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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( May 6, 1988 )

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VTco**
w^ The Jewish m ?
FloridiaN
of South County

i
Volume 10 Number 10
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, May 6, 1988
Price: 35 Cents
Members Of Congress Soviets Testing Israeli Reaction To
Protesting New Sale Of Recent Statements By Gorbachev
Weapons To Saudis
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
More than 100 members of
Congress are expected to
write Secretary of State
George Shultz urging him to
withdraw U.S. plans to sell
Saudi Arabia close to $1 billion
in new weaponry, Capitol Hill
sources said.
In alte March, Shultz infor-
mally notified Congress of
plans to sell $500 million worth
of Bradley Fighting Vehicles
and TOW missiles, as well as
$450 million worth of support
equipment for AW ACS recon-
naissance planes previously
sold to the Saudis.
A letter from House mejbers
to Shultz, originated by Reps.
Larry Smith (D-Fla.), Charles
Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Con-
stance Morella (R-Md.), states
that they are "deeply concern-
ed" about the recent sale of
intermediate-range ballistic
missiles from China to Saudi
Arabia.
"At this time we urge you to
withdraw pending U.S. sales
to the kingdom, including
Bradley fighting vehicles,
TOW missiles and AW ACS
support systems," said the let-
ter, which had 50 signatures to
date.
The Senate version,
authored by Sen. Howard
Metzenbaum (D-Ohio), had 45
signatures. In that letter, the
senators expressed the hope
that the administration will
not move ahead on the
AW ACS package.
The senators also called for a
"re-examination" of U.S. arms
policy toward Saudi Arabia in
light of its purchase of the
Chinese missiles, which are
capable of holding nuclear
warheads.
They said they are "deeply
concerned that the saudis hid
the fact that they possess
these weapons. The situation
raises serious questions about
the possibility of the Saudis
compromising the security and
technology of sensitive
weapons systems."
Saudis Pulled 'A Fast One'
A Capitol Hill source said
members of Congress are
angry at Saudi Arabia for
"pulling a fast one that
escalates the arms race." The
Saudi purchase was initially
concealed from the United
States.
The administration has until
late April to provide Congress
with formal notification of the
proposed safes. Congress then
would have 30 days to reject
the sale; otherwise it would
automatically go through.
The most recent arms sale to
Saudi Arabia occurred last
year, after Congress forced
President Reagan to eliminate
1,600 Maverick air-to-ground
missiles from a $1.4-billion
package.
Hospital Serving Children
To Be Built
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Ground-
breaking ceremonies were
held for a new children's
hospital whose sponsors say is
designed for the physical and
emotional needs of childhood,
not simply to treat their
ailments.
The $60 million medical
center, which will serve
children throughout the Mid-
dle East, will be erected on the
grounds of Beilinson Hospital
in Petach Tikva, largely
through the generosity of New
York realtor Irving Schneider,
who has donated millions of
dollars for the project.
Only at the last moment did
striking doctors employed by
Kupat Holim, Histadrut's
health care agency, withdraw
their threat to disrupt the
ground-breaking. They carried
out such a threat last week at
the ground-breaking for a $7.2
million medical research
center, also to be erected on
the Beilinson Hospital
grounds.
Beilinson is one of 14 Kupat
Holim hospitals in the grip of a
partial strike bv physicians.
They are observing a reduced
Sabbath schedule, performing
only emergency medical pro-
cedures. So far, elective
surgery has been canceled for
some 400 patients and another
10,000 have been denied out-
patient treatment.
Doctors are also on strike at
hospitals run by the govern-
ment or run jointly by the
government and local
municipalities. They issued an
ultimatum Monday to escalate
selective sanctions into a
24-hour, full-scale strike unless
the Treasury agrees to resume
wage negotiations by Tuesday
night and cancels back-to-work
orders issued to state-
employed anesthesiologists.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Soviet Union seems to be soun-
ding out Israel's response to
the conciliatory tone recently
adopted by Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev.
Maariv rerported that a
ranking member of the Soviet
delegation to the United Na-
tions in New York asked a
member of Israel's U.N.
delegation whether Israel has
been receiving Gorbachev's
signals of a more flexible
Soviet stance in the Middle
East peace process.
He was referring to Gor-
bachev's remarks to Yasir
Arafat in Moscow in which the
Soviet leader told the visiting
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
Soldiers
Killed In
Clash
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israel Defense Force soldiers
were killed and two were
wounded in a clash with ter-
rorist infiltrators on the slopes
of Mount Hermon.
Three terrorists were also
killed in the brief but fierce
gun fight on rugged terrain, a
military spokesman reported.
The soldiers killed were
identified as the unit com-
mander, Lt. Col. Shmuel Adiv,
of Kfar Saba, and a Bedouin
tracker whose name has not
yet been released. Adir was
known as a brave officer who
always insisted on going ahead
with his tracker.
According to the spokesman,
a unit of the Givati Brigade
spotted the trail of infiltrators
on the western slopes of the
mountain and gave chase with
the aid of trackers and
helicopters. Contact was made
less than 200 yards inside the
Israeli border.
The infiltrators opened fire
from concealed positions in
underbrush. The soldiers
returned the fire, killing three
terrorists at close range. The
terrorists fired a missile and
threw hand grenades during
the battle.
The commander of the nor-
thern region, Maj. Gen. Yossi
Peled, said the infiltrators had
intended to seize hostages in
Israel.
One of the wounded men is
reported to be in serious but
stable condition. The other
man was lightly injured. The
clash was the third such en-
counter in the Mount Hermon
area this month.
tion chief that he should take
Israel's security interests into
account. The story was
covered extensively by Tass,
the Soviet news agency.
Tass also reported that Gor-
bachev is very much aware
that the permanent members
of the U.N. Security Council
would have only an advisory
role at the proposed interna-
tional conference for Middle
East peace.
When queried about these
statements, the Israeli
delegate replied that while
Israel is aware of them,
messages of that kind should
be conveyed directly to
Jerusalem, Maariv reported.
Meanwhile, Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, who
favors the international peace
conference as a means of laun-
ching Israeli-Arab negotia-
tions, said that it is up to King
Hussein of Jordan to select a
negotiating partner.
Jordan can negotiate with
Israel or with the PLO, Peres
told the Commercial and In-
dustrial Club last week. If
Israel misses the opportunity
for dialogue with Huspein,
Arafat will become the only
negotiating partner left to the
king, Peres said.
But the PLO has presented
tough terms for a settlement.
It reportedly is demanding its
own passports, currency, flag
and diplomatic representation,
as well as rotation of leader-
ship of the planned federation
with Jordan.
WEEPING FOR COMRADE-Friends of slain Israeli Lieute-
nant Colonel Shmuel Adiv, 29, weep during funeral servuxs at
Magdiel Cemetary in Kibuttz Magdiel, north of Tel Aviv. Adiv, a
battalion commander, was hilled in a terrorist attack along the
Israeli-Lebanon border.
Greens Endorse
Display Of Nazi Art
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The opposi-
tion Green Party is supporting
a parliamentary initiative to
exhibit art produced during
the Nazi era in West German
museums. But the party also
insists on both official recogni-
tion and reparations for artists
declared "degenerate" by the
Nazis, who banned their works
from public display.
The Greens opened debate
on the issue in the Bundestag,
Germany's parliament.
The government will be
challenged to take a position
on the matter that has been
the subject of a fierce con-
troversy among artists and
scholars for the past six
months.


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
May 6, 1988

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00310

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
May 6, 1988

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00310

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text

^co^
w^ The Jewish m y
FlomdiaN
of South County
Volume 10 Number 10
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, May 6, 1988
Price: 35 Cents
Members Of Congress Soviets Testing Israeli Reaction To
Protesting New Sale Of Recent Statements By Gorbachev
Weapons To Saudis
By HOWARD ROSENBERG
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
More than 100 members of
Congress are expected to
write Secretary of State
George Shultz urging him to
withdraw U.S. plans to sell
Saudi Arabia close to $1 billion
in new weaponry, Capitol Hill
sources said.
In alte March, Shultz infor-
mally notified Congress of
plans to sell $500 million worth
of Bradley Fighting Vehicles
and TOW missiles, as well as
$450 million worth of support
equipment for AW ACS recon-
naissance planes previously
sold to the Saudis.
A letter from House mejbers
to Shultz, originated by Reps.
Larry Smith (D-Fla.), Charles
Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Con-
stance Morella (R-Md.), states
that they are "deeply concern-
ed" about the recent sale of
intermediate-range ballistic
missiles from China to Saudi
Arabia.
"At this time we urge you to
withdraw pending U.S. sales
to the kingdom, including
Bradley fighting vehicles,
TOW missiles and AW ACS
support systems," said the let-
ter, which had 50 signatures to
date.
The Senate version,
authored by Sen. Howard
Metzenbaum (D-Ohio), had 45
signatures. In that letter, the
senators expressed the hope
that the administration will
not move ahead on the
AW ACS package.
The senators also called for a
"re-examination" of U.S. arms
policy toward Saudi Arabia in
light of its purchase of the
Chinese missiles, which are
capable of holding nuclear
warheads.
They said they are "deeply
concerned that the saudis hid
the fact that they possess
these weapons. The situation
raises serious questions about
the possibility of the Saudis
compromising the security and
technology of sensitive
weapons systems."
Saudis Pulled 'A Fast One'
A Capitol Hill source said
members of Congress are
angry at Saudi Arabia for
"pulling a fast one that
escalates the arms race." The
Saudi purchase was initially
concealed from the United
States.
The administration has until
late April to provide Congress
with formal notification of the
proposed sales. Congress then
would have 30 days to reject
the sale; otherwise it would
automatically go through.
The most recent arms sale to
Saudi Arabia occurred last
year, after Congress forced
President Reagan to eliminate
1,600 Maverick air-to-ground
missiles from a $1.4-billion
package.
Hospital Serving Children
To Be Built
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Ground-
breaking ceremonies were
held for a new children's
hospital whose sponsors say is
designed for the physical and
emotional needs of childhood,
not simply to treat their
ailments.
The $60 million medical
center, which will serve
children throughout the Mid-
dle East, will be erected on the
grounds of Beilinson Hospital
in Petach Tikva, largely
through the generosity of New
York realtor Irving Schneider,
who has donated millions of
dollars for the project.
Only at the last moment did
striking doctors employed by
Kupat Holim, Histadrut's
health care agency, withdraw
their threat to disrupt the
ground-breaking. They carried
out such a threat last week at
the ground-breaking for a $7.2
million medical research
center, also to be erected on
the Beilinson Hospital
grounds.
Beilinson is one of 14 Kupat
Holim hospitals in the grip of a
partial strike by physicians.
They are observing a reduced
Sabbath schedule, performing
only emergency medical pro-
cedures. So far, elective
surgery has been canceled for
some 400 patients and another
10,000 have been denied out-
patient treatment.
Doctors are also on strike at
hospitals run by the govern-
ment or run jointly by the
government and local
municipalities. They issued an
ultimatum Monday to escalate
selective sanctions into a
24-hour, full-scale strike unless
the Treasury agrees to resume
wage negotiations by Tuesday
night and cancels back-to-work
orders issued to state-
employed anesthesiologists.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Soviet Union seems to be soun-
ding out Israel's response to
the conciliatory tone recently
adopted by Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev.
Maariv rerported that a
ranking member of the Soviet
delegation to the United Na-
tions in New York asked a
member of Israel's U.N.
delegation whether Israel has
been receiving Gorbachev's
signals of a more flexible
Soviet stance in the Middle
East peace process.
He was referring to Gor-
bachev's remarks to Yasir
Arafat in Moscow in which the
Soviet leader told the visiting
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
Soldiers
Killed In
Clash
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israel Defense Force soldiers
were killed and two were
wounded in a clash with ter-
rorist infiltrators on the slopes
of Mount Hermon.
Three terrorists were also
killed in the brief but fierce
gun fight on rugged terrain, a
military spokesman reported.
The soldiers killed were
identified as the unit com-
mander, Lt. Col. Shmuel Adiv,
of Kfar Saba, and a Bedouin
tracker whose name has not
yet been released. Adir was
known as a brave officer who
always insisted on going ahead
with his tracker.
According to the spokesman,
a unit of the Givati Brigade
spotted the trail of infiltrators
on the western slopes of the
mountain and gave chase with
the aid of trackers and
helicopters. Contact was made
less than 200 yards inside the
Israeli border.
The infiltrators opened fire
from concealed positions in
underbrush. The soldiers
returned the fire, killing three
terrorists at close range. The
terrorists fired a missile and
threw hand grenades during
the battle.
The commander of the nor-
thern region, Maj. Gen. Yossi
Peled, said the infiltrators had
intended to seize hostages in
Israel.
One of the wounded men is
reported to be in serious but
stable condition. The other
man was lightly injured. The
clash was the third such en-
counter in the Mount Hermon
area this month.
tion chief that he should take
Israel's security interests into
account. The story was
covered extensively by Tass,
the Soviet news agency.
Tass also reported that Gor-
bachev is very much aware
that the permanent members
of the U.N. Security Council
would have only an advisory
role at the proposed interna-
tional conference for Middle
East peace.
When queried about these
statements, the Israeli
delegate replied that while
Israel is aware of them,
messages of that kind should
be conveyed directly to
Jerusalem, Maariv reported.
Meanwhile, Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, who
favors the international peace
conference as a means of laun-
ching Israeli-Arab negotia-
tions, said that it is up to King
Hussein of Jordan to select a
negotiating partner.
Jordan can negotiate with
Israel or with the PLO, Peres
told the Commercial and In-
dustrial Club last week. If
Israel misses the opportunity
for dialogue with Huspein,
Arafat will become the only
negotiating partner left to the
king, Peres said.
But the PLO has presented
tough terms for a settlement.
It reportedly is demanding its
own passports, currency, flag
and diplomatic representation,
as well as rotation of leader-
ship of the planned federation
with Jordan.
WEEPING FOR COMRADE-Friends of slain Israeli Lieute-
nant Colonel Shmuel Adiv, 29, weep during funeral services at
Magdiel Cemetary in Kibuttz Magdiel, north of Tel Aviv. Adiv, a
battalion commander, was killed in o terrorist attack along the
Israeli-Lebanon border.
Greens Endorse
Display Of Nazi Art
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The opposi-
tion Green Party is supporting
a parliamentary initiative to
exhibit art produced during
the Nazi era in West German
museums. But the party also
insists on both official recogni-
tion and reparations for artists
declared "degenerate" by the
Nazis, who banned their works
from public display.
The Greens opened debate
on the issue in the Bundestag,
Germany's parliament.
The government will be
challenged to take a position
on the matter that has been
the subject of a fierce con-
troversy among artists and
scholars for the past six
months.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 6, 1988
New Labor Zionist Head Says:
American Jews Must Speak Out
ANDREW SILOW CARROLL
NEW YORK (JTA) -
When Menachem Rosensaft
appeared at a Mideast peace
rally in New York, he was the
only scheduled speaker who
was also a member of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish
Organizations.
And when Israeli Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir ad-
dressed the Conference of
Presidents more than a month
ago, and warned American
Jewish leaders about speaking
out in criticism of Israel,
Rosensaft was one of only two
of those leaders to stand up
and challenge the premier:
"A lot of people came up to
me afterwards saying 'We
agree with you.' I said 'thank
you,' but told them I'd rather
they had told Shamir that,"
said Rosensaft.
As the newly-inducted presi-
dent of the Labor Zionist
Alliance, Rosensaft said he
refuses to believe that in shar-
ing the ideology of Israel's
Labor party, the LZA
represents the minority opi-
nion in the American Jewish
community .
Rosensaft assumes the
stewardship of the LZA suc-
ceeding Ezra Spicehandler
after having founded and serv-
ed as chairman of the Interna-
tional Network of Children of
Jewish Holocaust Survivors.
He also chairs the executive
committee of the World-
Jewish Congress-American
Section and the collections
committee of the New York
Holocaust Memorial
Commission.
Sitting in his office a day
afer his induction at the LZA's
triennial convention, and a
week before his fortieth birth-
day, the New York lawyer ex-
plained his views on the
Zionist movement in general,
and the Labor movement in
particular.
But whatever the topic,
whether speaking about the vi-
sion of Israel's founding
Laborites or what he called the
"inaction" of his own
organization over the past ten
years, he returned again and
again to the subject of "speak-
ing out."
"During the past several
decades, (Israel) had the
tendency to view the Zionist
organizations as merely a sup-
port body for Israel. Of course,
that's part of their role, but
not their entire role," he said.
The "entire role," he added,
is more akin to a partnership.
"To view the American Jewish
community as nothing but a
philanthropic arm or political
rubber stamp ... is both in-
sulting and unrealistic.
"We support Israel fully and
identify with her totally. But
that does not mean we have to
agree with every single deci-
sion or policy set by the
government or a particular
minister. Voicing our concerns
does not indicate disloyalty."
Shamir, he argued, "doesn't
purport to be apolitical on his
trips to the U.S." And if the
Conference of Presidents
nevertheless reaches a consen-
sus to support the prime
minister as the leader of
Israel, "then it is the respon-
sibility of those in the leader-
ship of the liberal organiza-
tions to make our views heard
there."
Most Jews in U. S. Congress
Considered Liberal
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) Four
of the seven Jews in the
Senate and 22 of the 28 Jewish
members of the House can be
considered liberals, according
to Americans for Democratic
Action
The liberal ADA ranked the
members of Congress by how
they voted in 1987 on 20 key
issues in the Senate and 25 in
the House. Sen. Howard
Metzenbaum (D-Ohio) and
Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.)
voted 100 percent for what the
ADA considers liberal posi-
tions, while those voting the
most conservative, 0 percent,
were Sens. Chic Hecht (R-
Nev.) and Willis Gradison (R-
Ohio).
Two other Jews in the House
voted less than 50 percent for
liberal positions: Rep. John
Miller (R-Wash.), 48 percent,
and Rep. Ben Erdreich (D-
Ala.),40.
"The Jewish members of
Congress have traditionally
reflected the liberalism of the
overall community, and 1987
was no exception," said Marc
Pearl, the ADA's national
director.
Pearl, the former
Washington representative of
the American Jewish Con-
gress, noted that while the
average score in the House
was 51 percent liberal in 1987,
the average for Jewish
members was "an astounding
81 percent."
In the Senate, the average
score for the Jewish members
was 59 percent, compared to
53 percent for the overall
Senate.
Dutch Essayist Dead At 90
By HENRIETTA BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) Jac-
ques de Kadt, a political
essayist of Jewish origin who
was a member of the Dutch
Parliament for more than 20
years, died here. He was 90.
De Kadt joined the Com-
munist Party as a young- man
but left to form an indepen-
dent left-wing party in the
1930s. When the Nazis invad-
ed Holland in 1940, he escaped
to England. He then went to
Australia and from there to In-
donesia (then called the Dutch
East Indies), where he was in-
terned by the Japanese in
1941.
De Kadt was the author of
books on fascism, the Soviet
Union and Indonesia.
Israelis
Debate
Expulsions
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israelis were debating
whether the deportation
orders issued against 20
Palestinian activists in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip will
subdue the Arab uprising in
the territories or escalate it to
new levels of violence.
The orders were issued in
the aftermath of a clash in the
West Bank village of Beita,
where a teen-age Jewish giri
was killed on April 6. Eight
Palestinians, including four
from Beita, were swiftly ex-
pelled to Lebanon.
The remaining 12, six of
whom are from Beita, have the
right to appeal. Three filed
their appeals Tuesday with a
military appeals board. If re-
jected by the military board,
they are entitled by law to a
hearing by Israel's Supreme
Court.
The action on 20 deportation
orders in a single day was seen
here as a new stage in the
military authorities' "get
tough" policy to suppress the
four-month-old Palestinian
uprising. Advocates of that
policy point to the relative
calm in the West Bank in re-
cent days as proof that the
measures are effective.
But critics, concerned that
the deportations will lead to a
new wave of unrest, noted that
two Palestinians were killed in
clashes with security forces
Monday in Rai village, in the
Jenin region of the West Bank.
Two others were wounded.
And late in the day, there
were reports of a major up-
surge of violence in the Gaza
Strip.
Peres Defends Deportations
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres defended the deporta-
tions. He told reporters during
a visit to the Jordan Valley,
that he regretted every expul-
sion, but he preferred to have
subversive elements out of the
country than engaged in
hostile activities inside it.
At an earlier interview,
Peres rejected suggestions
that the latest deportations
were a prelude to more
massive expulsions of Palesti-
nians. He stressed that the
deportees are known to be
leading activists and members
of terrorist organizations in-
volved in subversion and in-
citement to violence. Similar
statements were made by
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin.
The latest deportations were
reportedly authorized by what
is known as the "Prime
Ministers Club." It consists of
Shamir, Peres and Rabin, all of
whom hold or have held the of-
fice of prime minister.
The orders were issued amid
mounting pressure from mili-
tant Jewish settlers in the
West Bank and right-wing
politicians for tougher security
measures against Arabs in the
territories, particularly the
residents of Beita.
But the Israel Defense Force
chief of staff, Gen. Dan
Shomron, implied Tuesday
that the deportation orders
were of long standing and not
related to settler pressure
over the tragic events in Beita.
A Back-to-Basics Primer
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
With all the news coming out of the Middle East, it
might be a good time to get back to basics. Often
the sheer volume of coverage missile attacks,
riots, hijackings, presidential candidates' statements, etc.,
produces a kaTeidescope instead of a clear picture. As the
media focus shifts back and forth, the application of logic
and common sense often gives way to confusion leading to
erroneous and naive conclusions. The answers to some
basic questions may provide a more rational basis for judg-
ing unfolding events.
Q. If the Palestinians on the so-caUed West Bank say the
PLO represents them, why won't Israel negotiate with the
PLOf
A. The PLO is still pledged by word (its covenant) and
deed (its latest terrorist attack on Israeli civilians) to the
destruction of Israel. There is no reason to believe the PLO
and even more extremist groups would ever settle for a
mini-state. It is not only Jericho and Nablus most Palesti-
nians want, but Haifa and Jerusalem. A recent poll of West
Bankers demonstrated this loud and clear.
Q. Why won't Israel agree to "land for peace" and rely on
guarantees from the United States?
A. Paper guarantees in the Middle East are no substitute
for defensible borders. Israel's pre-1967 borders are simply
not defensible against the modern arms in the hands of
Israel's Arab foes and Israel did not have peace before
1967. There is also the problem of whom to negotiate with
and what kind of "peace" Israel could expect to get from
inherently unstable Arab regimes. Prime Minister Shamir
has stated if direct negotiations begin, "everything is on
the table." Sadat paid with his life for making peace with
Israel even though he got back "every inch of sacred Egyp-
tian soil."
Q. Why don't Israeli leaders listen more carefully to the
advice of American Jews?
A. Ultimately it will be Israelis, not Americans, who
must live with the consequences of security decisions made
by the leaders. Living in the United States, American Jews
do not send their children to the Army, serve two months a
year in the Reserves, nor are they subject to terrorist at-
tacks. Since Israel is a democracy, its own people can
change their leadership if it does not represent the views of
the majority. While not always agreeing with everything
Israel does, or with every word her leaders say, there is a
special responsibility to be more understanding.
Q. Doesn 't the current violence in the Territories mandate
immediate action for a permanent solution?
A. While the status quo with continuing violence and
fatalities appears intolerable, the wrong kind of solution
could be even worse. Or to answer this question in the time-
honored Jewish tradition with another question what
solution?
Q. Will there ever be peace in the Middle East between
Arabs and Jews?m
A. There will probably be conflict and tension for the
foreseeable future, given the lack of Arab unity and the
refusal of too many Arabs to be reconciled to Israel's right
to exist as a Jewish State. What can be hoped for is the
emergence of realistic Arab leaders (a la Sadat) who will
acknowledge Israel's permanence in the region and reach
some kind of accommodation, formal or informal, with
Israel. However, the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and
the unhelpful (until now) Soviet role militate against any
positive trend.
Q. Will U.S. support for Israel continue, given pressing
domestic needs and changing public opinionf
A. America's friendship with Israel is based on both sen-
timental and strategic grounds. The values both share as
fellow democracies complement Israel's position as a
reliable, battle-proven ally in an unstable region. Israel's
military capabilities help protect U.S. interests in the
Mediterranean and elsewhere at relatively low cost. Polls
continue to show that the American people overwhelmingly
support Israel as opposed to its Arab adversaries.
Q. What can American Jews do to help ensure the security
and well-being of Israel during these troubled times?
A. Being informed of the facts and transmitting them to
friends, local newspapers and elected representatives, is in
the best traditions of our democracy. It is precisely when
Israel is under attack that Jews in this country must be
counted upon to come to her defense and be even more
stalwart in their support.
In this regard there is a final question we might wish to
ask ourselves can we imagine what it would be like if
there were no Israel?
'Sharp Reaction Was A Must'
Appearing before the Knesset
Foreign Affairs and Defense
Committee, Shomron also
defended the IDF's demolition
of 14 houses in Beita. He said
the residents of the village "at-
tacked children and a sharp
reaction was a must."
But an autopsy and an IDF
investigation determined that
the Jewish victim at Beita,
15-year-old Tirza Porat, was
killed by a bullet apparently
fired in panic by an armed
Jewish settler, not by stones
thrown by an Arab mob, as
originally reported.
An Israeli civil rights group,
acting on that information,
won a Supreme Court order
Sunday halting the demolition
of Arab homes in Beita.


Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
AMIT WOMEN
The Beersheva Chapter will
meet on Wednesday, May 11,
at 12:30 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank, Kings Point,
Delray Beach.
Dr. David Demko will speak
on aging. Refreshments will be
served.
HADASSAH
The Menachem Begin
Chapter will meet on Wednes-
day, May 18, noon, at Temple
Emeth, 5780 West Atlantic
Ave., Delray Beach. The new
president of Florida Atlantic
Region will install the slate of
officers. Entertainment will be
provided by the Kings Point
"Happy Hoofers."
NA'AMAT USA
The Beersheeba Club will
spend Mother's Day (May 8) on
the Viking Princess. The
cruise is from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
and the price of $57 includes
bus transportation, tax and
tips. Reservations: 499-9748 or
499-3971.
The Beersheeba Club's In-
stallation of Officers for
1988-89 will take place on
Tuesday, May 10, at Boca
Pointe. Lunch will be served
and there will be entertain-
ment. For information:
499-1573 or 499-3971.
Beersheba Club is planning a
cruise on the Carnival Cruise
Lines to the Western Carib-
bean from Port of Miami. Sail-
ing date is Dec. 10 to 17. For
information: 499-9748 or
499-1573.
The Kinneret Chapter of
Delray Beach will install.its
next year's officers on Mon-
day, May 23, at a luncheon at
the Pelican Restaurant in Boca
Raton.
Mildred Weiss, a member of
the national board, will preside
at the installation. A skit will
provide the entertainment.
The cost is $12. For informa-
tion: 498-7491.
The Kinneret Chapter is
planning a trip to the Main
Library and Art Museum on
Las Olas Boulevard in Ft.
Lauderdale. The trip will take
place on Wednesday, May 18.
On exhibit at the Art
Museum is the Sphinx, the
nude sculpture that had been
on Worth Avenue in Palm
Beach. Guided tours will be
provided 'through both
facilities and lunch can be
bought at the library. The $12
cost will cover all admission
fees and transportation from
the Palm Greens Tennis
Courts.
For information and reser-
vations: 495-2432 or 498-1031.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
The Lakeside Chapter will
hold its annual installation of
officers on Monday, May 16, at
noon. The luncheon will take
place at Gleneagles Country
Club, Delray Beach. For infor-
mation: 272-3982, 272-1780 or
498-96%.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
The Women's League for
Israel will hold a regional
meeting on Friday, May 13,
9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., at the
Jewish Community Center,
Soref Hall.
A mini-breakfast and box
lunch will .be provided for
$3.50.
Guest speaker is Dr. Nili
Porat, Israeli directress.
Reservations: 748-6886.
Dutch Trip To
Israel Postponed
By HENRIETTA BOAS
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The
scheduled visit to Israel next
month by Dutch Premier
Rudolf Lubbers and Foreign
Minister Hans van den Broek
has been postponed indefinite-
ly, it was announced here. The
official reason given is conflic-
ting agendas.
Lubbers announced at his
most recent news conference
that he would make the trip
during the third week in May,
when Israel will be celebrating
the 40th anniversary of its
independence.
He said the foreign minister
would accompany him in order
to convey to the Israeli govern-
ment Holland's objections to
the way it is handling the
Palestinian unrest in the West
Bank and Gaza Strip.
Originally, Lubbers planned
to go alone, returning a
January 1986 visit to the
Netherlands made by Shimon
Peres, who was prime minister
of Israel at the time.
But Dutch opinion has been
running strongly against
Israel since the Palestinian
unrest began. Members of
Parliament have urged that
Lubbers cancel his trip
because he would be the only
head of a European Communi-
ty member state to participate
in Israel's 40th anniversary
festivities.
According to the announce-
ment, the trip was postponed
because Peres will be in
Washington during the third
week of May and alternate
dates proposed by the Israelis
conflict with van den Broek's
plans to attend a meeting of
the U.N. Disarmament Com-
mission in Washington.
Murderer To Serve
Time On Kibbutz
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
American Jew serving a
25-year-to-life prison sentence
for murder arrived in Israel on
Tuesday to begin a rehabilita-
tion program at a kibbutz.
William Shapira, 62, was
paroled by the governor of
Florida after Herut Lapid,
head of the kibbutz move-
ment's prisoner rehabilitation
program, interceded on his
behalf. Lapid acted at the re-
quest of several prominent
Israelis interested in the case.
Under the agreement with
the Florida authorities, he will
be responsible for Shapira for
the 12 remaining years of his
sentence. Shapira will reside
at a kibbutz and willl share in
the routine duties expected of
all members.
AMSTERDAM -
Yad Vashem Award was
presented here recently to
40 Dutch families or groups
who saved Jewish lives dur-
ing the Nazi occupation of
Holland in World War II.
A hand-inscribed certificate was presented to Dr. and Mrs. Max
Matzkin by Sylvia Danizg, right, president of Hadassah's
Menachem Begin chapter of Delray Beach. In honor of Dr. Mat-
zkins birthday, Rose Matzkin, past national president of
Hadassah, and her family, had made a gift to Hadassah of an
electric dental chair and lamp.
In Warsaw, Thousands Of Jews Gather
For Commemoration Of Uprising
By MILTON JACOBY
WARSAW (JTA) All of
Warsaw seems to be preparing
for the main events com-
memorating the 45th anniver-
sary of the Warsaw Ghetto
Uprising, scheduled for Mon-
day and Tuesday.
Thousands of Jews from 35
countries have been gathering
here to participate in the com-
memorative rites, which began
on April 14. It is by far the
largest convocation in the
history of the ceremonies,
which began shortly after
World War II and are held
every five years.
This time round, the accent
is on youth. Last Thursday,
2,000 children from 35 coun-
tries joined in a "march for the
living," from the chambers of
horror at Auschwitz to the
death camp of Birkenau, a
distance of three miles. Almost
half of the participants were
from the United States and
Israel.
Waving blue-and-white flags
and wearing Windbreakers
with Stars- of David designed
by artist Yaacov Agam, they
were an endless sea of blue. At
the end of their haunting
journey, between the
crematoria of Birkenau, they
were addressed by former
Israeli President Yitzhak
Navon, now minister of
culture and education; Simcha
Dinitz, chairman of the World
Zionist Organization-Jewish
Agency Executive; and Ben-
jamin Netanyahu, who recent-
ly resigned from his post as
Israel's ambassador to the
United Nations.
Red Cross Pressed To Recognize
Magen David Adorn
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Red Cross associations in
Europe, Latin America and
Asia are being asked to of-
ficially recognize the emblem
of Israel's Magen David Adorn,
in an effort to bypass the In-
ternational Red Cross's con-
tinued refusal to do so.
Rabbi Rubin Dobin, interna-
tional president of Operation
Recognition for Magen David
Adorn of Israel, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Thursday that the American
Red Cross has already entered
into what is known as
"bilateral recognition," by
placing the Magen David
Adorn emblem on its let-
terhead along with the Red
Cross and Muslim Red
Crescent.
The American Red Cross,
with the support of President
Reagan and Congress, has
long taken the lead in pressing
for international recognition.
Dobin, an orthodox rabbi in
Miami Beach, met here with
Richard Schubert, president of
the American Red Cross, and
Martin Citrin Dead
enlisted his support to gain
bilateral recognition from
other countries.
He said Arab "blackmail"
has blocked the numerous ef-
forts to gain recognition for
the Israeli organization by the
International League of the
Red Cross. He noted the
league acknowledges that
Magen David Adorn meets
nine of the ten criteria for ad-
mission, the tenth being the
emblem.
The international league
recognizes only the Red Cross
and the Red Crescent. But un-
til 1980 it also recognized the
Red Lion and Star of Iran.
After the Shah of Iran was
overthrown, Iran adopted the
Red Crescent.
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Funeral services were held in
Southfield, Mich., Apr. 11 for
Martin Citrin, past president
of the Council of Jewish
Federations. Citrin, who resid-
ed in the Detroit suburb of
Bloomfield Hills, was 59 years
old.
Citrin served as CJF presi-
dent from 1981 to 1984. Dur-
ing his tenure, he stressed the
need to formulate new
methods of doing business in
order to meet fresh and
developing problems.
Citrin began his communal
work with the Jewish Welfare
Federation of Detroit, serving
as its president from 1975 to
1978. He also served as chair-
man of the C JF-United Jewish
Appeal Campaign Task Force,
a member of the board of
governors of the Jewish Agen-
cy for Israel and co-chairman
of its Commission on Jewish
Education.
In addition, Citrin served on
the board of trustees of UJA,
the executive committee of the
Joint Distribution Committee
and board of directors of the
United Israel Appeal.
Citrin was involved in
petroleum marketing for more
than 30 years and was presi-
dent of the Citrin Oil Co. from
1966 to 1970. He was the only
non-family executor of the
estate of Henry Ford 2nd.
Free Blood Pressure Screening
Free blood pressure screen-
ings will be offered by
Memorial Hospital in conjunc-
tion with Flager Federal Sav-
ings and Loan on Monday,
May 16, 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.,
at the bank on North Universi-
ty Drive in Pembroke Pines.
For information, 985-5961.
YOUR CAR
IN ISRAEL
140

,'. MiTEl
Ml A ,t
1-a00-533877t
Ml % It ** ON I
T t i A*. -
v I M|HA
a s- s


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 6, 1988
Mother's Day May 8 Hussein Sending Mixed Signals
Jews all over the world are
celebrating the 40th anniversary
of the birth of the modern State of
Israel. Like many births, there
was a long and tedious period of
gestation and a very difficult
labor. The 'pregnancy' began
about 1904, with the followers of
Theodore Herzl, who was un-
doubtedly the 'father' of the
State. (Jews had always lived in
the land, although they were
generally the Ultra-Orthodox,
who lived on donations from the
Diaspora.) Between 1904 and
1914, about 200 Jewish women
mostly from middle-class Euro-
pean families, arrived in Palestine
to pursue their Zionist ideals of
equality and justice. These women
were surely the mothers of this in-
credible 'baby', born in May of
1948, that was named "The State
of Israel'.
Many of those young settlers
were between the ages of 17 and
19. They expected to fulfill their
dreams by working on the soil in
their new land. Life was extreme-
ly difficult. They suffered through
wars with the Arabs and the first
World War in Europe, along with
the men. They also fell ill with
typhoid and malaria, along with
the men. Unfortunately, they
were not usually permitted to
work the land along with the men.
Women were almost always sent
to the kitchen or laundry. It was
only the 'exception' the
woman who insisted on field work,
who was allowed to till the soil or
plant the trees.
On January 2, 1904, Many a
Shochat, a 24 year old Russian im-
migrant, arrived in Palestine to
join her younger brother,
Nachum. Although she claimed
not to have been a Zionist, it did
not take long before she fell in
love with the country.
Accompanied by her brother,
she made a horseback tour
through Palestine. These are her
own words:
"We rode ten hours a day,
changing horses frequently. In
this way we cut through the entire
Arab settlement from Dan to
Beersheva. We visited Transjor-
dania, too. The entire trip took us
six weeks, and in the course of it
there grew up in me a deep and
passionate love for the country, a
love which filled the brain as well
as the heart. It is a love which has
lasted all through my life, and its
strength seems to be bound up
with the renewal of something
many centuries old."
The following year Manya made
a survey of the Jewish set-
tlements. She visited the Jewish
colonies and asked many ques-
tions with particular emphasis on
details of income, and the employ-
ment of Arab workers. Commen-
ting about colony life, she said,
"... I became acquainted with the
character of our first Aliyah; and I
came to a definite conclusion. My
comrades were absolutely mad!
The way they were working, there
was absolutely no hope of creating
in Palestine a Jewish agricultural
proletariat!"
"The Jewish workers in the col-
ony of Petach Tikvah had ac-
cepted the same conditions as the
Arabs; their pay was 5 paistres
(25 cents) a day. They believed as
Zionists they simply had not the
right to ask for more. They lived
eight to a room ... a small room
. .. their beds were mattresses on
the floor. When I told them that
they ought to demand houses and
public buildings they answered
proudly that this would be philan-
thropy ... it would only be a
renewal of the evil of the
'Chalukah' ... the charity system
for Palestinian Jewry."
Convinced that a Jewish
Palestine was only possible if the
people lived together in collective
settlements, Manya proposed the
idea to others. Traveling to Paris
to do research on collectives, she
attempted to convince the Jewish
Colonization Association to buy
land in the Jezreel Valley. While
in Paris, she also raised money
from Baron Edmond de
Rothschild and others in order to
buy arms for Jewish self defense
in Russia. These she smuggled in-
to Russia .. where she remained
for three months. Manya records,
"I re-entered Russia illegally.
During the pogram in Shedlitz, I
took an active part in the Jewish
self-defence. Later I organized a
national group to exact vengeance
from the leaders of Russian anti-
Continued on Page 5
Strict* 0*t~vl
PATHefSDAV
mSSh jm**' *****
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OCtAMFMHT
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4DAYS/3NGHTS$Q^
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db* occ

T^^ The Jewish ^k y
FloridiaN
;
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
of South County
PrtlSkorktt
SUZANNE SMOCHET
Executive Editor
PubliibM- Weekly Mid-Seateabcr threat* Mid-May.
Bi->rlily balance ef year (43 iaeaee)
Main Office Plant: 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami Fla. 33132 Phone 3734806
Advertising Dlrecter. Stacl Leaser, Phene SU-II52
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7)
Friday, May 6,1988
Volume 10
19
IYAR 5748
Number 10
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israelis are mulling over con-
flicting versions of where King
Hussein of Jordan stands with
respect to the American peace
initiative, after his final talks
with Secretary of State
George Shultz.
An upbeat version was con-
veyed to Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres by Wat
Cluverius, a senior American
diplomat sent by Shultz to
brief Israeli leaders on his
talks in Arab capitals. Accor-
ding to this version, Shultz
was very much satisfied by his
discussions with the Jordanian
ruler.
But an opposite impression
was left by an official state-
ment issued in Amman by
Premier Zaid al-Rifai that in-
dicated Hussein to be uncom-
promising in demands for
Israeli concessions.
According to that statement,
Israel's withdrawal from all of
the administered territories
and a full role for the Palestine
Liberation Organization are
Hussein's conditions for par-
ticipating in peace talks with
Israel.
Sources close to Premier
Yitzhak Shamir said Hussein
actually hardened his positions
during Shultz's six-day visit to
the region. They recalled that
they had said all along that
Hussein would reject Shultz's
idea of negotiations without
thePLO.
Aides to Peres Conceded that
Jordan's public statement does
project a tougher stance. But
they suggested that in private,
the king may have been more
flexible, contributing to
Shultz's optimism. The
Foreign Ministry therefore
leaked Cluverius' report to the
media.
Cluverius also met with
Shamir amid reports that
Shultz is tentatively planning
yet another trip to the Middle
East, possible this month,
after his meeting with Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze.
Shultz May Return To
Mideast
Shultz told reporters before
leaving Amman to return to
Washington that he would
return to the Middle East to
keep the American peace in-
itiative alive. He declined to
say when.
That visit presumably would
precede the next summit
meeting between President
Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev, scheduled
to take place in Moscow from
May 29 to June 2.
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B'nai B'rith Youth Council Weekend
Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
The Gold Coast Council B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization
(BBYO) recently held its Spr-
ing MIT/AIT Training
Weekend at Camp Shalom in
West Palm Beach. Coor-
dinated by Steve Finkelstein,
Danny Gal pern, Marci Roberts
and Jill Zwerner, the Council's
membership vice presidents,
the weekend drew over 50
BBYO members from North
Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach counties.
The purpose of the weekend
is to teach new members about
the history, structure, rituals
and traditions of BBYO. Dur-
ing the two days, the MITs
(Members-In-Training girls)
and AITs (Alephs-In-Training
boys) attended various ses-
sions and programs designed
to give them a comprehensive
understanding of BBYO and
how it works.
Friday evening
"icebreakers helped the par-
ticipants meet one another and
were followed by a traditional
Shabbat dinner and Friday
night services. A series of
workshops were then held on
the history of the organization,
I b
followed by planning groups
for the Saturday Shabbat
services.
Saturday's program includ-
ed the religious services, more
learning sessions, and athletics
in the afternoon. The evening
was capped off by Havdallah, a
song session, and a "BBYO
Bowl" to see how much
everyone had learned.
The highlight of the
weekend was the formal In-
duction Ceremonies, at which
the participants became full-
fledged members of BBYO. A
talent show and dance
followed.
After Sunday breakfast and
cleanup time, the final Friend-
ship Circle offered an oppor-
tunity for BBYO's newest
members to reflect upon the
things they had learned and
the friends they had made.
The Gold Coast Council con-
sists of 20 chapters throughout
North Dade, Broward and
Palm Beach counties. Jewish
teens, ages 14-18, who may be
interested in joining BBYO
can call 581-0218 or 792-6700.
Mother's Day
Continued from Page 4
Semitism. The police looked for
me in St. Petersburg. I changed
my lodgings every day, never
sleeping twice in the same place.
With clockwork regularity the
police always searched, too late,
the place I had slept the night
before. My name was unknown to
them."
Returning to Palestine in 1906,
Manya again took up the cause of
collective farming, but she realiz-
ed that what she had in mind had
never been done, anywhere.
Critics in France considered the
idea so ridiculous they were ready
/g------
Emigration On Rise
NEW YORK (JTA) A
total of 1,088 Jews left the
Soviet Union during the month
of April, according to figures
provided by the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry and
the Geneva-based In-
tergovernmental Committee
for Migration.
This is the highest number of
Jews to leave the Soviet Union
in a single month since May
1981, when 1,110 emigrated.
The April figures bring 1988
emigration to date to 3,526
Jews, surpassing the 1982
year-end total of 2,688, and
totals for all years since.
Soviet Jewry activists,
however, note that emigration
levels are still well below those
of 1979, when more than
51,000 Jews were allowed to
leave the country.
Of the 1,088 Soviet Jews
who left in April, 11 took
direct flights to Israel via
Bucharest, Romania. But 908
Jews or 83.5 percent chose to
go to countries other than
Israel, making April the worst
ever month for neshira, accor-
ding to the Public Council for
Soviet Jews in Israel.
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to prove that it could never suc-
ceed. Journeying to America on
behalf of her objectives, she
became acquainted with two in-
fluential Zionist leaders, Henriet-
ta Szold and Dr. Judah L. Magnes.
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vanced, and demonstrated once
and for all that a collective
economy was possible."
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 6, 1988
;..
GHETTO FIGHTERS MONUMENT Marek Edelman, center,
the last surviving commander in Poland of the 19US Warsaw
Jewish Ghetto Uprising, stands as the Polish national anthem is
sung at an unsanctioned rally to pay homage to victims of the
Nazi Holocaust in World War II. AP/Wide World Photo
Israel 40th Anniversary:
The JDC Was There
In 1948
Celebrations of the 40th An-
niversary of the Independence
of the State of Israel have
evoked a wave of nostalgia
about the heroic and dramatic
days of 1948.
Ma'ariv, the mass circula-
tion daily in Israel, recently
reprinted the front page of its
April 21st, 1948 issue. (The
paper had only four pages then
and cost the equivalent of one
U.S. cent.) Most of the
headlines dealt with the
British Army's activities in
Palestine, the Haganah bat-
tles, and the preparation for
the upcoming General
Assembly of the United Na-
tions in Lake Success, New
York.
There was also a report from
Paris: The European Council
of "The Joint" The
American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee had
allocated $98 million for aid to
Jews in the Middle East and in
Europe. Ma'ariv quoted
Joseph Schwartz, a senior
Joint official at the time, as
saying: "Every single dollar
that we are not raising from
American Jews through the
UJA may cost the loss of life."
Forty years later, this state-
ment still rings true. Joseph
Schwartz, who later became
Executive Vice-President of
JDC, is no longer alive.
However, the Joint Distribu-
tion Committee, on behalf of
the American Jewish Com-
munity, continues to offer
much needed assistance to
Jews in Israel and in 33 other
countries around the world.
Heinz Eppler, President of
JDC, says r'We are proud to be
an inseparable part of the
history of the State of Israel.
The needs have changed since
1948, but the commitment of
American Jews through JDC
is as strong as ever."
Soviet Umbrella Group Formed
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Nearly 400 activists represen-
ting two dozen Soviet emigre
organizations convened to
launch a new umbrella body,
and elected ex-refusenik
Natan Sharansky as its first
president.
Although spokesmen for the
new organization insisted it
was non-political, seasoned
observers regard the forma-
tion of the Zionist Federation
of Soviet Jewry as a signifi-
cant development for the
180,000-strong Soviet im-
migrant community in Israel,
and for the world-wide strug-
gle for free Jewish emigration
from the USSR.
The founders plan to elect an
11-member executive commit-
tee in the near future. Its
members will represent the
various political and cultural
strands within the Soviet im-
migration movement, and will
include, for example, one
member from the Likud-
affiliated Soviet emigre
organization and one from a
Labor-aligned organization.
According to emigre activist
Yosef Mendelevich, the new
federation will enable the
movement to "speak with one
voice." He said they would
take extreme care to avoid
politics, and that he was confi-
dent ideological divisions could
be transcended in order to
establih a strong, broadly-
based organization to serve
the common interests of all
emigres and activists.
Hussein Sending Mixed Signals
On Shultz Peace Initiative
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israelis are mulling over con-
flicting versions of where King
Hussein of Jordan stands with
respect to the American peace
initiative, after his final talks
with Secretary of State
George Shultz.
An upbeat version was con-
veyed to Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres by Wat
Cluverius, a senior American
diplomat sent by Shultz to
brief Israeli leaders on his
talks in Arab capitals. Accor-
ding to this version, Shultz
was very much satisfied by his
discussions with the Jordanian
ruler.
But an opposite impression
was left by an official state-
ment issued in Amman by
Premier Zaid al-Rifai that in-
dicated Hussein to be uncom-
promising in demands for
Israeli concessions.
According to that statement,
Israel's withdrawal from all of
the administered territories
and a full role for the Palestine
Liberation Organization are
Hussein's conditions for par-
ticipating in peace talks with
Israel.
Sources close to Premier
Yitzhak Shamir said Hussein
actually hardened his positions
during Shultz's six-day visit to
the region. They recalled that
they had said all along that
Hussein would reject Shultz's
idea of negotiations without
the PLO.
Aides to Peres conceded that
Jordan's public statement does
project a tougher stance. But
they suggested that in private,
the king may have been more
flexible, contributing to
Shultz's optimism. The
Foreign Ministry therefore
leaked Cluverius' report to the
media.
Cluverius also met with
Shamir amid reports that
Shultz is tentatively planning
yet another trip to the Middle
East, possible this month,
after his meeting with Soviet
Foreign Minister Eduard
Shevardnadze.
Shultz May Return To
Mideast
Shultz told reporters before
leaving Amman to return to
Washington that he would
return to the Middle East to
keep the American peace in-
itiative alive. He declined to
say when.
That visit presumably would
precede the next summit
meeting between President
Reagan and Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev, scheduled
to take place in Moscow from
May 29 to June 2.
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.......-----
Bat/Bar Mitzvah
*"^*^**-#^*<##i#######
Friday, May 6, 1988/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Temple News
MEREDITH LINN
Meredith Linn, daughter of
Jill Hoffman, will be called to
the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday morning, May 7, at
Congregation B'nai Israel,
Boca Raton. She will lead the
congregation in prayer and
study of the weekly Torah por-
tion, Emor (Leviticus 21-24).
Meredith will share her Bat
Mitzvah in absentia with Anna
Kaganovich of Minsk in the
U.S.S.R.
Meredith attends Loggers
Run Middle School. In her free
time she enjoys roller skating,
dancing and listening to music.
In addition to her mother,
the special day will be shared
by her sister, Alison; brother,
Adam; grandparents, Lorraine
and Irving Hoffman of Boca
Raton; and great-
grandparents, Elsie and Ben-
jamin Schwartz of Delray
Beach.
AMANDA STRAUS
Amanda Straus, daughter of
Sonja and Herbert P. Straus,
will be called to the Torah of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
as a Bat Mitzvah on Saturday,
May 7. As an ongoing Temple
project, Amanda will be
"Twinning" with Maya
Mullokanov of the Soviet
Union.
A seventh grade student at
Pine Crest School, Amanda at-
tends the Temple Beth El
Religious School.
Family members sharing in
the simcha are Amanda's
sister and brother Elayne and
Adam; and her grandparents,
Carol Straus of North Miami
Beach and Hildegarde
Jazowka of Cannonsburg, Pa.
Mr. and Mrs. Straus will
host a Kiddush in Amanda's
honor following Havdalah
Service.
JEREMY MATZA
Jeremy Matza, son of Dr.
Barry I. and Susan Matza, will
be called to the Torah of Tem-
ple Beth El of Boca Raton as a
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday, May
7.
A seventh grade student at
Boca Raton Academy, Jeremy
attends the Temple Beth El
Religious School.
Family members sharing in
the simcha are Jeremy's
brother, Joshua; grand-
parents, Betty and Irving Eps-
tein of Palm Beach and Kaye
and Sam Matza of Ft. Lauder-
dale; and great-grandparent,
Lee Ross of Palm Beach.
Dr. and Mrs. Matza will host
a Kiddush in Jeremy's honor
following Shabbat morning
service.
EMILY TAUB
Emily Taub, daughter of Dr.
Marc and Ronna Taub, was
called to the Torah of Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bat
Mitzvah on Saturday, April 30.
As an ongoing Temple pro-
ject, Emily was "twinned"
with Ina Lederman of the
Soviet Union.
A seventh grade student at
Pine Crest School, Emily at-
tends the Temple Beth El
Religious School.
Family members sharing in
the simcha are Emily's
brother, David; and grand-
parents Hy and Betty Taub of
Pompano Beach, and Albert
and Pearl Alt of Delray Beach.
Dr. and Mrs. Taub will host a
Kiddush in Emily's honor
following Shabbat morning
service.
TEMPLE EMETH
A Yom Y'rushalayim Day
(Jerusalem Day) program on
Sunday, May 15, 7 p.m., will
celebrate the anniversary of
the reunification of the City of
Jerusalem. The program will
demonstrate how musical
culture assisted the Jews to
survive through a difficult
Diaspora. It will show how
over the millenium, whenever
the Jews prayed and in
whatever land they lived, they
expressed through prayer and
song the eternal hope of a
return to Israel. These aspira-
tions helped the Jews over-
come the persecutions,
discriminations and har-
rassments of every day life and
was part of both their religious
and secular life.
Since the Reunification of
Israel in 1967 new prayers and
new songs have been written
and composed. The program of
ancient prayers and new songs
of hope will be presented by
President Cantor David J.
Leon, Cantor Zvi Adler and
Max Willner. The public is in-
vited to attend.
Temple Emeth is located at
5780 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach.
ANSHEI EMUNA
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks will
preach the sermon on the
theme "Mother-Hood and
Nation-Hood" at the Sabbath
morning service on Saturday,
May 7, at 8:30 a.m. Kiddush
will follow.
Rabbi Sacks will preach the
sermon on the theme "Moun-
tains to Climb" at the Sabbath
morning service on Saturday,
May 14, at 8:30 a.m. Kiddush
will follow.
The Se'udat Shli'shet with
the Rabbi's D'var Torah in
Yiddish will be celebrated in
conjunction with the Sabbath
twilight minyon services.
A seminar in the Talmudic
Tome "Perke O'Vas" (Ethics
of the Father) is led by Rabbi
Sacks, in the course of the Sab-
bath twilight minyon services.
Daily classes in the "Judaic
Code of Religious Law"
(Schulchan Orach), led by Rab-
bi Sacks, begin at 7:30 a.m.
preceding the daily minyon
services and at 6:30 p.m. in
conjunction with the daily
twilight minyon services.
For information: 499-9229.
The Men's Club of Temple
Anshei Shalom, 7099 West
Atlantic Avenue, Delray
Beach, will sponsor a
breakfast/meeting on Sunday,
May 15, at 9:30 a.m. A raffle
drawing, with the prize a stay
at The Lido Spa will be held.
The guest speaker will be
humorist Oscar Goldstein of
Menorah Temple. For infor-
mation: 495-0466.
TEMPLE BETH EL
The Temple Beth El Solo's of
Boca (for ages 49 and over)
will hold a house party on Sun-
day, May 14, at 6 p.m. Space is
said to be limited therefore
reservations are necessary.
Costs of admission are $5 for
members and $7 for guests.
Information: 395-2226,
482-4340 or 428-9665.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
The installation of the officers
and board of Sisterhood Tem-
ple Beth Shalom of Century
Village West will be held on
Thursday, May 12 at 1 p.m. at
the temple. It will be a
membership tea and dessert
party under the hospitality of
Sonia Oresky and her commit-
tee. The program will include a
fashion snow, under the direc-
tion of Rose Schun. For reser-
vations: 487-0633 or
483-6947.
Dr. Rabbi Donald D. Crain
will install the slate of officers:
Hilda Kravitz, president; Rose
Juvall, vice-president and
chairman of the board;
Dorothy Tane, vice-president
membership; Sylvia Leitner,
vice-president fund raising;
Sylvia Goldman-Gorbaty, vice
president, financial secretary;
Minnie Rappaport, vice presi-
dent, boutique-gift shop; Ann
Alster, treasurer; Alberta
Tancos, recording secretary;
Lillian Brasnick, correspon-
ding secretary; and Belle
Lupa, honorary member.
CONGREGATION B'NAI
ISRAEL
Shabbat services on Friday,
May 6, at Congregation B'nai
Israel, Boca Raton, will be held
at the Center for Group
Counseling on Boca Rio Road,
starting at 8 p.m. Cheryl
Newman's third grade
students from B'nai Israel's
School for Living Judaism will
present a portion of the
service.
On Friday, May 13, Shabbat
services will begin at 8 p.m. at
the Center for Group Counsel-
ing on Boca Rio Road.
Members of the Sisterhood
will conduct a major portion of
the Sisterhood Shabbat
Service.
Valve of Religion
Is Radio Talk Theme
The value of religion will be
discussed by Rabbi Samuel
Silver of Temple Sinai, Delray
Beach, on the Jeff Charles
Talk Show on WNWS, 790
AM, on Tuesday, May 3, noon.
After setting forth the ra-
tionale for religion, Rabbi
Silver will talk to listeners who
telephone into the station.
Tennis Team. other family members sharing
Sharing Joshua's Bar Mitz- *nis special day will be
vah, in absentia, will be Ilya Joshua's brother and sisters,
Khanukaev of Derbent in the GreSg> Kristin, Megan and
U.S.S.R. Melissa, and his grandmother,
Joanne Broadhurst, of Suring,
In addition to his parents, Wisconsin.
Joint Salvation Booklet Published
JOSHUA STEINBERG
Joshua Steinberg, son of
Sherry and Jerry Steinberg,
will become a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday morning, May 14, at
Congregation B'nai Israel,
Boca Raton. Joshua will lead
the congregation in prayer and
study of the weekly Torah por-
tion, Behar-Bechukotai,
(Leviticus 25-27).
Joshua attends Boca Raton
Middle School where he plays
tennis. He also plays for the
Town Swim and Racquet Club
NEW YORK (JTA) A
booklet discussing the differ-
ing requirements for salvation
in Catholic and Jewish tradi-
tions has been published by the
American Jewish Committee's
Skirball Institute on American
Values and the Los Angeles
Archdiocesan Office on
Ecumenical and Religious
Affairs.
Inspired by the Los Angeles
Priest-Rabbi Committee,
which prepares joint
statements on matters of in-
terest to Catholics and Jews,
the booklet, "Salvation-
Redemption: Catholic-Jewish
Reflections," is available from:
American Jewish Committee,
165 E. 56th St., New York,
N.Y. 10022.
B'nai Zion Beth El Honors ORT Meets
"The Mid-East and The
Media Fatal Attraction?"
will be discussed by William F.
Saulson at a meeting of B'nai
Zion in Century Village, Deer-
field Beach, on Saturday, May
14, at 8 p.m.
Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton will honor its Religious
School and Nursery School
teachers at a faculty dinner on
Friday, May 13, 5:45 p.m. and
at Sabbath services at 8 p.m.
The Del Pointe Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
meet Tuesday, May 17, 12:30
&.m., at Temple Sinai, Delray
each.
Saving through June 15, 1988 Only
PRE-CONSTRUCTION
MAUSOLEUMS
FROM 4,775 PRE-NEED ONLY
Including Opening/dosing, Perpetual Care and Basic Inscription
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
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JF/JA


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 6, 1988
Cost of Living Up
In First Quarter
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's
inflation rate is both higher
and lower, according to figures
released by the Central
Bureau of Statistics.
It ran at an annual rate of 17
percent during the first three
months of 1988, well above the
12 percent targeted by the
Treasury. The March hike was
1.6 percent, also higher than
anticipated.
The good news is inflation
was down in the 1987-88 fiscal
year, which ended in March. It
stood at 15.7 percent, down
from 23 percent.
Hoosiers To Train Rabbis
SOUTH BEND (JTA) The
first rabbinical college in In-
diana's 170-year history has
been incorporated here.
The Rabbi Naftali Riff
Yeshiva will formally begin its
college-level rabbinical studies
program in August, but
already operates a kollel, or
advanced Talmud study, divi-
sion composed of ordained rab-
bis. The yeshiva will offer a
high school program for boys
beginning in the fall of 1989.
The new yeshiva is named
for the grandfather of its
founder, Rabbi Yisrael Get-
tinger, and its dean, Rabbi
Raphael Moshe Gettinger. Ac-
cording to Yisrael Gettinger,
spiritual leader of the Hebrew
Orthodox Congregation of
South Bend since 1980, the ci-
ty provides an ideal at-
mosphere for the yeshiva
because it is "quiet and pic-
turesque with tree-lined
streets and a special small-
town quality of life."
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