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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( April 10, 1987 )

Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 10, 1987
Passover Around The JDC World
In Romania, 5,000 Jews,
many of them aged and infirm
survivors of the Holocaust,
will attend community
Sedorim funded with the help
of the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC).
Other members of the com-
munity will receive special
Passover parcels of kosher
food and wine.
In Tunisia, some 350 people
in six communities will receive
special assistance to buy mat-
zah, matzah meal, wine, meat,
and oil for the holiday, thanks
to JDC.
These are two ways in which
JDC helps bring Passover into
Jewish homes, no matter how
isolated or poor, around the
world.
"May all who are hungry'
come and eat," reads the Hag-
gadah. JDC, acting on behalf
of the American Jewish com-
munity, takes this injunction
very seriously.
"Wherever there are Jews in
need, JDC is at work," say
JDC President Heinz Eppler
and Executive Vice President
Ralph I. Goldman in their
Passover message. "As we
celebrate this joyous festival,
we join in sending greetings to
our fellows Jews around the
world those overseas, whom
we help observe the holiday, as
well as those at home, who
make this help possible with
their continued support of the
United Jewish Appeal."
In many of the 34 countries
in which it operates, JDC helps
provide Passover assistance.
The Jewish communities of
Morocco and Poland receive
shipments of matzah, matzah
flour, and wine for the holiday.
Elsewhere in Eastern
Europe, JDC helps distribute
matzah to clients of the Jewish
community's social assistance
agency in Hungary. In
Czechoslovakia, where kosher
food and Passover wine are
not available, JDC helps pur-
chase the supplies elsewhere
and imports them into the
country for distribution.
The 180 Jews of Egypt
receive supplies of kosher
meat and wine, matza, and
matzah meal with help of JDC.
Passover supplies and food
baskets are provided for needy
Jews in Algeria as well.
In Israel, JDC is faithful to
its tradition of helping those
on the fringes of society and
gives aid to the physically and
socially handicapped, the aged,
and the very young. In old-age
homes, community centers,
and other institutions where
JDC plays a major role in
maintaining a high standard of
service, its presence is quietly
felt at the Seder table.
This mitzvah is made possi-
ble by the American Jewish
community's generous support
of the United Jewish Appeal,
which provides the bulk of the
JDC 1987 budget of $57
million.
Israeli Pavilion
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israeli pavilion at the Interna-
tional Trade Fair in Cairo had
some 10,000 visitors during the
first week of the fair last week, ac-
cording to an Israel Embassy
spokesman in Cairo.
Israel Bonds Takes Low Profile
In Wake of Pollard Spy Case
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Israel Bonds Organization
has taken a low profile in the U.S. since exposure of the
Jonathan Pollard spy case, its world president Yehuda
Helevy disclosed Monday.
HALEVY TOLD Israel Radio that the Pollard affair
would cause a temporary suspension of Bonds activity
among non-Jewish organizations including commercial
firms, banks and pension funds. Those bodies are said to ac-
count' for 30-35 percent of annual Bonds sales in the U.S.
INTRODUCING
EL AL'S JEWISH
HERITAGE TOURS
TO HUNGARY-
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POLAND AND ISRAEL
Remember the past, as EL AL takes you back to your roots in
Eastern Europe. You'll be able to tour places like Budapest,
Warsaw and Prague. More important, you'll be able to discover
your heritage. Then, rejoice in the future as EL AL takes you
forward to Israelsymbol of the Jewish spirit reborn.
For more information about EL AL's new Jewish Heritage Tours
to Eastern Europe and Israel, see your travel agent or call EL AL at
1-800-ELALSUN (1-800-352-5786).
For a free, detailed color brochure, please write:
EL AL ISRAEL AIRLINES
Jewish Heritage Tours
850 Third Avenue
New York, NY 10022
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has something so tiny made it so big.
Is Tetley s tiny little tea leaves They ve been making it big in
Jewish homes lor years Tetley knows that |ust as tiny lamb
chops and tmy peas are the most flavorful, the same thing is
rue tor lea leaves So for rich refreshing flavor, take time out
tor Tetley tea Because tiny is tastier'
TETLEY
< Tla.
Kosher for Passover
.ir.r TETLEY. TEA
Timtt is tmnUrr"


:; .- ..'/. ';' :..:.:: .,.;:
'Deeply Distressed'
'60 Minutes' Failed To Tell Story
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Congress
says it is "deeply distress-
ed" by a CBS "60 Minutes"
segment on March 22
because it claims the pro-
gram suggested that only a
relatively small number of
Soviet Jews are unhappy
with life in the Soviet
Union.
A statement by Theodore R.
Mann, president of AJCongress,
said the segment, featuring Mike
Wallace, presented a "simplistic
and inaccurate picture" of Soviet
Jewish reality and was dedicated
"to sweeping aside painful
evidence of decades of anti-Jewish
discrimination and oppression."
THE STATEMENT asserted it
has never been denied by
American Jewish organizations
that some Jews are satisfied with
Soviet life and do not wish to
leave. But it noted that the "key
concern" is with the "400,000
Jews who have requested and
received invitations from Israel"
and with additional hundreds of
thousands "who may wish to leave
but are fearful of even expressing
such a desire."
Mann's statement also question-
ed the candor of "satisfied" Jews
interviewed by Mr. Wallace, con-
tending they were fully aware
that their comments "would even-
tually be seen and heard by the
Soviet government."
The text of Mann's statement
reads:
"WE ARE deeply distressed by
a March 22 segment on CBS's
'Sixty Minutes' suggesting that
only a small group of hard-core
Soviet Jewish dissidents are
dissatisfied with life in the Soviet
Union.
"We have never denied that
there arc some Jews who are
satisfied with Soviet life and do
not wish to leave. Others, referred
to in the TV segment by a Soviet
Jewish refusenik as 'trained
Jews,' have been willing to trade
their Jewish identity for material
rewards within the Soviet system.
"Our key concern, rather, is
with the 400,000 Soviet Jews who
have requested and received in-
vitations from Israel. These do not
even include the additional hun-
dreds of thousands of Jews who
may wish to leave but are fearful
of even expressing such a desire.
"The Sixty Minutes segment ig-
nores this truth about the Soviet
Jewish condition and dedicates
itself to sweeping aside painful
evidence of decades of anti-Jewish
discrimination and oppression.
"ONE CANNOT help wonder
about the candor of some of those
"satisfied" Jews interviewed on
camera who knew full well that
their comments would eventually
be seen and heard by the Soviet
government.
"It is strange that 'Sixty
Minutes' did not make a single
reference to the U.S. State
Department's recently-issued
'Country Reports on Human
Rights Practices for 1986' which
notes that Jews in the Soviet
Union are subjected to
'systematic persecution based on
ancestry.' This report also
declares that Jews are denied ac-
cess to the better schools and
universities, are virtually banned
from political careers in the Com-
munist Party and upper echelons
of state government and from
other crucial areas of public life,
and have been subjected to vicious
anti-Semitic Vilification in official
Soviet propaganda, including
books, broadcasts and newspaper
articles. Moreover, Soviet Jews
study or teach Hebrew or Jewish
history only at the risk of
imprisonment.
"Even those assimilated Jews
who have sought accommodation
with the Soviet system cannot en-
tirely escape the burden of their
official designation as Jews. And
for those who choose to live as
Jews, worship as Jews or main-
tain Jewish cultural traditions, the
price is infinitely greater. In
Soviet terms, one cannot be a full-
fledged citizen and also be a Jew.
"It is regrettable that 'Sixty
Minutes,' in its eagerness to scoop
its competitors in the media, has
presented a simplistic and inac-
curate picture of a complex and
troubling problem that will surely
be recorded by Soviet public rela-
tions specialists as a major
triumph."
Poland-Israel
Ties Improve
NEW YORK (JTA) Rela-
tions between Poland and Israel
are improving in all areas, accor-
ding to Kalman Sultanik who was
reelected president of the
American Federation of Polish
Jews last week.
Addressing the Federation's an-
nual conference here Sunday,
marking 1,000 years of Jewish life
in Poland, Sultanik spoke of en-
couraging signs that Israel and
Poland are drawing closer after
20 years without diplomatic ties.
He stressed that the content of
their relations, for example,
cultural exchanges, are more im-
portant than their formality.
Nevertheless, reporting in his
recent meeting with Jo:eph
Cyrek, chairman of the Polish
Parliamentary Commission on
Foreign Affairs, Sultanik said
steps are being taken to restore
diplomatic relations between the
two countries.
JTA/WZN News Photo
Former Prisoner of Zion Zachar Zunshine and his wife, Ta-
tiania, are shown at Jerusalem's Western Wall. Zunshine, who
served three years in a Siberian prison camp on charges of
'spreading anti-Soviet propaganda,' was released on March 6.
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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
April 10, 1987

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00283

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
April 10, 1987

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00283

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text

5747 A Happy Passover 1987
w^ The Jewish <^ ?
FloridiaN
of South County
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
BOCA RATON. FLORIDA
PERMIT NO. 1093
Volume 9 Number 11
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, April 10,1987
BEFORE START OF MEETING: Former President Jimmy
Carter (left) meets with Israel's Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
in Jerusalem. The former President was on an unofficial visit to
Israel during which former Prime Minister Menachem Begin, co-
signer with the slmn Egyptian President Sadat of the Camp
David Accord, refused to see Carter.
Carter's New Dreams of Glory
Says Assad* Hussein Prepared To Enter Into Peace Talks
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Former President Jimmy
Carter arrived in Israel
Thursday (March 26) saying
he was convinced that the
leaders of Syria and Jordan
would join direct peace talks
with Israel held within the
framework of an interna-
tional peace conference.
Meeting with Vice Premier and
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
shortly after reaching Jerusalem
by the Allenby Bridge from Jor-
dan, Carter said that President
Hafez Assad of Syria understood
that an international conference
was the next stage toward direct
negotiations.
HE SAID that King Hussein of
Jordan wanted to advance the
peace process and held "flexible
views," but was unable to move
forward in the absence of an inter-
national forum. According to
Carter, Assad regards Jordan as
"a leading force in the peace pro-
cess." Carter said that in his own
view, Syria, too, has an important
role in the process.
Carter's visit to Israel, his first
since 1983, is the final leg of a tour
that took him to Algeria, Egypt,
Syria and Jordan. The former
President stressed repeatedly
here and in the Arab capitals that
his visit was private and the views
he expressed were his own. He
made clear he is not representing
the U.S.
He made several statements in
the course of his journey on the
need to include the Palestine
Liberation Organization in an in-
ternational conference.
CARTER'S ARRIVAL in
Israel coincided with the eighth
anniversary of the signing of the
Israel-Egyptian peace treaty on
March 26, 1979 at a White House
ceremony. The signatories were
then Israeli Premier Menachem
Begin and the late President An-
war Sadat of Egypt. Carter
engineered the treaty.
Carter asked for a meeting with
Begin, who has been living in
seclusion at his suburban
Jerusalem home since he resigned
from office in August 1983. Ac-
cording to Begin's spokesman.
Yechiel Kadishai, the 73-year-old
former Premier said "that he
can't see him, that's all. He didn't
give any reason." Begin and
Carter last met during Carter's
1983 visit.
Carter told reporters Thursday
that one of the lessons of Camp
David, at which Egypt, Israel and
the U.S. talked was that one
should not stick to any single
specific formula in pursuing peace
and that it is time to advance to a
new stage. He said that would
seem to be an international
conference.
HE SAID his visit to Israel was
to raise questions and float ideas
for Israeli leaders, as a private
citizen. He added that he had
never succeeded in convincing
Israelis "or anyone else" to do
what they did not want to do.
Asked why the peace process
had not advanced after C ip
David, Carter said "Perhaps tnere
is more I could have done, but I
don't think that in the last six
years (the tenure of the Reagan
Administration) it has been as
high a priority as it has been with
me, when it was almost an
obsession."
Carter expressed hope never-
theless that the last two years of
the Reagan Administration would
see the Middle East peace process
become a greater priority.
The Reagan Administration
sharply criticized Carter for a
remark before the American
Chamber of Commerce in Cairo
last week that there was "missing
leadership" in Washington.
"President Reagan has not been
inclined to use negotiation and
diplomacy as a means to achieve
our nation's goals as have his
Democratic and Republican
predecessors. He's more inclined
to exert America's military
strength, either the actual use of
it or the threat of it," Carter said.
THOSE REMARKS brought
an angry response from White
House spokesman Martin Fitz-
water last Friday. He said the Ad-
ministration was "deeply disap-
pointed" that Carter wouloVmake
such a statement on the "very
delicate" Mideast peace process
while in a foreign country. "It is
not right to say we have not been
pursuing the peace process in the
Middle East," Fitzwater said.
State Department spokesman
Charles Redman declared that
"This Administration has remain-
ed actively involved in the peace
process and is deeply committed
to it"
Carter met with Assad in
Damascus for three-and-a-half
hours Sunday, according to
Syria's official news agency,
Sana, discussing "issues relating
to the international situation, the
Middle East and Lebanon."
CARTER ARRIVED in Jordan
earlier Tuesday (March 24) asser-
ting that" As long as the parties
stay flexible and listen to contrary
views, the hope for a (interna-
tional) conference is kept alive."
He met with King Hussein and
Crown Prince Hassan.
In Jerusalem Thursday, Carter
said he had no word on any possi-
ble progress on the hostage issue
in Lebanon.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 10, 1987
B'nai Mitzvah
STACY BERGSTEIN
Stacy Jill Bergstein,
daughter of Lindsey and David
Bergstein, will be called to the
Torah of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton as a Bat Mitzvah
on Saturday, April 11. Stacy is
a 7th Grade student at Boca
Raton Middle School, and at-
tends The Temple Beth El
Religious School. Family
members sharing in the simcha
are: her brother, Scott
Michael, her sister, Ally son
Beth, and her grandparents,
Bea and Edward Reicher of
Deerfield Beach, Florida and
Vera and Irving Bergstein of
Easton, Pennsylvania.
Mr. and Mrs. Bergstein will
host a Kiddush in Stacy's
honor following Shabbat morn-
ing services.
JILL VOGEL
Jill Vogel, daughter of Linda
and Arthur Vogel, will be call-
ed to the Torah of Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bat
Mitzvah on Saturday, April 11.
As an ongoing Temple project
she will be "Twinning
Dana Luovsky.
with
Stacy Jill Bergstein
Jill is a 7th Grade student at
Boca Raton Academy, and at-
tends The Temple Beth El
religious School. Family
members sharing in the simcha
are her sister, Wendy, and
Dorothy and Jack Isaac of
Lake Worth, Florida.
Mr. and Mrs. Vogel will host
a Kiddush in Jill's honor
following Havdallah services.
Israel Wants Right To
Inspect UN Documents
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Binyamin Netanyahu,
Israel's Ambassador to the
United Nations, revealed
Sunday night that Israel will
soon ask UN Secretary
General Javier Perez de
Cuellar to be given permis-
sion to inspect hundreds
more files at the UN archive
on war criminals.
In an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
shortly before he departed for
consultations in Israel,
Netanyahu said Israel will re-
quest an access to 500 more
files in addition to the 2,500
files it already examined. The
UN archive on accused war
criminals contains
40,000 files.
some
FOR YOUR
EYES ONLY
Dr. Mark S. Jaffe M.D.
This column is part of a continu-
ing series on eye health by Dr. Mark
S. Jaffe of the Jaffe I dayman
ophthalmic practice in Delray
Beach.
Dear Dr. Jaffe:
My father, age 72. has been advised
to undergo cataract surgery. What
are cataracts, and what is the current
treatment for this condition?
Ruth B, Boca Raton
Dear Reader:
A cataract is a clouding process of
the human lens inside the eye. Once
it is so cloudy that the patient cannot
see well enough to function, it is
removed during a cataract operation.
and must be replaced by some sort of
artificial lens system. In the past, the
artificial lens system consisted of
cataract eyeglasses, very unsuc-
cessful and cumbersome for the pa-
tient. Another type of artificial lens
system, contact lenses, are some-
times difficult to insert and remove,
especially for the older patient. In
lections around the eye, red eyes and
tearing are other complications
associated with the use of contact
lenses in this application.
In the late 1960s, intraocular lens
implants, the insertion of a special ar-
tificial lens, were being performed
by four lens implant surgeons in the
United States, including Dr. Norman
Jaffe, my father, in Florida. Today,
more than 7,000 eye surgeons are
performing lens implant surgery
throughout the country, with nearly
one million cataract operations per-
formed yearly.
Dear Dr. Jaffe:
I've been an avid reader all my life,
and don't want to miss out on the
latest best sellers now. But lately,
when I try to read at night, my eyes
get so tired and my vision blurs so.
I can't continue. Can you give me any
suggestions on how to relieve my
tired eyes?
Phyllis M., Boynton Beach
Dear Reader:
Patients often tell me they were once
able to read for hours each night,
usually in bed, but now experience
the same irritations as you. Many
people erroneously feel they need
stronger reading glasses, which may
not be the case. As people get older,
the focusing muscles of the eye are
not able to work as well for prolong-
ed periods. Does this mean you have
to cut down on your reading time?
You might do better reading dur-
ing the daytime, rather than at night
when your whole body is tired. If you
are accustomed to reading in bed, try
reading in a comfortable upright
chair. Lying in bed forces you to use
your eyes in a downcast position,
which already puts a strain on them.
Shady illumination also creates fur-
ther strain on the eyes, so read in a
very good light. Also, cold com-
presses can often rejuvenate your
eyes and result in more comfortable
reading for a longer time.
Sometimes the symptoms you
have mentioned may be warning
signs for more serious problems. To
put your mind at ease, see your
ophthalmologist.
Please address any questions
about your eye health to Dr. Mark
S. Jaffe, 5130 Linton Boulevard at
Military Trail, The Linton Pro-
menade, Delray Beach, Florida
33445, or call 499-0232. Dr. Jaffe
will do his best to answer you
promptly.
_______________bJ-------------
MEETING IN MOSCOW: British Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher (left,) meets
(March SI) with 1975 Nobel Peace Prize-
winner Andrei Sakharov and his wife, Yelena
Bonner. Since his release from internal exile
AP/Wide World Photo
in Gorky for dissident activities, Sakharov
has expressed vocal support for the new
'glasno8t' policy of Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
bachev.
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1
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County
Heschel Recalled As 'Prophet' By Coretta Scott King
Page 3
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Rabbi Abraham Joshua
Heschel, the late Jewish
philosopher and civil rights ac-
tivist, was recalled as a
"prophet" by Coretta Scott
King here last month.
King, president of the Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. Federal
Holiday Commission, spoke at
a meeting of the commission of
the "common ground of faith"
between her late husband and
Heschel, who was a professor
at the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America.
She said it was good from
time-to-time to be reminded
that "people like Martin and
Kabbi Heschel don't come
around very often." She said
the two men were friends and
co-workers in the civil rights
struggle.
Martin Luther King spoke to
the Rabbinical Assembly of
America, the Conservative
rabbinic group, in March 1968,
ten days before he was slain by
an assassin in Memphis, Tenn.,
and his widow recalled
Heschel's introduction of her
husband. "Martin Luther King
Jr. is a voice, a vision and a
way," Heschel said. "I call
upon every Jew to hearken to
his voice, to share his wisdom,
to follow his way. The whole
future of America will depend
on the impact and influence of
Dr. King/'
The commission heard
reports on the observance of
the King holiday last January,
including the activities of the
American Jewish community,
Israel and at the Israel Em-
bassy here where Coretta
Scott King was the guest of
honor.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 10, 1987
Preparing Kitchen
For Passover
Issued by the Law Committee,
Rabbinical Assembly of America
Passover, Festival of Freedom, has a unique
place in the Jewish home because of the seder and
because of the changed atmosphere in the home
during the Passover week.
This Passover home atmosphere is created each
year by the traditional practice of thoroughly
cleansing the home in all its parts and by the
removal of all chometz or leaven, in preparation for
the welcome of Pesach. Also through the
meticulous avoidance of the use of chometz or
leaven throughout the Passover days, both at home
and when away.
The term chometz or leaven is applied not only to
foods, the use of which is to be avoided during
Pesach, but also to the dishes and utensils in which
foods are prepared or served during the year, and
which dishes or utensils may not be used during
Pesach except, as herein indicated.
Foods During Passover
FORBIDDEN FOR USE: The following foods are
forbidden for use during Passover Leavened
breads, cakes, biscuits and crackers, cereals, coffee
substances derived from cereals, wheat, barley,
oats, rice, dry peas and dry beans, and all liquids
which contain ingredients or flavors made from
grain alcohol.
PERMITTED FOODS: Requiring no Kosher
L'Pesach label. The following foods are permitted
in unopened packages or containers. They require
no Kosher L'Pesach label. Natural coffee, sugar,
tea, salt, pepper, vegetables (except peas and dry
beans) and fruits. Permitted vegetables can be
fresh or frozen.
// Certified for Passover use by rabbinical
authority: matzos, matzo flour. Passover noodles,
candies, cakes, beverages, canned and processed
foods, milk, butter, jams, cheese, jellies, relishes,
dried fruits, salad oils, vegetables, gelatin, shorten-
ings, vinegar, wines and liquors are permitted if
they are certified by competent rabbinical authori-
ty as fit for Passover use. Labels and tags marked
Kosher L' Pesach are of no value unless they bear
rabbinical signature.
Dishes and Utensils
Only dishes and utensils specially reserved for
Passover should be used with the following excep-
tions: (A) The silverware, knives, forks and spoons
made wholly of metal, if used during the year, may
be used on Passover if thoroughly scoured and im-
mersed in boiling water. All table glassware is per-
mitted after thorough scouring. Fine translucent
chinaware, if not used for a year, is permitted.
(B) Metal pots and pans used for cooking purposes
only (but not for baking), if made wholly of metal,
though used during the year, may be used on
Passover if first thoroughly scoured and immersed
in boiling water. (C) Utensils used for baking dur-
ing the year cannot be used during Passover.
Earthenware, enamelware and porcelain unten-
sils used during the year may not be used on
Passover.
The stove is prepared for Passover by thorough
scrubbing and cleansing of all parts and turning on
full flame in the bake oven and all the grates.
A dishwashing machine may be used for
Passover after thorough scouring with boiling
water and the use of a new tray.
Editor'* Note: According to Orthodox Pro-
cedure, the following preparation should be added:
All pots, pans and utensils being kashered
should not be used for a 24-hour waiting period
before being immersed in boiling water.
Table glasswear may be used after it has been
soaked in water for three days. The water should
be changed every 24 hours.
Non-Passover china may be used only "in cases
of dire emergency." But first, a competent rab-
binical authority should be contacted.
According to some authorities, an oven can be
used after it is thoroughly cleansed, undergoes a
24-hour period of waiting, and is then turned on to
its highest heat for one hour.
According to some authorities, a dishwasher
may be used for Passover. After undergoing a
24-hour waiting period, the machine should run
through three cycles on the highest heat.
String beans as well as dried beans should not
be consumed on Passover.
End Of The Seder
It's Like A Surprise Symphony
By YITZCHAK DINUR
The end of the Seder is
rather like the Surprise Sym-
phony. Following the sump-
tuous meal, many (especially
the children) drowse through
the second part of the Seder
when all are suddenly wakened
by the rousing, almost roister-
ing, songs which finish off the
evening with great eclat.
These songs were apparent-
ly introduced for this very pur-
pose, or perhaps to add an in-
formal element to this careful-
ly arranged and impressive
family ceremony. Some of
them were originally sung only
in the Ashkenazic rite, but of
late they have been adopted by
many Sephardic Jews as well.
They are deservedly among
the most widely known and
beloved of the entire Jewish
festival repertoire.
The first two songs are long
acrostic poems from the 7th
Century: lines begin with suc-
cessive letters of the Hebrew
alphabet. The first night's
song recounts a series of
miracles said to have occurred,
like Passover, at the dead of
night. The second night's
acrostic enumerates events
said to have occurred on
Passover and has the refrain
- "This was the Paschal
sacrifice." They were written
respectively by Yannai and
Eleazar Kalir, both 7th Cen-
tury Hebrew liturgists.
The third poem, Ki Lo Naeli
- "For It Befits Him" is of
quite a different ilk. Also an
acrostic, it reviews the various
attributes of God and has a
quaint refrain, "Thine Also
Thine," taken from different
verses in the Book of Psalms.
The theme of this song, as of
the entire Haggadah, is God's
greatness, mercy and his love
for the Jewish people shown in
His leading them out of Egypt.
Though Moses is a central
figure in the Biblical account
of Passover and the Exodus,
he is completely absent from
the main body of the Hag-
gadah and from these con-
cluding songs.
The most rousing of all the
songs is Adir Hu "Mighty is
He,' which is sung to a
rollicking tune. This 15th Cen-
tury acrostic implores God to
rebuild His temple speedily. It
has a paraphrase in Old Yid-
dish which used to be sung un-
til quite recently after the
Hebrew song. I have seen it
printed in American Haggadot
from the 1930's. This Old Yid-
dish Adir Hu appeared in the
first printed illustrated Hag-
gadah of Gershon Cohen of
Prague of 1526, and it is thus
the earliest printed song
known in Old Yiddish.
"Who Knows One?" is a folk
song in the form of questions
and answers on numbers one
to 13. It seems to be the closest
thing to a catechism in
Judaism. However, it is not
doctrinal but relates to objects
and matters significant in
Jewish life. The form is very
popular the world over. The
English folksong, "Green
Grow the Rushes 0," is the
most familiar. It begins with
"Who'll tell me one O?
Green Grow the rushes 0.
I'll tell you one 0
One is God and all alone and
evermore shall be it so."
The Israel Labor movement
has also generated a version of
this in which the response to
the first question is: "One is
workers' unity and evermore
shall be so, which is op-
timistic to say the least.
Paraphrases of Ehad Mi
Yodea "Who Knows One?"
in Ladino and in Yiddish are
also sung at the Seder.
The last song in the Hag-
gadah Had Gadya, written
in imitation Aramaic from the
15th Century, is the most
lovable. In a breathless climax
to the Haggadah, it relates the
events following the purchase
of a kid "bought by my father
for two coins," and ends with
the Lord showing that he over-
comes the Angel of Death.
An unorthodox Hebrew ver-
sion of this ends with the pro-
mise that these events will be
terminated with the abolition
of evil as a prelude to universal
peace. 1 remember singing a
song in Yiddish in a similar
vein with my father, a song in
which the Lord sends a pea-
sant to pick apples in a forest,
but the peasant refuses to per-
form this chore, and the subse-
quent messengers, identical
with the actors in the Had
Gadya, also refuse to do their
duty, until the Lord himself
goes to the forest. Then all ac-
quire a fear of the Lord, do
their own jobs, and even the
apples begin to drop of their
own volition.
It is also a celebration of love
interpreted allegorically as the
love of God for the People of
Israel, which is the central
theme of the Haggadah.
For Children of The Holocaust
The Fifth Child
(This prayer is to be in-
serted in the Passover seder
before opening the door for
Elijah.)
THE ONE WHO CANNOT
ASK
On this night, we remember a
fifth child.
This is a child of the Shoah
(Holocaust), who did not sur-
vive to ask.
Therefore, we ask for that
child Why?
We are like the simple child.
We have no answer.
We can only follow the
footsteps of Rabbi Elazar ben
Azariah, who could not bring
himself to mention the
Exodus at night until Ben
Zoma explained it to him
through the verse.
In order that you
REMEMBER the day of your
going out from Egypt, all the
days of your life.
(Deut. 16:3)
"The days of your life," in-
dicates the daylight and the
goodness of life. "AH the day
of your life," means even
in the darkest nights when we
have lost our firstborn, we
must remember the Exodus.
We answer that child's ques-
tion with silence.
In silence, we remember that
dark time.
In silence, we remember that
Jews preserved their image
of God in the struggle for
life.
In silence, we remember the
seder nights
spent in the forests, ghettos,
and camps; we remember
that seder night when the
Warsaw Ghetto rose in revolt.
(lift the cup of Elijah)
In silence, let us pass the cup
of Elijah, the cup of the final
redemption yet-to-be. We
remember our people's
return to the land of Israel,
the beginning of that
redemption. Let us each fill
Elijah's cup with some
of our wine, expressing the
hope that through our
efforts, we will help bring
closer that redemption.
We rise now and open our door
to invite Elijah, the
forerunner of the future
which will bring an end to
the nights of our people.
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area 3 60 Annual ,2 Yea. Minimum 17!
Friday, April 10,1987
Volume 9
11NISAN5747
Number 11


Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Weekly PortionTzav
By RABBI PINCHAS ALOOF
Anshei Shalom, Delray Beach
Sacrificial Duties of the Priests
The priests were charged with
the duty of bringing a burnt-
offering on behalf of the communi-
ty every morning and evening and
the fire on the altar was to be kept
burning continuously. Supplemen-
tary laws prescribed their
sacrificial duties and the portions
of the offerings they were to
receive as their dues. Their share
of the meal, sin and trespass offer-
ings could be eaten only within the
Court of the Sanctuary by a priest
who was ceremonially clean.
Aaron, from the time he was or-
dained, was to bring a meal-
offering each morning and even-
ing on his own behalf, and on
behalf of the priesthood.
The peace offering was the only
sacrifice of which the offerer, too,
was permitted to partake provid-
ed he was ceremonially clean.
Consecration of Aaron and His
Sons
In an impressive ceremony held
in the Court of the Sanctuary,
Aaron and his sons were con-
secrated and installed by Moses in
the presence of the congregation.
After the priests had bathed,
Moses dressed Aaron in his
distinctive garments and anointed
the Tabernacle and its contents
(i.e. the Ark, Table of Show-bread,
Candlestick and altar of incense)
as well as the altar of burnt-
offering with its accessories, and
the laver and its base, all of which
stood in the Court of the Sanc-
tuary. He then poured the anoin-
ting oil upon Aaron's head to sanc-
tify him. Finally, the ordinary
priests were invested with their
garments, and a sin-offering,
burnt-offering and a special con-
secration were offered up by
Moses. These rites were repeated
for seven days, Aaron and his sons
remaining in the Court
throughout the period.
Shabbat Shalom This is Shab-
bat Hagadol, the Haphtarah,
Malachi III, 4-24-read on the Sab-
bath before Passover. The pro-
phet foretells the punishment of
all evil-doers on the day of G-d's
judgment and condemns the peo-
ple for neglecting to pay the tithes
and offerings due to the Priests
and Levites. Were they to honor
their obligations He would shower
blessings upon them and the land
would yield abundant crops. The
righteous who show impatience at
the apparent prosperity of the
wicked will reap the reward for
their integrity on Judgment Day
when the unrighteous will be
destroyed. The prophet calls upon
the people to remember the Law
of Moses and foretells the coming
of Elijah before 'the great and ter-
rible day of the L-rd' when parent
and child will be reconciled and
turn their hearts towards G-d.
A Happy Kosher Passover.
Rose Matzkin, of Delray Beach, a former National President of
Hadassah, is congratulated by Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of
Jerusalem, as he bestows on her his city's highest award, Amit
Yerushalaiyim "Guardian of Jerusalem" during the open-
ing ceremony of the Hadassah Diamond Jubilee Mission to
Israel.
miL,
New Rental Plan
at The Court
Allows You to
Move-In
Without a Large
Cash Commitment.
The Court at Palm-Aire is an exclusive full-service com-
munity for active, independent adults 62 and over. Our
new rental plan, without endowment or entrance fee.
will be offered for a limited time only.
South Florida's Premier Retirement Community Features:
Prestigious location sur- Auditorium and large-screen
rounded by golf courses. television room
shopping centers and Beauty parlor and barber
shop
entertainment
Elegant dining
Housekeeping and linen
service
24-hour security
Individually-controlled heat-
ing and air conditioning
Screened-in balcony or patio
Pool and health spa
Exercise room
Library, card room, game
room, arts and crafts center
Discover the standard of excellence by which all others
will be judged The Court at Palm-Aire. Our luxurious
accommodations include features that further enhance
our image as the premier residential retirement commu-
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Full-time social director
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Scheduled mini-bus
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The David Ben-Gurion Centennial committee
of the U.S. and the United Negro College Fund
co-hosted a reception March 11 at the Waldorf-
Astoria Hotel in New York to Commemorate
David Ben-Gurion's 100th birthday. Shown
here from left to right are: Dr. Benjamin
Hirsch, executive director of the Ben-Gurion
Centennial Committee; Christopher F. Edley,
president of the United Negro College Fund;
Jacqueline Grennan Wexler, president of the
National Conference of Christians and Jews
and keynote speaker at the event; and Jack J.
Spitzer, chairman of the Ben-Gurion Centen-
nial Committee.
PASSOVER CHOCOLATE
YOU CANT PASS OVER
k^B\RTONS"
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rcsrmu2
*a
A special meal for a special time.
Special times deserve the best! This Passover, make your meal
extra special with a delicious kosher turkey from Empire.
Each turkey meets the highest kosher standards for purity
and excellence (and Empire's standards for great taste).
Treat your family and friends to the unforgettable taste
of Empire., and feast on the compliments.
THE MOST TRUSTED NAME IN KOSHER FOODS.
1 (800) EMPIRE-4


Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 10, 1987
Passover Around The JDC World
In Romania, 5,000 Jews,
many of them aged and infirm
survivors of the Holocaust,
will attend community
Sedorim funded with the help
of the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee (JDC).
Other members of the com-
munity will receive special
Passover parcels of kosher
food and wine.
In Tunisia, some 350 people
in six communities will receive
special assistance to buy mat-
zah, matzah meal, wine, meat,
and oil for the holiday, thanks
to JDC.
These are two ways in which
JDC helps bring Passover into
Jewish homes, no matter how
isolated or poor, around the
world.
"May all who are hungry
come and eat," reads the Hag-
gadah. JDC, acting on behalf
of the American Jewish com-
munity, takes this injunction
very seriously.
"Wherever there are Jews in
need, JDC is at work," say
JDC President Heinz Eppler
and Executive Vice President
Ralph I. Goldman in their
Passover message. "As we
celebrate this joyous festival,
we join in sending greetings to
our fellows Jews around the
world those overseas, whom
we help observe the holiday, as
well as those at home, who
make this help possible with
their continued support of the
United Jewish Appeal."
In many of the 34 countries
in which it operates, JDC helps
provide Passover assistance.
The Jewish communities of
Morocco and Poland receive
shipments of matzah, matzah
flour, and wine for the holiday.
Elsewhere in Eastern
Europe, JDC helps distribute
matzah to clients of the Jewish
community's social assistance
agency in Hungary. In
Czechoslovakia, where kosher
food and Passover wine are
not available, JDC helps pur-
chase the supplies elsewhere
and imports them into the
country for distribution.
The 180 Jews of Egypt
receive supplies of kosher
meat and wine, matza, and
matzah meal with help of JDC.
Passover supplies and food
baskets are provided for needy
Jews in Algeria as well.
In Israel, JDC is faithful to
its tradition of helping those
on the fringes of society and
gives aid to the physically and
socially handicapped, the aged,
and the very young. In old-age
homes, community centers,
and other institutions where
JDC plays a major role in
maintaining a high standard of
service, its presence is quietly
felt at the Seder table.
This mitzvah is made possi-
ble by the American Jewish
community's generous support
of the United Jewish Appeal,
which provides the bulk of the
JDC 1987 budget of $57
million.
Israeli Pavilion
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israeli pavilion at the Interna-
tional Trade Fair in Cairo had
some 10,000 visitors during the
first week of the fair last week, ac-
cording to an Israel Embassy
spokesman in Cairo.
Israel Bonds Takes Low Profile
In Wake of Pollard Spy Case
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Israel Bonds Organization
has taken a low profile in the U.S. since exposure of the
Jonathan Pollarcf spy case, its world president Yehuda
Helevy disclosed Monday.
HALEVY TOLD Israel Radio that the Pollard affair
would cause a temporary suspension of Bonds activity
among non-Jewish organizations including commercial
firms banks and pension funds. Those bodies are said to ac-
count for 30-35 percent of annual Bonds sales in the U.S.
INTRODUCING
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forward to Israelsymbol of the Jewish spirit reborn.
For more information about EL AL's new Jewish Heritage Tours
to Eastern Europe and Israel, see your travel agent or call EL AL at
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For a free, detailed color brochure, please write:
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mil i CTiNi
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t0futtibrri10s introduces
Lou-Crlorie Frozen Dessert
RRHURy n y -oj- tofutti srrmds inc. sric it
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Not since the asking ot the Four Questions
has something so tiny made it so big.
Is Tetley s tiny little tea leaves They've been making it big in
Jewish homes lor years Tetley knows that |ust as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same thing is
rue for tea leaves So for rich, refreshing flavor, take time out
tor Tetley tea Because tiny is tastier1
TETLEY
< Kosher for Passover
fh* ... it tetley. tea
"Tin* iii tn*t\rrZ


...
. .
;-;0>!j
...
.... .
'Deeply Distressed'
'60 Minutes' Failed To Tell Story
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Congress
says it is "deeply distress-
ed" by a CBS "60 Minutes"
segment on March 22
because it claims the pro-
gram suggested that only a
relatively small number of
Soviet Jews are unhappy
with life in the Soviet
Union.
A statement by Theodore R.
Mann, president of AJCongress,
said the segment, featuring Mike
Wallace, presented a "simplistic
and inaccurate picture" of Soviet
Jewish reality and was dedicated
"to sweeping aside painful
evidence of decades of anti-Jewish
discrimination and oppression."
THE STATEMENT asserted it
has never been denied by
American Jewish organizations
that some Jews are satisfied with
Soviet life and do not wish to
leave. But it noted that the "key
concern" is with the "400,000
Jews who have requested and
received invitations from Israel"
and with additional hundreds of
thousands "who may wish to leave
but are fearful of even expressing
such a desire."
Mann's statement also question-
ed the candor of "satisfied" Jews
interviewed by Mr. Wallace, con-
tending they were fully aware
that their comments "would even-
tually be seen and heard by the
Soviet government."
The text of Mann's statement
reads:
"WE ARE deeply distressed by
a March 22 segment on CBS's
Sixty Minutes' suggesting that
only a small group of hard-core
Soviet Jewish dissidents are
dissatisfied with life in the Soviet
Union.
"We have never denied that
there are borm Jews who are
satisfied with Soviet life and do
not wish to leave. Others, referred
to in the TV segment by a Soviet
Jewish refusenik as 'trained
Jews,' have been willing to trade
their Jewish identity for material
rewards within the Soviet system.
"Our key concern, rather, is
with the 400,000 Soviet Jews who
have requested and received in-
vitations from Israel. These do not
even include the additional hun-
dreds of thousands of Jews who
may wish to leave but are fearful
of even expressing such a desire.
"The Sixty Minutes segment ig-
nores this truth about the Soviet
Jewish condition and dedicates
itself to sweeping aside painful
evidence of decades of anti-Jewish
discrimination and oppression.
"ONE CANNOT help wonder
about the candor of some of those
"satisfied" Jews interviewed on
camera who knew full well that
their comments would eventually
be seen and heard by the Soviet
government.
"It is strange that 'Sixty
Minutes' did not make a single
reference to the U.S. State
Department's recently-issued
'Country Reports on Human
Rights Practices for 1986' which
notes that Jews in the Soviet
Union are subjected to
'systematic persecution based on
ancestry.' This report also
declares that Jews are denied ac-
cess to the better schools and
universities, are virtually banned
from political careers in the Com-
munist Party and upper echelons
of state government and from
other crucial areas of public life,
and have been subjected to vicious
anti-Semitic Vilification in official
Soviet propaganda, including
books, broadcasts and newspaper
articles. Moreover, Soviet Jews
study or teach Hebrew or Jewish
history only at the risk of
imprisonment.
"Even those assimilated Jews
who have sought accommodation
with the Soviet system cannot en-
tirely escape the burden of their
official designation as Jews. And
for those who choose to live as
Jews, worship as Jews or main-
tain Jewish cultural traditions, the
price is infinitely greater. In
Soviet terms, one cannot be a full-
fledged citizen and also be a Jew.
"It is regrettable that 'Sixty
Minutes,' in its eagerness to scoop
its competitors in the media, has
presented a simplistic and inac-
curate picture of a complex and
troubling problem that will surely
be recorded by Soviet public rela-
tions specialists as a major
triumph."
Poland-Israel
Ties Improve
NEW YORK (JTA) Rela-
tions between Poland and Israel
are improving in all areas, accor-
ding to Kalman Sultanik who was
reelected president of the
American Federation of Polish
Jews last week.
Addressing the Federation's an-
nual conference here Sunday,
marking 1,000 years of Jewish life
in Poland, Sultanik spoke of en-
couraging signs that Israel and
Poland are drawing closer after
20 years without diplomatic ties.
He stressed that the content of
their relations, for example,
cultural exchanges, are more im-
portant than their formality.
Nevertheless, reporting in his
recent meeting with Jo.eph
Cyrek, chairman of the Polish
Parliamentary Commission on
Foreign Affairs, Sultanik said
steps are being taken to restore
diplomatic relations between the
two countries.
Enjoy
one of
Passover's
most
JTA/WZN News Photo
Former Prisoner of Zion Zachar Zunshine and his wife, Ta-
tiania, are shown at Jerusalem's Western Wall. Zunshine', who
served three years in a Siberian prison camp on charges of
'spreading anti-Soviet propaganda,' was released on March 6.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 10, 1987
Peres Answers Arabs' Queries
On Wireless Telephone Hook-Up

By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Utilizing an international
wireless telephone hook-up
via West Germany, Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres
answered questions from
callers in the Arab world for
a half-hour Thursday (Mar.
26). Most of the questions
related to Middle East
peace.
The telephone exchange was ar-
ranged by the Arabic service of
the state-owned Israel Radio in
cooperation with a radio station in
Bonn. Except for callers from
Egypt, who used the newly install-
ed direct-dialing, questions and
answers were relayed through
Bonn. Peres heard simultaneous
translations and replied in
English, which was translated in-
to Arabic.
CALLS FROM Syria, during a
practice run Wednesday, were cut
off abruptly, and there were no
Syrian calls Thursday. But there
were calls from Lebanon, Jordan,
Egypt and the West Bank. Peres
was asked about an international
conference for Middle East peace,
the peace process with Egypt and
the situation between Israel and
Syria since Syrian armed forces
occupied West Beirut earlier this
month.
The Foreign Minister stressed
that Israel wants peace, but apart
from Egypt has found no Arab
partners.
He said Israel was ready to par-
ticipate in preparations for an in-
ternational conference or in talks
with a joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation, but not with the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion, which he said "preferred
shooting to talking."
EARLIER. Peres met with
three Palestinian leaders, Hanna
Seniora, editor of the East
Jerusalem Arabic daily Al Fajr;
Fayez Abu Rahman, a West Bank
attorney; and Dr. Saeri
Nusseibeh.
He said his purpose was to hear
their opinions on Israel-
Palestinian relations and acquaint
them with Israel's policies.
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troupe based in Hollywood, Fla.
A group of 20 youngsters, ages seven to seventeen,
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"The Generation Gap is designed to give students
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adding that the dance .company often performs for civic
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The program held at The Court At Palm-Aire was
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Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
In Florida
Do We Need An Official 'English Only' Movement?
Is there a need for Federal
or state laws making
English the "official
language" of the United
States? How do the
"English-only" movements
relate to America's tradi-
tion of cultural pluralism? Is
bilingual education effec-
tive? Should all Americans
be multilingual?
And how can we defuse the
often heated tensions surrounding
these issues and replace rancor
with reasonable, workable
solutions?
These and related questions
were discussed at what is believed
to be the first major Conference
on Language Policy in the United
States, a forum on "English: The
Only Language? Whose Deci-
sion?" last week at the Tamiami
Campus of Florida International
University in Miami.
SPEAKERS included experts
in bilingual education, leaders of
minority communities, and
intergroup-relations specialists.
Conference sponsors were the
American Jewish Committee, the
Center for Educational Develop-
ment, Center for Multilingual and
Multicultural Studies of Florida
International University, Cuban
National Planning Council, Dade
County Community Relations
Board, Florida International
University, Greater Miami
United, and the Mitchell Wolfson
New World Center Campus of
Miami-Dade Community College.
Keynote speaker was Dr. Sarah
E. Melendez, associate director of
the American Council on Educa-
tion's Office of Minority Con-
needs of language minorities does
not pose a threat to America's
true common heritage and com-
mon bond the quest for freedom
and opportunity."
cerns, who said in an inteview:
"We don't need laws to make
English the official language as it
already is, by tradition and
custom. Furthermore, Hispanics
and other language minority
groups don't need laws to force
them to learn English; rather,
they need opportunities thev
need classes, teachers, and
materials. Every ESL class has a
waiting list, which proves we
don t need to be coerced to learn
English."
Dr. Melendez also disputed "the
prevalent notion that large
numbers of Hispanics never learn
English, pointing to Census
Bureau findings than 94 percent
of Hispanics in the United States
speak English to some extent.
AS FOR the youngsters of
Hispanic origin, Dr. Melendez said
that "there is no danger that
children going to our school
systems will not learn English,"
adding: "The reality is that
without some special efforts they
will soon forget their parents'
language, which is too bad
because the United States needs
many people with multiple
language capabilities."
Irving M. Levine, director of
AJC's National Affairs Depart-
ment and of its Institute for
American Pluralism, discussing
the issues covered by the con-
ference, censured those who
"become emotionally over-
wrought about linguistic diversi-
ty, demand 'English-only,' and
refuse to see the value in people's
maintaining their ethnic linguistic
and cultural interests."
Agreeing that "becoming com-
petent in English is more of a
8 Terrorists Arrested
PARIS (JTA) French
counter-intelligence has ar-
rested eight men believed to be
terrorists planning to blow up
El Al and TWA airliners. The
police have refused to pinpoint
the date of the arrests and said
that one of the group was a
Lebanese, another a Fren-
chman known for his pro-
Palestinian leanings, and the
rest "came from the Middle
East."
Police say that documents
found at the time of the arrests
show that the group was also
planning to carry out in-
dividual attacks against
various Israeli personalities in
France as well as against Arab
representatives considered by
them as "hostile to the Palesti-
nian cause."
Police have found three hand
grenades and an unspecified
amount of explosives and are
searching for additional
Nuclear
Energy Confab
GENEVA - is participating in the first
United Nations conference on
peaceful uses of nuclear
energy. The Israeli delegation
to the conference which ends
Friday is headed by Hannan
Baron, former deputy director
general of the Foreign
Ministry. Ambassador Moham-
med Ibrahim Shaker, the
Egyptian representative to the
United Nations here, was
elected president of the
conference.
weapons which, they say, the
group has hidden in the vicini-
ty of Paris.
necessity than ever for new im-
migrants," Levine held that,
nevertheless, "mastering the new
language while also preserving
the old is what the equation should
be for new ethnic Americans."
AS FOR Americans whose
forebears came here a generation
or mroe ago, Levine suggested
that "it might not be a bad idea
for them to learn the language of
their heritage." adding: "But if
they do not care to do that, let
them at least be more tolerant of
those who do not wish to discard
the treasures the spoken and
written words of cultures that
have enriched our own."
Also slated in a major address at
the conference is Dr. Rodolfo J.
Cortina, director of the Center for
Multilingual and Multicultural
Studies at Florida International
University. Indicating a central
issue examined in his address, Dr.
Cortina said that the United
States Constitution, "like the na-
tion, did not confirm any single
ethnic reality but was, rather, in-
vented by multiple ethnic
groups."
Moreover, he said, the Constitu-
tion "was meant to be a map of
the future rather than a confirma-
tion of the past" and, he stressed,
"the Constitution contains not
one statement on language policy,
thus demanding that we invent a
language policy for our own
future."
KRAMERS OF the Constitu-
tion, continued Dr. Cortina,
"were not unaware of the strong
feelings provoked by language
and ethnicity, but their Constitu-
tional silence on this issue stems
from the common-law tradition of
not restricting future generations
through needlessly detailed laws
. And I believe that a language
policy in the United States has to
be made by the people, and not by
unnecessary laws."
Touching on another aspect of
the debate, Marilyn Braveman,
AJC director of education and one
of the organizers of the con-
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ference, maintained that "re-
quirements that English be the of-
ficial language can have
dangerous, far-reaching, and
unanticipated effects."
"Current English-language pro-
positions," she said, "contain
specific provisions for enforce-
ment, raising the specter of costly
and time-consuming litigation.
Opponents say this could en-
danger or have a chilling effect on
911 lines, interpreters in state
courts for witnesses, crime vic-
tims and defendants, health and
mental-health services, and
multilingual police, fire, and
emergency services. They say it
could eliminate public service an-
nouncements in any language
other than English, including
pamphlets explaining how to
enroll a child in public school."
RATHER THAN adopt
negative approaches, Braveman
said, "we should support and
develop positive approaches such
as the English Proficiency Act
and other programs designed to
help children and adults gain pro-
ficiency in English."
Advocating that "we talk about
an 'English-plus' rather than an
'English-only' approach,"
Braveman concluded: "The use of
additional languages to meet the
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 10, 1987
A Jewish Community Thrives In Tokyo
By JANE ORNAUER
It could be a synagogue in
Anytown, U.S.A. The building is
starkly modern, brick, three
stories high. The facade's only
decor are the traditional six-
pointed Star of David and a
menorah.
Inside, the sanctuary is also
"American Familiar." The pews
are of highly polished blond wood
with hinged reading desks to hold
prayer books. The ark curtains
are of gold-fringed blue velvet,
embellished with menorahs and
other symbols.
Yet, this synagogue is 10,000
miles from New York, in the
center of Tokyo, Japan. Called the
Jewish Community of Japan
(JCJ), it lies in the fashionable
Hiroo district and serves as the
heart and home of Jewish
religious and cultural activities for
the vast Tokyo metropolitan area.
Jews of many nationalities and
denominational preference (Or-
Jane Ornauer is managing
editor of the ADL Bulletin.
thodox, Conservative and
Reform) reside in the environs of
Japan's capital city and form the
JCJ's widely diverse congrega-
tion. At a recent Friday evening
Sabbath service, I saw a group of
Israeli men seated together,
several American families, a few
women whose husbands are in the
U.S. military, a student who came
from Staten Island, NY, and a
young man from Strasbourg,
France. One couple, who were ob-
viously American tourists, had
come to say Kaddish.
The synagogue may look like
one in America but its procedures
are different. A chart outside the
sanctuary plainly spells out that
pew sections are divided. Some
are for men only, some for women
and there are others where men
and women may sit together.
Temple Beth Israel Rally
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Temple Beth Israel of Deer-
field Beach sponsored a rally
last week to show solidarity
amongst Jews who are
assimilating at alarming rates,
according to the temple's
spiritual leader Rabbi Joseph
Langner.
"Intermarriage and a low
birth rate of 1.2 children per
family are the primary reasons
for our shrinking number,"
said Langner. He said
estimates show that, in the
past 15 years, between
500,000 and one million Jews
have been lost through
assimilation.
"It must be remembered
that the Jewish community is
approximately some 350 odd
years old. We have steadily
grown. Only in the last 12 to 15
years have our numbers begun
to decrease for the first time in
the entire 350 year history.
"As we have witnessed in
the last 20 years, interfaith
marriage is growing from 20
percent of Jewish people to at
least 40 percent and some say
as high as 60 percent."
Langner also points to
decreasing number of
membership in organizations
such as B'nai B'rith. Educa-
tion statistics also show that
the majority of Jewish children
do not receive a Jewish educa-
tion, especially beyond the age
Rabbi Joseph Langer
of a bar or bat mitzvah. accor-
ding to Langner.
"We are losing the battle,"
Langner asserts. "You need
only g" to various synagogues
ami aiiii up the total member-
ship of all the synagogues and
you'll see it adds up to a paltry
11, 12 percent of the Jewish
people who live in this
((immunity.
"What has been worse," he
added "is that a weakened
Jewish commitment has made
us easy prey for the various
evangelistic and cultist
movements in the country who
are sometimes filling a need
that we in our blindness have
never sought to address."
The question, says Langner,
becomes: "What are
synagogues and organizations
doing to reconnect Jewish peo-
ple to their heritage?
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The service itself reflects this
blend. The rabbi faces away from
the congregation, in the Orthodox
manner. The ritual includes facets
from each of the main branches of
Judaism. Most prayers are in
Hebrew although some are said in
English.
As the congregation's spiritual
leader, Rabbi Michael Schudrich
explains, "We are a traditional
synagogue but unaffiliated with
any of the major arms of Judaism.
We try to make our members com-
fortable sometimes we don't
succeed."
The congregation, which
numbers about 170 families living
in Japan, is about 50 percent
American 25 percent Israeli and
the remainder from various other
parts of the world. There are eight
to ten Japanese converts among
the current membership.
The synagogue dates back about
40 years to the immediate post-
World War II era. The founders
were primarily Russian Jews who
had fled their homeland after the
1917 revolution and made their
way to China. Following the
Chinese Communist takeover in
1947, they settled in Japan and
formed the nucleus for a
synagogue, along with personnel
from the American occupation
forces.
The present building, which was
erected in 1980, serves as the
focal point for every stage of
Jewish life cycle events. From
birth to death, observant Jews
turn to the JCJ for service and
assistance. Babies are welcomed
into the faith. There is a mikveh
on the premises. Weddings are
held and celebrated a recent
one united a vacationing Israeli
couple, who decided not to wait to
return home before tying the
knot.
The JCJ religious school is at-
tended by some 65 children, pro-
viding education through Bar and
Bat Mitzvah. The rabbi, who came
to the Tokyo pulpit from New
York several years ago with his
wife, told me he has hopes of for-
ming a Hebrew high school as his
students mature.
The rabbi fills a variety of
capacities as well as spiritual
leader. He is principal of the
religious school, directs a youth
group and teaches adult education
classes.
He also supervises conversions
to Judaism, which occur with sur-
prising frequency, considering the
location. While we talked, his
telephone rang and a Japanese
woman inquired about the conver-
sion procedure. When questioned
about her interest ("I expected to
hear that she planned to marry a
Jew," Rabbi Schudrich said later),
she told him she had visited Israel
and was studying Hebrew.
As I toured the three floors of
the immaculate building, where
hallway conversations in Hebrew
are not uncommon, I realized that
this is the center for Tokyo's
Jewish social life as well as
religious activity. On the second
floor, an outdoor swimming pool
is surrounded by circular tables
topped with colorful umbrellas,
where members, family and
friends can enjoy a respite from
Tokyo's oppressive summer heat
and humidity.
Indoors on the same floor there
is a 1,000-volume library offering
a wide variety of reading
materials, ranging from the latest
on the New York Times Best
Seller List to classics in fiction
and non-fiction. The library is pro-
bably one of the few places in the
Tokyo area where popular
English-language reading is
available.
The walls of the library are lined
with photographs of past
presidents ofthe congregation,
again a similarity to American
temple Hfe.
Another unique aspect of the
JCJ is that members go there to
buy imported kosher meat and
other foods including Passover
goods. Tokyo offers few if any
other resources for such
necessities. These foods also ap-
pear on the menus at the monthly
community dinners and the Oneg
Shabbat meals which follow some
of the Friday evening services.
What about anti-Semitism in
Japan, I asked Rabbi Schudrich.
Actually, he said, most Japanese
don't know much about Jews or
Judaism they think it's
another part of Christianity.
"If pressed to name people they
know as Jewish," he said, "the
answers would likely be Einstein,
Freud and Bar bra Streisand."
Some Japanese, he added, do
think of Jews as prominent in the
medical profession and the media,
which they consider to be positive
assets.
He told of problems in the
Japanese educational system with
respect to Jews, however. The on-
ly Shakespearean play most
Japanese students are likely to
read is "The Merchant of
Venice," leaving youngsters with
the stereotyped view of Shylock
the Jew. In addition, he said such
notorious works as the "Protocols
of the Elders of Zion," and other
anti-Semitic literature are
published in Japan.
Rabbi Schudrich, who is study-
ing the Japanese language several
times a week, takes such problems
to the Anti-Defamation League
Committee of the Tokyo B nai
B'rith Lodge, which interacts
with Japanese government of-
ficials and educators.
After talking with Rabbi
Schudrich, touring the synagogue
building and chatting with con-
gregants both before and after
services, it no longer seemed sur-
prising to me that there is a thriv-
ing Jewish community in the heart
of Tokyo one that seems destin-
ed to keep the faith in the years
ahead for those far from home.
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Interfaith Body Condemns
Unsolicited Conversion Activity
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
I- The Interfaith Con-
ference of Metropolitan
[Washington has issued a
[statement condemning ef-
forts at religious conversion
[which are deceptive or deny
[the legitimacy of another
|religion. Specifically con-
demned were deceptive
[practices aimed at Jews.
The statement by the Con-
ference, which is made up of 29
[islamic, Jewish. Mormon, Protes-
Itant and Roman Catholic "faith
communities" in Washington and
It he surrounding Maryland and
Virginia suburbs, stresses support
It if "the right of all religions to
(share their message" with people
]of other religions.
"But it is inappropriate for one
(faith group to openly demean or
|disparage the philosophies or
uactices of another faith group as
[part of its proselytizing," the
Statement said. "Proselytism
vhich does not respect human
freedom is carefully to be avoided.
^roselytism must be done with a
tense of humility and a respect for
lothers."
WHILE INTERFAITH groups
hroughout the country have
Issued statements condemning a
specific occurreHe, this is believ-
!'tl to have tieef)The first general
statement issued by such a group,
|atrording to Dr. Sidney Schwarz,
utive director of the Jewish
|('ommunity Council of Greater
Washington, and the Rev. Clark
|Lol>enstine, executive director of
the Interfaith Conference.
The Conference statement
limted that it felt "compelled to
speak out when a religious group
promotes or sanctions activities
that are harmful to the spirit of in-
Iterreligious respect and tolerance.
We condemn proselytizing efforts
which delegitimize the faith tradi-
Itions of the person whose conver-
sion is being sought. Such tactics
|go beyond the bounds of ap-
propriate and ethically based
religious outreach."
The statement added that
deceptive methods "are practiced
:m the most vulnerable of popula-
Jewish Role
To Be Stressed
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
|A high-ranking Spanish
[government official said
Ihere Wednesday (March 25)
[that his government plans
[to stress the contribution of
[Spanish Jews to the
[discovery of America in the
[course of the quincentennial
[celebrations of the event in
11992.
Luis Yanez, Spain's Secretary
[of State for International
ICooperation, said at a special
I briefing with Israeli reporters and
Ithe Jewish Telegraphic Agency
I that he visited New York last
[week specifically to meet with
|Jewish organizational leaders.
HE SAID that he discussed
[with leaders of the American
[Jewish Committee, the American
[Jewish Congress and other
[organizations his government's
[plans to reinvoke the role of the
IJews in the discovery of America
I by holding seminars, discussions
land congresses and by publishing
I information on the issue.
"The response of the Jewish
organizations was very positive,"
I Yanez said in reply to a question.
'FOR MANY years we ex
Iperienced disinformation regar-
ding the role of Jews in modem
Spain."
tions residents of hospitals and
old age homes, confused youth,
college students away from home.
These proselytizing techniques
are tantamount to coerced conver-
sions and should be condemned."
AS EXAMPLES, the state-
ment listed practices used by such
groups as Hebrew, Christians,
Messianic Jews and Jews for
Jesus.
"These groups specifically
target Jews for conversions to
their version of Christianity, mak-
ing the claim that in accepting
Jesus as the savior/messiah, a Jew
'fulfills' his/her faith," the state-
ment said. "Furthermore, by
celebrating Jewish festivals, wor-
shipping on the Jewish sabbath,
appropriating Jewish symbols,
rituals and prayers in their chur-
ches and, sometimes even calling
their leaders, 'rabbi,' they seek to
win over, often by deception,
many Jews who are sincerely look-
ing for a path back to their
ancestral heritage."
The Conference statement will
be distributed to some 2,000 chur-
ches and synagogues and
clergymen in the Washington
area, Lobenstine said, and will be
sent to some 300 interfaith groups
around the country.
PASSOVER
GREETINGS
FROM DELTA
AIRLINES.
Delta Air Lines and its 48,000 professionals
extend best wishes to you and your family.
May your Passover season be filled with happiness.
1987 Delta Ait Lines. Inc


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 10, 1987
Sephardi Haggadah Best
Example: The Sarajevo Edition
By DR. LEILA AVRIN
The Jews of medieval
Europe had their best sellers
too. In those days, a book sold
fewer copies but remained on
the list for a few centuries.
The Jewish best seller of 13th
and 14th Century Spain was
the illuminated Haggadah. Not
every Sephardi could afford to
have an illustrated book for his
Seder table on Passover, but
the number must have exceed-
ed the thirty or so surviving
Haggadot. Still, considering
the persecutions and forced
conversions from the late 14th
Century until the final expul-
sion in 1492, and the wander-
ing, resettlement and hard-
ships afterwards, thirty does
not seem so few.
Before the expulsion,
Sephardim were well in-
tegrated into the cultural life
of the Moslem and Christian
societies around them; this is
reflected in Hebrew literature,
architecture and the visual
arts. Much energy was
devoted to the art of the book,
its hand-written text, its
decoration and its leather bin-
ding. None of the Sephardi
scribes or craftsmen left his
name in the manuscript in the
form of a colophon, the
signature at the end
characteristic of medieval
books, which can be found in
some of the Hebrew Bibles
from Spain. That the artists of
Sephardi Haggadot were
Jewish is obvious from the
many illustrations which show
an intimate knowledge of
Jewish customs associated
with the Passover festival.
THE BEST known Sephardi
Haggadah today, the Sarajevo
Haggadah, was originally writ-
ten in Catalonia in the 14th
Century. It has survived
because its owner, whoever he
was, was wise enough to leave
Spain with it. The Ottoman
Turks welcomed Jews to settle
all over their empire; some
came to Sarajevo in
Yugoslavia by way of Salonica
in the mid-16th Century. The
Haggadah may have been in
the same family for centuries.
In 1894, a Sephardi child, in
order to raise money for the
family after his father died,
brought the book to school to
sell. It was purchased for the
newly-established Bosnian
National Museum for the
reported sum of 100 florins.
Four years later, a facsimile of
the Sarajevo Haggadah was
published in Vienna; from that
time on, several Haggadot
have been reproduced. They
have become gift books in our
times in all price ranges, from
the magnificent Golden Hag-
gadah, a limited edition of an
early 14th Century manuscript
in the British Library, shining
with gold leaf, to the more-
popularly priced Sarajevo
Haggadah, republished in col-
or in the 1960's in New York,
London and nearly every
European country including
Yugoslavia.
It is still being reproduced in
Israel, often being given as a
gift to one's Seder host. So
famous was this manuscript
that when the Nazis took Sara-
jevo in Apirl of 1941, as SS of-
ficer was sent to the museum
to take the Haggadah as a
prize. While the curator kept
the officer occupied, his
secretary spirited the Hag-
gadah away, and handed it
over to a villager who gave it
to his priest in Foca, on Mt. Ig-
man, where it remained until
after the war.
LIKE THEIR Ashkenazi
counterparts, Sephardi Hag-
gadot depict biblical and ritual
scenes, but there are major dif-
ferences between them, in ad-
dition to style. First, in
Sephardi Haggadot the biblical
illustrations, often from the
beginning of Genesis through
the Exodus, are grouped at the
front of the Haggadah.
Sometimes two or four scenes
on each page form a con-
tinuous narrative. The style
and subjects came from il-
lustrated Latin Bibles and
books of the Psalms that were
made in France, but whose
popularity spread to Spain. To
these, Jewish legends were ad-
ded by Sephardi artists.
A second difference is in the
scenes of contemporary life. In
Sephardi Haggadot there are
more pictures of activities in
the synagogue: illustrations of
the service or the family leav-
ing the synagogue, the reading
of the Haggadah on the Sab-
bath preceding Passover, and
the distribution of matzah to
the congregants. They reflect
the essential role of the house
of worship in the Sephardi
world.
By the 20th Century, few
Haggadot remained in private
collections. One outstanding
collector was Rabbi David
Solomon Sassoon (1880-1942),
born in Bombay to a successful
Baghdad mercantile and bank-
ing family. He lived in
England, as did his son, Kabbi
Solomon David Sassoon, who
came to Jerusalem in 1960,
where he continued his
father's scholarly and
charitable activities. In order
to raise money for Sephardi
educational institutions the
world over, he has been selling
off the 1,000 or so manuscripts
his father collected.
In 1975, when one of the auc-
tions took place at Sotheby's in
Zurich, a fund was established
in Israel to redeem some of the
books. The whole nation par-
ticipated in this campaign;
school children went from door
to door to help raise the money
to enable at least part of the
Sassoon treasures to reside in
Israel permanently. For-
tunately one of the
manuscripts, a 14th Century
Catalan Haggadah, is now in
the Israel Museum; six other
important codices are in the
Jewish National and Universi-
ty Library.
A Hebrew manuscript with
decorations costs at least
$300,000, if one happens to
come up for sale. A few of
them are exhibited from time
to time, and there are always
some on display at the British
Library in London and at the
Israel Museum in Jerusalem.
But fine reproductions can
now be enjoyed by all in
fascimile editions and in the re-
cent calendars and greeting
cards that have been published
in Israel.
DELUXE KOSHER
PASSOVER TOURS
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"F^^peraondtCH4cho(pmfesskin^wah30yearsofexperienx^
COPACABANA
POSADADELSOL
MISSION HILLS RESORT
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HOTEL MERIDIEN
NmpartBeach
Florida
FOUNTAINBLEAU HILTON
INNISBROOK RESORT
SHERATON BAL HARBOUR
SANSSOUO
H.Y.
TAMIMENT RESORT
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flye.wr
HARBOR ISLAND SPA
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Wlnlr ftckigtt In
Puerto Rico
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AMBASSADOR BEACH
PvrtoRico
DUPONTPLAZA
ATLAS AMBASSADOR KOSHER TOURS
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Dial Station charge calls Raw, ,u&*ct to change Dayt.m. rate, are rghr Rates do not reflect appfccatXe led.-* slate and local taxes A^T^r.-LAT^ %& o3y


Exciting Chicken Recipes For
Passover From Empire Kosher
Friday, April 10, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 13
National Conference on Soviet Jewry
This Passover, serve some
kosher delights from around
the world. Try these sugges-
tions from the Orient, Italy,
Scandinavia and Hungary to
add a little zest to mealtime
this year. Enjoy, and eat in
good health!
Baked Chicken Oriental
1 Empire chicken, cut in serv-
ing pieces
8 Tbsps. margarine
Vz cup honey
A cup lemon juice
1 can crushed pineapple
(kosher for Passover)
Wash chicken* pieces and
drain. Melt half the margarine
in a baking dish (13"x9"x2").
Roll chicken pieces in
margarine one at a time to
coat evenly. Place skin side
down in baking dish and bake
in moderate 350 degrees oven
for 30 minutes. Melt remain-
ing margarine in small sauce
pan. Stir in honey, lemon juice
and pineapple until well mixed.
Turn chicken. Bake, basting
several times with syrup and
drippings in pan 30 minutes or
until tender and richly glazed.
Serves 4-6.
Chicken Cacciatore
4-5 Empire chicken breasts
(remove skin and bone)
2 cups Tokay wine
1 onion, diced
2 stalks celery, diced
Vz pound fresh mushrooms,
diced
Vz cup ketchup, kosher for
Passover
1 cup water
garlic powder
salt and pepper
Cover Dutch-oven-type pot
with oil and fry all vegetables
BBYO
Tour
The B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYO), which
has been sending teenagers on
tours of Israel for three
decades, has announced plans
to broaden the scope of its
overseas programming this
summer with the introduction
of its Capital Cities Tour of
Europe.
The program, which is open
to BBYO members age 15 or
older, will take the youth on a
20-day tour of Amsterdam,
Brussels, Antwerp, Paris, and
London, with side trips to
points of interest outside of
these major cultural and
population centers. The trip
will run from July. 1 to 23.
Throughout the entire tour,
participants will be housed in
youth hostels and hotels.
The cost is $2,500 which in-
cludes airfare from New York
to Amsterdam and the return
trip from London. It also in-
cludes all room, board,
sightseeing tours, professional
guides, admission fees, and
orientation procedures at the
point of departure. Transpor-
tation between a participant's
home and New York is not
included.
Application for this program
can be made by contacting the
Registrar, Capital Cities Tour,
: BBYO, 1640 Rhode Island
t Avenue, N.W., Washington,
D.C. 20036. The program can
only accommodate on a first-
. come first-serve basis.
with garlic powder, salt and
pepper until lightly browned.
Scoop all vegetables from pan
and place on platter. Put
chicken pieces in pot and
braise on both sides for only a
few seconds. Then replace
vegetables and add water and
wine. If needed, add more
water to barely cover chicken.
Add ketchup. Simmer 2Vz
hours covered and 15-30
minutes uncovered. Cook a
total of three hours.
Serves 4-5.
Scandinavian
"Pepper Root" Chicken
8 drumsticks from Empire
broiler or fryer chickens
1 cup oil or margarine
3 Tbsps. tomato ketchup,
kosher for Passover
3 Tbsps. bottled horseradish
1 Tsp. salt
legg
Quickly rinse drumsticks and
set aside to drain. Blend re-
maining ingredients in blender
or use wire whip to make a
thick sauce. Brush sauce over
drumsticks. Broil. Turn and
baste frequently during cook-
ing, about one hour. Chicken
will be tender and moist with
crisp, golden brown crust.
Serves 4-5.
Chicken Paprikash
1 3-pound Empire chicken
salt and pepper
2 large onions, minced
2 Tbsps. vegetable oil
1 green pepper, minced
2 stalks celery, diced
1 Tsp. paprika
1 tomato, cut in eighths
Cut chicken into serving
pieces. Season with salt and
pepper. Fry onions in a heavy
skillet until golden brown. Add
green pepper, celery and
paprika. Mix well. Add chicken
and tomato. Turn occasionally
to keep from burning, taking
care to keep chicken pieces in-
tact. When done, remove
chicken to hot platter. If more
sauce is desired, add a little
water and bring to boil.
Serves 4-6.

I l -' THE MATZAH OF HOPE 1 '
THE MATZAH OF HOPE
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Publlx
Publix
wishes you and
your family a
joyous Passover
celebration.
May the spring festival of
Passover bring you an abundance
of peace and happiness.
L


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, April 10, 1987
Synagogue JVIeuis
ANSHEI EMUNA
Rabbi Louis Sacks will of-
ficiate at the celebration of the
Siyum, the completion of a
Talmud Tractate, in conjunc-
tion with the pre-Passover ser-
vice on Monday, April 13 at
7:30 a.m.
Morning services on Tues-
day and Wednesday, April 13
and 14, will begin at 8:30 a.m.,
and the Passover Service will
be at 5:30 p.m. on both dates.
Rabbi Sacks will preach a
series of sermons on the
theme, "Servants of the
Lord."
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks will
preach a sermon on the theme
"The Shattered Tablets" at
the Passover Sabbath morning
service on Saturday, April 18,
commencing at 8:30 a.m.
Kiddush will follow services.
The Se'udat Shl'isht with the
Rabbi's D'var Torah in Yiddish
will be celebrated in conjunc-
tion with the Sabbath Twilight
Minyon Services.
Mr. Harry Cope, Mrs.
Lucille Cohen, Dr. Nathan
Jacobs and Mrs. Nora Kalish
are the chairpersons of the
Membership Committee.
For further information call
499-9229.
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks will
preach the Sermon on the
theme "Shemini The Week-
ly Torah Biblical Portion" at
the Sabbath Morning Service
on Saturday, April 25 com-
mencing at 8:30 a.m.
Kiddush will follow service.
The Se'udat Shl'isht with the
Rabbi's D'var Torah in Yiddish
will be celebrated in conjunc-
tion with the Sabbath Twilight
Minyon Services.
Daily Classes in the "Judaic
Code of Religious Law"
(Shulchan Oruch) led by Rabbi
Sacks begin at 7:30 a.m.
preceeding the Daily Morning
Minyon Services.and at 5 p.m.
in conjunction with the Daily
Twilight Minyon Services.
TEMPLE
ANSHEI SHALOM
Men's Club of Temple An-
shei Shalom, 7099 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray Beach, will spon-
sor a breakfast meeting on
Sunday, April 19 at 9:30 a.m.
Guest speaker will be Dr.
Allen Tauritz, podiatrist. For
information, call 495-0466.
TEMPLE BETH AM
Temple Beth Am, 757
Parkway St., Jupiter, will hold
its annual Passover Seder
Tuesday, April 14, starting at
6 p.m., with Rabbi Elaine
Zecher officiating. The cost for
adults is $30, children 12 years
and under, $15. Seating is
limited, so call 747-1109 or
747-1432 for reservations.
Temple Beth Am will be hav-
ing a Toy and Book Sale/Flea
Market on Sunday, April 26 at
11 a.m. A Barbeque lunch will
also be available.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth, Delray
Beach, at Saturday morning
services, April 11, will honor
the volunteers who have con-
ducted the Monday evening
games reliably and conscien-
tiously for the past 13 years,
under the leadership of Ben
Kessler and David Spector.
Past President Louis Medwin,
Chairman of the Bar Mitzvah
Year program, inaugurated
this event. All are welcome.
Temple Emeth, Delray
Beach, will conduct two Seder
Services on Passover, Monday,
April 13 and Tuesday, April
14. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd
and Cantor Zvi Adler will of-
ficiate. Because of Daylight
Saving Time, services will
start at 7:15 p.m. For further
information call 498-3536.
TEMPLE SINAI
Shabbat service will take
place at Temple Sinai, 2475
W. Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach on Friday, April 10 at
8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver
and Cantor Elaine Shapiro will
be in attendance. Rabbi
Silver's sermon is entitled
"The Special Shabbat."
Shabbat services will be held
at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April
11.
If you are not affiliated with
any other Temple please con-
sider joining Temple Sinai.
Call Helen Berger, Chairper-
son at 276-6161.
Services for the first day of
Passover will take place Tues-
day, April 14 at 10 a.m. at
Temple Sinai. Rabbi Samuel
Silver and Cantor Elaine
Shapiro will be be in atten-
dance. Rabbi Silver's sermon
will be "More Questions."
Temple Sinai will conduct a
complete seder on April 14 at 6
.m. This will be led by Rabbi
ilver and Cantor Shapiro.
Donation is $30 per person,
$15 a child. For reservations
please send your check to Tem-
ple Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33445.
For information call 276-6161.
Temple Sinai will continue
the Bible study lectures every
Thursday at 2 p.m. with Rabbi
Samuel Silver, except for the
third Thursday of the month
when Rabbi Silver will speak
on Great Jewish Personalities.
Cantor Elaine Shapiro
presents her Jewish Music
series every first Thursday of
the month at 10:30 a.m. For in-
formation call Temple Sinai,
276-6161.
The second Temple Sinai
Blood Donor Day will be held
at Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach,
on Monday, May 11 from 2:30
to 6 p.m. We anticipate having
three or four donor days per
year so that we can add to our
blood bank. Please help us help
ourselves. Join us in this life
saving cause. Call Temple
Sinai, 276-6161.
The message of Israel is
heard every Sunday on WSBR
Boca 740 on AM dial at 7:06
a.m. and WFTL Ft. Lauder-
dale 1400 AM dial at 6:45 a.m.
On April 12 Rabbi Sheldon
Harr, Temple Kol Ami of Plan-
tation will deliver a special
Passover message.
Kulanu, Temple Sinai's
young Jewish Social Group is
having a dance on Saturday,
April 25, 8 p.m. to midnight at
Temple Sinai.
Sing and dance to United
Sounds Inc., featuring Dave
Pirro. Admission is free, and
there will be refreshments,
contests and prizes! For infor-
mation call 967-4436 or
278-8726.
The students of the Paul B.
Anton Religious School of
Temple Sinai are reading
many books of Jewish interest,
because a new reading pro-
gram, introduced last fall, has
stimulated them.
Each student keeps a
cumulative record and report
on the books he or she has
read, and librarian Sylvia
Schulman helps the students
choose the books suited to
their ages. Reading is fun at
Temple Sinai!
Temple Sinai will conduct
Duplicate Bridge games on
Thursdav evenings at 7:30
p.m. Refreshments are served,
master points will be awarded,
and these games are sanction-
ed by ACBL, Fee is $2 per per-
son. For further information
call Jack Alter 496-0946.
This year Yom Hashoah
the day of x Remembrance of
the Holocaust falls on April
26. Temple Sinai will com-
memorate Yom Hashoah on
April 17 during Friday night
services led by Rabbi Silver.
The Second Session of
Outreach Program will be held
on Thursday, April 23 at 7:30
p.m. at Temple Sinai. Rabbi
Rachel Hertzman, Outreach
Coordinator for the UAHC
(Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, S.E. Region,
will participate in the even-
ing's program.
We request that you come
with one or two written ques-
tions relating to intermar-
riage. Refreshments are plan-
ned so RSVP to the Temple of-
fice, 276-6161.
Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach,
will have Shabbat services on
Friday, April 17 at 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Samuel Silver and Can-
tor Elaine Shapiro will be in at-
tendance. Rabbi Silver's ser-
mon will be "Doubly Holy."
Passover Shabbat Services
at Temple Sinai on Saturday,
April 18, will start at 10 a.m.
The service for the last day
of Passover will take place at
Temple Sinai, Monday, April
20 at 10 a.m. Yizker will be
recited, and Rabbi Silver's ser-
mon will be "Let Us
Remember." Cantor Elaine
Shapiro will be in attendance.
If you are not affiliated with
any other Temple, please con-
sider joining Temple Sinai.
Call Helen Berger, Chairper-
son at 276-6161 for
information.
Temple Sinai will continue
holding Bible study lectures
every Thursday at 2 p.m. with
Rabbi Samuel Silver, except
for the third Thursday of the
month when Rabbi Silver will
speak on Great Jewish Per-
sonalities. Cantor Elaine
Shapiro presents her Jewish
Music Series every first Thurs-
day of the month at 10:30 a.m.
The Brotherhood of Temple
Sinai will be running a special
luncheon for members and
non-members. Cost is $3 per
person. Date April 12 at 1 p.m.
TEMPLE
ANSHEISHALOM
The following Sermons will
be offered by Rabbi Pincus
Aloof at Temple Anshei
Shalom, Friday night, Sabbath
Services 8 p.m. The Services,
each week, will be augmented
by Cantor Louis Hershman
and the Temple Liturgical
Choir. An Oneg Shabbat will
follow the Services.
Friday Evenings
April 10 Prohibition Period
April 17 Passover and
Easter
April 24 Contemporary
Scene
At 8:30 a.m. Saturday morn-
ing Shabbat Services, Rabbi
Aloof will interpret the follow-
ing portions of the week.
Saturday Morning
April 11 Tzav
April 18 A value unto
Himself
April 25 Shemini
Think about
Tomorrow,
Today.
If you're tlM typa ol poreon amo hat alway
boon thoughtful of your tared oom. you know
that tunaral coata hare Malory of riatoa You
can protacl your tared onaa from making coalty
amotlonal daclarena. Pranaad lunaral
arrangomanta can aava manay and in|Mlin al a
MM whan H'a moat appraourtad. Act an
tomorrow, today by caHtng tor a protoailonal
conaurtatton.
re-arranoamanf t bacauaa you care.
tBETH ISRAEL
RUBIft
cA Family Ptbtectiori Plati Chapel
rre Need Conference Center
6578 W Atlantic Ave a Delray Beach, ft 33446 3OS-496-5700
Chapel
5808 W Atlantic Ave. Delray Beach, fl 33446 a 3OS-499-80O0/732 3O00
PASSOVER
April 14 The Long Search
April 21 The Two Arks
For additional information
call Temple Office, 495-1300.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton grades seven through
confirmation is sponsoring a
family dinner and Shabbat
Service on Friday, April 10.
The dinner is at 5:45 p.m. with
services following at 8 p.m. at
the Temple, 333 SW Fourth
Ave., Boca Raton. For infor-
mation contact Rabbi Gregory
S. Marx, 391-8900.
Temple Beth El Clubs six
and seven (6th and 7th
graders) are having an over-
night on April 10 in the Youth
Lounge beginning at 8 p.m.
and ending Saturday morning
at 9 a.m. For more informa-
tion, contact Mindie Stein,
731-3074 or Rhoda Schuval at
753-6756.
Temple Beth El is sponsor-
ing a Congregational Passover
Seder on Tuesday, April 14 at
6 p.m. at the Temple. Early
reservations are requested.
Send reservations and check
to: Seder Reservations, Tem-
ple Beth El, 333 SW Fourth
Ave., Boca Raton, FL 33432.
For further information, con-
tact Mrs. Sidney Kaufman at
973-0817.
BOFTY Elections will take
place at 7:30 p.m. in the Youth
Lounge. If you are interested
in running for office, send a
letter of intent to Marc Spec-
tor. The elections will take
place on April 15. For further
information contact Marlene
and Mark Isenberg at
395-7052.
The SOLOS (Singles group
of Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton 49 and up) is planning
a Third Seder with traditional
foods and all the trimmings on
Thursday, April 16 at 6 p.m. at
the temple.
Reservations are a must.
For further information con-
tact Sylvia at 395-2226, Lillian
at 487-7780 and Esther at
499-8325.
BOFTY (Senior Youth
Group) of Temple Beth El will
be directing Friday night ser-
vices at Manor Care Nursing
Home in Boca Raton on April
17 at 6 p.m.
Spring Season
Pre-Need Special
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including Perpetual Care
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Organizations
ZOA
Zionist Organization of
America will hold a meeting
on Thursday, April 9. For
m 498-1196.
AIPAC
Examines U.S.-Israel
Partnership at Annual
Policy Conference
Nearly 2,000 pro-Israel ac-
tivists, members of Congress
and Executive Branch officials
will convene in Washington
May 17-19 for the American
Israel Public Affairs Com-
mittee's 28th annual Policy
Conference. This year's theme
is America and Israel: Explor-
ing the Partnership."
Secretary of State George
Shultz, Israeli Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres,
Senate Armed Services Com-
mittee chairman Sam Nunn
(D-GA) and Senate Armed Ser-
vices Committee member Sen.
John McCain (R-AZ) will brief
Conference delegates on the
current state of bilateral rela-
tions during the three-day lob-
bying event.
AIPAC's 28th annual Policy
Conference at the Washington
Hilton is a three-day explora-
tion of the political process.
Conference fee, which includes
all meetings, workshops,
meals and the AIPAC ban-
quet, is $295; $250 if registra-
tions are postmarked before
April 15. For more informa-
tion, contact Brenda Pearson
at AIPAC's Washington of-
fice, 202/638-2256.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
The North Pines Chapter of
Women's American ORT is
bringing the Bloodmobile on
April 15 to the Pines of Delray
North Condominium, 1431
NW 18th Ave., Delray Beach
on Congress Ave., at the
North Clubhouse from 9 a.m.
to 1 p.m. For more informa-
tion, contact Betty at
278-7196.
B'NAI B'RITH
Tel Aviv Lodge No. 3015
"Glasnost: Rhetoric and
Reality" will be discussed by
special guest speaker William
F. Saulson for Tel Aviv Lodge
No. 3015 of B'nai B'rith during
their meeting Monday, April 6
at Temple Beth Sholom Lake
Worth, at 1 p.m.
Mr. Saulson, a family consul-
tant, is vice president of the
Riverside Memorial Chapels
and director of their public ser-
vice Speakers Bureau.
NCJW
South Point Section,
National Council of Jewish
Women, to Present Drama
"New Horizons for the
Family," a dramatic presenta-
tion of our changing social
mores, will be the highlight of
the April 17 meeting of South
Point Section, National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women, to be
held at the Boca Raton Com-
munity Center on Crawford
Street at 9:30 a.m.
The drama, which will be
enacted by members of the
South Point Section, will be
followed by an open
discussion.
Refreshments will be served.
The meeting is open to the
public.
Women's American ORT
The Del Pointe Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
meet Tuesday, April 21, at
Temple Sinai, 2745 W. Atlan-
tic Avenue, at 12:30 p.m.
Don Samberg will be guest
speaker. Refreshments will be
served and new members are
welcome. Call Betty 499-2466
for more information.
Lakeside Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
hold its next regular meeting
on Monday, April 27 at 12:30
p.m. at Patch Reef Park, on
Yamato Rd., one block west of
Military Trail.
Dr. Robert K. Alsofrom,
clinical psychologist, will
speak on "How To Look Bet-
ter and Live Longer." Ceil
Brod is chairperson of the day.
Refreshments will be served,
and all are welcome. For more
information call 276-1524.
FLORIDA ATLANTIC
UNIVERSITY
FAU Faculty Member Chosen
As Social Worker of the Year
Diane Alperin, a member of
the social work faculty at
Florida Atlantic University,
has been named Florida Social
Worker of the Year by the
state chapter of the National
Association of Social Workers,
Inc., (NASW) in recognition of
her leadership in the field.
Professor Alperin will
receive the award at a banquet
during the 11th annual Con-
ference on Professional Social
Work Development at the
Palm Beach Airport Hilton in
West Palm Beach in early
April.
An assistant professor and
field experience coordinator in
the Social Work Program at
Friday. April 10, 1987/ThejIewish Floruiian of South County Page If,
FAU since 1980, Alperin was
chosen as a "master teacher"
for the 1986 Annual Program
Meeting of the Council On
Social Work Education.
As a volunteer, Professor
Alperin helped to organize a
local women's shelter, served
on the South County Human
Service Executive Council,
and as a consultant for
Hospice By The Sea. Before
joining the FAU faculty, Pro-
fessor Alperin was a practicing
social worker in Florida.
Earlier she was director of
Respite Care, Inc. of Boca
Raton, a non-profit corpora-
tion organized to provide
short-term respite care to
families caring for
developmentally disabled
children in their home.
MAE VOLEN
SENIOR CENTER
"All About Pacemakers"
will be presented by Wendy
Bayless, R.N. on April 5 from
1 to 2 p.m., and on April 10
from 10 to 11 a.m. The lecture
is free and will be held at the
Mae Volen Senior Center,
1515 W. Palmetto Pk. Road.
Please call center front desk to
register (395-8920).
ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
OF AMERICA
Seid Delray-Boynton
Beach District, will hold their
next meeting Thursday, April
9, 2 p.m., at Temple Sinai,
2475 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach. A movie "Jerusalem,
City of Peace" will be shown.
Guests are welcome. For fur-
ther information, call
499-7705.
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Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of Sooth County/Friday, April 10, 1987


TABLE
At Passover, your Seder table is blessed with prayers. Family.
And a lifetime of tradition. And assuredly, one of these traditions
is Manischewitz Kosher Wines.
Our wines have been served at Passover meals for generations
because they're made in accordance with strict Orthodox
Rabbinical requirements. Ones that make them as kosher and as
blessed as your Seder.
From all of us at Manischewitz, a happy, zissen Pesach.
m\
Canandaigua Wine Company
Kosher Wine
Product o the MantochewNz Wine Co Naples. NY
KMhruth Certificate available upon request