The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00311

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Full Text
^sh^.
%C0^
w The Jewish -m y
FloridiaN
of South County
Volume 10 Number 11
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, May 20, 1988
Price: 35 Cents
FUNERAL FOR FALLEN ISRAELI SOLDIER: The coffin con- recent Israeli incursion into Lebanon, is lowered into his grave
taining the body of Israeli Captain Boaz Ravid, killed during the in Nes Tzionajust south of Tel Aviv. API Wide World Photo.
Extremists
Attacked
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Members of
a Jewish defense organization
attacked extreme right-wing
demonstrators, injuring eight.
Two were in serious condition,
according to police sources.
The demonstrators belonged
to a right-wing royalist move-
ment opposed to Jean-Marie
Le Pen's National Front,
which they consider "too
moderate."
Police said some 30 hooded
people armed with steel bars
rushed at the extreme right-
wing group as it was preparing
to take part in Joan of Arc
celebrations in the center of
Paris.
The attack lasted less than a
minute and was described as
"very violent." The attackers
hit at the demonstrators' legs
and heads. The two seriously
wounded men suffer from
serious head injuries including
broken bones.
Police said 10 suspects have
been arrested and four have
been charged and put in
preventive detention. The
four, according to police
sources, belong to the Jewish
Combat Organization.
It is the same group that at-
tacked the office of a right-
wing publication last
December and, on May 1,
detonated smali bombs outside
the offices of four organiza-
tions close to the extreme
right-wing National Front.
Officials Charge NBC for Possible Censorship Violation
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Government officials are in-
vestigating charges that NBC
News may have violated cen-
sorship rules when it broadcast
a bulletin of an Israel Defense
Force incursion into southern
Lebanon, The Jersualem Post
reported.
NBC broke into its regular
programing with the bulletin
hours before the IDF officially
announced the operation. The
early report may have given
terrorists in southern Lebanon
advance warning, enabling
them to escape, The Jerusalem
Post said.
If the NBC correspondent
filed the report without sub-
mitting it to the military cen-
sor, it would be the second
such breach by the American
network in the past two
weeks. The Israel Government
Press Office previously
suspended the credentials of
NBC correspondent Martin
Fletcher.
Fletcher allegedly violated
censorship rules with a report
on the Israeli government's
purported involvement in the
assassination of Khalil al-
Wazir, second in command of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization, who was gunned
down at his home in Tunis.
The NBC bulletin claimed
that 2,000 Israeli troops had
entered southern Lebanon and
that their objective was
unknown. No other American
network broadcast a special
bulletin and Israeli military
sources said the NBC estimate
of troops involved was wildly
exaggerated.
The Jerusalem Post quoted
"sources in southern
Lebanon" as describing the
IDF operation as a "show of
strength rather than a military
mission aimed at specific
targets."
The sources noted that
news of the operation had ap-
parently been deliberately
leaked to the foreign media
in direct contravention of the
usual practice during an IDF
operation," the newspaper
said.
Orthodox Archives Partly Destroyed In Fire
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Agudath Israel of America
hopes to be able to reconstruct
at least part of the National
Orthodox Jewish Archives
destroyed by a fire that swept
through one floor of the
organization's national head-
quarters in Lower Manhattan.
Rabbi Moshe Sherer, presi-
dent, estimated the damage to
the office in the hundreds of
thousands of dollars. But the
archives were priceless, he
said.
No one was hurt in the blaze,
which gutted the 11th floor at
84 William Street. The New
York fire marshal had confirm-
ed that the fire was not of a
suspicious nature and
originated with a faulty elec-
trical fixture.
They contained thousands of
documents and photographs
relating to the Holocaust, Or-
thodox Jewish life in pre-
Holocaust Europe and the ac-
tivities of Orthodox Jews in
the United States, before and
during the Holocaust, to
rescue Jews in Europe.
They were "a major
repository of matters relating
to an urgent time in history,"
Sherer said. He said the fire
destroyed 80 to 85 percent of
the archives and what was not
burned is waterlogged.
The waterlogged material
can be restored by profes-
sionals, Sherer said. He said he
hoped much of what was a
total loss could be retrieved
through appeals to scholars
and others who have used the
archives in the past.
He explained that many of
the burned documents had
been photocopied and that
many books have been written
based on material culled from
the archives.
mi s c
h- SI s S
K i 1
*sz is
o3 II


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 20, 1988
Ask him how
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Friday, May 20, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Bat/Bar Mitzvah
JOSH BELLO
Josh Bello, son of Elaine and
Richard Bello, was called to
the Torah of Temple Beth El
of Boca Raton as a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday, May 14.
Josh is a seventh grade stu-
dent at Boca Raton Middle
School and attends the Temple
Beth El Religious School.
Family members sharing in
the simcha were his brother,
Adam and grandparents,
Erica and Max Birkenholz of
Delray Beach and Esta Hahn
of Lauderhill.
Mr. and Mrs. Bello hosted a
kiddush in his honor following
Shabbat morning service.
t
ELLEN GINZBERG
Ellen Ginzberg, daughter of
Myrna and Charles Ginzberg,
will be called to the Torah of
Congregation B'nai Israel as a
Bat Mitzvah on Saturday mor-
ning, May 28
Ellen will lead the congrega-
tion in study and prayer of the
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4-7).
Sharing Ellen's Bat Mitzvah,
in absentia, will be Elena
Kilberg of Leningrad, USSR.
Ellen attends Loggers Run
Middle School and enjoys
music, reading and singing.
Attending the Bar Mitzvah
along with her parents and her
brother, Wayne, will be grand-
mother Sofia Ginzberg of Boca
Raton and grandmother Irene
Tannen of Brooklyn.
BRENT ALAN GORDON
Brent Alan Gordon, son of
Arleen and Michael Gordon,
was called to the Torah of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
as a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday,
May 14.
Brent is a seventh grade stu-
dent at Boca Raton Academy
and attends the Temple Beth
El Religious School.
Family members sharing in
the simcha were his sister,
Brittany and grandparents,
Leon and Rhea Gordon of
Plantation and Lillian
Rosenberg of Sunrise.
Mr and Mrs. Gordon hosted
a kiddush in Brent's honor
following Havdalah Service.
Arab Villagers
Charged with
Lynching
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Nearly 100 residents of
Kabatiya village in the West
Bank have been accused in
Nablus military court of con-
stituting a lynch mob responsi-
ble for the death of a fellow
villager, who allegedly
cooperated with the Israeli
authorities.
Formal charges were
brought against 47 of the
suspects and 48 more were to
be charged. They were
brought into the courtroom in
groups of five. All pleaded not
guilty.
The victim, Mohammad
Ayed Zakarani, 29, died Feb.
24. According to the charge
sheet, a crowd of about 1,000
villagers set fire to his house,
driving him outside, where he
was beaten to death with an
axe and hanged from a utility
pole.
Some of the defense lawyers
claim their clients were not
present at the lynching.
Others say the charge sheet is
unclear, and several argued
that Zakarani died of a heart
attack.
Klein Advocates Free Market
By MANFRED NEUBER
Bonn/Damascus (DaD)
When Germany's Economic
Cooperation Minister Hans
Klein tours the Third World
the message he has for his host
countries is that the free
market economy spells pro-
gress and economic develop-
ment. This was the message he
took with him to Syria, an
Arab country with a planned
economy in the throes of a
serious economic crisis. Inter-
national experts doubt
whether he will have succeed-
ed in gaining a hearing in
Damascus.
On the eve of three hours of
talks with President Assad,
Hans Klein asked German
businessmen in Damascus
what advice they would give
the Syrian leader on what to
do about the country's
economy. Encourage private
enterprise and private in-
itiative, they said. That would
boost business confidence in
the future of the Syrian
economy.
As Klein then told "German
Features" (DaD), he was in
Syria to promote trade, small-
scale industry and small and
medium-sized farmers. In his
view, many Syrians who had
transferred capital abroad
would be keener to invest in
Syria if only government con-
trols were eased.
The Federal Republic of Ger-
many has made fresh aid
pledges in development aid for
1988. It will mainly go toward
finacing a gas turbine power
station. A decision will soon be
reached, in connection with
specific projects, on unfreez-
ing earlier pledges that were
frozen until last year on ac-
count of political differences
between Bonn and Damascus.
Asked what contribution
German development aid
might make toward promoting
peace in the Middle East,
Klein said: "German experts,
German know-how and Ger-
man money can be of use in
regional development. Further
development and im-
provements in living condi-
tions are a contribution toward
relaxation of political tension,
no matter how modest the Ger-
man contribution may be."
In his talks with Syrian of-
ficials he dealt mainly with
projects in which German aid
will assist in rural develop-
ment, in improving energy and
water supplies and in pro-
viding vocational training.
When his hosts referred to red
tape he noted: "It's just like in
the European Community.
There's no chance of free
market activity in
agriculture."
Syria was a focal point of
German development aid until
the early 1980s.
The Federal Republic of Ger-
many is one of Syria's
foremost trading partners.
Experts are agreed that, in-
view of new oil strikes and ar-
tificial irrigation of large areas
of land on the Euphrates, it
has a "high development
potential." The Syrians are
keen on joint ventures in
tourism (holiday villages on
the Mediterranean) and vehi-
cle manufactuer (buses).
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 20, 1988
Exhibit Of Soldiers' Photos
Recalls Warsaw Ghetto Tragedy
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
More than 100 photographs
taken by a German soldier in
the Warsaw Ghetto in 1941
went on exhibition at the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Center
here.
The exhibition, titled "A
Day in the Warsaw Ghetto
A Birthday Trip Into Hell"
was opened by Education
Minister Yitzhak Navon on the
occasion of the 45th anniver-
sary of the Warsaw Ghetto
Uprising. The pictures were
taken by Heinz Joest, a
hotelier and amateur
photographer who was station-
ed at a German army camp
near Warsaw.
The "birthday trip" referred
to in the title was Joest's birth-
day in 1941 when, as he told
the West German magazine
Stern years later, he first ven-
tured inside the ghetto to find
out what was going on behind
its walls.
He recorded the sights in
129 photographs which are
starkly horrifying and em-
pathetic. Stern reported that
Joest was so deeply shocked
that he told no one of his ex-
perience. "I didn't want to
upset my family. I thought,
what sort of world is this?" the
ex-Wehrmacht soldier was
quoted as saying.
Joest gave his pictures to
Stern two years before he died
in the early 1980s. The
magazine never published
them, but gave them to the
Yad Vashem archives last
year.
They depict hunger, beg-
gars, the indignities heaped on
the dead. The photos are
displayed here according to
subject matter: children,
street life and burial pits. Ac-
companying the exhibit are
sections from the "Warsaw
Diary" of Chaim Kaplan, an
eyewitness account of what
the Jews in the ghetto
endured.
Navon left for Poland Tues-
day with a delegation of some
1,200 Israelis, who will com-
memorate the 1943 uprising
on the site of the ghetto. The
group includes seven Knesset
members and 600 teen-agers,
some of whom were awarded
the trip in a nationwide quiz on
the Holocaust.
The trip is the first by Israeli
officials to Poland since that
country severed diplomatic
ties with Israel in 1967. They
are traveling as individuals
and, while not guests of the
state, are expected to meet
with members of the Polish
government.
Some 4,000 Jews from 20
countries are also expected to
attend the ceremonies in
Warsaw.
Hadassah's Convention In Chicago
NEW YORK More than 2,500 delegates from the
United States and Israel will gather July 31-Aug. 3 in
Chiacago for the 74th National Cnvention of Hadassah, the
Women's Zionist Organization of America.
The delegates representing 385,000 members in 1,500
chapters, the largest Jewish women's volunteer organiza-
tion in the U.S. are expected to take action on a range of
issues affecting the future of Zionism.
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m ^ The Jewish > y
FloridiaN
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
of South County
Ifrrl Shochrt
Publiihed Weekly Mid-September through Mid-May.
Hi V. rekli balance of year (43 iuuei)
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Edilor
Main Office Plant 120 N E 6th St., Miami Fla 33132 Phone 3734605
Advertising Director. Stacl Letter, Phane MI-IIS2
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area S3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum %7)
IF YOU THINK
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Friday, May 20,1988
Volume 10
4 SIVAN 5748
Number 11
1
Give a Little...
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In America's Interest
This week the House Appropriations Committee's Sub-
committee on Foreign Operations will hear testimony from pro-
ponents of U.S. aid to Israel. Advocates of close U.S.-Israel rela-
tions, and of American economic and military assistance to Israel,
traditionally have been the only ones to work for final passage of
all foreign aid. They understand that strengthening U.S. allies
strengthens the United States, and they recognize that Israel is
one of this nation's closest allies.
Two recent reports, one featured in this issue, highlight that
relationship. One demonstrates how Israel continues to be
America's staunchest supporter at the United Nations. The other
puts American foreign aid to Israel in perspective relative to U.S.
assistance to other countries, illustrating the bargain it is.
Fiscal 1989 will be the third consecutive year that the Reagan
Administration has recommended a total of $3 billion in foreign
aid to Israel $1.8 billion in military aid and $1.2 billion in
economic support. This is a significant sum, which deserves to be
placed in context;
Since 20 of 21 Arab states Egypt excepted refuse to make
peace with Israel, it must plan for the worst. That means spen-
ding well over $5 billion, or almost 25 percent of its annual gross
domestic product, on defense. By comparison, the United States
spends about 6 percent on defense, its NATO allies around 4 per-
cent. And a strong Israel bolsters the West's strategic position,
not only in the Middle East but in the Mediterranean basin as
well, especially as some NATO allies bicker among themselves or
make increasingly higher sometimes exclusionary demands
regarding U.S base privileges.
As for economic support, the current level roughly matches
Israel's interest payments to the United States for military loans
taken out after the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the defense in-
frastructure relocation from the Sinai to the Negev following
peace with Egypt.
The continuing large-scale arms buildup in the Arab world
forces Israel to keep pace. Added to that is a second economic
burden: the Arab economic war against Israel. This rests on the
"oil weapon," use of which sent a wave of inflation through the
world economy in the 1970's, and a boycott illegal under U.S.
law of those who do business with the Jewish state. Absent
both of these, Israel might be able to regain its status of a genera-
tion ago, that of a national economic miracle.
Meanwhile, U.S. aid is crucial to keeping Israel strong. An over-
whelming bipartisan majority in Congress repeatedly has
recognized this fact of international life. This year should be no
exception.
Near East Report
Friday, May 20, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Palestinian
Urges Sabotage
JERUSALEM (INB) -
Mubarak Awad, director of the
controversial Palestinian
Center for Non-Violence, has
repeated his call for the
sabotaging of Israeli utility
lines.
In an interview with the
weekly Meurav Yerushalayim,
Awad was asked if he still
stood by his 1983 statement
urging Arabs to sabotage
Israeli electricity, water and
gas lines. "Absolutely," he
replied, "We may suffer as a
result, but the suffering will be
in the spirit of freedom."
Awad said that he regards
violence as a tactical error, but
implied that it might ultimate-
ly be the only way for Arabs to
choose. "There is no possibility
of claiming that the Israelis
withdrew from Lebanon
because of non-violent tac-
tics," Awad said. "Israel left
Lebanon because of the death
toll."
Awad praised foreign media
coverage of the Arab rioting in
Judea, Samaria and Gaza. He
said that television coverage is
a "very important" part of the
Arab struggle against Israel,
since it helps "change the im-
age of the Palestinians and do
away with the image of
terrorists."
Awad was reportedly seen at
the Colony Hotel in East
Jerusalem, distributing copies
of "Leaflet No. 12," the latest
in a series of illegal brochures
giving local Arabs instructions
on how to attack Israelis.
Awad has been living in
Israel illegally since last
November. The Interior
Ministry has refused to renew
his tourist visa, but the police
have hesitated to deport him
for fear of arousing world
criticism.
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 20, 1988
Nearly a tie vote:
Cantors Assembly
Rejects Women
By ANDREW SILOW
CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) In a
historic decision, the Conser-
vative movement's Cantors
Assembly voted to reject a
move to admit qualified
women members.
The vote was 97-95 against
admitting women awarded the
degree of hazzan (cantor) by
the Jewish Theological
Seminary's Cantors Institute
into the ranks of the world's
largest professional body of
cantors.
A two-thirds vote was need-
ed for the measure to have
passed.
The vote took place at the
assembly's 41st annual con-
vention at the Concord Hotel
in Kiamesha Lake, N.Y.
Cantor A. Eliezer Kirshblum
of Toronto led the forces op-
posed to women's member-
ship. He called the vote "a vic-
tory for common sense, for
halacha and for due process."
In a statement, he urged
that JTS Chancellor Ismar
Schorsch reconsider his
february 1987 decision that
qualified women graduates of
the institute could be given the
title of hazzan.
He also proposed that the
halachic legitimacy of women
cantors be referred to the law
committee of the Rabbinical
Assembly, the organization of
Conservative rabbis, for study
and an eventual recommenda-
tion that would require "a ma-
jority consensus rather than
the opinion of one man."
In a statement of their own,
the four women cantors who
have been granted the title of
hazzan, joined by 12 women
Equality
Reigns For
Conservative
Majority
NEW YORK A survey
conducted by Women's
League for Conservative
Judaism shows that most U.S.
and Canadian synagogues to-
day count women as part of
the prayer minyan (quorum of
ten people), and grant them
aliyol (honors) during the wor-
ship service.
In response to the questions
"are women counted in the mi-
nyan?" and "are women given
aliyot?", 693 answers were
received a 100 percent
response from League af-
filiates in the U.S., Canada,
Mexico and Puerto Rico. The
over-whelming response show-
ed that 446 (65 percent) con-
gregations count women as
part of the prayer quorum and
that 459 (66.5 percent) give
them aliyot on either all or
special occasions. The ruling
by The Rabbinical Assembly
Law Committee stating that
women may be counted as
equals to men in the minyan
was adopted on October 5,
1973.
currently enrolled in the Can-
tors Institute, said they were
disappointed by the vote.
'Dedicated To Our Calling'
"The outcome does not sur-
prise us," they said. "We
understand that change is
often difficult. But we are
dedicated to our calling... We
are devoted to the cantorate,
proud to serve the Jewish com-
munity and optimistic about
the future."
Cantor Abraham Lubin of
Chicago, who presented the
main argument in favor of the
admission of women
graduates, predicted that the
matter would be presented to
the body again at one or more
future conventions and that
"women will be accepted as
members with all of the honor
and respect due them."
At the inauguration of the Jewish National
Fund Museum, Chaim Herzog, president of
Israel, right foreground, and Moshe Rivlin,
JNF world chairman, inspect exhibits
documenting the political and military
developments which led to the declaration of
the State of Israel. The museum is located in
JNF's Tel Aviv offices, in the same building in
which Israel's Provisional Council passed the
critical resolution on May 1U, 191,8, leading to
David Ben Gurion's declaration of statehood.


Friday, May 20, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Arab Nations
All Have Missiles
TEL AVIV (JTA) All of
Israel's Arab neighbors, ex-
cept Jordan, have entered the
missile race, according to Gen.
Dan Shomron, the Israel
Defense Force chief of staff.
But the IDF possesses the
defensive and offensive power
to deter their use, Shomron
said in an Israel Radio inter-
view. He did not go into
details, but indicated the Arab
states were aware of Israel's
means of retaliation.
Shomron said the danger of
the missile race was the
tendency to develop chemical,
biological or nuclear weapons.
The Chinese-made CSS-2 in-
termediate range missiles
recently acquired by Saudi
Arabia are capable of carrying
nuclear warheads, but both
China and the Saudis have
denied they are so armed.
According to Shomron,
Israel's ability to strike back
has deterred the Arab states
from using chemical weapons
in their wars with Israel.
Egypt used chemical weapons
during its campaign in Yemen
in the 1960s, but not in the
1967 war with Israel, Shomron
pointed out.
Similarly, Syria had
chemical weapons at the time
of the 1973 Yom Kippur war,
but neither the Syrians nor the
Egyptians employed them
against Israel, even when their
armies on the ground were in
Ketubah
Fetches
Record Bid
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
18th-century Italian ketubah
(Jewish marriage contract)
sold for a record $47,300 at
Sotheby's Judaica sale here.
It was not only the historic
value and beauty of the
elaborately illuminated doc-
ment, but the hint of a roman-
tic triangle which may have ac-
counted for the bid.
The sale price was about
$16,000 higher than the best
price previously offered for
such an item, according to a
spokesperson for the auction
house.
The ketubah, dating from
1732, went to a private
American collector. Decorated
with birds, flowers, pillars and
figures, it is, "a prized posses-
sion" of "great dramatic and
literary value," in the opinion
of Sotheby's consultant on
Jewish books and manuscripts,
Professor Chimen Abramsky
of University College in
London.
The auction was part of the
week-long Judaica Fair attend-
ed by dealers and collectors
from all over the world.
The highest price paid for
any one item was a $92,000 bid
by an American dealer for an
18th-century German spice
box depicting enameled
figures each performing a dif-
ferent stage of the havdalah
service at the close of the
Sabbath.
serious difficulties, the chief of
staff said.
The Arabs knew that Israel's
capability to hit back was far
greater, he said. Nevertheless,
there are gas masks available
for every Israeli citizen, should
the need arise. But the danger
of chemical warfare against
population centers is exag-
gerated, according to
Shomron. By ^closing doors and
windows the danger is greatly
reduced, he said.
Shomron also supported
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin's point made that air
power, in which Israel excels,
is a more effective attack
system than missiles. He noted
that while Syria's Soviet-made
Skud missiles can carry 100
tons of explosives, a warplane
that carries five tons is much
more accurate.
Rabin said that Israel's air
force could drop 100 tons of
high explosives on enemy
population centers for every
ton delivered to Israel in a
missile attack.
Shomron maintained that
missiles cannot determine the
outcome of a war. He recalled
in that connection the
strategic failure of V-l and V-2
rockets Germany used to at-
tack British cities during the
final year of World War II.
Asked if Israel has joined the
missile race, Shomron replied,
"That's what I read in the
papers."
Construction has begun for Congregation
B'nai Israel's permanent synagogue facility
on Yamato Road, between Military Trail and
St. Andrews Boulevard in Boca Raton. Plans
are for the synagogue to open its new doors in
Spring, 1989.
Ground Breaking At B'nai Israel
Congregation B'nai Israel of
Boca Raton has begun con-
struction of its permanent
synagogue facility at 2200
Yamato Road, between
Military Trail and St. Andrews
Boulevard in Boca Raton. Con-
struction of the sanctuary,
social hall, education wing, and
administration space is now
underway.
The 6.13 acre parcel of land
on which the new facility will
be located, is owned outright
by the congregation. Financ-
ing for the project in the form
of a $2.6 million mini-perm
mortgage loan has come from
NCNB National Bank.
Rabbi Richard Agler,
spiritual leader of the con-
gregation said: "The beginn-
ing of construction is an ex-
citing and of course a historic
moment in the life of our con-
gregation. We have come a
long way in a short time and,
of course, the best is yet to
be."
Joel Nadel, president of Con-
gregation B'nai Israel com-
mented: "We've been blessed
with outstanding lay leader-
ship and wonderful members
who have so generously given
of their time and talent to
make this moment happen."
Joe Wasch and Doug Feurr-
ing are co-chairpersons of the
Building Committee and they
have seen the project through
from its inception to the pre-
sent time. "Now that construc-
tion has begun," said Wasch,
"we look forward to the pro-
gress that is yet to be made.
Each new day brings a new ex-
citement. People should drive
by and see!"
The planned ten month con-
struction period will enable the
synagogue to open its doors in
the spring of 1989.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 20, 1988
Official Says....
PLO Not Out To Destroy Israel
By JEAN COHEN
ATHENS (JTA) A rank-
ing Palestine Liberation
Organization official claims
that the PLO no longer calls
for Israel's destruction, and in
fact dropped that demand
from its Covenant 14 years
ago.
Shalah Kallar, also known as
Abu Iyad, said the PLO is
prepared to have a common
border with Israel in a Palesti-
nian state, according to an in-
terview in Baghdad, published
in the Greek daily
Eleftherotypia.
Abu Iyad dismissed the
famous Covenant article which
calls for the destruction of
Israel by armed struggle.
"The articles you are referr-
ing to, and, which the Israelis
promote so much we do not
include them since the 1974
PNC meeting that re-shaped
our program," he said.
The PNC is the Palestine
National Council, the PLO's
quasi-legislative body
sometimes referred to as the
Palestinian parliament-in-
exile.
Abu Iyad insisted that the
Arabs have become more
moderate. "Unfortunately, the
Israelis of today speak the
same language the Arabs used
to speak 30 years ago," he
said. "We say yes to peace, yes
to a political solution, defacto
recognition of the Palestinian
land."
But according to the PLO of-
ficial, Israel's Labor Party,
which declares itself
moderate, has not shown any
willingness to share mutual
borders with a Palestinian
state.
Abu Iyad said one of the
causes of friction between
PLO chief Yasir Arafat and
President Hafez Assad of
Syria is the PLO's relations
with progressive and peace-
loving Israelis.
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Rabin Defends
Israeli Tactics
Friday, May 20, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
By DAVID LANDAU
and HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin characterized the Israel
Defense Force's two-day in-
cursion into southern Lebanon
as a defensive measure made
necessary by the lack of a cen-
tral government in Lebanon
capable of controlling the
region.
"As long as there is no
government in Lebanon
capable of entering into anti-
terrorist arrangements ... as
exist de-facto with Syria and
Jordan, and of course with
Egypt .. there is no alter-
native but to continue with this
policy," Rabin said.
Rabin described the opera-
tion in interviews with Voice
of Israel Radio and the Army
Radio. He affirmed that the
most serious action was
against the pro-Iranian Shiite
Hezbollah guerrillas, who,
"more than any other group-
ing in Lebanon, cooperates
with (Yasir) Arafat's wing of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization" and Syrian-
backed PLO dissidents.
The battle to capture Mai-
doun village, the main Hez-
bollah stronghold, cost the
IDF three dead and 17 wound-
ed. Between 40 and 50 guer-
rillas were killed, according to
military sources.
Two of the IDF fatalities
were officers Capt. Zion
Mizrachi 23, of Moshav
Megadim south of Haifa, and
Capt. Boaz Ravid, 26, of Bet
Oved. Sgt. Marco Bernstein,
21, of Nahariya, was also
killed.
Rabin explained to the radio
interviewers that Israel's
policy of protecting its nor-
thern settlements required
that the area north of the
border be kept free of
terrorits.
He said the policy was
established by the government
in January 1985 and im-
plemented five months later,
when the IDF pulled out of
DONKEY 5EHENAPE
^v/TA
southern Lebanon and set up
the border security zone
patrolled jointly with the
Israel-backed South Lebanon
Army.
"The maintenance of the
security zone is not sufficient,
without preventive actions
against terrorist targets,
whether deep in Lebanon, or
in the zone and its immediate
environs," Rabin said.
Yeshiva Commencement
On June 2, Yeshiva University will hold its first off-
campus commencement exercise in the institution's 57
years, at New York's Lincoln Center. The commencement
address will be given by Vernon Walters, U.S. ambassador
to the UN, who will receive an honorary Doctor of Humane
Letters. This honorary doctorate will also be conferred
upon Israeli-born violinist Itzhak Perlman.
OSI Pleased
With Supreme
Court Ruling
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Neal Sher, director of the
Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations, ex-
pressed satisfaction on a
Supreme Court decision order-
ing a new hearing on whether
an alleged Nazi war criminal
should have his U.S. citizen-
ship revoked.
He said the ruling would be
helpful to the government's ef-
forts in prosecuting Nazi war
criminals in the United States.
The Supreme Court, in a
6-to-2 decision, set aside a
1986 ruling by the U.S. Court
of Appeals that revoked the
citizenship of Juozas Kungys,
who was accused of helping
the Nazis kill more than 2,000
Jews in Lithuania during
World War II. They ordered
the appeals court to hold a new
hearing.
The OSI, which is charged
with finding and prosecuting
Nazi war criminals living in
the United States, is still stu-
dying the decision, but Sher
said the OSI is "pleased with
the ruling" because the court
set down clear standards for
revoking citizenship.
"The decision by and large
supports the positions" taken
by the OSI in seeking the
revocation of citizenship, that
"someone who gives false
testimony lacks the necessary
good moral character to
become a U.S. citizen," Sher
said.
The standards for revoking
citizenship, outlined in the
court's opinion by Justice An-
tonin Scalia, approved
denaturalization of someone
whose misstatements or con-
cealment of facts "had a
natural tendency" to influence
decisions by immigration
officials.
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 20, 1988
New Yorkers Freedom Rally Draws 2,000
Ur. and Mrs Arnold Feiner, at right, were recently honored by
Temple Israel ofMiramar and the State of Israel Bonds for their
dedication to Israel. The 1,0th Anniversary Award was presented
to them by Rabbi, left, and Mrs. Bernard Presler, second right,
who hosted the evening at their home.
Arab Students
Question Coexistence
Although not one Arab stu-
dent at Israeli State College
has been absent from class or
refused to participate in pro-
grams with Jewish students
during the tension period in
the West Bank and Gaza Strip,
college Provost Aaron
Seidenberg cautions that
"there is growing tension and
agitation beneath the
surface."
The college is Israel's only
institute of higher learning
concentrating on promoting
Arab-Jewish coexistence and
on bridging Israel's social
gaps. Some 13 percent of its
students are Israeli Arabs.
In New York recently at a
conference organized by the
Friends of the Israeli State
College, Seidenberg explained
that Arab students have begun
to question the viability of
coexistence with Jews, and are
expressing increasing difficul-
ty in reconciling their identity
as citizens of Israel with their
emotional support for their
Palestinian brothers in the
territories.
Another conference speaker,
Prof. David Sidorsky of Col-
umbia University, spoke of the
conflicting cultural tendencies
that Israeli Arabs have. "It re-
mains an open question," he
said, "whether Arab culture
will be able to adapt Western
traditions develop a hybrid
Musical Light
and
Sound Show
By HUGH ORGEL
MASADA (JTA) This
serene mountaintop in the Ju-
dean Hills will be the scene of a
musical light-and-sound show
next October 13, winding up
Israel's 40th anniversary
celebration.
Next October, the ancient
hills will echo to the music of
the Israel Philharmonic Or-
chestra under the baton of its
conductor and musical direc-
tor, Indian-born Zubin Mehta.
Seating is being arranged
for 4,000 at the open-air con-
cert, a $1.5 million event in-
itiated by the Keren Or, a non-
profit Jewish organization in
France that raises funds to
help Israeli soldiers, and for
different cultural causes in
Israel.
form of Islamic Marxism or
revert to a fundamentalist
reinterpretation of Islamic
tradition."
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Former Soviet prisoner of
Zion Yosef Begun thanked an
avenue block packed with
"Freedom Day" ralliers for
winning his release, but ex-
pressed concern at the shrink-
ing numbers of Soviet Jewry
Anne Frank
Diary Uncontested
AMSTERDAM (JTA) An
82-year-old neo-Nazi in Ham-
burg backed away from a legal
showndown over his claim that
the Diary of Anne Frank was a
falsification.
Ernst Roemer, who publicly
challenged the authenticity of
the diary, the personal account
of a Dutch-Jewish teen-ager
who died in the Holocaust,
decided not to appeal a fine im-
posed on him 10 years ago by a
Hamburg lower court, his
lawyer said.
The fine was the outcome of
a lawsuit brought against
Roemer, who failed to prove
his contention. His appeal had
gone through several stages
and was about to be heard in
Hamburg.
demonstrators since he and
other highly publicized
prisoners have been freed.
"We have no right to
weaken our struggle, deman-
ding and pressure on the
Soviet Union," Begun shouted
to an estimated 2,000
demonstrators at the Soviet
mission to the United Nations.
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev "says his country is
free and open, that human
rights is there. But it's not
true," Begun added, as he
spoke publicly in America.
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Friday, May 20, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
Temple News
ANSHEI EMUNA
The Festival of Shavuot
(Pentecost) will be ushered in
on Saturday evening, May 21,
with a service commencing at
8 p.m. at Anshei Emuna Or-
thodox Congregation.
The Festive Morning Ser-
vices on Sunday and Monday,
May 22 and 23 will begin at
8:30 a.m.
The Yiskor Memorial Ser-
vice will be commemorated on
Monday, May 23.
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks will
preach a series of sermonic
messages on the over-all
theme "Reverberations of
Sinai."
On Saturday, May 28, at
8:30 am., at the Sabbath Morn-
ing Service, Rabbi Sacks will
preach the sermon on the
theme "Finding Sinai in the
Wilderness." Kiddush will
follow.
A seminar in the Talmudic
Tome "Perke O'Vas" (Ethics
of the Fathers) is led by Rabbi
Sacks in the course of the Sab-
bath Twilight Minyon
Services.
Daily Classes in the "Judaic
Code of Religious Law"
(Schulchan Orach), led by Rab-
bi Sacks, begin at 7:30 a.m.
preceeding the Daily Minyon
Services and at 6:30 p.m. in
conjunction with the Daily
Twilight Minyon Services.
The Anshei Emuna Institute
for Adult Jewish Education
presents several other courses.
Sessions of "Great Passages
of the Torah," led by Rabbi
Sacks, whose classical
Talmudic volume was recently
republished by the Mosad
Harav Kook of Israel, are held
on Wednesdays, at 2:30 p.m.
A "Class in Mishna," in-
structed by Max Lenowitz, the
Ba'al Korah, is scheduled for
Wednesdays, at 3:30 p.m.
The institute is co-sponsored
by the Congregation,
Sisterhood and Men's Club.
There are no fees and the com-
munity is invited to participate
in the program. For informa-
tion: 499-9229.
Anshei Emuna is located at
16189 Carter Road, Delray
Beach.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
Shabbat services on Friday,
May 20, at Congregation
B'nai Israel will be held at the
Center for Group Counseling
on Boca Rio Road, Boca
Raton, beginning at 8 p.m.
B'nai Israel's faculty will be
honored.
Confirmation services on
Erev Shavuot will begin at 8
p.m. on Saturday, May 21. The
confirmands for 5748 are: Eric
Ascher, Steven Blader, Stacy
Bloom, Jeffrey Coles, Wayne
Ginzberg, Eric Gutmann and
Jodi Janus.
Also Brian Makoff, Kimberly
Metsch, Evan Nadel, Joanna
Polin, Matthew Rosner and
Craig Spodak.
Shabbat services on Friday,
May 27, will begin at 8 p.m.
Singles are especially
welcome. Rabbi Agler will
speak on "Is The Sexual
Revolution Really Dead?"
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton will have Erev Shavuot
Services on Saturday, May 21,
at 7:30 p.m.
Shavuot will be celebrated
with Confirmation Services
conducted by the Confirmation
Class on Sunday, May 22, at
10:30 a.m.
Yizkor Service will be held in
the Sanctuary on Monday,
May 23, at 10:30 a.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton is located at 333 SW 4
Ave., Boca Raton.
For information: 391-8900.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
The Sisterhood of Temple
Beth Shalom of Century
Village West will have its next
general meeting on Monday,
May 30 (instead of May 23), at
10 a.m. There will be a bouti-
que, and refreshments will be
served.
Echoes of Terrorism
Khalil al-Wazir, second to
Yassir Arafat in the umbrella
grouping of terrorist factions the
world complacently calls the
Palestine Liberation Organization
(PLO), was shot down in sight of
his wife and two of their children
in Tunis on Apr. 16. Wazir also
known as Abu Jihad (father of ho-
ly war) headed PLO "military
operations." In addition, he ap-
parently was coordinating the
Palestinian Arab uprising in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Intisar Wazir her nomme de
guerre is Umm Jihad (mother of
holy war) was quoted as saying
that after commandos killed her
husband with automatic weapons,
"I turned toward the wall and
prayed, waiting for my turn. It
never came."
Her fate and that of her children
Area Deaths mmm
SALTZMAN
Jack David, 71. of Boca Raton, died on May
2. He was the husband of Margaret; the
father of Mark (Tara), Ira, and Lisa
Saltzman, and Susan Brustman; grand-
father of Eric; and brother of Lillian
Saltzman and Edith (Murray) Weinstein.
Services at Temple Solel, Hollywood
(Riverside).
RABIN
Helen K., 79, of Pompano Beach, died on
May 9. A former resident of Belle Glade, she
was the widow of the late Harold J. Rabin,
former Mayor of Belle Glade and a pioneer
in the produce industry. She is also survived
by three daughters, Joan Rabin Levy of
Tamarac, Linda Rabin Gangler of Boynton
Beach, and Marilyn Rabin Mansberry of
Rockledge; four grand-children and three
great-grandchildren. Graveside services
were held at Star, of David Cemetery
(Menorah Chapels).
LEWINSOHN
Jan, 31, of Coral Springs, died on May 5.
She is survived by her husband, Arnold; son,
Daniel; parents, Gary and Elaine Shore of
Maitland; brothers, James and Ronald; and
sisters Vicki (Duane) Stampler and Cindi
Shore. Services were held at Levitt-
Weinstein. Interment followed at Beth
David Memorial Gardens.
SILVER
Myron Herbert of Lauderhill, retired from
the U.S. Air Force. He was the son of Frank
and Blumee Silver; the brother of Pearl
Silver, and Sydelle and Charles Weiss; the
uncle of Melanie, Brad and Marc Weiss; and
cousin of the Mosman family. Graveside ser
vices were at Lakeside Memorial Park.
(Eternal Light).
differed from that of those caught
in other bursts of violence con-
nected with Abu Jihad. For exam-
ple: On Mar. 11, 1978, terrorists
landed on the Israeli coast. They
murdered the first person they
found, American photographer
Gail Rubin.
Then they hijacked a bus filled
with families on an outing. Before
security forces stopped them
killing nine and capturing two
the terrorists had murdered 33
civilians, including many children,
and wounded 82, firing from the
bus at other travelers.
Several years ago the
Jerusalem, Post wrote of one of
the wounded. He was a young
father, wheelchair-bound as a
result of the attack. He had seen
his wife and children immolated
when the hijackers ignited an in-
cendiary grenade. Israel blamed
Abu Jihad for organizing the
coastal road massacre.
The point? Not to trade stories
of violent loss, but to distinguish
between criminals and victims,
the prerequisite for justice. Israel
which did not claim responsibili-
ty for killing Wazir held him ac-
countable for other such "military
operations." These included the
1975 attack at Tel Aviv's Savoy
Hotel 12 civilians died and
last month's Negev bus hijacking.
Then three Israelis including
the widower father of two young
children perished along with
the three terrorists.
News stories almost invariably
described Wazir as a moderate,
comparing him to Salah Khalaf
Abu Iyad Arafat's ideological
chief. Wazir's moderation could
be seen in his reported description
of the Negev hijacking as a
success."
Coincidentally, on Apr. 18 as
U.S. naval forces blasted Iranian
oil platforms and navy ships in the
Persian Gulf in retaliation for the
mine explosion which nearly sank
the USS Samuel Roberts the
State Department termed the
Wazir killing "an act of political
assassination This violence is
not going to be part of the solu-
tion. The solution is going to
come through a negotiated settle-
ment ... that works toward a
comprehensive peace."
News of Wazir's murder spark-
ed a day of violent mourning in
the territories. At least 14 Palesti-
nian Arabs were killed and 100
wounded by Israeli forces trying
to restore order. Such grief over
Abu Jihad does not suggest sup-
port for a negotiated settlement
and comprehensive peace.
Like Wazir and the PLO, Iran
and Iranian-backed Lebanese
Hezbollah (Party of God) members
believe in terrorism. Of course,
when they kidnap people like the
U.S. hostages in Lebanon, or
murder people on buses or planes
like the Kuwaiti aitliner recently
hijacked to Algiers, it is not terror
but "armed struggle."
Other armed stragglers include
the Japanese Red Army members
suspected of involvement
together with "Middle Eastern
terrorists" in the recent bomb-
ing in Naples which killed one
U.S. service woman and four
Italians, and the Red Army
member stopped in New Jersey
with three bombs in his car.
Among the Red Army's earlier
explits alongside Middle Eastern
terrorists was the 1972
machinegun and grenade attack
at Lod now Ben Gurion Air-
port in Israel. Twenty-seven peo-
ple, including 17 Christian
pilgrims from Puerto Rico, were
murdered in that joint Red Army-
Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine (PFLP) assault.
Again coincidentally, the PFLP
was an early practitioner of air
piracy.
The American message after
the attack on two Iranian oil plat-
forms asserted: "Any further pro-
vocative or hostile Iranian
military or terrorist actions
against U.S. personnel or targets
will receive a firm U.S. response."
The killing of Wazir was a similar
response.
Shultz Shuttle
Is On Again
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) Secretary of State George Shultz
will travel to the Middle East June 3 for his fourth trip to the
region this year, the State Department announced.
The Mideast swing, which will come after the summit in
Moscow between President Reagan and Soviet leader Mikhail
Gorbachev, includes meetings in Egypt, Jordan, Syria and
Israel.
It would end in time for Shultz to meet in Madrid June 9 to 10
with foreign ministers of the North Atlantic Treaty
Organization.
Department spokesman Charles Redman said Shultz is return-
ing to the Mideast because there are "underlying problems in the
region which remain unresolved. And the secretary has said
many times the status quo is not tenable."
He said Saudi Arabia is not included in the itinerary, because it
is "not one of the countries actively involved in the peace pro-
cess, in the sense that they are not a negotiating partner for the
Israelis, in terms of a comprehensive settlement."
"The United States has advanced a realistic and a workable
plan to bring about negotiations," Redman said. "So the
secretary is prepared to continue his intensive effort to try to br-
ing about negotiations on a comprehensive peace."
Redman acknowledged that the peace plan's original timetable
has not been met. It called for an international peace conference
to be held in mid-April and for negotiations on autonomy
measures for Palestinians on the West Bank and Gaza Strip to
start in early May.
"Those days have passed," Redman said. "We need to get this
under way as soon as possible that's the objective in all of
this."
He said the peace plan is still "workable. In fact it is the only
workable alternative" to no peace effort in the Middle East.
Shultz's plan has divided Israel's national unity government,
with Labor supporting it and Likud opposed, particularly to the
idea of an international conference. Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres indicated that he will make the proposal a major issue in
this year's Knesset elections.
Meanwhile, The New York Times reported that Jordanian of-
ficials oppose the international conference as envisioned by
Shultz, a meeting that would set the stage for negotiations bet-
ween Israel and a Jordanian-Palestinian delegation.
Hussein, who has demanded that the conference be an "um-
brella" for negotiations with Israel, stressed at a news con-
ference in Amman that Jordan will not now represent the
Palestinians, even if the Palestine Liberation Organization asked
it to do so, the Times reported. "We would certainly say that
they represent themselves," Hussein was quoted as saying.
New Exec VP for AJC
Ira Silverman has been named the executive vice presi-
dent of the American Jewish Committee.
Silverman, 43, was director of New York's 92nd Street
YM and YWHA from July, 1986, until last month. Before
that he served for five years as president of the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical College, the rabbinical
seminary of the Reconstructionist movement of Judaism,
in Wyncote, Pennsylvania.
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 20, 1988
P&nAm
Makes The Worid
Affordable.
Low Airfares To The World.
Pan Am has super-low airfares to cities in the
U.S.. Europe. Latin America and the
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have a lot more great places at great prices,
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Fantastic Hotel And Rental Car
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Europe looks even more attractive when you
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We have affordable hotels in most other cities
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at just $69 with unlimited mileage.
And More.
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Restrictions: Fares are roundtrip in economy with varying advance purchase, effective dates and min/max stay requirements.
Weekend surcharges and cancellation penalties may apply and certain fares are nonrefundable. Seats at these fares may not be
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Additional International Restrictions: $23 US. departure tax. security surcharge and customs fee not included ($10 security fee not
applicable to Rio de Janeiro). Additional US. Restrictions: Fuel surcharges of $5 from Chicago. $2 from Florida. $2.50 from
Boston not included. HOTEL varying effective dates, advance reservations/purchase requirements apply. Hotel space is limited.
CAR: Rates start at $69 a week in Great Britain. Germany and Spain, and $99 a week in France. Ireland. Italy and Sweden. A
minimum of two passengers per car required. An additional charge applies for passengers traveling alone. Higher rates apply in
all other countries, however rental cars not available in Czechoslovakia. Romania. Russia and Turkey. A seven day advance
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Roundtrip Airfares:
America:
Houston.......$198
OIXNR/QII NR
Los Angeles...$268
(,)\l I4NR
New\ork.......$158
(.>\r\R
Oriando.........$48
ME00X367ME0QZ567
San Diego.....$238
(;\l I4\R
San Francisco $308
(;\N4\R
Europe:
Amsterdam.... $775
MHXAB
Athens.........$1012
MHNR
Belgrade.......$930
BOM
Berlin..........$980
BHXAB
Brussels.......$947
BHXAP
Dubrovnik.....$960
BOKI
Dusseldorf....$922
BHXAB
Frankfurt......$548
MINIR
Geneva.........$776
MXAB
Hamburg......$922
BHXAB
London........$625
BOXAB
Madrid.........$734
BHXAP
Milan..........$872
MPtXS
Moscow.......$1218
BHXAP
Munich........$980
BHXAB
Paris............$489
MABNR
Prague.........$933
BHAB
Rome..........*922
MPtXS
Shannon.......$601
MONR
Stuttgart.......$922
BHXAB
Tel Aviv........$1102
BOAP
Zagreb.........$930
Boxr
Zurich..........$776
MXAB
Latin America:
Buenos Aires.. $872
MLAP3
Caracas........$300
MAE2I
Rio de Janeiro $929
MHAP3
Number one to Europe. And more.


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