called to secure such
direct negotiations.
Israel, at the same time, must not present to
the world any position which negates its
historic desire to discuss peace with the Arabs
any time, any place, and with no pre-
conditions.
Appropriate Representation
Israel's Ambassador to the United States
correctly has informed the Reverend Jesse
Jackson that discussions of the Israeli-
Palestinian dispute are the province of govern-
ments, and not individual citizens, no matter
how well they might be motivated.
Ambassador Arad, representing a coalition
government with widely divergent views,
seems ready and able to continue the tradition
of a single voice for Israel.
With elections scheduled for this fall both in
the United States and Israel, the new envoy
has his work cut out for him.
WIUTHISfUSfc
BBLlTNeXT?
U7A The Case Against the Red Cross
By ROBIN SCHWARTZ
Israel's equivalent of the
Red Cross organization, the
Magen David Adorn (MDA)
Society, is the only such body
that does not belong to the
International Movement of the
Red Cross because of a dispute
over symbols.
The International Red
Cross, a well-known humani-
tarian organzation which
provides assistance to victims
of conflict and disaster, is
easily recognized by its red
cross symbol. Red Cross offi-
cials maintain that the symbol
is the Swiss flag reversed and
has no religious significance.
Founded 125 years ago in
Switzerland, the organization
has tried to avoid politics. Yet
in not recognizing MDA, it
appears that the International
Red Cross is taking a political
position.
Officially, Israel has not
asked for recognition from the
International Committee of
the Red Cross (ICRC) since
1949, when its proposal was
defeated by one vote at the
Geneva Convention. The MDA
qualifies in nine of the 10
stipulations but it refuses to
accept one condition
adopting one of the three
recognized ICRC symbols; the
red cross, the red crescent, or
the red lion and sun (created
especially for Iran when the
Shah was in power but no
longer used). The MDA uses a
red Star of David, insisting
that the use of the Christian
cross or the Moslem crescent
would offend Jews.
Originally only the red cross
emblem was used. When
Turkey and Iran refused to
join the organization unless
they could use Moslem
symbols, the ICRC agreed.
"There is a clear precedent
for having more than one
symbol," commented Sherman
L. Conn, Georgetown Univer-
sity Law Center professor and
former president of the Amer-
ican section of the Interna-
tional Federation of Jewish
Lawyers and Jurists. "There is
no rational, logical reason for
not allowing the red Magen
David," he said.
In 1986 the ICRC officially
adopted the name Interna-
tional Movement of the Red
Cross and Red Crescent.
Although the organization
claims it is non-religious, its
name implies religious affilia-
tion. And, if the red cross
symbol is neutral and non-
religious, why did not Moslem
countries adopt it, asks Elan
Steinberg, executive director
of the World Jewish Congress.
"Israel is being asked to do
something (adopt the red cross
emblem) that other countries
are not being asked to do,"
Steinberg commented. "The
effort to recognize the MDA
has been blackballed by the
Arab countries."
According to Jose Aponte,
director of the International
Services of the American Red
Cross, the International Red
Cross Council is "tied" to the
Geneva Conventions. "The
governments who ratify the
Geneva Conventions have to
agree to the fourth symbol,"
he said. This means that more
than 150 countries including
the entire Middle East must
agree that Israel can use the
Star of David. 'It's extremely
unfortunate that that's the
way it is," Aponte commented.
The American Red Cross
officially recognizes the ADM
and the two "maintain very
friendly relations."
Near East Report
Politics and Jewish Agenda
By MITCHELL BARD
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A reporter called me
recently to ask how I thought
Jews would vote in November.
Contrary to what some
believe, Jews have not moved
to the right.
True, young Jews are to the
right of their parents, but
^ The Jewish i^. y
FloridiaN
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
of South County
GFrrd&ueket
PaMisked Weekly Mid-Seatember (krone* Mid-May.
Bi Weekly balance of year (41 iaaaaa)
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Eacutivt Editor
Main Ollica Plant: 120 N.E th St., Miami Fla. 33132. Phone 373-4805
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Friday, August 26,1988
Volume 10
13ELUL5748
Number 18
Jews, overall, are still more
liberal than any other group in
America except blacks; there-
fore, I said that I expected
Jews to return to their tradi-
tional support for the Demo-
cratic Party and that Michael
Dukakis should get a minimum
of 70 percent of the Jewish
vote, despite the fact that
George Bush has a very good
record on Middle East policy.
Dukakis has certainly been
saying the right things with
regard to Israel, but there is
evidence that when it comes to
policy-making, Democratic
presidents have tended to take
Israel's supporters (which
includes many non-Jews) for
granted.
In a study of over 600 Middle
East policy decisions made
between 1945 and 1984, I
found that Republican presi-
dents adopted a pro-Israel (or
Jewish state) position 54
percent of the time compared
to only 48 percent for Demo-
crats.
Although Jews comprise less
than one percent of the Repub-
lican Party, compared to over
five percent of the Democrats,
Republican candidates still
have an incentive to court
Jewish voters because it may
make a difference whether
they lose the Jewish vote by a
3-2 or 3-1 margin.
For example, if only one in
nine of the New York Jews
who voted for Carter had
voted for Ford, Carter would
have lost New York and the
presidency. Jews not only vote
in disproportionate numbers,
but they also contribute time
and money, which makes them
valuable participants in
campaigns.
The importance of the presi-
dential campaign should not be
allowed, however, to obscure
the significance of congres-
sional races.
There has, after all, never
been an anti-Israel president
and though there are differ-
Continued on Page 5


Qatar Seeks
Soviet Ties
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Said to be
"deeply offended" by Wash-
ington's refusal to sell it
sophisticated missiles, the oil-
rich nation of Qatar has estab-
lished diplomatic relations
with the Soviet Union.
The formal agreement was
signed at the Persian Gulf
nation's embassy in Paris by
Ambassador Abdel Rahman
Hannad Alatyia and the Soviet
charge d'affaires, Oleg
Krigonogov, according to an
embassy spokesman.
Arab sources said the move
was prompted by the refusal of
the United States to sell Qatar
Stinger missiles of the type
sold to Bahrain, Kutwait and
Saudi Arabia.
The State Department criti-
cized Qatar and threatened it
with economic sanctions for its
recent acquisition of 13 U.S.-
made Stinger missiles in viola-
tion of U.S. law.
According to sources in
Washington, the Stingers
were part of a CIA shipment of
20 missiles seized and distri-
buted by opposition groups in
Iran.
Arab sources here said the
Soviet Union is expected to
sell Qatar some of the weapons
it wants. No details were avail-
able.
Of Arab nations, only
Bahrain and Saudi Arabia
have so far failed to establish
diplomatic relations with
Oman and set up an embassy
in Muscat, that nation's
capital. Kuwait and the United
Arab Emirates have had diplo-
matic relations with the Soviet
Union for some time.
The Saudis, who recently
signed a major arms deal with
Britain, have expressed their
dissatisfaction with what they
consider their unfriendly treat-
ment by the U.S. Congress.
Jewish Agenda
Continued from Page 4
ences between the candidates,
there is no reason to expect
either George Bush or Michael
Dukakis to be any different.
Thus, a key determinant of
U.S. Middle East policy will be
the composition of the
Congress. The president's
position is the most important
determinant of foreign policy,
but my study also found that in
more than one-fourth of the
decisions made in the 1945-84
period, a pro-Israel position
was adopted over the objection
of the president.
When a decision is made in
Congress, where support for
Israel has grown increasingly
strong, presidents adopt a pro-
Israel position well over half
the time.
Even when the president
took what might be considered
an anti-Israel position, the
Congress overruled him in 55
percent of the cases that
required its approval.
There will undoubtedly be
occasions when the president,
Bush or Dukakis, makes deci-
sions that are perceived to be
anti-Israel. The best insurance
against those policies being
adopted is the election of a
pro-Israel Congress.
Dukakis Call for Soviet Jews
Marking the 36th anniversary of the Stalinist liquidation
of 24 Soviet Jewish poets and cultural leaders, Gov.
Michael Dukakis, Democratic candidate for president,
called upon the present Soviet leadership to "lift all
barriers to Jewish cultural and religious expressions, and
to open wide the doors of emigration to those who wish to
depart the Soviet Union."
He made the demand through Hyman Bookbinder, his
special adviser and former Washington Representative of
the American Jewish Committee, at a rally on the steps of
the New York City Hall organized by the Workmen's Circle
and leading Jewish publications and cultural institutions.
Friday, August 26, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
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Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
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v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
August 26, 1988

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Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

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University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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ocm44560186
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Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
August 26, 1988

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00318

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Jewish Floridian

Full Text
, 'Vco
w^ The Jewish <^ y
FlomdiaN
of South County
Volume 10 Number 18
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, August 26, 1988
Price: 35 Cents
KING HUSSEIN MEETS WITH PLO: Jordan's King Hussein met with a
senior Palestine Liberation Organization team to discuss his decision to cut
Jordan's ties with the Israeli-administered West Bank. From left, are Hani
Israelis Disdain Posture:
al-Hassan, an adviser to PLO chief Yasir Arafat; and executive committee
members Abdul-Razak al-Yahia, Mohammed Milhem, Abdullah Horani and
Mahmoud Abbas. AP Wide World Photo.
PLO Peace' Move Dismissed
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Both
Likud and Labor appeared
indifferent to continuous
reports that the Palestine
Liberation Organization was
about to adopt a more flexible
stance toward Israel.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres dismissed as mere
words a declaration by Yasir
Arafat's deputy that the PLO
was ready to negotiate with
Israel.
Salah Khalaf, popularly
known as Abu Iyad, was
quoted in a French news
weekly as saying that a provi-
New Israel
Fund Increase
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Thirty board members of the
New Israel Fund met and
announced a 40 percent rise in
their budget for next year, to
an all-time high of $5.1 million.
NIF, which was founded in
1979 in the United States as a
partnership of Israelis and
North American Jews dedi-
cated to social justice and the
democratic, process in Israel,
announced that for the first
time, over $80,000 was raised
in Israel itself.
sional government being
planned by the PLO for the
West Bank and Gaza would be
"wholly different from the
actual PLO's national cove-
nant."
The covenant calls for
Israel's destruction.
Abu Iyad called for mutual
recognition by Israel and any
Palestinian state that might be
created.
PLO leaders abroad, as well
as their backers in the Israeli-
administered territories, seem
determined to move the Pales-
tinian uprising, now nine
months old, into a political
course.
Israeli political analysts
believe Abu Iyad's declaration
might be an indication that the
mainstream PLO, loyal to
Arafat, has succeeded, or
believes it can succeed, in
adopting a common formula
with the extremists, by
claiming that a basis for nego-
tiations with Israel would be
the United Nations partition
resolution of 1947.
But Israeli leaders' imme-
diate reactions were negative.
Playing With Words
The Prime Minister's Office
dismissed the report as
"playing with words." Shamir
told Israel TV that Abu Iyad's
ideas do not bring peace
closer, but rather push it away.
He said Israel would never
deal with the PLO even if it did
change its charter.
He also maintained that the
idea of a Palestinian govern-
ment in exile was not accepted
by anyone in Israel.
Shamir told Yediot Achronot
he did not believe the interna-
tional community would recog-
nize a Palestinian government-
in-exile, and said Israel was
determined to thwart such a
development.
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin said Israel could not
mold its policy according to
"one declaration or another,"
and sources at the Foreign
Ministry said they would not
become Abu Iyad's inter-
preters.
PLO leaders have been
meeting in Tunis to evaluate
their next move, following the
decision of Jordan's King
Hussein to sever Jordanian
ties and responsibilities to the
West Bank.
The PLO is now trying to lay
out a blueprint for a provi-
sional government for the
territories now administered
Continued on Page 3
Transfer Taboo Breakthrough
By CATHKINE GERSON
JERUSALEM (JTA) Jewish Israelis appear to
have broken through a long-held taboo by indi-
cating that they believe in the transfer of Arabs
from the Israeli-administered territories.
According to the results of a poll published in The
Jerusalem Post, 49 percent of Jewish Israeli adults
believe that transfer of the Arab population of the
Israeli-administered territories would allow the
democratic and Jewish nature of Israel to be
maintained.
Of that 49 percent, nearly two out of three said
they intended to vote for the Likud party over
Labor.
This most recent poll was conducted in late June
as part of a continuing survey by the Israeli
Institute of Applied Social Research and Communi-
cation Institute of the Hebrew University. The
results indicate that the subject of transferring
Arabs from the administered territories is no
longer taboo. According to a front-page article in
The Post, the word "transfer" was virtually
unmentionable until a few months ago.
The timing of the change in the willingness of
Israelis to even consider the subject of transfer
seems to run parallel with the Palestinian uprising.
The respondents were not asked directly if they
favor transfer, but "if the territories remain under
Israeli rule, what should be done to preserve the
democratic character of the state?"
Of those asked, 21 percent were in favor of
"giving rights to Arabs," 49 percent favored
causing "Arabs to leave (transfer)," 28 percent
favored the alternative to "relinquish territories,"
and three percent did not think that democratic
character was important.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, August 26, 1988
Local Residents On
Na'Amat Area Board
New NCJW Scholarship To FAU Student
Several local residents have
been elected to positions in the
Southeast Area of Na'amat
USA, the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of
America.
Headed by Gert Aaron, a
Hallandale resident, in the top
spot of area coordinator, those
taking office for 1988-89
include Rita Sherman of Boca
Raton, a member of the
national board of
Na'amat USA, who was
elected Southeast Area's
membership committee
chairman; Mildred Weiss of
Deerfield Beach, new club
liaison committee chairman;
Shulamith Saltzman of
Margate, Zionist and Amer-
ican Affairs committee
chairman; Sylvia Snyder of
Delray Beach, a board
member; Bebee Pullman of
Fort Lauderdale, program and
education committee chairman
member; and Frieda Leemon
of Boca Raton, past national
president of Na'amat USA,
honorary board member.
Miami Beach resident
Harriet Green, national vice
president, was elected area
advisor.
Others on the board are
Felice Schwartz of Miami
Beach, a national board
member, who was named
chairman of the public rela-
tions committee; Lillian
Hoffman of Sunny Isles,
elected area treasurer; Rae
Hoff of West Palm Beach,
fundraising committee
chairman; and elected as board
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members, Margot Bergthal of
Miami Beach and Freidel
Frank of Royal Palm Beach.
Also serving on the South-
east Area board will be Sandra
Cohen of Delray Beach,
chairman of the Palm Beach
Council, and Ruth Pecherer of
Pompano Beach, president of
the Broward Council.
Aaron is a member of the
national board of
Na'amat USA, which supports
more than 1,000 Na amat
owned and operated health,
educational and cultural facil-
ities in Israel.
Southeast Area headquar-
ters is located on Lincoln Road
in Miami Beach. Delray Beach
resident Grace Herskowitz is
the area field consultant.
A scholarship intended to aid
a woman returning to college
after an interruption of her
educational plans has been
awarded by the National
Council of Jewish Women to
Joyce Tindell, a senior at
Florida Atlantic University.
Established earlier this year
by Boca Raton/Delray Beach
members of the National
Council of Jewish Women, the
scholarship is in memory of
Elaine Proger and Kay
Levine. Proger was the first
president of the local group.
Tindell, who plans to teach
elementary school, returned to
school alter her two sons
entered college. A single
parent, she has worked as a
teacher's aide and as a tutor
for bilingual and Spanish-
speaking youngsters. After
completing her course work
this December, she will begin headed by Sylvia Forman, will
the required student teaching. ^'^ a Florida Atlantic Univ-
ersity student each semester
The scholarship committee, to receive the $250 award

a-'
Agnes Agines, right, a member of the Scholarship Committee of
the National Council of Jewish Women, congratulates Joyce
Tindell, who received NCJW's 1988-89 scholarship award.
Tindell is a student at Florida Atlantic University.
PETER M.
t
FOR PALM BEACH COUNTY COURT JUDGE
Everything a judge should be. Concerned about the
future of Palm Beach County. Concerned about crime;
the court system; the people.
Peter M. Evans wants the courts to be accessible to
the public and less cumbersome. He wants the
victims voice to be heard. He wants to work with you
to build a better court system.
Peter M. Evans will:
Ensure and protect the rights of victims.
Closely review plea bargains to ensure that dangerous criminals
aiu not SGI Tr.
Work to streamline crowded court case loads and expedite leqal
procedures to bring about speedy and meaningful justice.
Make small claims court truly the people's court.
Work with you to build a better court system.
? Family Man
Married for 12 years, has one son, age
five. Hopes to be a third generation judge.
D Proven Intellectual Ability
Juris Doctor, Georgetown University Law
Center, Washington, DC
Bachelors Degree, summa cum laude,
Honors College Program, Ohio University
Co-authored Florida Dissolution of Marriage
Teaching Assistant at Ohio University and
Instructor at Palm Beach Junior College.
D Proven Professional Ability
Partner, Evans, Sharff & Kamber, PA. For
twelve years specializing in litigation with
extensive trial experience in family law,
personal injury, construction, commercial,
and criminal litigation in both the circuit
and county courts.
D Proven Leadership Ability
Active in many professional organizations
and their specialized committees.
President, Lake Worth Area Bar Associa-
tion, 1986
Palm Beach County Bar Association
Florida Bar Association
American Bar Association
Association of Trial Lawyers of America
Academy of Florida Trial Lawyers
? Proven Community Concern
RW^,K0rnian J" Kapner ^ Unit of
B nai Bnth
Member Temple Beth Torah
Legal Advisor. Martin Luther King Day
Coordinating Committee of West Palm Beach
Member, Wellington Elementary PTA
Vote Sept. 6
Pud Political AdvartiMirwnt


Friday, August 26, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
City of Hope's New Council
Young professionals from
Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach counties have formed
the Tri-County Council/Sandra
J. Mendelson Guild, a new
local support group for the
City of Hope.
Through cultural and social
events within the community,
the council will raise funds to
support the City of Hope. The
California-based medical and
research center is dedicated to
the treatment and research of
major diseases including
cancer, Huntington's Disease,
leukemia, sickle-cell anemia,
diabetes, epilepsy and AIDS.
Hadassah
Convention
Carmela Efros Kalmanson
of West Hempstead, New
York, was elected national
president at Hadassah's 74th
national convention held in
Chicago.
Linda Minkes of Miami was
elected one of the five national
vice presidents.
Almost 2,000 delegates
representing Hadassah's
385,000 members in 1,500
chapters throughout the U.S.
and Puerto Rico, also
approved a series of major
policy statements including
praise for the "deepening
bonds between the U.S. and
Israel;" support of Israel's
efforts to resolve the conflict
in the administered territories;
and support for Soviet Jewry,
and of the Jackson-Janik
Amendment and the Jewish
Agency's position on reset-
tling Soviet Jews in Israel.
Other issues covered by the
delegates dealt with AIDS and
education, travel to Israel and
anti-Semitism.
"We look forward to
working together with the Tri-
County Council in their
fundraising and membership
drive efforts," stated Stanley
G. Gittelman, City of Hope's
southeast regional director.
Leading the newly formed
council are Gloria Helman of
Boca Raton, president; Toby
Parnes of Boca Raton, vice
president; Sandra Randall of
Miami, secretary; and Eileen
Perlow of Plantation, trea-
surer.
For information: call (305)
944-6262 in Dade County;
(407) 368-6677 in Broward and
Palm Beach counties.
Don t Forget!
Send your name and addrew tor the.
latest edition ot the free < onsumer
Information Catalog. Write today:
Department DF
Pueblo, Colorado 81009
PLOMove-------
Continued from Pafe 1
by Israel.
A meeting of the Palestine
National Council is planned for
Algeria at the end of this
month.
Israelis did not appear open
to whatever declaration would
come of the meeting.
Foreign Ministry sources
asked rhetorically, "What is
the point of reacting to that
statement or another, if hours
after it is being made, a petrol
bomb is thrown, wounding
children and mothers in a
vicious terrorist act?"
In this case, they were refer-
ring specifically to a bombing
attack on Jewish settlers
traveling in a van in Gaza
Sunday night, casting a
shadow over any political
developments. Four children
and their two mothers were
injured in the attack.
B'nai B'rith Opposes Arafat Address
STRASBOURG, FRANCE Georges M. Bloch,
chairman of the International Council of B'nai B'rith,
criticized the invitation extended by the Socialist faction of
the European Parliament to Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion leader Yasser Arafat to address the group later this
month.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, August 26, 1988
Intolerable Proposition
There are some indications that the obvious
"leak" by the Israel government of a paper,
written by an American Jew with Palestinian
leanings, proposing establishment of some
kind oi a Palestinian government-in-exile may
have been a mistake.
But arguing over the correctness of leaking
the document does little to help Israel present
a united front against any such Palestinian
declaration.
Jordan has lessened dramatically its
commitment to supporting the residents of the
West Bank (Judea and Samaria).
Israel has stated emphatically that it will not
permit the Palestine Liberation Organization
to fill any vacuum so created.
The United States and other Western coun-
tries must be on guard against being drawn
into support of creation of a Palestinian state,
homeland or entity adjacent to pre-1967
Israel.
Such an option is intolerable to the security
of Israel, and the resolution of the territorial
questions must be left for a face-to-face
negotiation on the part of the principals.
Until the PLO abandons its sworn declara-
tion of destroying all of Israel, there is no
place for negotiating with a self-proclaimed
terrorist organization.
The United States and the United Nations
should begin to apply pressure on the Arabs to
produce a Palestinian delegation able and
willing to enter direct negotiations, or even an
international conference called to secure such
direct negotiations.
Israel, at the same time, must not present to
the world any position which negates its
historic desire to discuss peace with the Arabs
any time, any place, and with no pre-
conditions.
Appropriate Representation
Israel's Ambassador to the United States
correctly has informed the Reverend Jesse
Jackson that discussions of the Israeli-
Palestinian dispute are the province of govern-
ments, and not individual citizens, no matter
how well they might be motivated.
Ambassador Arad, representing a coalition
government with widely divergent views,
seems ready and able to continue the tradition
of a single voice for Israel.
With elections scheduled for this fall both in
the United States and Israel, the new envoy
has his work cut out for him.
wiu/THisfuse
ae LIT NEXT?
r
UTA
The Case Against the Red Cross
By ROBIN SCHWARTZ
Israel's equivalent of the
Red Cross organization, the
Magen David Adorn (MDA)
Society, is the only such body
that does not belong to the
International Movement of the
Red Cross because of a dispute
over symbols.
The International Red
Cross, a well-known humani-
tarian organzation which
provides assistance to victims
of conflict and disaster, is
easily recognized by its red
cross symbol. Red Cross offi-
cials maintain that the symbol
is the Swiss flag reversed and
has no religious significance.
Founded 125 years ago in
Switzerland, the organization
has tried to avoid politics. Yet
in not recognizing MDA, it
appears that the International
Red Cross is taking a political
position.
Officially, Israel has not
asked for recognition from the
International Committee of
the Red Cross (ICRC) since
1949, when its proposal was
defeated by one vote at the
Geneva Convention. The MDA
qualifies in nine of the 10
stipulations but it refuses to
accept one condition
adopting one of the three
recognized ICRC symbols; the
red cross, the red crescent, or
the red lion and sun (created
especially for Iran when the
Shah was in power but no
longer used). The MDA uses a
red Star of David, insisting
that the use of the Christian
cross or the Moslem crescent
would offend Jews.
Originally only the red cross
emblem was used. When
Turkey and Iran refused to
join the organization unless
they could use Moslem
symbols, the ICRC agreed.
"There is a clear precedent
for having more than one
symbol," commented Sherman
L. Conn, Georgetown Univer-
sity Law Center professor and
former president of the Amer-
ican section of the Interna-
tional Federation of Jewish
Lawyers and Jurists. "There is
no rational, logical reason for
not allowing the red Magen
David," he said.
In 1986 the ICRC officially
adopted the name Interna-
tional Movement of the Red
Cross and Red Crescent.
Although the organization
claims it is non-religious, its
name implies religious affilia-
tion. And, if the red cross
symbol is neutral and non-
religious, why did not Moslem
countries adopt it, asks Elan
Steinberg, executive director
of the World Jewish Congress.
"Israel is being asked to do
something (adopt the red cross
emblem) that other countries
are not being asked to do,"
Steinberg commented. "The
effort to recognize the MDA
has been blackballed by the
Arab countries."
According to Jose Aponte,
director of the International
Services of the American Red
Cross, the International Red
Cross Council is "tied" to the
Geneva Conventions. "The
governments who ratify the
eneva Conventions have to
agree to the fourth symbol,"
he said. This means that more
than 150 countries including
the entire Middle East must
agree that Israel can use the
Star of David. 'It's extremely
unfortunate that that's the
way it is," Aponte commented.
The American Red Cross
officially recognizes the ADM
and the two "maintain very
friendly relations."
Near East Report
Politics and Jewish Agenda
By MITCHELL BARD
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A reporter called me
recently to ask how I thought
Jews would vote in November.
Contrary to what some
believe, Jews have not moved
to the right.
True, young Jews are to the
right of their parents, but
1 The Jewish -^k y
FloridiaN
of South County
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
hrr* Shock* I
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
Published Weekly Mid-September throeffc Mid -Mar.
Bi-Weeklr balaaee of jtar (43 ieeaee)
Main Office Plant 120 N.E 6th St.. Miami Fla. 33132. Phone 373-4005
Advertlting Director. Stacl Letter. Phone Ma ItS]
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Area S3 SO Annual (2 Year Minimum 17)
Friday, August 26,1988
Volume 10
13 ELUL 5748
Number 18
Jews, overall, are still more
liberal than any other group in
America except blacks; there-
fore, I said that I expected
Jews to return to their tradi-
tional support for the Demo-
cratic Party and that Michael
Dukakis should get a minimum
of 70 percent of the Jewish
vote, despite the fact that
George Bush has a very good
record on Middle East policy.
Dukakis has certainly been
saying the right things with
regard to Israel, but there is
evidence that when it comes to
policy-making, Democratic
presidents have tended to take
Israel's supporters (which
includes many non-Jews) for
granted.
In a study of over 600 Middle
East policy decisions made
between 1945 and 1984, I
found that Republican presi-
dents adopted a pro-Israel (or
Jewish state) position 54
percent of the time compared
to only 48 percent for Demo-
crats.
Although Jews comprise less
than one percent of the Repub-
lican Party, compared to over
five percent of the Democrats,
Republican candidates still
have an incentive to court
Jewish voters because it may
make a difference whether
they lose the Jewish vote by a
3-2 or 3-1 margin.
For example, if only one in
nine of the New York Jews
who voted for Carter had
voted for Ford, Carter would
have lost New York and the
presidency. Jews not only vote
in disproportionate numbers,
but they also contribute time
and money, which makes them
valuable participants in
campaigns.
The importance of the presi-
dential campaign should not be
allowed, however, to obscure
the significance of congres-
sional races.
There has, after all, never
been an anti-Israel president
and though there are differ-
Continued on Page 5


Qatar Seeks
Soviet Ties
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Said to be
"deeply offended" by Wash-
ington's refusal to sell it
sophisticated missiles, the oil-
rich nation of Qatar has estab-
lished diplomatic relations
with the Soviet Union.
The formal agreement was
signed at the Persian Gulf
nation's embassy in Paris by
Ambassador Abdel Rahman
Hannad Alatyia and the Soviet
charge d'affaires, Oleg
Krigonogov, according to an
embassy spokesman.
Arab sources said the move
was prompted by the refusal of
the United States to sell Qatar
Stinger missiles of the type
sold to Bahrain, Kutwait and
Saudi Arabia.
The State Department criti-
cized Qatar and threatened it
with economic sanctions for its
recent acquisition of 13 U.S.-
made Stinger missiles in viola-
tion of U.S. law.
According to sources in
Washington, the Stingers
were part of a CIA shipment of
20 missiles seized and distri-
buted by opposition groups in
Iran.
Arab sources here said the
Soviet Union is expected to
sell Qatar some of the weapons
it wants. No details were avail-
able.
Of Arab nations, only
Bahrain and Saudi Arabia
have so far failed to establish
diplomatic relations with
Oman and set up an embassy
in Muscat, that nation's
capital. Kuwait and the United
Arab Emirates have had diplo-
matic relations with the Soviet
Union for some time.
The Saudis, who recently
signed a major arms deal with
Britain, have expressed their
dissatisfaction with what they
consider their unfriendly treat-
ment by the U.S. Congress.
Jewish Agenda
Continued from Page 4
ences between the candidates,
there is no reason to expect
either George Bush or Michael
Dukakis to be any different.
Thus, a key determinant of
U.S. Middle East policy will be
the composition of the
Congress. The president's
position is the most important
determinant of foreign policy,
but my study also found that in
more than one-fourth of the
decisions made in the 1945-84
period, a pro-Israel position
was adopted over the objection
of the president.
When a decision is made In
Congress, where support for
Israel has grown increasingly
strong, presidents adopt a pro-
Israel position well over half
the time.
Even when the president
took what might be considered
an anti-Israel position, the
Congress overruled him in 55
percent of the cases that
required its approval.
There will undoubtedly be
occasions when the president,
Bush or Dukakis, makes deci-
sions that are perceived to be
anti-Israel. The best insurance
against those policies being
adopted is the election of a
pro-Israel Congress.
Friday, August 26, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
Dukakis Call for Soviet Jews
Marking the 36th anniversary of the Stalinist liquidation
of 24 Soviet Jewish poets and cultural leaders, Gov.
Michael Dukakis, Democratic candidate for president,
called upon the present Soviet leadership to "lift all
barriers to Jewish cultural and religious expressions, and
to open wide the doors of emigration to those who wish to
depart the Soviet Union."
He made the demand through Hyman Bookbinder, his
special adviser and former Washington Representative of
t ie American Jewish Committee, at a rally on the steps of
the New York City Hall organized by the Workmen's Circle
and leading Jewish publications and cultural institutions.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, August 26, 1988
Bat and Bar
Mitzvahs
Tel Aviv University Pays Tribute To Nizer
Rachel Harm an
Rachel Harman, daughter of
Paula and Henry Harman, will
be called to the Torah of
Congregation B'nai Israel,
Boca Raton, on Saturday
morning, Aug. 27, as a Bat
Mitzvah. She will lead the
congregation in prayer and
study of the Torah portion, Ki
Tetze (Pent. Deut. 21:10-
25:19). Riva Baazov of Gruzzr,
USSR, will share the Bat
Mitzvah in absentia.
Paula attends Loggers' Run
Middle School in Boca Raton
and is a member of the
National Junior Honor
Society.
Along with her parents,
Rachel will share this special
day with her sister, Allyson;
grandparents, Audrey and
Jerome Weinberg of New
Jersey and Boca Raton, and
Beatrice Herlihy of Seattle,
Washington; and great-
grandparents, Ada and Morris
Kohlreiter of Miami.
Boca Raton residents, Sally
and Lester Entin were present
at the Waldorf Astoria in New
York, when the American
Friends of the Tel Aviv Univ-
ersity paid tribute to trial
lawyer Louis Nizer. The univ-
ersity announced plans to
establish the Louis Nizer wing
of its law library.
Armand Hammer flew in
from the far east to deliver the
keynote address and Jack
Valenti, president of the
Motion Picture Industry of
America, welcomed the crowd.
Valenti honored Nizer
saying. "It is especially fitting
that a part of Tel Aviv Univer-
sity, with its great humani-
tarian mission, be dedicated to
Louis Nizer."
A living legend in the legal
profession for over a half-
century, Nizer was instru-
mental in establishing and
structuring the Israeli legal
system. He has also served as
counsel to the Motion Picture
Association of America.
Among the friends and asso-
ciates at the dinner were the
Entins Lester Entin is vice
chairman of the university's
Board of Governors
Benjamin Krim of Orion
Pictures, New York State
Attorney General Louis
Lefkowitz, screen writer
Sidney Kingsley, CBS news
anchor man Jim Jensen and
Dean of Tel Aviv Law School
Uriel Reichman.
Women's American ORT
Andrew Klepner
Andrew Klepner, son of
Leslie and Elliott Klepner, will
be called to the Torah on
Saturday morning, Sept. 3, at
Congregation B'nai Israel as a
Bar Mitzvah. Andrew will lead
the congregation in study of
the Torah portion, Ki Tavo
(Deut. 26-29).
Dmitry Klebanov of the
USSR will share Andrew's Bar
Mitzvan (in absentia) because
of the restrictive religious poli-
cies of the Soviet Union.
Andrew attends Loggers
Run Middle School of Boca
Raton. He especially enjoys
the saxophone and drums.
Sharing this special day with
Andrew and his parents will be
his sister, Emily, and grand-
parents Thelma and Seymour
Klepner of Delray, FL.
Free Federal Consumer
Information Catalog.
Drpi DF. Pueblo, Colorado kkmn
The Lakeside Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold an evening cruise to
"nowhere" on Saturday,
October 1. A bus to Fort Laud
erdale will leave Rainberry
Bay Clubhouse at 5 p.m.
On board the ship, passen-
gers will be offered a buffet
dinner and there will be
dancing, a musical revue and
two casinos.
JOINING IN THE RECENT GALA TRIBUTE to celebrated
attorney Louis Nizer were, from left, Uriel Reichman, dean of Tel
Aviv University Law School; former New York State Attorney
General Louis Lefkowitz; and Lester Entin, a Boca Raton
resident and vice chairman of the university's board of governors.
Entin and his wife, Sally, were among those present at the affair
sponsored by the American Friends of Tel Aviv University and
held at the Waldorf Astoria. An international business man and
philanthropist, Entin is dedicated to higher education in Israel.
Besides his service on the board, he is founder and chief benefactor
of the Fund for the Hearing Impaired and Disadvantaged Youth,
founder of the Jeanne Kirkpatrick Forum, and founder of the
School of Communication Disorders.
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Synagogue Jkm
Friday, August 26, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
High Holidays Explained on Radio
TEMPLE EMETH
Rabbi Dr. Philip Book will
officiate at the Sabbath
weekend services of Friday,
Aug. 26, and Saturday, Aug.
27, after returning from a
short vacation.
The Oneg following Friday
evening services will be spon-
sored by Ruth and Frank
Vogel in honor of their
wedding anniversary. The
Kiddusn after Saturday
morning services will be spon-
sored by Miriam Blinder in
honor of her husband,
Murray's 68th birthday.
The observance of Selichot
will begin Saturday, Sept. 3, at
9 p.m. with a collation. Under
the direction of Temple
Emeth's vice president, Carl
Miller, Shem Tov awards will
be presented at 10 p.m.
Services begin at 10:30 p.m.,
with the choir directed by
Anne Katz.
Temple Emeth is located at
5780 West Atlantic Avenue,
Delray Beach. For informa-
tion: 498-3536 or 498-7422.
CONGREGATION B'NAI
ISRAEL
On Friday, Aug. 26, at 8
p.m., Mark Allen, Steve
Blader and Oren Shakerdge,
members of Congrega-
tion B'nai Israel's Youth, will
speak to the congregation
about their experiences in
Israel this summer. Rabbi
Richard Agler will deliver the
sermon and an Oneg Shabbat
will follow.
"The Possibility of Change"
is a special program for Seli-
chot at Congregation B'nai
Israel on Saturday, Sept. 3, at
10 p.m. at the Center for
Group Counseling, Boca Rio
Road, Boca Raton.
Psychologists, Dr. Gary
Eisenberg, Dr. Karen Rapa-
port and a representative of
the Jewish Federation and
Children's Service will discuss
the possibility of personal
change. The panel will make
presentations and then there
will be a discussion. Selichot
services will follow.
A High Holy Day service,
especially for singles, will be
conducted by Rabbi Agler and
Cantor Stephen Dubov on
Monday, Sept. 12, at 4 p.m.,
the first afternoon of Rosh
Hashanah. The service, which
will be held in the main ball-
room of the Park Place Hotel
will last approximately one
hour and will include a Shofar
sounding, Torah reading and
sermon by Rabbi Agler.
ANSHEI EMUNA
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks will
preach the sermon on the
theme "Anti-Semitism and
Anti-Sinai-ism" at the Sabbath
service on Saturday, Aug. 27,
at 8:30 a.m. Kiddush will
igl&Dont
WFbrget!
Send your name and address for the
latest edition of the free Consumer
Information Catalog. Write today:
ConsNmer Information Center
Drpartmcnt DF
I'ueblo, Colorado 81009
follow.
At services on Saturday
Sept. 3, at 8:30 a.m., Rabbi
Sacks will preach the Sabbath
sermon on the Torah Portion
of "Ki Tavo." Kiddush will
follow.
A seminar in the Talmudic
Tome "Perke O'Vas" (Ethics
of Fathers) is led by Rabbi
Sacks in the course of the
Sabbath twilight minyon
services.
The annual Selichot service
will start on Saturday, Sept. 3,
10 p.m., with Rabbi Sacks
officiating and preaching on
the theme "In Pursuit of
Repentance."
Cantor Alexander Weider
will chant the liturgy.
A pre-Selichot hour of
fellowship and sociality will
commence at 9 p.m.
Daily classes in the "Judaic
Code of Religious Law"
(Schulchan Oruch), led by
Rabbi Sacks, begin at 7:30
a.m. preceeding the daily
minyon services and 6:30 p.m.
in conjunction with the daily
twilight minyon services.
For information: 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI
SHALOM
Temple Anshei Shalom of
Delray Beach will be observing
Selichot Saturday Sept. 3,
beginning 8 p.m.
"If We Only Had Love," a
movie starring Theodore
Bickel, will be shown and
refreshments will be served.
This will be followed by the
Selichot service led by Rabbi
Pinchas Aloof and Cantor
Louis Hershman.
Temple Anshei Shalom is
located at 7099 West Atlantic
Ave., Delray Beach. For infor-
mation: 495-1300.
The significance of the
Jewish High Holidays are
explained by Rabbi Samuel M.
Silver of Temple Sinai, Delray
Beach, on two radio programs.
On WEAT, West Palm
Beach (850 AM and 104.3 FM),
Rabbi Silver expounds on the
meaning of the observances to
Dr. John Mangrum, an Epis-
copal priest. The program is
heard Sundays, 6:45 a.m.
On WDBF, Delray Beach
(1420 AM), the explanation is
given to Rev. Michael
McClure, a Baptist minister.
On the programs, the rabbi
has offered to send a free
description of the holy days to
anyone who writes him at
Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach
33445.
Golfing Vacation
The Men's Club of Temple
Anshei Shalom of Delray
Beach is sponsoring a three
day vacation, Tuesday through
Thursday, December 6-8, for
golfers and non-golfers, at
Cape Coral Country Club on
Florida's west coast.
The donation will be $155
per person for golfers and
$137 for non-golfers, double
occupancy, including greens
fees, golf carts, gratuities,
taxes, and a cocktail party.
Round trip bus transportation
will be $20.
For non-golfers there will be
special programs and side-
trips. For information: 407-
495-1300.
m^%
ca's hottest
home value!
ALL
Lakefront
with garages
69,990
INCLUDES:
Concrete <
Construction <
Fully Equipped
Eat-In Kitchen <
Washer/Dryer <
Tiled Bathrooms <
Florida Room i
Pets Welcome
Low Down Payment
Adult Community
i Super Active
Clubhouse
i Swimming
Tennis
> Jacuzzi
Low Monthly
Maintenance
4 a
Direction* like the *Ht)
to the Boa Won cut. |o rl
to Lom Road, then north tro
milnluftnVlll
Broker Participation Invited
T0WM VI HAS
18711 Lyons Road, Boca Raton. Telephone 482-0009. Open 10-6 daily.
Prices subject to change without notice.


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, August 26, 1988

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