The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
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oclc - 44560186
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ocm44560186
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AA00014304:00301

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Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, December 18, 1987
S
The Chanukah Legend And Modern Miracle
By DVORA WAYSMAN
(WZPS) Chanukah, known as the Festival of
Lights, or more correctly the Festival of
Dedication, is the only important Jewish festival
that is not mentioned in the Bible. The story is re-
counted in the First and Second Books of the Mac-
cabees, which form part of the Apocrypha. It oc-
curs each year on the Hebrew date of 25th Kislev,
with candles being lit each night for eight days as a
symbol of the miracle which occurred in 165 BCE.
The story is well-known: Chanukah com-
memorates the victory of Judah the Maccabee and
his tiny band of loyal followers over the forces of
the Syrian king Antiochus, who tried to subdue
Palestine by wiping out the Jewish religion. The
Greek language, gods and customs were introduc-
ed and giant sports stadiums built; the temple was
defiled and a giant statue of the Greek god Zeus
wasplaced there, with the Jews ordered to worship
it. When Judah the Maccabee's army triumphed
and he re-established an independent Jewish
government, his first priority was to purify the
Temple.
The miracle of Chanukah is acknowledged as be-
ing that of the cruse of oil. There was just once
cruse of pure oil left in the Temple, but instead of
burning for just one day, as it was meant to do, it
burnt for eight days until the Jews had time to ac-
quire more. It was also something of a miracle for
such a small army to have been victorious against
great battalions, but we are not told that it was due
to any supernatural phenomena. It was not a
miracle in the sense of other Biblical miracles ...
the partin gof the sea in the crucial moment after
the Exodus from Egypt; the staying of the sun in
the days of Joshua; or when the great walls of
Jericho came tumbling down at the blast of a
trumpet. The Jewish victory in the Chanukah story
was evidently due (as in the modern Six-Day War)
to superior military tactics and strategy, and a
strong motivation on the part of the Jews that their
ancestral faith should survive.
Nevertheless, the victory of the Maccabees ap-
pears to be the visible and perceptible enactment of
God's will. The festival possesses human
significance and is far more than a Jewish national
celebration it is a festival of liberty which
glorifies the right of freedom of worship for all
peoples.
This fight for the right to practice Judaism did
not vanish with King Antiochus. The Jews of the
Soviet Union are still denied this right, and
"refuseniks" continue to dwell in the darkness of
oppression. Similarly, Syrian and Ethiopian Jews
long for the right to worship without fear of
reprisal and the right to make aliya to Israel.
The true relevance of the Festival of Lights can
be felt in Israel, particularly in Jerusalem where
the events of the Chanukah story took place more
than 2,000 years ago. In Israel, one's loyalty is not
divided, and there is nothing to compete with our
own national and religious holidays. Almost every
Jerusalem home is bedecked with a Chanukah
menorah during the eight days of the festival, and
each evening the little candles are a beacon of light
as voices all over the city sing Maoz Tsur.
The miracle we are proclaiming is not an act of
supernatural grace. Our miracle is that the Jewish
people and the State of Israel continue to survive,
and that our Light will never be extinguished.
\
On the Rock:
Gibraltar Jewish Piety And Secular Worldliness
By DAVID LANDAU
As in most synagogues, the
gossip in Nefutsot Yehudah
centers on whether the man
sitting in the front row will run
for office yet again.
But in Nefutsot Yehudah,
the office in question is not
gabbai (or parnas,(as it is call-
ed there), but of chief minister
of the government.
An Israeli reporter recently
visiting was reluctant to
trespass on the special Sab-
bath ambience by asking Sir
Joshua Hassan straight out
about his plans. Next morning,
however, at the delectable
Jewish patisserie around the
corner, the reporter seemed to
have his answer.
The chief minister, dapper in
Sunday cravatte and tweeds,
amiably kissed each of the
shop girls as they wrapped his
bread and cakes. A bodyguard,
dour and discreet, followed
him out.
But Gibraltar's politics are
apparently not so easily
deciphered. The shop girls,
Suite unflustered, made it
lear to the newsman that they
expect the weekly kisses to
continue whether or not Sir
Joshua decides to prolong his
30-year rule over this rock.
They simply like him.
Everybody seems to like
everybody in Gibraltar, which
makes it such a pleasant place
to visit and to live on, too,
despite it tininess, 2.1 miles in
area and 1,3% feet high.
On Shabbat morning, after
services have ended at the four
synagogues and the youth mi-
nyan at the Jewish school, the
entire Jewish community
(about 600 souls) seem to be
out on Main Street, strolling
and exchanging smiles and
small talk with their non-
Jewish friends. About 30,000
people live on the rock.
At the Convent, the official
residence of the British gover-
nor, they may pause to inspect
the solitary guard, marching
up and down in his mirror-
polished boots. Rachel
Benisso. whose husband
Abraham is a cantor famous
throughout the Sephardi
world, remembers when her
son Isaac was in the army (the
Gibraltar Regiment) and took
his turn to stand guard there.
She would bring him a pot of
steaming hamim (cholent) to
the guard room across the
street.
Gibraltar is unique in many
ways. A last bastion, literally
and metaphorically, of the
British Empire, the British
fleet and army still stand
guard there over the entrace
to the Mediterranean Sea. On
Main Street, Marks and
Spencer and British Home
Store ensure that this corner
of the continent shall be
forever England.
This doesn't stop housewives
from hopping across the
border to La Linea, Spain for
shopping, and rich men's
yachts ply casually from
Gibraltar s fine marina to the
jet-set playground of Marbella,
on Spain's southern coast. But
political relations are still
sometimes tense, and the
Gibraltarians are fierce in
their allegiance to London.
For the Jewish traveler min-
ing the famous cities of
southern Spain in search of the
Golden Age, Gibraltar's uni-
queness lies in the special at-
mosphere of coexistence of
which the Jewish com muni ty is
so proud, and in which it has
flourished for centuries.
A visit to Cordoba, bir-
thplace of Maimonides; to
Seville, with its massive
cathedral; and to the Alham-
bra in Granada is a feast for
the eye, but a strain on the im-
agination. The remarkable
rivalry and interplay of the
Moorish and Catholic cultures
in Spain are clear to see in
the architecture, in the
gardens and museums. But of
the great flowering of Jewish
life, so fully reported in extant
literature, almost nothing
tangible remains.
The great Alhambra itself,
the guidebook tells us, was
originally built by a Jewish
minister as his own place. Cen-
turies later, King Ferdinand
and Queen Isabella, the
Catholic monarchs who drove
out the Moslem Moors, sat in
the breathtakingly beautiful
building and turned a deaf ear
to Don Isac Abardanel's pleas.
He and his whole Jewish
community were banished
from the laand and the society
in which they and their
forbearers had been totally in-
tegrated culturally,
economically, politically. Yet,
they had totally preserved
their own identity as Jews.
This fusion was probably uni-
que in the Diaspora ex-
perience. Even in America to-
day it is arguably not yet
matched.
Wandering through the
Juderia (Jewish section) of
Seville or the single surviving
and unused synagogue in Cor-
doba, it is hard to conjure up
those centuries of Jewish
vitality and mutually enriching
coexistence with the wider
world.
Gibraltar, in its own tiny
way, can help. Not just
because the popular chief
minister happens to be Jewish,
or the mayor, or the head of
the bar, or the chairman of the
chamber of commerce.
But also because the Jewish
shops on Main Street are all
closed on the Sabbath and
festivals, and that seems
perfectly natural to everyone.
Because the Israel flag flies
from the honorary consul's of-
fice from sunset Friday to
nightfall Saturday. Because
the Catholic archbishop at-
tends a brit milah and the
governor attends synagogue
on Hanukkah.
Because in order to ascer-
tain the extend of the erui
(area in which it is permissible
to carry during the Sabbath),
the visitor need only ask In-
spector Moses Benggio of the
Gibraltar Police, whom he will
encounter in the kosher goods
shop, just opposite the
cathedral.
Because a leader of the local
British Legion is Capt. (Ret.)
Solomon Levy, whose booming
bass rings out at services at his
synagogue.
Levy, until his recent retire-
ment from the local ter-
ritorials, commanded the
massive naval guns that look
out over the straits. They were
fired on the Queen's birthday
until Sir Joshua persuaded
Levy that the cost in broken
window panes was too high.
The captain had asked for a
Jewish legal ruling about fir-
ing on the Sabbath.
Continued on Page S
Hq)pyHaojkkah
*i*^i^i
From the Delta
family to your family,
here's wishing you a
joyous holiday. And if
you're gathering together
during the Festival
of Lights, remember
that Delta and The Delta
Connection* serve over
230 cities worldwide.
DELTA
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Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Curacao Charm and Jewish Community
The Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue in Willemstad
Curacao, the oldest
continually-operated house of
worship in the Western
Hemisphere, will be the focal
point of January's Curacao
Caribbean Jewish Festival, a
unique program honoring
Curacao's 300-year-old Jewish
community as a haven offering
religious freedom.
Dedicated in 1732, the tem-
ple is one of Curacao's most
popular attractions. The struc-
ture has an exterior reminis-
cent of Amsterdam's Por-
tuguese Synagogue and an in-
terior rich with mahogany
wood, brass candeliers, and a
sand-carpeted floor.
Interesting legends and
theories account for the use of
the sand:
Symbolically, the sand
represents the Sinai Desert in
which the Jews sojourned
enroute to the Promised Land.
The interior of the Synagogue
is patterned after an ancient
Israeli encampment with the
Tabernacle in the center and
the Israelites encamped on the
perimeter.
Some prefer to think the
sand represents a blessing to
the patriarchs which declared
that their descendants would
be as numerous "as sand
which is upon the seashore."
A historical version of the
sands' use follows the premise
that the ancestors of its
original members fled to the
Curacao temple from Spain
and Portugal, placing sand on
the floors of their secret
synagogues to muffle the
sounds of prayer.
From a more practical stand-
point, the thick layer of sand
served as a carpet to cover the
hollow, woodenplank floor to
minimize the sounds of
footsteps during the service.
Those footsteps resound
nonetheless, "Today, when
religious intolerance and
fanaticism dominate so much
of the news, we felt it was im-
portant to honor the people of
Curacao and the Netherlands
who have made such historic
contributions to upholding
respect for all peoples, and, in
particular, the Jewish people,"
says Rabbi Marc Tannnebaum,
director of International Rela-
tions, American Jewish Com-
mittee, on the meaning of the
Curacao Jewish Festival.
The Curacao Jewish Carib-
bean Festival, running from
January 3 to 21, centers
around the origins of the
Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue and offers visitors
the opportunity to participate
in a cultural experience while
vacationing in Caribbean
resort.
According to Tannenbaum,
the reason that Curacao's
Jews have thrived both
materially and spiritually was
that in 1652 Curacao adopted
the earliest known charter
guaranteeing religious liberty
for Jews and other minorities
in the New World.
He adds that the Dutch
leaders on this Caribbean
island were simply following
the precedent of the
Netherlands motherland,
which, in 1579, became the
first country in Europe to
establish religious tolerance as
a way of life.
Visitors to the Curacao
Jewish Festival will ex-
perience cultural and spiritual
enrichment as well as the
island's beautiful vacation
facilities and amenities
Because it is just 20 miles off
the coat of South America,
Curacao enjoys a sun-drenched
climate tempered by the
prevailing tradewinds, white
beaches and warm, tranquil
waters for swimming, fishing
and scuba diving.
Curacao is the largest of the
Netherland Antilles, a 38-mile
tropical resort reflecting the
traditions of its Dutch origins,
offering the vacationer diverse
culture, restaurants, enter-
tainment, water and land
sports, and shopping.
Curacao's Caribbean Jewish
Festival, a series of events
centered around the origins of
Mikve Israel-Emanuel
Synagogue, taking place bet-
ween Jan. 3-21,1988, has been
organized by the Curacao
Tourist Board in cooperation
with the island's Jewish com-
munity, the philanthropic Bnai
Zion organization and
American Airlines.
Immaculate streets lined with colorful
narrow-gabled, Dutch-style structures add to
the unique storybook texture of Willemstad,
capital of Curacao, home of the Curacao
Caribbean Jewish Festival, which celebrates
one of the oldest Jewish communities in the
Western Hemisphere the first three weeks in
January, 1988.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, December 18, 1987
Rededication to Freedom
Chanukah the Festival of Rededication
the Festival of Lights.
As we prepared to kindle the first light of
Chanukah Tuesday night, the story of the
victory of the ancient Maccabees had never
been more relevant.
The ongoing plight of Soviet, Ethiopian,
Syrian, Iracri and other Jews reminds us that
we must redouble our efforts on their behalf.
At the same time, we note with pride that
this is the 40th year in which Chanukah
lights are kindled in a free State of Israel.
And it is the 21st year in which the
Chanukah Menorah at the Kotel, the
Western Wall, is lit in a reunited Jerusalem.
Therefore we rejoice in the freedoms that
we enjoy in this country, in Israel and in
many nations, but vow to either extend
those freedoms to those lands in which Jews
are second- or even third-class citizens, or to
see that they are permitted to leave.
Chag Sameiach!
Terrorism in Gaza
The sudden upsurge in violence in the
Gaza Strip warrants an immediate review of
Israeli policy towards the narrow piece of
territory along the Mediterranean which has
been the scene of warfare for the past 3,500
years.
Unlike Judea and Samaria or the West
Bank, Gaza has no demonstrable link to
Jewish sovereignty. Part of the British man-
date over Palestine for 31 years, Gaza was
occupied by Egypt in 1948. During 29 years
of Egyptian occupation, interrupted for a
few months by the Sinai Campaign when
Israel seized the territory, Cairo made no
move to incorporate Gaza into its
boundaries.
It has been more than 20 years since Israel
won the 26-mile long strip in the Six Day
War, and Gaza has done little to make its oc-
cupation worthwhile during the two
decades. Hundreds of thousands of Palesti-
nians, ignored and neglected by their Arab
neighbors, make Gaza more of a tinder box
than Israel needs.
While there is ambivalence toward
American Jewry dictating resolutions and
while the solution may not be as simple as
simply moving out and erecting a 50-foot
high wall to separate Gaza from Israel, it is
hard to present a case for the drain on both
Israeli manpower and reputation which the
fighting between rebellious youths, tough
troops and border police brings about.
Certainly the 3,000 Jewish settlers in the
Gaza strip can be relocated in nearby parts
of Israel which literally beg for additional
inhabitants.
It may be time to transfer the problems of
Gaza to an Arab state, and to do so quickly.
m j Th* Jewish <^ ~r
FloridiaM
of South County
OTA
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
hrrdShocM
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Eieculive Editor
PnWi.kea- Weekly Mid-September tkroef* Mid-Ma)
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Friday, December 18,1987
Volume 9
27 KISLEV 5748
Numh -29
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Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Sephardic Congress Votes Down Extremism Montreal ^p"*" tp8 $30M
JERUSALEM The World
Sephardi Congress ended with
a call to renew the spirit and
lift the aspirations of Sephardi
Jews in Israel, to strengthen
the Sephardi role as a
moderating force in Israel's
religious wars and to intensify
the search for Arab-Israel
peace.
Nessim Gaon, an Egyptian-
born businessman who now
lives in Geneva, Switzerland,
was re-elected president of the
federation by acclamation at
the conclusion of the three^lay
meeting.
In a series of resolutions,
some 400 delegates from
Israel and 16 countries around
the world voted to condemn
religious extremism, to help
overcome "mistrust between
Bomb Threat Thwarts Dutch Meeting
AMSTERDAM (JTA) A bomb threat emptied a
meeting hall hert of some 800 people, mainly non-Jews,
who gathered to protest the recent upsurge of anti-
Semitism in Holland.
The anonymous telephone warning was found, but the
threat seemed to underscore the reason for the gathering.
Gibraltar Worldliness
Continued from Page 2
''What's your job?" the rabbi
asked.
"I shout, 'fire!' "
"No problem then," was the
reply.
But the guns at the top of
the rock, and Levy, in his dress
uniform, had to march up
there on foot for a firing dur-
ing the Sabbath. His troop,
gentiles all, could have driven,
but they insisted on marching
up with him.
Levy's brother James is
president of the Gibraltar
Jewish community. He is a
senior partner in Sir Joshua
Hassan's law office. He is also
active with accountant Moses
Garson and other businessmen
in Gibraltar's flourishing new
enterprises as an "offshore"
financial center. People say
James Levy is tempted to run
for political office, and that he
could one day become chief
minister, too.
Like his brother, James
loves Gibraltar with a passion.
But he is torn, he says, and
may soon move away
because there is no Jewish
high school.
He himself went to a local
monastery-school where the
monks, he recalls, would cut
down branches for the Jewish
children to take home for the
sukkahs. His education imbued
him with the fusion of Jewish
piety and secular worldliness
that is the hallmark of
Gibraltar's Jewry. Yet he feels
he can no longer sustain it and
transmit it to his growing
children. He has sent his eldest
daughter off to an Orthodox
grammar school in London.
The community would be
truly sorry to see him go. Part-
ly to keep him and others like
him from leaving, they are con-
sidering the founding of a
Jewish school in Gibraltar, so
that learned young men would
come and live on the rock, and
teach the younger generation.
"But they would have to be
men with a smile," Levy
warns. "No extremism can
succeed here."
He says the children today
are somehow less confortable
with the non-Jews than he and
his generation are. He be-
moans it yet he recognizes
that it is a manifestation of
that certain xenophobia in
modern Orthodoxy that has
been reincarnated from the
ashes of Eastern Europe and
now sets the tone among Or-
thodox Ashkenazim and
Sephardim the world over, in-
cluding in Israel.
It is the antithesis of the
Golden Age of Spain, and it
threatens to dull the special
brilliance of the gem that is
Jewish Gibraltar.
Arab and Jew and to act "as a
force for religious tolerance."
In response to reports of
"acute distress" and "crisis"
in Israel's development towns,
where larger numbers of
Sephardi Jews from North
Africa and Oriental lands now
live, the WSF voted to create
new economic and educational
opportunities for young people
through a council of develop-
ment town mayors.
The centerpiece of the pro-
gram will be the establishment
of Sephardi House, which will
serve as headquarters for what
treasurer Stephen Shalom of
New York called "an un-
precedented self-help program
designed to have major and
long-range repercussions in
Israel."
As proposed by Shalom,
Sephardi House will "offer
programs of legal assistance
and advocacy, initiate pro-
grams to re-establish Sephardi
pride, provide a way for
Sephardim to express their
distinctive culture and
preserve the culture for future
generations and thus enhance
the Sephardi contribution to
the life of the Jewish people,
the cause of Jewish unity and
the State of Israel."
MONTREAL Montreal's Combined Jewish Appeal at-
tained $30,237,192 last month, becoming the first Jewish
community outside of the United Stated to raise more than
$30 million in its annual campaign.
The figure represented an increase of more than $2
million over the 1986 Campaign on a gift-for-gift basis. The
Women's Division also attained a record total of
$3,599,538.
Jefferson National Bank
Joins FAU President's Club
Jefferson National Bank,
which opened this summer in
Boca Raton, has joined the
growing list of corporate
donors that have made finan-
cial commitments for the sup-
port of Florida Atlantic
University.
Arthur H. Courshon, chair-
man of the board, and Barton
Goldberg, bank president, an-
nounced a gift and pledge of
$10,000 to the FAU Founda-
tion, the fund-raising arm of
the University, qualifying the
bank for membership in the
President's Club.
Also attending a recent
presentation ceremony in the
bank's Boca Raton office were
Joseph G. Snyder, senior-vice-
president and bank manager,
and Morgan Zook, president of
the FAU Foundation.
Jefferson National Bank
opened in June as the first
Palm Beach County office of
Jefferson Bancorp, Inc., a
publicly held bank holding
company.
In commenting on the Presi-
dent's Club pledge for FAU,
Courshon said, "We intend to
maintain the same standards
of community commitment
and involvement in Boca
Raton which we have
established in Greater Miami.
The steady growth of the Boca
Raton area as a fine communi-
ty in which to live and work
convinced our board that Jef-
ferson National Bank should
be a significant part of the
financial community here," he
added. "We recognize FAU as
essential to maintaining the
quality of life enjoyed here,
and we are proud to be
numbered among its
supporters."
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, December 18,1987
Violence in Territories As Murders Mount
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
One Arab was killed and nine
were wounded as violence con-
tinued in the Gaza Strip and
West Bank. But Israeli
authorities said the situation in
the administered territories
was relatively calm and under
control after a week of rioting
that some officials described as
a civil revolt.
The disturbances of the past
week are acknowledged to
On A Knife Edge
Tension has been rising in Britain over a campaign to ban
shechita (Jewish ritual slaughter). Various groups
dedicated to animal welfare have attacked Jewish (and
Muslim and Sikh) ritual slaughter on the grounds that it is
cruel and inhumane.
But Jewish leaders whether lay or religious hit back
hard. They published much scientific evidence to show that
the animal does not suffer; indeed, they argued, because of
the high skills required of a shochet (ritual slaughterer) the
animal is less likely to suffer than under any other method.
The government has now intervened. A new type of pen
must be introduced which will involve the Jewish com-
munity in considerable expense. But it has firmly rejected
proposals to ban shechita, recognizing that a basic tenet of
faith would be compromised.
AMERICA'S PLUMPEST PITTED PRUNES
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Or nosh them whenever you hove the notion. They're
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1 Sun Onmond Grow**! of California 1884
have been the worst in recent
years and politicians of the
Labor Party and Likud are
each accusing the other of
responsibility for allowing con-
ditions to deteriorate so
precipitously.
In Washington, the U.S.
State Department expressed
"serious concern" over the
situation and blamed the trou-
ble on the lack of a peace
agreement in the region and
Israel's "occupation" of the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
At the United Nations,
meanwhile, the Security Coun-
cil prepared to meet for the se-
cond time in four days, to
discuss the situation.
While Israeli authorities
sought to ease tensions, Arabs
rioted in the northern Gaza
Strip town of Khan Yunis. An
unidentified Arab of about 25
was shot to death after he at-
tacked an Israel Defense
Force patrol with a gasoline
bomb. Four other rioters were
wounded.
The IDF has been under
orders since late last week to
exercise maximum restraint.
An investigation into the Khan
Yunis incident was promptly
held and the soldiers were
found to have "acted proper-
ly" in the circumstances.
In a bizarre aftermath, the
dead man's body was snatched
from the hospital morgue,
displayed in the streets by
demonstrators and returned to
the morgue.
Elsewhere in the Gaza strip,
soldiers at a roadblock wound-
ed four young Arabs who at-
tacked them with rocks.
One Arab was slightly
wounded in a clash with the
IDF in the West Bank. Youths
hurled rocks at army patrols in
the narrow alleys of the
Nablus casbah. They were
dispersed by tear gas. Mean-
while, a curfew was lifted at
the Balata refugee camp near
Nablus, only to be reimposed
later when rioting broke out in
the camp.
Officials of Israel's civil ad-
ministration in the territories
met with local Arab leaders to
try to calm the unrest. But
Arab municipality officials ap-
parently have little control
over what happens in the
refugee camps where pro-
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion activists are said to be the
source of unrest.
The authorities are hoping to
convince merchants in the ter-
ritories to reopen their shops,
which have been closed for
several days, and to prevail
upon Arab workers in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip to
return to their jobs in Israel.
About 60,000 Arabs from
the territories have failed to
show up for work in Israel, ac-
cording to a report in Al
Hamishmar. The paper said
the effects of the strike are felt
mainly at construction sites
and in municipal services, such
as street cleaning and garbage
removal, in which many Arabs
are employed.
Meanwhile, the coalition
partners continued to clash
over short-term and long-term
policy in the territories.
Leaders of Likud's Herut fac-
School-Time Religion
Jewish studies in Britain's schools may be drastically af-
fected by government plans to change the education
system. Concerned at low standards, the government is
planning to introduce a compulsory national curriculum
comprising ten "foundation" subjects. This means that
"soft" subjects such as religion will, it is feared, be almost
removed from the classroom.
Jewish schools at present devote 25-30 percent of their
curriculum to Jewish studies, but with the government pro-
posing to assess each school's performance and publish the
results, the pressure to abandon these studies may be too
great.
It's the
traditional
taste that makes
the holidays
even more specia
Also look tor our Dijon
Mustard in the mustard
section of your favorite
supermarket
For a F*E recipe book send a serf-edckessed stamped envelope
to Gold', Oept f, 905 McDonald Avenue, irooMyn, NY mis
tion accused the Labor Party
of aggravating the ferment in
the West Bank and Gaza by its
"low profile," "know-nothing"
policies.
They claimed that "quiet
and security will be restored
only when it is made clear that
Likud policy will be the one to
determine the future of
Judaea, Samaria and Gaza."
Laborites responded sharp-
ly, charging that Likud policies
were hindering any advance
toward negotiations for peace.
But Premier Yitzhak Shamir
got in the last word. He at-
tributed the unrest to the
"defeatist reaction of certain
circles" and charged that
"there are those among us
who believe that if we return
to the 1967 borders, the Arab
world will embrace us with
love." The premier spoke at a
meeting of Rafi, a dissident
faction that split from the
Labor Party long ago when it
was headed by Premier David
Ben-Gurion.
A dispute arose on another
front. According to a report in
Haaretz, Uri Porat, director
general of the Israel Broad-
casting Authority, charged
that television coverage of
disturbances in the territories
was abettng Arab propaganda.
Porat spoke at a meeting
with senior TV news depart-
ment personnel. He criticized a
segment of newscast in which
an Arab interviewee claimed
that "the army is to blame for
everything" and an army of-
ficer was asked repeatedly by
the reporter, "if it was not
possible to prevent incidents,"
Haaretz reported.
The paper also said there
was wide agreement at a
Cabinet meeting that the news
media were "inflating" the
situation in the territories.
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Bar Mitzvah
Gary Reshefsky
GARY RESHEFSKY
On Saturday, Dec. 19, Gary
Reshefsky, son of Amy and
Ronald Reshefsky, will be call-
ed to the Torah of Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bar
Mitzvah. As an ongoing Tem-
ple project he will be "Twinn-
ing" with Valensas Glinskene
of the Soviet Union. Gary is an
8th grade student at North
Broward School and attends
the Temple Beth El Religious
School. Family members shar-
ing in -the Simcha are his
sisters, Rebecca and Milissa;
and grandparents, William
Reshefsky of Boca Raton and
Sonia S. Newman of Jupiter,
Mr. and Mrs. Reshefsky will
host a Kiddush in Gary's honor
following Havdalah Service.
RYAN SHORE
On Saturday, Dec. 19, Ryan
Powell Shore, son of Verna
Himber and Michael Shore,
will lie called to the Torah of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
as a Bar Mitzvah. As an ongo-
ing Temple project he will be
Ryan Shore
"Twinning" witn Roman Fa-
ingersh of the Soviet Union.
Ryan is an 8th grade student
at Boca Raton Middle School
and attends the Temple Beth
El Religious School. Family
members sharing in the Sim-
chas are his brothers, Kevin
and Adam; and grandparents,
Sally and Louis Libman and
Bernice and Mac Shore, both
of Toronto, Canada. Ryan's
parents will host a Kiddush in
his honor following Shabbat
Morning service.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
David Krakower, son of
Beth and Mark Krakower, will
become a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday morning, Dec. 26.
David will lead the congrega-
tion in Torah study of the
weekly Torah portion,
Vayigash (Genesis 44-47).
Sharing David's Bar Mitzvah
(in absentia) will be Igor
Iosovich of the Ukraine, who
because of the repressive
policies of the USSR has been
David Krakower
unable to freely practice his
religion.
David attends the Loggers
Run Community Middle School
where he plays for and
manages the school Baseball
Team. He collects baseball
cards and is a sports writer for
the school newspaper.
Sharing the occasion with
him will be his brother Jason
and grandparents Harriet and
Milton Aronowitz of Highland
Beach and Janet and Stanley
Krakower of Coconut Creek.
DAVID SLOSSBERG
David Steven Slossberg, son
of Ellen and Robert Slossberg
will be called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday mor-
ning, at Shabbat services at
Congregation B'nai Israel of
Boca Raton. David will read
portions of the morning ser-
vice and will lead the con-
gregation in the Torah
dialogue of the weekly portion
of Genesis called Miketz.
Sharing his Bat Mitzvah (in
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Gary, others sharing in the
celebration will be grand-
parents Thelma and Myer
Slossberg of Boca Raton and
grandmother Dorothy Epstein
of Baltimore, Md.
Wedding
Irene and Lou Fradin,
Delray Beach, celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary on
Thanksgiving Day. Family and
friends joined them in a recep-
tion held in Woodmere, Long
Island.
The Fradins moved here in
1982, upon Lou's retirement,
from his position with an
advertising agency ,^ where he
was in charge of the computer
department.
Lou is the newly-elected
Vice President of Ritual at
Temple Emeth, where they
have been members since
1982.
They have two daughters,
Vivian Greenstein and Sally
Shelowitz, and five grand-
children, all residing in New
York.
David Slossberg
absentia) will be Dalia Brailov-
sky of Moscow, who has been
unable to practice the rituals
of the Jewish religion by the
Soviet government.
David attends Loggers Run
Middle School, where he is in
the 8th grade. His hobbies in-
clude surfing, skateboarding
and water sports. He is a
former vice president of the
Congregation s Junior Youth
Group.
In addition to his brother
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_
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, December 18, 1987
Urgency Spurs Search For Donor
*
-
By ALISA KWITNEY
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
NORMA WEINSTEIN
says that she is "not a teary
person," even though she is
crying as she speaks of her
daughter, Ann Koch.
Koch, 31, has lived her life
for the past seven years under
the threatening shadow of
disease; diagnosed in 1980
with chronic myelogenous
leukemia, she nonetheless
married, (Dr. Howard Koch, a
Miami Beach physician) had a
child, and led an active life.
"For the seven years, she
would have her down
moments, but on the whole she
led her life as if there were
nothing wrong," her mother
recalls. "She and her husband
traveled she and I would go
to a par 3 golf course together
and she cooked, jogged,
went to aerobics. She has
always been a wonderful wife
and mother."
All of this changed drastical-
ly when Koch's disease ac-
celerated recently. Now, only
a bone marrow transplant
from a suitable donor could
prolong Koch's life.
"Unfortunately, her siblings
are not matches," says Weins-
tein, whose other daughter,
Andrea Siassipmour, has been
trying to help locate a person
whose bone marrow would
match Ann's.
"(Andrea) has uncovered
numerous registries
throughout the country to see
if they can find a donor for
Ann, but so far we have been
unable to find a perfect
match," Weinstein reveals.
Since the chances of finding
a suitable bone marrow match
from a non-relative are "bet-
ween 1 out of 16,000 to 1 out of
20,000," the odds are against
Ann Koch. The local general
and Jewish communities,
however, are supportive of
her.
SYNAGOGUES and
Hebrew schools have been sen-
ding their prayers, donations
and blood samples to be tissue-
typed in an effort to help Koch.
The cost of the blood tests,
normally $500 each, was
reduced to $50 by Roche
Laboratories.
The Second Generation
Deed Club has been covering
the still considerable cost of
the testing, aided by
donations.
"People have really rallied
behind my daughter," says
Weinstein. "I'm not surprised.
I've always had great faith in
Miami, after living here for 44
years. The community has
been absolutely wonderful,
especially the Jewish
community."
Weinstein says that her
synagogue, Temple Menorah,
has been a great support for
her, along with ot ler area
synagogues. High school girls
from Mesivta have even gone
to have blood tests, as has
newscaster Jim Brosemer
from Channel 4.
The blood tests, drawn for
tissue typing, are the first step
in determining whether or not
a person is a potential donor. If
a person's tissue type matches
Koch's, the next step would be
another two tests, to discover
whether other blood factors
match.
ALL THREE tests reveal
that there is a match, the
donor would be admitted to
the hospital in the evening,
and the next morning, under
light general or local
anesthesia, the procedure
would take place.
A bone marrow transplant,
Weinstein points out, is a non-
surgical process. A needle is
inserted into each of the
donor's hips, bone marrow is
withdrawn and given to the pa-
tient intravenously. The donor
returns home that evening or
the next morning.
"The donor may be a little
sore in the hip area for a few
days," Weinstein admits. "But
they may save a life without
giving a life."
Potential donors sign con-
sent forms at each stage of the
process; they may back out at
anytime, and the entire pro-
them
cedure is explained to
carefully beforehand.
It is also Ann Koch's
chance for life: With
transplant, her odds for sur-
vival become 30 percent in-
stead of zero.
only
the
"Annie doesn't have that
much time what we are try-
ing to do is buy more time for
her."
But time is relentless, and
for Ann Koch, it may be runn-
ing out too fast.
To inquire about taking a
blood test, or to make a dona-
tion, call the Second Genera-
tion Deed Club, 751-9035.
Norma Weinstein is tired.
She has just returned from
visiting her daughter at the
hospital, where she sleeps in a
cot overnight. Her husband
"takes over during the day
hours."
STILL, THERE is just
enough energy left in her for
one more interview, one more
plea for assistance.
"We are totally consumed
with helping my daughter, but
we desperately need people,
we need money," says
Weinstein.
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Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
Catholic-Jewish Relations
WASHINGTON Dr.
Eugene J. Fisher, the Ex-
ecutive Secretary of the
Secretariat for Catholic-
Jewish Relations of the Na-
tional Conference of Catholic
Bishops, declared today that
"while 1987 was a turbulent
year in Catholic-Jewish rela-
tions, nevertheless, the
delicate fabric of the new rela-
tionship that Catholics and
Jews have been weaving in pa-
tient dialogue for the past
twenty years in this country
and throughout the world re-
mained intact."
In an address before the
American Jewish Committee's
Interreligious Affairs Commis-
sion which is meeting here, Dr.
Fisher said that "what took
place between our two com-
munities, especially after Pope
John Paul IPs meeting last
June with Kurt Waldheim, was
something extraordinary. It
was tough and challenging on
both sides, but Jewish and
Catholic leaders were able to
cut through the rhetoric of
outrage and defensiveness,
and for a moment, we touched
each other in ways that had
not happened before. The re-
cent months of controversy
have deepened the entire
Catholic-Jewish encounter,
and, ironically, have
strengthened the entire
endeavor."
The Catholic leader added:
"Unfortunately there are
those within both the Jewish
and the Catholic communities,
and certainly in the media,
who want to write this year's
story as one of winners and
losers. It is simply not so. And
it has been mainly those in our
communities who have been
least involved in the ongoing
dialogue, and who may have a
stake in diminishing its
significance, who have tried to
push this false interpretation
of the events."
With regard to the recent
controversy concerning the
remarks of Cardinal Ratz-
inger, Dr. Fisher added: "The
real story of the events sur-
rounding Cardinal Ratzinger's
interview in R Sabato has yet
to come out in the media. That
story is, that the system if
imperfect does work. A
clarification was needed. A
clarification was asked for,
and within days, a clarification
was given. While much re-
mains to be discussed, there
should be no question concern-
ing the irreversibility of the
positive stance toward Jews
and Judaism officially taken by
the Church since the second
Vatican Council."
Rabbi A. James Rudin, the
AJC's National Interreligious
Affairs Directo-, responded by
praising Dr. Fisher for "his
outstanding leadership in
building positive Catholic-
Jewish relations. Personal in-
tegrity and wise counsel are
Gene Fisher's hallmarks, and
they were clearly in evidence
during an extreme!., difficult
period in the history of our two
communities."
"ibbi Rudin noted that in
1987 alone there had been
"Cardinal John O'Connor's
trip to Jordan and Israel, the
furor surrounding the con-
struction of a convent at the
Auschwitz death camp, the
beatification of Edith Stein,
the Papal meeting with
Waldheim, the Rome~ Castel
Gondolfo, and Miami Catholic-
Jewish meetings, and most
recently Cardinal Joseph Ratz-
inger's disturbing interview in
an Italian journal. These
shocks, jolts, and surprises
have severely tested Catholic-
Jewish relations. But I have
been enormously heartened by
the positive strength of
Catholic-Jewish relations in
the United States, and I have
been gratified by the impor-
tant leadership role that the
American Catholic Bishops
have played throughout this
year of crisis.
"Future generations will
judge us harshly if we now
weaken our resolve to continue
building positive Catholic-
Jewish relations, or, worst of
all, if we abandon the task
because of the events of 1987."
Jack Lapin of Houston,
Texas, who is Chairperson of
the AJC's Interreligious Af-
fairs Commission, said, "The
American Jewish Committee
is intensifying its continuing
commitment to interreligious
activities. One of these pro-
grams is the Holocaust Educa-
tion program that is being
jointly undertaken by the AJC
Coi
and the National Conference
of Catholic Bishops. This pro-
ject will make the study of the
Shoah a permanent part of
Catholic education, somethii
the Pope stressed in his
dress in Miami last
September."
The American Jewish Com-
mittee is this country's pioneer
human relations organization.
Founded in 1906, it combats
bigotry, protects the civil and
religious rights of Jews here
and abroad, and advances the
cause of improved human rela-
tions for all people
everywhere.
The Boca Raton Unit has
been active for the past three
years. Richard Davimos is
president and founder of this
group. If you are interested in
becoming a member and would
like to be invited to our func-
tions please call, Mr. Davimos
or Mr. Gary Scharf at
368-4533, or ask for Nancy.
NOTICE
If your Zip code has changed please notify the
Jewish Floridian so you can continue receiving
your paper.
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j


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South Comity/Friday, December 18, 1987
Sun
agogue
cAlews
ANSHEI EMUNA
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks will
preach the Chanukah Sermon
on the theme "The Hammer
and the Anvil" at the Sabbath
Morning Service on Saturday,
Dec. 19 commencing at 8:30
a.m.
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks will
preach the Chanukah Sermon
on the theme "Success A
Biblical Definition" at the Sab-
bath Morning Service on
Saturday, Dec. 26 commenc-
ing at 8:30 a.m.
Kiddush will follow.
The Se'udat Shli'shet with
the Rabbi's D'var Torah in
Yiddish will be celebrated in
conjunction with the Sabbath
Twilight Minyon Services.
Daily Classes in the "Judaic
Code of Religious Law"
(Schulchan Oruch) led by Rabbi
Sacks begin at 7:30 a.m.
Sreceeding the Daily Morning
linyon Services and at 5 p.m.
in conjunction with the Daily
Twilight Minyon Services.
For further information call
499-9229.
Anshei Emuna Institute for
Adult Jewish Education pro-
udly announces the addition of
the following three courses.
1. "Great Passages of the
Torah" led by our Rabbi Dr.
Louis L. Sacks, whose classical
Talmudic volume was recently
republished by the Mosad
Harav Kook of the State of
Israel.
Sessions: Wednesdays, 2
p.m. (Beginning on Wednes-
day, Dec. 23)
2. "Class in Mishna" with
Mr. Max Lenowitz, our Ba'al
Korah, as the instructor.
Sessions: Wednesday, 3:30
p.m. (Beginning on Wednes-
day, Dec. 23)
3. "Synagogue Skills" with
our Gabbai and Ba'al Korah,
Mr. Abe Stiefeld, as the
instructor.
Sessions: Tuesdays, 4 p.m.
(Beginning on Tuesday, Dec.
22)
Seminars in Shnlehan
Orach (Code of Jewish
Religious Law) conducted Dai-
ly by the Rabbi in conjunction
with Morning and Evening
Services.
D'Var Torah in Yiddish
each Sabbath in conjunction
with the Twilight Services.
The institute is co-sponsored
by the Congregation,
Sisterhood, and Men's Club.
No fees, what-so-ever. The
community at large is cordially,
invited to participate in this in-
tellectual and religious enrich-
ment outreach program.
For further information callv
the Synagogue office
499-9229.
Mr. Ernest Goldblum,
Anshei Emuna
Philanthropist
To Be Honored
Mr. Ernest Goldblum, a
Delray Beach Anshei Emuna
philanthropist, will be the
honoree at the Congregational
Breakfast on Sunday, Dec. 27
at 9:30 a.m. with Congressman
Daniel A. Mica as the guest
speaker.
During the past decade, Mr.
Goldblum has endowed
Holocaust Studies in many
Universities, both in the
United States and in his native
Vienna, Austria, with the
assistance of Senator James L.
Buckley and Congressman
Hamilton Fish. He established
the Westchester Conference
on Soviet Jewry besides serv-
ing on the Board of the New
York Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Through "The Mariach and
Elias Goldblum Fund"
established by Mr. Goldblum in
tribute to his parents, educa-
tional programs have been
established and Scholar-in-
residence series have been in-
itiated to educate our genera-
tion as to the significant im-
plications of the Holocaust
catastrophy.
In a major speech by Senator
James L. Buckley, inserted in
the Congregational Record,
the narrator quotes the follow-
ing words articulated by Mr.
Goldblum when he accepted
the B'nai B'rith Brotherhood
award:
"I can think of no better way
to open my remarks today
than by quoting the words of
the chairman of the
Westchester Conference on
Soviet Jewry, Mr. Ernest
Goldblum, when he accepted
the B'nai B'rith Brotherhood
Award some months ago.
"The 'plaque of darkness' is
with us" he said, "when we fail
to see the needs, the pain, the
joys of our fellow, when each is
so preoccupied with his own
place that he never goes out to
share the concern of his
neighbor. Brotherhood is the
blessing of light which dispels
the plague of darkness, and
each of us must work together
to rid the earth of the darkness
that threatens to destroy."
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks,
spiritual leader of Anshei
Emuna, will be the presenter
of an award to the honoree,
with Mr. Harry Cope Presi-
dent, serving as the
toastmaster, and with Mr. Ed-
ward Bobick introducing Con-
gressman Mica.
TEMPLE
ANSHEISHALOM
Men's Club of Temple An-
shei Shalom at 7099 West
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach,
will sponsor a
breakfast/meeting on Sunday,
Dec. 20 at 9:30 a.m.
The guest speaker will be
Mr. Rice of the Paramedics.
Important information will be
flven, both visual and oral,
lease attend. For informa-
tion, call 495-0466.
Temple Anshei Shalom is
featuring an evening on Sun-
day, Jan. 10 at 8 p.m. with a 5
man Klezmer Band, and with
Rachell Paston, singer and
dancer and Hy Kipnis,
American-Jewish humorist.
All seats reserved. Donation
$5. For information, 495-1800.
Temple Anshei Shalom will
present Piano-Concert on Sun-
day, Jan. 17, 7:30 p.m. with
James Eliot Behr, pianist.
Brilliant-Superb gifted talent
has performed all over U.S.
Donation $6.50.
Refreshments-Collation after.
Tickets at Temple office.
TEMPLE BETH EL
On Nov. 12, Gilbert Keen,
President of Temple Beth El
Brotherhood, and Judge
Milton Alpert, Brotherhood
Chairman for Jewish Chautau-
qua, presented five volumes
relating to Jewish subjects to
the College of Boca Raton, for
addition to its library, for
general use of students at the
College.
The gift was accepted by
College President Donald E.
Ross. President Ross express-
ed the thanks and appreciation
of the College and stated his
hope that students of the Col-
lege would thereby broaden
their knowledge and
understanding of the history,
religion, customs and tradi-
tions of the Jewish people.
Two of the volumes relate to
history, two to religion and
one to customs and traditions.
Members of Temple Beth El
support the Jewish Chautau-
qua Society through annual
membership fees. Renewals
notices are currently being
mailed to present members.
Additional members are need-
ed to complete Beth El's
quota. Temple members, and
others who are interested,
desiring to help in the
Society's work of familiarizing
college students with Jewish
history, religion, customs and
traditions and in assisting col-
lege students of the Jewish
faith, are urged to become
members of Chautauqua. The
basic fee is $35, and your check
payable to the Society, may be
mailed to Judge Milton Alpert,
2701 N. Course Drive, Apt.
810, Pompano Beach, FL
J33069.
The Brotherhood dedicates
its April Sunday breakfast to
the work of the Chautauqua
Society.
Chanukah
Family Celebration of
Chanukah for Parents and
Children of Temple Beth El
lege students with a
Homecoming Service. All
students and their families are
welcome to attend our Sabbath
Evening Service. Prior to our
Services, Rabbi and Mrs.
Merle E. Singer will be hosts
to the college students at a
Sabbath dinner at their home.
For information, 391-8900.
TEMPLE SINAI
If you are not affiliated with
another Temple, please con-
Nursery School will be on Fri- anmner-i*"JFg. '
day, Dec. 18 at 10:45 a.m. at ^Temple hftMJW.
the Temple Beth El Sanc-
tuary, 333 SW 4th Ave., Boca
Raton.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach.
Rabbi and Cantor will re-
count the Story of Chanukah
and light the Chanukah
Menorah. The children will
Eresent songs to welcome the
oliday. All attending will
4' Interdenominational''
Program
Rabbi Samuel Silver, of
Temple Sinai, Delray Beach,
leader of a Reform Jewish con-
gregation and Orthodox Rabbi
Mordecai Winyarz, of the Boca
share potato latkes and other Raton Synagogue are engaged
. i ___ a____ii___:_ i_________d-j:. *..;,,.,
treats, and
celebration.
sing together in
Chanukah
Square Dance
And Latke Party
The SOLOS (Singles group
over 49) of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton is sponsoring a
Chanukah Square Dance and
Latke Party on Sunday, Dec.
20 at 5:30 p.m. at the temple.
There will be an exchange of
gifts worth $2 each. Please br-
ing a gift that will be suitable
both for men and women. Fee:
Paid Members $3, Guest $6.
For information, Sylvia
395-2226 or Florence
428-9665.
Shared Care
Will Not Be Held
SHARED CARE The In
terfaith Day Care Program,
will not be held on
Wednesdays, Dec. 23 and 30,
m order that the families may
anjoy their holidays together.
College Homecoming
On Friday night, Dec. 25 at 8
p.m., Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton will be honoring our col-
in a dialogue on Radio Station
WDBF, Delray Beach, 1420 on
the AM dial Sundays in
December, 10:06 a.m.
In their colloquy the two rab-
bis compare the outlook of
their respective branches of
Judaism.
The program is called
'' Interdenominational.''
Friday, Dec. 18 Shabbat ser-
vices will be Chanukah service
at Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach.
Rabbi Samuel Silver's sermon
will be "We are Dedicated."
Cantor Elaine Shapiro will be
in attendance.
Saturday, Dec. 19 Sabbath
services will be held at 10 a.m.
at Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach.
For the hard of hearing Tem-
ple has available "Pocket-
talker" amplifier for services.
Please request same of ushers
when you arrive.
Every third Thursday, Rabbi
Silver of Temple Sinai talks
about "Great Jewish Per-
sonalities." at Temple Sinai at
10 a.m.
wan^^wiTsisasn^
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Every first Thursday of the
month, Cantor Elaine Shapiro
presents her Jewish Music
series at Temple Sinai at 10
a.m.
Temple Sinai presents "The
Dardashti Family" Sunday,
Dec. 20, at 8 p.m. a concert
featuring cantorial, popular
operatic and Broadway music.
All seats reserved. Tickets $7
per person.
The third annual Blood
Drive at Temple Sinai of
Delray Beach, is Monday, Dec.
21 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free
blood pressure and cholesterol
tests will be offered when you
give blood. Every one is eligi-
ble to join our group. The place
is Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach.
Friday, Dec. 25, Shabbat
services will be held at Temple
Sinai of Delray Beach at 8:15
p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver's
sermon will be "Good Will to
All." Cantor Elaine Shapiro
will be in attendance.
Saturday, Dec. 26 Sabbath
services will be held at 10 a.m.
at Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach.
The Duplicate Bridge is open
to the public at Temple Sinai
every Thursday at 7:30 pm.
Games are sanctioned by the
American Contract Bridge
League and master points are
awarded. Fee is $2.50 per per-
son and refreshments are serv-
ed. All welcome. For informa-
tion, 498-0946.
Please note change of time:
Sisterhood General Meeting
Monday, Dec. 28 at 11:15 to
11:45. Program at 12 sharp
will be a dialogue with three
outstanding Rabbis: Rabbi Pin-
ches Aloof, Temple Anshei
Shalom; Rabbi Mordechai
Winyarz, Boca Raton
bynagogue and Rabbi Samuel
buver, Temple Sinai, on "Who
is a Jew." Friends and
husbands are invited.
Refreshments will be served
Please call Bea Heitner,
498-0675 for further
information.
Sisterhood Temple Sinai is
giving a Gala New Year's Eve
party Thursday, Dec. 31, with
a complete hot meal, choice of
entrees, champagne cocktail,
noisemakers, hats, live music
and entertainment. Cost $28
per person. For information,
499-9883 or 272-7762.
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
Organizations
NA'AMAT USA
Religious Directory
ANSHEI EMUNA ORTHODOX CONGREGATION
Orthodox, Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks, 16189 Carter Road, Delray :|
Beach, Florida 38446. Phone 499-9229. Daily Torah Seminars S
preceding Services at 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Sabbath Eve Services ::;
at 5 p.m. Sabbath and Festival Services 8:30 a.m.
BETH AMI CONGREGATION
P.O. 7105, Boca Raton, Florida 33431. Conservative. Phone (305) S
994-8693 or 276-8804. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer; Cantor Mark Levi; %
President, Joseph Boumans. Services held at Mae Volen Senior ::
Center, 1515 Palmetto Park Road, Boca Raton. Friday evening at %
8:15 p.m., Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conservative. $
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Cantor Elliott Dicker. ::
Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. >j:
Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month. ::j:
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE ORTHODOX
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2262, Boca Raton, Fla. 33427-2262. ?
Phone: 392-5732. President: Steven D. Marcus. Services Fridays >j:
evening five minutes before candlelighting. Shabbat morning 9 ij:
a.m. Sunday morning minyan at 8:30 a.m. Services will be held at ::
the new building 7900 Montoya Circle. For information regarding g
services call 483-5384 or 394-5071.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22455 Boca Rio Road, :=:
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler. Sab- ::
bath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10:15 a.m. Mailing ad- :|:
dress: 8177 W. Glades Road, Suite 210, Boca Raton, FL 33434. g
Phone 483-9982. Baby sitting available during services.
CONGREGATION TORAH OHR
Located in Century Village of Boca Raton. Orthodox. Rabbi ij:
David Weissenberg. Cantor Jacob Resnick. President Edward ::
Sharzer. For information on services and educational classes and :|:
programs, call 482-0206 or 482-7156.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
7099 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33446. Conser- |
vative. Phone 495-1300. Rabbi Pincus Aloof. Cantor Louis Her- j:j
shman. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:30 a.m. jjj:
Daily services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Reform. j
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Associate Rabbi *
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at
8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month, Saturday morning services 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FL 33434. Con-
servative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services 8 am.
and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday 8:30 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 483-5557. Joseph
M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Conser-
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd. Zvi Adler,
Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:45 a.m.
Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Barwick
Road), Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Reform. Sabbath Eve. ser-
vices, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver,
phone 276-6161. Cantor Elaine Shapiro.
Jack Smith, seen frequently
in his "happi" coat and rice
straw hat, escorting visitors
through the Morikami
Museum, will speak on "The
Japanese Women" at the next
meeting of the Kinneret
Chapter Na'amat USA, Mon-
day Dec. 21 at the Palm
Greens Clubhouse on Via
Delray in Delray Beach. Mr.
Smith will discuss the life-style
of the Japanese Jewish family
and how they have been
assimilated into the culture of
Japan without compromising
their Jewish heritage.
A mini-luncheon will precede
the meeting.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
Women's American ORT,
Lakeside Chapter, is having a
regular meeting on Monday,
Dec. 28 at 12:30 p.m. at Patch
Reef Park, Yamato Road, west
of Military Trail. Chanukah
will be celebrated.
Refreshments will be served.
Everyone is welcome. For
more information, please call
Shirley Leibert, 276-4543.
The Del Pointe Chapter of
Women's American ORT is
planning a New Year's
weekend (three days). The trip
will leave by bus Dec. 30 for
Lehigh Resorts. Price per per-
son: $200 (plus $50 for
golfers), including all meals,
entertainment, and bus trip.
Women's American ORT,
Boca Century Chapter, is
Dlanning a three-day, two-
light trip on Port Canaveral
Seaescape, Thursday, Dec. 31.
For information, 487-3920.
B'NAI B'KITH WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women, Boca
Raton Chapter, is planning a
three-day, two night New
Year's Holiday trip from
Wednesday, Dec. 30 to Friday,
Jan. 1. It will be held at the
new Sheraton Harbor Hotel in
Ft. Myers. Transportation,
breakfasts, dinners and all
gratuities are included, along
with a luncheon and show at
the Naples Dinner Theatre, a
New York's celebration at the
hotel, visits to local attractions
and a cruise on New York's
Day. For information,
941-1671.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Mitzvah Chapter of
Women's League for Israel
will hold its next meeting Mon-
day, Dec. 21 at 10 a.m. in the
administration building of
CVW.
Come join us at our
Chanukah party. See our big-
ger and better boutique. Meet
people and make new friends.
Our functions are:
1. Newport Hotel for dinner
and show Sunday, Dec. 13
2. Sheik of Ave. B Thursday,
Jan. 14
3. Broadway Bound Thurs-
day, Feb. 4
4. Big River Thursday,
March 17
For information call
483-3645, 487-0286 or
487-2734.
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
BRANCH NO. 1051
Workmen's Circle, Branch
1051, Delray Beach, meets
the second Wednesday of
every month, from October-
May at 1 p.m. in Temple Sinai,
2475 West Atlantic Ave.,
Delray Beach. For further in-
formation, please call
499-2055.
THEODORE HERZL
INSTITUTE
An 18 week Distinguished
Lecture Series, sponsored by
the Florida Region Theodore
Herzl Institute, in conjunc-
tion with the Synagogue Coun-
cil of Delray and the four
Delray temples, was announc-
ed by Florida Region Coor-
dinator, Is Aronin. The lec-
tures will all be held Tuesdays,
at 10:30 a.m., at various
temples free to public.
The lecture series will be
offered:
Dec. 22 Temple Sinai,
"Personal Report on Jews in
Germany, Belgium and
Holland Today," Rabbi P.
Aloof
Elected Pre-Need Counselors' Director
Irvin Schwartz has been
selected as the Florida Direc-
tor of Pre-need counselors by
Blasberg Parkside Funeral
Chapels, Inc., a group of eight
Funeral Chapels located in
New York and Florida.
Schwartz assists customers
in the selection of pre-
arranged funerals through The
Assured Plan, a program
supervised by the State of
Florida.
A World War II veteran
Schwartz attended the Univer-
sity of Ohio, and then joined
ITT in management. He mov-
ed to South Florida in 1969
and has been associated with
other Funeral Homes organiz-
ing and assisting in their
marketing programs for the
past 10 years. He and his wife
reside in Broward County.
S
Ease an emotional
time with dignified
professional
assistance.
1 till it nil d< i iNi.mis |iit ma* .in i iiihIiuikiI l inn
.lit iIh kt*| Ilium* V*MI vt.ml in ilu ,iu
rhi;iiilM ii |inli snMrtWl .issini.hu i nt rhoos
mi; ilu kinds ui mh K's von Ittvd. wain
.iiii( i .ui .illiinl l.ii us hi l|> iliiniH1 (hi nj
sin ssltil nun s
< .ill I'.| ,111 .l|>|NHHlmi III Im1.iv
I'ii .ii i.uit;i ilu ills Im-i .ins! you < .in
"BETH ISRAEL
- 4 tAnuUPimrriH*!! ft-fj I 4>apW
Dec. 29 Temple Shalom,
Jew on the Move, Prof. B
Johnpoll.
Virtuoso Violinist
Heifetz Dead At 86
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Jascha Heifetz, universally ac-
claimed as the greatest
violinist of this century, died
late Thursday night in Los
Angeles, of complications
resulting from a fall. He was
86.
Heifetz, who performed con-
certs throughout the world un-
til age 73, was best known for
his technical mastery of the
violin, the elegance and fine
detail of his playing, his in-
sistence on perfection and his
disinterest in publicity. He was
once quoted as saying that
there was nothing to write
about his life other than the
dates of his birth and premier
performances.
In 1917, in the wake of the
Russian Revolution and
heightened persecution of
Jews, Heifetz left Russia and
settled in the United States.
He made his American debut
at Carneige Hall on Oct. 27 of
that year an event one critic
called a ''turning point in the
musical history of the
country."
Heifetz first visited
Palestine in 1926 and donated
funds at the time to build a
Jewish music conservatory
there. The Jascha Heifetz Hall
was later built in Tel Aviv, the
only music hall in the world to
bear his name.
Heifetz was married twice,
first to Hollywood star
Florence Vidor, whom he
divorced in 1945, and then to
Frances Spiegelberg, whom he
married one year later and
divorced in 1963.
Because
we care
These temples and Jewish
organizations have chosen to have
sections in Menorah Gardens'
memorial paric
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI SHOLOM
CONGREGATION B'NAI JACOB
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
GOLDEN LAKES TEMPLE
INTERNATIONAL ORDER OF
ODDFELLOWS
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
KNK3HTS OF PYTHIAS
TEMPLE BETH EL
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
TEMPLE BETH ZION
And because we care, Menor-
ah will make a donation to these
cxganizations each time one of
their members purchases a
Menorah Pre-Need Funeral Plan.
Menorah. Serving the needs of our
people.
Offer available only through
December 31,1987-
JMenQ&hm
Gardens and Funeral Chapels
9321 Memorial Park Road
T1. Mikv vivj mI WSwa
iIk- NmoIi l.ikc IkHikv.iril I ah i
Phone: 627-2/"-
( rtWWfTarS rlirafWi (xMpnS
Miiwlri Prr *W nmmmK II


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, December 18, 1987
'Simcha' Tax Feeds The Hungry

-.*
Mazon, the organization that
provides food for the hungry
by asking American Jews for a
i?elf-imposed three percent
"tax" on the cost of weddings,
bar- and bat-mitvahs, anniver-
saries and other happy occa-
sions, says the idea has caught
on so quickly that contribu-
tions have tripled in a single
year.
To date, Mazon the
Hebrew word for food has
distributed a total of 44 grants
to established community
agencies, both Jewish and non-
Jewish, that feed poor people
in this country and ; broad.
Founded two yeai ? ago by
Leonard Fein, former editor of
Moment magazine Mazon
reported total contributions of
$163,000 during its fi*st year,
which ended November 1986.
Donations for the second year,
which has just ended, showed a
dramatic jump to $550,000. In
addition, the number of gifts
has more than doubled clim-
bing from 3,850 for 1985-86 to
9,975 for 1986-87.
Theodore R. Mann, chair-
man of Mazon and president of
the American Jewish Con-
gress, says the organization
will make a stepped-up appeal
during the current holiday
season "because the need
keeps growing and Mazon is
one of the most direct and ef-
fective ways to help the
hungry and the homeless."
Among the agencies that
have received grants from
Mazon are Project Ezra, which
conducts a food kitchen for
elderly Jews on New York's
Lower East Side; the
American Jewish World Ser-
vice of Boston, which trains
local volunteers for an
agricultural development pro-
gram in Sri Lanka; and the
Wilkinson Emergency Service
liter in East Dallas, Texas,
which stocks a food pantry for
-nt immigrants from Asia.
The Mazon concept of asking
families celebrating
py events, or simchas. to
' a voluntary "tax'' to the
i of the function has proved
he particularly appealing.
B Mann, because it adds to
the joy of the occasion.
'Giving three percent of the
of a party or other
bratioo makes it more
meaningful and reflective of
the ancient Jewish imperative
one's neighbor and feed
hungry, he notes.
According to Mazon
very gift IS signifi-
hether it is a $90 dona-
i on a $-'5,duo bar
or a $H()() gift pro-
120,000 welding.
are not onJv im-
d they buy,
eaning they pro-
the giver and the
i n says. Hardly
in the Mazon
. Angeles that does
i note of thanks
from the donor for the oppor-
tunity to "make a difference,"
he points out.
Mazon has received the en-
dorsement of the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis,
the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations, the
Rabbinical Assembly, the
United Synagogue of America,
the Federation of Reconstruc-
tioni: t Congregations and
Havurot, the North American
Theodore R. Mann
Federation of Temple Youth.
Mazon's board is made up of
Orthodox, Conservative,
Reform and Reconstructionist
rabbis and laymen.
Hundreds of synagogues
throughout the United States
have established relations with
Mazon, and more than 1,000
rabbis are now urging their
congregants to adopt the prac-
tice of imposing a "Mazon tax"
on themselves and their
families when celebrating hap-
py occasions.
Irving Cramer, executive
director of Mazon, expects the
organization to become an
even more potent force in the
future by helping bring food
and life to additional
thousands of needy people and
by spreading the concept of
taxing oneself to help the poor.
Mazons' office is located at
2940 Westwood, Blvd. Los
Angeles, CA 90064; (213)
470-7769.
Israel Has NATO Status
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israeli Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin and Defense
Secretary Frank Carlucci sign-
ed a memorandum of
understanding that boosts
Israel's status to the
equivalent of a NATO ally of
the United States.
The agreement, signed at
the Pentagon at the beginning
of Rabin's three-day visit here,
provides for the United States
and Israel to carry out joint
military research and develop-
ment programs. It also allows
Israel to bid on military sales
to the Pentagon on the same
basis as NATO members.
Israel joins a select group of
five major non-NATO allies of
the United States that also
comprises Australia, Egypt,
Japan and South Korea.
The memorandum takes on
new importance in the wake of
Israel's agreement, under
pressure from the United
States, to cancel development
of the Lavi jet fighter. The
new pact is expected to help
save many of the Israel Air-
craft Industry jobs lost by the
cancellation.
Pentagon sources noted that
the memorandum is the latest
in a series of cooperating
agreements with Israel since
the 1970s, including the four-
year-old memorandum on
strategic cooperation.
to your whole family
from the people at Publix.
_ May the spirit of the season bless
C(?j you with peaee, joy and love.
Publix


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Bar Mitzvah
Gary Reshefsky
GARY RESHEFSKY
On Saturday, Dec. 19, Gary
Reshefsky, son of Amy and
Ronald Reshefsky, will be call-
ed to the Torah of Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bar
Mitzvah. As an ongoing Tem-
ple project he will be "Twinn-
ing" with Valensas Glinskene
of the Soviet Union. Gary is an
8th grade student at North
Broward School and attends
the Temple Beth El Religious
School. Family members shar-
ing in -the Simcha are his
sisters, Rebecca and Milissa;
and grandparents, William
Reshefsky of Boca Raton and
Sonia S. Newman of Jupiter,
Mr. and Mrs. Reshefsky will
host a Kiddush in Gary's honor
following Havdalah Service.
RYAN SHORE
On Saturday, Dec. 19, Ryan
Powell Shore, son of Verna
Himber and Michael Shore,
will be called to the Torah of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
as a Bar Mitzvah. As an ongo-
ing Temple project he will be
Ryan Shore
"Twinning" witn Roman Fa-
ingersh of the Soviet Union.
Ryan is an 8th grade student
at Boca Raton Middle School
and attends the Temple Beth
El Religious School. Family
members sharing in the Sim-
chas are his brothers, Kevin
and Adam; and grandparents,
Sally and Louis Libman and
Bernice and Mac Shore, both
of Toronto, Canada. Ryan's
parents will host a Kiddush in
his honor following Shabbat
Morning service.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
David Krakower, son of
Beth and Mark Krakower, will
become a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday morning, Dec. 26.
David will lead the congrega-
tion in Torah study of the
weekly Torah portion,
Vayigash (Genesis 44-47).
Sharing David's Bar Mitzvah
(in absentia) will be Igor
Iosovich of the Ukraine, who
because of the repressive
policies of the USSR has been
David Krakower
unable to freely practice his
religion.
David attends the Loggers
Run Community Middle School
where he plays for and
manages the school Baseball
Team. He collects baseball
cards and is a sports writer for
the school newspaper.
Sharing the occasion with
him will be his brother Jason
and grandparents Harriet and
Milton Aronowitz of Highland
Beach and Janet and Stanley
Krakower of Coconut Creek.
DAVID SLOSSBERG
David Steven Slossberg, son
of Ellen and Robert Slossberg
will be called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah on Saturday mor-
ning, at Shabbat services at
Congregation B'nai Israel of
Boca Raton. David will read
portions of the morning ser-
vice and will lead the con-
gregation in the Torah
dialogue of the weekly portion
of Genesis called Miketz.
Sharing his Bat Mitzvah (in
Friday, December 18, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Gary, others sharing in the
celebration will be grand-
parents Thelma and Myer
Slossberg of Boca Raton and
grandmother Dorothy Epstein
of Baltimore, Md.
Wedding
Irene and Lou Fradin,
Delray Beach, celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary on
Thanksgiving Day. Family and
friends joined them in a recep-
tion held in Woodmere, Long
Island.
The Fradins moved here in
1982, upon Lou's retirement
from his position with an
advertising agency, where he
was in charge of the computer
department.
Lou is the newly-elected
Vice President of Ritual at
Temple Emeth, where they
have been members since
1982.
They have two daughters,
Vivian Greenstein and Sally
Shelowitz, and five grand-
children, all residing in New
York.
David Slossberg
absentia) will be Dalia Brailov-
sky of Moscow, who has been
unable to practice the rituals
of the Jewish religion by the
Soviet government.
David attends Loggers Run
Middle School, where he is in
the 8th grade. His hobbies in-
clude surfing, skateboarding
and water sports. He is a
former vice president of the
Congregation s Junior Youth
Group.
In addition to his brother
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Violence in Territories As Murders Mount
Mcavaum.
bum
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*&**a emm -r.ua. samp*.**" arraia |r*uj*
\*iiu'*L*'. aiimat *lSa-* la-."* MMM wroi ant
tfiuaim ant buai -r.ua aau^nvr or :i* {r*wnitH Ira*' r a
i .unaiift.
-" ***raH RvtKr^ vneiiftr aw ir ^ei^mns nr ua-a
la**"*; ""** vuuisttfvt mud *?r*eicrtr ewmwr..-* i\ atn-v liar
Sm aiimai t#\fta mr suSe- iirtwrt. feaa a-|ru*t. weaia* xf
'am. na*i arils -vuur-tft if" i *%4/9ur :-nua aawpme-"- iw
aumai a ew iifsi u su3*r liao uuter an' trtifc mearvc
Tut f.'vnmftnr uat m*v nr.*r-v*nft?t- fc i#- -yv* if vsi
muff i* mwairast vnuci vil mvoiv* uj ,*nrisi -.-im-
munni n '-.-uuMtentu** e-*>naft bir r ias fr"m* !mec
s-tsmu* K uai mmrxix*. "wrupnanix ^^r ***- w*'
iani wiirt 1^ -vimjr-vmuK-t.
oaw* ifti us wars* n "-s-eir
MUBii ant nohxExnt rr Ik
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"^flsxnsuniir^ fir aun-riiar tui-
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it V-asnmpim.
Sia* I*einineir. n aw r,
' aermia .tikbtt mr iih
sraau/tn ant nann*-; in* vmr
ix* m lift attf ir i :*ai3t
a*r-srneiT n im -"spim- ant
isme' i irmnjomn if
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nnec sammt
nttanvmif*: Hit b*mr-r* '..uin-
ci jr*irt n ne far in* ae-
vout inn* n imr tarn, n
aarnaa tut smacnn.
Vnift israel aiEnir
wiprn u aaat leuHina. i^rau
rimec n 1m- no-ae-r jas*
DiUf iiwi a: ian Tana.
inutKTnifi*?t Tai ir" anmr in
wat antr n uuUi ahc at at.
MU ai iarne I#eien*t
* n uaim wrti i ^aaoint*
wirai. ? ou- rnn- rcoien wr
wuunurt.
Tfe US vm neei unoe-
u'-'OBit snrs aut aar w*-a k
eaeeraa* namnnm T>5Kiranr.
to mv3uajaujnt mo Hk Enat
' una urianr wat irmmr:
ta* aoaifer.
aaat rsz: i wat
hxe ta aoBpca nurxut
n 1- strje:
ii -
-
war-.- a: naafaxwa wount-
c foir ycaaf j'iraw wni a:-

^east men vr:: "k;:j.

nxnum n t ciaut v
iur*Hrt tocm a" a*T
u>v ali*-
Jiaatu* -aiaiai! "''
rian*r-:-
w-Tiit*. i tu-i'-v wa: aftM
::? baadi. -^fuf** *aini; nea*
aoe* wnei noang I it is
:m cairo
'tfuoaa ewi ao
mmiBvaiiui n n* terntonei
n^ vr.! loea aal batfa
aiin Hi* unr*ff but
-.-ai mumrroaiin yfTi'-uui a^r
ua-nv nav* iit^je cyn
vim*. naj^au izj tk*
^eiup** 'jamjt iiw ;
'-a**i*i* laneratKn. Orjouruz*
uin ari'viau a-* bac v '>r tt*
jout'j* of ua**eff.
T ainnumfta ar* nopuaj to
-mnvmo*- meroaur-i a tbe tw
niori n rnei anar bikj-^.
vtuci nave oeei. "youtsO fyr
itpvera oa*.*t anc v. pr*^'aii
raxn A.TU v"j-:*n Am
V eg: bain anc jazt 5*yo< to
stun K liter juw Israel.
iinoir M ,BM Araw from
:n* i*r~iiir' niivt failed to
snnv in iir wm: n. Israe.
nriiiuf ii i. npari n
iicwMjwiMr- Tm paper Baic
tta e5er:t tr iik Ki-iL* arc
mam1.* a: Bun-araciisfl i
ii muruajji.
at Bi*Tse*. 'jieamnr aiic rer
a-*
Meaiv be co*.
Miraiea BflaMafl-aj u> dash
I and jcing-terBi
.^aae- B -.: fac-
Religion
saaiiei n b-tarf. ncniKia nai\ :e -iraf-acadly af-
J*fO jrt'vennnen: pana v. amiur* mt education
waien. Otni*je-irec a: trw Bianoartit enaner/
niaimna* u nrmiQuat t _*,Jiroiuis,.r*i natitHMl curriculum
:inamf aa luunoaiiui' ] Tms means tnat
' nor-' sunee-ru sirn at -eiipai viL r. a feared, be almost
-enn.vec 5run. *anr "mnnTTrTT
ievan k&jub a: preaen: oevj> 2:-3(' percent of their
cumcuiun u ."?eviHi siudiet. nu: wet tat frcn-ernment pro-
e*d k2i**j: i perf'jrmance anc publish the
the j*hbli v. a-janajt tneat- stucbes mav be too
ve^ *: A.'-^^rcs<0>O*f r//e: w-^-- .v.-co*
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amnJ tfaat "qmet
'* itiumJ

Lir.uC pubcy viL W 1* tr,
ue fntar*
ana auc r^a*.'
La-.
^twi far peace.
laji ataal H* ^:
At unreat v. v^
oeieatiut reacLK 'jf oe-ia.-
Id and rfcaygnd that
dam are ttAae aBEWOf as
v. Mtow *it if ae retara
v^ -ae-i *^ft .J^rab
Mali will enatiract n with
k/vt 7>jr imaaa apoae at a
meeting vf Kafi. a dawdcat
hrtJW that apfat frw the
Laix^r Party -x ago wheo it
wat \*s*AtA by Premier Da-tid
fieri-''/un'Xi
A diapuUr aroae oo another
fr-^rit A'yjyrdinf to a report in
Haaretz, Uri font, rector
genera] of the Iarad Broad-
casting Authority, charged
that teie*.iB>oij owerage of
disrorbances io the
vat abettng Arab;
rat Bpor.fr at a **ii*g
Mi senior T\' neat ojepart-
rt personnel. He critic-aed a
segment of newscast w vhich
Arab interviewee claimed
that ""the army is to blame for
e-.erii.iing" and an army of-
ficer vat asked repeatedly by
reporter, "if it wat not
possible to prevent incidents,"
Haaretz reported.
Tbe paper also said there
was wide agreement at a
Cabinet meeting that the news
media were inflating" the
situation in the territories.
Isn't ther
you
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