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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( March 27, 1987 )

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
March 27, 1987

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00282

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
March 27, 1987

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00282

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
w^ The Jewish -m ?
FloridiaN
of South County
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
BOCA RATON. FLORIDA
PERMIT NO. 1093
Volume 9 Number 10
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, March 27.1987
Israel Doubts
U.S. Spy
In IDF Story
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israeli officials reacted
cautiously to reports from
Washington last Friday that
the CIA had tried to operate
a spy within the Israel
Defense Force in 1982.
The report was headlined in Fri-
day's Jerusalem Post (March 20).
It quotes Sen. David
Durenberger (R., Minn.) telling a
group of some 100 Jewish ac-
tivists in a meeting sponsored by
the American Israel Public Affairs
Committee in Palm Beach last
Sunday (March 15) that former
CIA Director William Casey had
authorized a covert operation
against Israel long before the
Pollard affair began.
Durenberjrer is the immediate
past chairman of the Senate In-
telligence Committee.
DEPUTY PREMIER and
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
told Israel Radio Friday there was
no truth to the report, adding he
understood IDF sources had
earlier Friday said they had no in-
formation about the alleged spy, a
"high-level Israeli officer in the
Continued on Page 17
U.S. Leaders
See Struggle Over Lavi
Giving Up to F-16's
HE'S NOT IMPRESSED: A teen-ager, wear-
ing a clown's outfit taking -part in the Tel Aviv
Purim carnival parade, sprays a border
policeman armed with an M-16 assault rifle.
The soldier was on patrol duty along the car-
nival route. During Purim, most youngsters
AP/WWe World Photo
dress up in costumes. The teen clown and his
shaving cream 'attack' showed scant concern
for the soldier's importance in a moment of
levity that, the happy holiday encourages in all
age groups.
By MARGIE OLSTER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The mission of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Ma-
jor American Jewish
organizations has veered
sharply away from the
Jonathan Pollard spy case
and politics to soar into the
wild blue yonder.
PERHAPS ITS LAST?: Lavi jet-fighter takes off in early test run.
-
JTA/WZN Nwi Photo
The leaders of 40 American
Jewish organizations, headed by
Conference chairman Morris
Abram, were introduced to two
state-of-the-art combat aircraft
the Israel-built Lavi now undergo-
ing rigorous test flights and the
American-made F-16, six of which
were delivered last Thursday
(Mar. 19) to an Israel Air Force
base after an 8,000-mile flight
from Fort Worth, Texas. This
brought to nine the number
delivered to date.
IT WAS an interesting jux-
taposition. The F-16s, which are
already part of the Israel Air
Force, may be the nemesis of the
Lavi, which aspires to be Israel's
second-generation jet fighter-
bomber. The two aircrafts may be
said to be in mortal combat, not in
their natural element but in com-
puter cost projections.
The Pentagon, and many in
Israel, are convinced that the
Lavi, with all of its high-tech
wonders, is too costly to produce.
The Americans are pushing the
latest model F-16s, tried and
tested in combat and bruited to be
one-third to one-half cheaper.
But Israel Aircraft Industries
(1AI), manufacturer of the Lavi, is
fiercely proud of its product and
makes a strong case. The
American Jewish leaders were in-
vited to IAI's complex at Ben-
Gurion Airport to witness test
flight No. 20 of Lavi prototype
No. 1, and to hear an earnest sales
pitch from IAI executives as if
they were in the market for a good
jet fighter.
THE PLANE itself is almost
toylike in appearance a small
white fusilage and tail bearing a
Continued on Page 3-
1


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, March 27,1987
Organizations
play Nettie Fowler, and Dean
Peterson will play Jigger.
Broadway Director Dona
Vaughn will debut as Stage Direc-
tor. Thomas Cavendish will con-
duct. Ticket prices range from $7
to $28.
MAE VOLEN
SENIOR CENTER
Mae Volen Senior Center at
1515 W. Palmetto Park Road,
Boca Raton is offering two new
artistic outlets to this community.
An eight week acting
workshop beginning April 23 from
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. for people wishing
to familiarize themselves with the
many techniques involved with
stage or television acting or to im-
prove on the art they might
already possess. $20 members,
$24 non-members. Pre-
Registration for this course is
mandatory.
A drama club at the center
that will actually produce shows
at the center is beginning. Mr.
Roger Holstein with years of ex-
perience in teaching acting
workshops and working for TV
studios in Hollywood, Ca. and
Montreal, Canada is conducting
the workshop and will be acting as
AMIT WOMEN
Kfar Boca Chapter of Amit
Women will meet on Wednesday,
April 1 at 12:30 p.m. in the Ad-
ministration Building, Century
Village, Boca Raton. A wonderful
program has been arranged and
refreshments will be served.
B'NAI B'RITH
Jacob Lodge No. 3246, B'nai
B'rith will hold its monthly
membership breakfast meeting
and special symposium, Tuesday,
April 7, 9:30 a.m. at Temple An-
shei Shalom of West Delray, 7099
West Atlantic Ave., adjacent to
the Public Library. Ladies are in-
vited. Membership is open to
residents of the Delray and con-
tiguous areas. Non-members are
invited. Robert Barnett is Lodge
President. Rabbi Pinchas Aloof,
spiritual leader of Temple Anshei
Shalom is the Lodge Chaplain.
Jacob Lodge meets regularly at
Temple Anshei Shalom.
Program vice president, Dr. Ed-
ward Kingsley announces that the
symposium phase of the meeting
will include a talk by noted Jour-
nalist, Al Ostrick, on Soviet
Jewry. Ostrick is a Jacob Lodge
Charter Member. He is chairman
of GRAN, Grass Roots Action
Network. Community Volunteer
Services Chairman, Joseph
Lubert, will deliver an in depth
analysis and evaluation report on
the functions, activities and ac-
complishments of his committee.
The meeting will include
finalization of plans for the "Get-
ting To Know You" members,
neighbors and friends, Wine and
Cheese Party. The event will take
place Thursday, April 23, 1:30
p.m., at the Abbey Village
Clubhouse, in the Village of
Oriole. There will be dancing to
the Big Band Sound of the 12
piece Bob Roberts Society Or-
chestra. Donation is $3 per per-
son. Co-chairmen are, Hy Feiers-
tein and Bernie Simon. For infor-
mation and reservations, call Dr.
Morton Margules, 498-3590; Dr.
Edward Kingsley, 499-5868; Sam
Pearlman, 496-3068, or Hy
Feierstein, 498-3519.
For membership meeting infor-
mation, contact public relations
vice president, Jack M. Levine,
498-1564.
HADASSAH
Aviva Chapter, Hadasaah of
Boca Raton is holding its Donor
Luncheon on April 6, at noon at
Boca Pointe Country Club. A
jewelry boutique will be displayed
at the luncheon. Those who have
made their donor and others who
may wish to do so, please reserve
with Gertrude, 278-9925 or
Belle/Ida, 392-7745.
The Chapter will sponsor a din-
ner and show at Musicana Dinner
Theater at West Palm Beach on
Sunday, April 26. This "Sen-
timental Journey" dinner-show
will begin at 4 p.m. The coat is
$27 per person, tax and tips in-
cluded with several choices of en-
tree. For reservations, please call
Elinor, 392-8849 or Hattie
483-1164 before April 18.
GOLD COAST OPERA
The Gold Coast Opera will pre-
sent Rodgers and Hatnmerstein's
Carousel on Friday, April 3 at 8
p.m. in Ralph R. Bailey Hall, 3501
SW Davie Rd., Ft. Lauderdale.
Tickets for this performance only
are sold out.
Tickets are available for Sun-
day, April 5, at 2:30 p.m. in BCC
North's Omni Auditorium at 1000
Coconut Creek Blvd., Coconut
Creek. Also tickets are available
for Tuesday, April 7 at 8 p.m. at
Omni. For ticket information, call
BCC North Omni at 973-2249.
Ron Raines of Broadway fame
will return to the Gold Coast
Opera as Billy Bigelow. Cheryl
Cavendish will portray Julie Jor-
dan. Judith Field will play Carrie
Piperidge, and David Rampy will
bfc Mr. Snow. Lyn Coughlin will
aaat <-.
artistic director for the Drama
Club.
There will be a get acquainted
coffee meeting for those in-
terested at the center on April 2
at 1 p.m. Attendance at this
meeting is free. Please come with
your questions. For more informa-
tion call Roger Holstein at
781-6902. Please call center front
desk to reserve your seat.
MASONIC CLUB
There will be a change of loca-
tion for the Masonic Club of the
Villages of Oriole, West Delray,
for the 9:15 a.m. Sunday, April 5,
"Bagel Bestowed, Bountiful,
Break Bread with Brothers,
membership breakfast meeting.
The meeting will be held at the
Birds Nest Chinese Restaurant,
Market Place of Delray, also
known as the K Mart Shopping
Center, West Atlantic Ave., cor-
ner Military Trail. By special ar-
rangement, Birds Nest will open
early to serve regular breakfast
for the Masonic Club meeting, at
$3 per person.
Seymour Steinberg, of Hun-
tington Lakes, a past master of
Keystone-National Lodge, will
give a talk on Masonic Trials he
witnessed in his travels as District
Deputy of the 2nd Manhattan
Masonic District in New York
City.
The Orioles Masonic Club is a
social-fun organization comprised
of Masons who are members of
Masonic Lodges throughout the
United States and Florida, and
who are residents of the Oriole
Oriented Villages of Abbey,
Bonaire, Ommelot, Deauville,
Evergreen, International Village,
Huntington Lakes and Coco Wood
Lakes.
Non-members Masons who
reside in, or are visiting the
aforementioned communities are
welcome to attend the meeting
and are invited to join the Club.
Residents, Masons, from other
areas are welcome to attend and
hear RW Steinberg's lecture.
For further information, Jack
M. Levine, public relations chair-
man, can be contacted at
498-1564.
Many of the officers and
members of the Oriole Masonic
Club are Shriners, and are
members of Amara Shrine Tem-
ple in Palm Beach Gardens. The
Shriners fraternal organization
provides free care to children at
19 orthopedic hospitals and three
burn institutes around the United
States and in Mexico.
This week, Amara Shrine Tem-
ple sponsored the air flight and
admission to the Philadelphia
Shriners Hospital for Crippled
Children for free rehabilitation
treatment, of a 13 year old West
Palm Beach youth, who slipped
and fell in the water while
skateboarding, breaking his neck
in two places as he hit the side of
the pool. The injury, last January,
left the boy paralyzed from the
neck down and confined to a
hospital bed. The youth was
rescued from the pool by his
cousin, an eighth grader.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
The B'nai B'rith Women's
Ruth Chapter is having a lun-
cheon cruise on the Island Queen
which leaves West Palm at 11
a.m. and returns at 2:30 p.m.
Donation $19 for information call
Ruth 498-3132 or Jennie
499-5250.
The B'nai B'rith Women Ruth
Chapter will have its paid up
membership luncheon and in-
stallation of officers Monday,
April 6 at Temple Sinai, 2475 w!
Atlantic Ave. at noon.
There will be entertainment and
food. Donation $3 for members
RSVP. Please call Ruth 498-3132


n
>r Sylvia 499-8136.
Boca Raton Chapter of B'nai
B'rith Women will hold its in-
stallation of officers for 1987-88 at
Jules' restaurant in Boca Teeca on
April 6 at noon.
The officers to be installed are:
President, Miriam Silverman;
Vice-Presidents, Mickey Gelman,
Pearl Beck, Pearl Schenkler,
Aileen Allen and Sarah Shatkin;
Treasurer, Sylvia Shershoff;
Financial Secretary, Renee Lef-
ton; Recording Secretary, Phyllis
Begelman; Corresponding
Secretaries, Helen Resnick,
Esther Schpiro.
Officers will be installed by
former president Mrs. Mickey
Gelman.
MAEVOLEN
SENIOR CENTER
The Mae Volen Senior Center
announces two lectures by Len
Berkan, BSMS, Industrial
Chemist, Professor Emeritus of
Bucks County Community Col-
lege. The free lectures will be:
March 26, 10 a.m., "Pollution in
the Home," save money while
reducing pollutants in your home;
March 30, 10 a.m., "Technology
- Good or Bad?"
The Mae Volen Senior Center is
located at 1515 W. Palmetto Park
Road, Boca Raton. For further in-
formation contact Joan Weppner,
395-8920.
The Horizons Unlimited Con-
cert Orchestra will perform from
10:30 a.m. to noon on Wednesday,
April 1. They will play selections
from Victor Herbert, Johann
Strauss, Wolfgang Mozart and
Sigmund Romberg. A Gay
Nineties Medley will also be
featured at the Mae Volen Senior
Center, 1515 West Palmetto Park
Road. The program is free. For in-
formation, contact Joanne Wepp-
ner, 395-8920.
Mae Volen Senior Center in
cooperation with American
Association of Retired Persons of-
fers a free income tax counseling
service for older persons in
cooperation with and supervised
by the Federal Internal Revenue
Service.
This Tax Aide is designed to
help older tax payers understand
the various tax forms and take ad-
vantage of special provisions in
the tax laws for retirement
ncome.
Counselors have been especially
trained through the IRS to
prepare returns for older tax
layers. Those needing help should
>ring their last years returns and
all tax-related materials. This ser-
vice is available Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
until April 15.
The Mae Volen Senior Center is
located at 1515 W. Palmetto Pk.
Rd., Boca Raton.
For further information call Bill
Karff at 368-8329.
FREE Eye Screening and
minor repairs of glasses, Kenneth
Lipsitt, MD; Thursday, April 9
and Friday April 24 from 11:15
a.m. to 12:15 p.m. at the Mae
Volen Senior Center, 1515 West
Palmetto Park Road. Call to
register 395-8920.
FREE Hearing Screening,
Patricia McCall. MS, Friday,
April 10 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
at the Mae Volen Senior Center,
1515 West Palmetto Park Road.
Call Center to register, 395-8920.
FREE Foot Screening, Allen
Taurite, DPM Monday, April 20
11:30 am. to 12:30 p.m. at the
Mae Volen Senior Center, 1515
West Palmetto Park Road. Call
Center to register, 395-8920.
The Mae Volen Senior Center is
sponsoring a three-day two-night
bus trip to Epcot. departing from
the Center, April 26-28. Cost is
$235 and includes meals, hotel and
entrance fees (based on 40
passengers traveling together).
Please contact Renee at 395-8920,
ext. 243.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Women's American ORT
District VI, will feature Marianne
Balshone, Holocaust survivor, and
heroine of Determined, authored
by her husband, Benjamin. The
Fourth Annual' "Gala for Giving"
will be held, Sunday, March 29, at
the Westin Cypress Creek Hotel,
Fort Lauderdale, at noon.
Determined is an oral history of
the escape from the Hungarian
holocaust by Marianne Balshone
and her family. The Balshones
have made extensive appearances
throughout the United States and
Canada promoting holocaust
education. Mr. Balshone has also
written several plays.
Members and friends of
Women's American ORT who
have been major benefactors to
the ORT program will be honored
at this "Gala for Giving." Par-
ticipating in this annual event will
be the seven South Florida
regions encompassing Dade,
Broward, and Palm Beach coun-
ties. This prestigious event is
chaired by Gloria Chekanow,
District VI, Vice President,
Capita] Funds Chairman and Nor-
ma Heit, District VI, Capital
Funds Co-Chairman.
The North Pines Chapter of
Women's American ORT is hav-
ing a rummage sale on Sunday,
March 29 at the Fidelity Federal
Savings Bank 5017 W. Atlantic
Avenue, Delray Beach. Time: 8
a.m. We have a large, varied
assortment of merchandise. Be
sure to come!
For information, call 278-7196.
TNE FLIGHT
THE LIMO
THE RESORT
THE FOOD
THE WEEK
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL
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Friday, March 27,1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Lavi Fighter
Last Gasps Before U.S. F-16's?
Continued from Page 1
blue Star of David. But small is
beautiful in the world of
aeronautical engineering. A jet is
no more, essentially, than a metal
pipe where kerosine and com-
pressed air are combined to
generate enormous power. Here,
as in many other unprepossessing
vehicles, it's the options which
count.
As the Lavi prototype zoomed
off the runway at a sharp angle
and swiftly became a dot in the
cloudless blue sky, IAI president
Moshe Kerret ushered his guests
into an auditorium for an hour-
long briefing on the issues of cost
and quality of the Lavi program
and an analysis of why the U.S.
government is so set against it.
First of all, Kerret stressed, the
purpose of the Lavi is to defend
Israel, not to create jobs and high-
tech spin-offs for Israel's in-
dustry. It will do those things, of
course. The project is a stimulus
to other technology-based in-
dustries and employs about 4,000
people, more than half of them
engineers.
THE U.S. government
acknowledges Israel's need for
the Lavi, according to a Defense
Department report, Kerret said.
The main risks, the Pentagon
maintains, are related to schedule
delays and cost increases. The
Defense Department contends
that Israel seriously
underestimated the cost of the
Lavi program.
Lavi Supporters
Under Fire
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A secret
report by the State Comptroller
several months ago warned that
the Lavi fighter plane project
could seriously impede the Israel
Air Force because of its rapidly
escalating costs, and sharply
criticized the judgment and
decision-making process of all in-
volved with the Lavi, Haaretz
reported Sunday.
According to the State Com-
ptroller, the cost of developing the
Lavi increased by 148 percent bet-
ween 1980 and 1985, and the
estimated production cost per unit
soared by 108 percent in the same
period.
THE COMPTROLLER'S
report charged the Israel Defense
Force General Staff and the IDF
Chief of Staff with failure to grasp
"the whole picture" or to realize
"the damage to the IDF's overall
resources" financing the Lavi
would cause.
Israel Air Force Commander
Gen. Amos Lapidot was taken to
task by the Comptroller for not
giving serious consideration to the
negative effects of the Lavi pro-
ject on other Air Force projects
and needs.
"From the military standpoint
the decision to manufacture the
Lavi binds the defense establish-
ment and restricts the flexibility
of its decisions," the Comptroller
stated according to Haaretz. The
report seems to bear out
American objections to the Lavi
on a cost basis.
IT RECOMMENDS, as the
Pentagon has done, that instead
of going ahead with the Lavi, now
being test-flown, Israel buy F-16C
aircraft from the U.S. which are
33 percent cheaper.
Chancellor Appointed
MONTREAL Quebec
Superior Court Chief Justice Alan
Gold has been appointed
chancellor of Concordia Universi-
ty. He is the first Jew to hold that
title for a Quebec university.
So did the Israel State Com-
ptroller in a scathing report issued
several months ago.
But Nissan Abel, head of LAI'a
advanced projects, who joined
Kerret on the platform, declared
that the project is on schedule and
cost overruns are slight. The
Lavi's performance is also better
than expected, he said.
Abe) dwelt on what he said were
the Lavi's advantages over alter-
natives, including the F-16s. The
Lavi has advanced human
engineering. It has a superior
digital computerized system for
the pilot. Because it is designed
and built by Israelis, it is better
suited to Israel's special needs
than any other aircraft. And
because it is built at home,
modifications can be made more
easily than on foreign-built planes,
Abel said.
Abel explained that the digital
computerized systems in planes
like the f-16 are almost impossible
to modify because the manufac-
turer keeps the software and
gives the purchaser only a "black
box" which controls the system.
HE SAID that was one of the
reasons Israel twice requested
licenses to build the F-16 in Israel.
It was rejected both times. But
now that Israel has produced the
Lavi prototype, the U.S. has of-
fered five licenses to build the
F-16 here Abel said.
As for costs, the Lavi program,
which includes the development
and production of 300 jet fighters,
has a $9.1 billion price tag. The
U.S. estimates the same number
of F-16s at about half the price.
But that figure does not include
the cost of electronic warfare
equipment, Abel pointed out. If
equipment is figured in, the F-16s
will cost as much as the Lavi and
possibly more, he said.
From the briefing room, the
American Jewish leaders filed
aboard an ancient Hercules
transport plane for a 15-minute
flight to an air base in northern
Israel.
THERE WAS a large welcom-
ing committee on hand and as
they all looked skyward, a V-
formatiin of F-16s appeared out of
the blue, escorted by several
Israeli jets. They circled the lan-
ding field once, peeled off and
dropped smoothly to the tarmac a
few hundred feet from the
assembled onlookers. These were
F-16Cs, the "C" designating the
most advanced model. Israel has
ordered 75 of them
The American pilots, glad their
grueling non-stop delivery flight
from Texas was over, emerged
from their plastic bubbles and
waved to the applauding crowd.
The Israel Air Force formally
took over. And as the American
Jewish leaders boarded their pur-
ple, state-of-the-art tour buses for
the ride back to Jerusalem, they
were doubtlessly pondering the
advantage of Lavi vs. F-16.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, March 27, 1987
Neusner's Article
Given Short Shrift
Prof. Jacob Neusner's article in the Miami
Herald some two weeks ago, in which he
argues that, for Jews, the United States is
the new Jerusalem, is given the short shrift
it deserves by the actions of the Conference
of Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations mission to Israel.
Neusner's view is that Jews can live a bet-
ter, more fruitful life in our country than
they can in Israel. We found the article
hideous in its intent, unfair in its assessment
of American realpolitik, groveling in the
sense that it is reminiscent of the smugness
of the German Jewish community that lived
on the cutting edge of the Nazi rise to
power, and insulting to Israel and its
manifest achievements as a national
homeland for Jews.
But the way in which the Conference of
Presidents raced off to Jerusalem to do bat-
tle with government leaders over such
diverse issues as the Jonathan Pollard spy
case, the Israeli role in the sale of arms to
Iran, and Israel's relationship to South
Africa showed anything but the cool-headed
position of power in which the Jewish com-
munity is ensconced in the United States as
Prof. Neusner sees it.
Avineri Was Right
On the contrary, the Conference .of
Presidents mission, during which Morris
Abram, president of the Conference,
repeatedly emphasized that "What Mr.
Pollard did was inexcusable it offends all
Americans," gives added credence to the
counter-argument of Prof. Shlomo Avineri
offered in a Front Page report in The Jewish
Floridian last week that American Jews suf-
fer from a "galut mentality" a sense of in-
security over their Jewishness in what, for
his part, Neusner in his article limned as the
new American Jewish Garden of Eden.
In our view, the intent of the Conference
of Presidents mission was as unjustifiable as
was Neusner's article in all of its considera-
tions. To come to Jerusalem to put the
Government of Israel on the carpet and call
it to account for its policies and problems
seemed as arrogant as was Neusner in his
anti-Israel and anti-Zionist polemic.
In effect, the Conference of Presidents
mission in Jerusalem called for sha-sha lest
our fellow-Americans turn an anti-Semitic
glance at us (they frequently find other
reasons for this) because an American Jew
was caught spying in the cause of Israel. If
nothing more, Mr. Abram and Co. produced
precisely the effect which it most fears
that the rest of us should be declared guilty
because Pollard also happens to be Jewish.
Dual Loyalty Who Says?
Such an attitude, allegedly reflective of
the general American Jewish sensitivity in
the Pollard case, by its bankrupt nature
declares Prof. Neusner's new Garden of
Eden a bust.
It is about time that all of us felt that we
can be loyal Americans, fervent Jews and
devout supporters of Israel all at once. And
this includes not having to match the
funereal tones of Secretary of Defense
Weinberger or, indeed, of Mr. Abram when
they talk about Jonathan Pollard.
Handle Soviets Gently
We do not really have to remind Israel to
be cautious in its diplomatic maneuvering.
The issue at hand involves statements made
by Mikhail Gorbachev to Italy's Prime
Minister Bettino Crazi during their recent
meeting.
In that meeting, Gorbachev is supposed to
have suggesed that a resumption of
diplomatic relations with Israel would be the
natural consequence of an Israeli decision to
support an international peace conference
on the Middle East.
Still, it is necessary to observe that
although there may be little reason to doubt
that Gorbachev would keep his promise, the
question is just what the Soviet Union would
contribute to the peace process once it was
returned to power as a Middle East broker.
One think for sure: Moscow would call for
an Israeli return to its pre-1967 borders. In
this, the Reagan Administration is, itself,
not far behind.
But more damaging is the fact that such a
conference would suggest little recognition
of an unalterable given: At best, at least for
the moment, this means Jordan and Egypt,
the latter of which presumably maintains
peaceful ties with Israel already.
Beyond this, there appears little will-
ingness to admit that the major forces of
turbulence in the Middle East have hardly
anything to do with the existence of Israel.
Indeed, the Soviet Union would, itself, be a
potentially turbulent force given the oppor-
tunity, and, once granted a peace-broker's
Another View
role there, would be able to operate in
precisely the opposite fashion.
Maybe Pollard Had A Credible Point
By JIM SHIPLEY
The Cherokee Indians have an
expression for it. It goes: "Before
you pass judgment, walk a mile in
my moccasins." It is a way of say-
ing that things look different to
us, based on the viewing angle and
whose ox is being gored.
I have heard, both within and
without the Jewish community
over the past few weeks, more
opinions on the Jonathan Pollard
affair than there are characters in
a Le Carre spy novel. I myself, in
a column written a few months
back, made the comment that "ap-
parently he did it for the money."
Not true. Jonathan Pollard,
however misguided his actions,
was a dyed-in-the-wool, dedicated
Zionist. Which brings me to the
moccasins.
SIT BACK, close your eyes and
imagine. You are a native-born
American, raised with all the
bounty and goodness of this coun-
try. You are Jonathan Pollard.
Looking like you do, you ap-
parently were the kind of kid who
would take your anti-Semitic
lumps in the neighborhood
brouhas. You burn with Zionist
zeal (well, maybe not burn
Pollard never made it to Aliyah,
but a lover of Israel for sure).
Now, you've got this job in
Naval intelligence. You got it
making no secret of your love for
the Jewish State and your desire
to protect it. The job is good, solid
future, neat stuff to work in. One
day, across your desk comes a
report about some Arab military
strength. A report that you know
will affect the security and
perhaps even the future of the
State of Israel. What to do?
You check. You find that no,
despite all the strategic coopera-
tion between Israel and the
United States, Israel does not
have access to this material.
What, my dear self-righteous
friend, would you do?
YOU HAVE a few alternatives.
You could make some discreet in-
quiries and find the right people
and let them know that there are
indeed reports that affect Israel
vis-a-vis the Arabs about which
Israel has no knowledge and let
the "pros" take care of it, keeping
yourself out of the line of fire. You
could ignore it not likely. Or,
you could find an Israeli contact
and tell him or her that you have
something of value and then steal
the material. OK, in your heart of
hearts. What would you do?
Picture Tevye caught in this
dilemma. "On the one hand, I am
working for the American govern-
ment. I swore an oath that I will
keep such secrets sacred. On the
the minds and ideas of school kids,
a debate for Sunday morning tem-
ple breakfasts. It could, with just
that much to it, be a luncheon
discussion at any deli in the
country.
Outside the Jewish community,
we might have expected a vicious
time no matter what. Dual loyalty.
'What, my dear self-righteous
friend, would you do?'
other hand, I am a Jew who loves
Israel and this material could save
Jewish lives. On the other hand, I
am breaking a trust and commit-
ting treason. On the other hand,
how will I feel if Israel is damaged
by not knowing ... On the other
hand ..." And so, as we know.
Pollard gave the first of many
reports to Israel. He became the
protagonist in a very
sophisticated spy story. His girl
friend became involved. He had
money "forced" on him. He was
caught. He was tried. He was con-
victed. End of story? Hardly.
IT COULD have been. At this
point the story could now become
a subject of debate within tin-
Jewish community and nothing
more. An exercise for expanding
Scheming Jews. Wolf Blitzer says
that the first fear among the
Jewish members of the various
sensitive agencies in Washington
was that the charge would be
leveled at them. Apparently and
blessedly so, it never happened.
But it did not end there. Here
now comes another mystifying
chapter. The State of Israel had
claimed that the Pollard affair
was part of a "rogue operation-
far from the halls of the Cabinet
run by a man who had lost his in-
fluence and was seeking to regain
it. Up to this point it is the stuff of
a Fredrick Forsythe or Robert
Ludlum spy-thriller. But this is
where it gets bizarre.
THE TWO Israelis who admit-
tedly were the direct participants
m the affair, Rafael Eitan and
Avram Sella, are flown back to
'srael and promoted. Not only
that Sella is given the job of runn-
ing Tel Nof Air Base, where the
United States does most of its
military liaison in Israel. Now,
that's chutzpah. No wonder the
United States is livid.
American Jewish leadership,
not really that strong under
pressure to begin with, is racing
off to Israel asking for boards of
inquiry and apologies and rever-
sals and anything else to keep the
heat off American Jews.
But here is the really sticky
part: How come all this had to
happen? Why didn't Israel have
this information? To the best of
my knowledge, only once did
Israel hold out on America. A few-
years ago, when the debate grew
strident in Congress about a par-
ticular aid package, the Israelis
held back some Russian
technology they had captured.
The aid package eventually
passed, and so did the informa-
tion. At one time, Israel sent its
commandoes deep into Egypt.
This was of course, before the
peace treaty. At great danger to
themselves, Israel took a complete
Russian-built radar station and
brought it back to Israel intact to
be turned over to the United
States.
ISRAEL HAS always done its
part. They were guinea pigs in
1973, testing new American tanks
that proved less than fire proof.
Israeli boys were incinerated so
that American boys would never
have to be. And yet, here is infor-
mation on Syria, on Iraq, on the
PLO, all avowed enemies of both
the U.S. and Israel that Israel
never would have been made
privy to except for the crimes of
Jonathan Pollard.
Why? That is the question Israel
should be asking America. It
doesn't make the Sella and Eitan
Continued on Page 17
Peres Given Award
JERUSALEM Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres has receiv-
ed the first President's Award of
the Jerusalem College of
Technology a likeness of him
and a scroll-like text.
FlowdiaN
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SUBSCRlPnON RATES L
Friday, March 27, 1987
Volume 9
"" ^ *> *"""' (2 Ve, M,n,mum IT]
26 ADAR 5747
Number 10


Friday, March 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
The Flying Rabbi Soars Again
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
"My name's Aloof," but
whether Rabbi Pinchas
Aloof is "aloof depends
on the perspective, says the
new spiritual leader of Tem-
ple Anshei Shalom in Delray
Beach.
"In Hebrew it means leader. In
English it means standoffish."
Aloof is a man full of energy,
and he intends to use that energy
to get the Jewish community in-
volved with the synagogue in his
area.
"I will not stand to see an empty
seat," he says, banging his fist
and stamping his feet in mock
tantrum.
YET THE statistics are grim.
"In Delray, we have between
60,000 and 80,000 Jews living in
South County. Only 13 percent
are affiliated with a synagogue.
And I have a challenge ahead of
me to bring my people in."
Aloof feels he has made a good
start at bringing people in. He in-
itiated a program of education
and, together with the Theodore
Herzl Institute of New York and
Rabbi Samuel Silver of Temple
Sinai of Delray, set up a lecture
series that began in February
with the topic: "Who Needs
Jewish Law Today?"
Aloof, 52, came to Temple An-
shei Shalom with his wife, Rebbet-
zin Linda Aloof, on Jan. 1. He was
born in Jerusalem when it was
then Palestine. ("I make jests
when I say I'm a real
Palestinian.")
ALOOF CAME to the United
States prior to his Bar Mitzvah
and attended the Talmudic
Academy in Baltimore and Ner
Israel Rabbinical College in
Baltimore.
Then he went into the United
States Marine Corps. It was dur-
ing the tail end of the Korean
War. While in Korea, he was tap-
ped to go to Japan to lead the
Kobe Jewish Community Center.
Upon the completion of his ser-
vice, he went to study in Israel
where Aloof said he earned the
degrees that were to shape the
course of his life.
He became rabbi shochet-
bodeck, a ritual slaughterer and
examiner, as well as a mohel, or
ritual circumcisor.
HIS WORLDLINES increased
when he was asked to serve in
Caracas, Venezeula, the post he
held prior to becoming spiritual
leader of Congregation B'nai
Israel in Spartanburg, S.C.
In Venezuela, Aloof noted that
they don't have denominations
such as Orthodox, Conservative or
Reform. There, the affiliation is
according to origin or
background, Sephardic,
Ashkenazic and German.
"That was very interesting to
me, because I was able to bring all
three together in one uniform ser-
vice on Friday night. And for me
it was an experience to conduct a
service for all my congregants to
feel at ease with. In Spanish, the
word is compromiso.
HE SOON found that his train-
ing as a mohel was needed, and he
became known as the rider of the
circuit in the Valley of Coco,
covering the region extending up
to Equador.
He took the post in Delray
Beach with the congregation of
1,200 families who were searching
for a full-time rabbi.
In Delray, he began to give
courses in Hebrew, Yiddish-and
the life cycle of Judaism.
"It's almost like Operation
Outreach." he says. "I feel people
hunger for something, for educa-
tion, I think."
An important aspect of Aloof s
work has been his role as founding
Rabbi Pinchas Aloof
president of the southeastern
region of Brit Milah (brit is cove-
nant, and milah is circumcision).
The organization covered 10
states, providing rabbis where
there were none to perform
circumcisions.
HE USED his flying skills
gleaned from his experience in the
service and became known as the
"flying rabbi," reaching com-
munities in outlying areas with his
service of ritual circumcision and
slaughtering of animals.
Recently, the members of the
organization changed the name to
Brit America, which not only
covers national circumcisions but
those in South and Central
America as well.
"There are no mohalim in those
areas," he says. The organization
set up a toll free number (800-For-
Brit), and it is employed by those
who want to perform the mitzvah
of circumcision.
The organization has responded
to calls from adults, many of
whom had lived in the Soviet
Union, where circumcisions were
forbidden. In the operation room
of a hospital, with the patient
under anasthesia, the mohalim
perform this service.
THE ORGANIZATION has a
halacha (law) committee, Latin
American Affairs committee and
medical committee.
"I predict within the year, we
will have 200 mohalim who will af-
filiate with our organization,"
Aloof says.
Aloof, the father of six children,
and grandfather to four, recently
performed a bris on his grandson
before 600 members of his con-
gregation, right in the sanctuary.
"Many said it made their day
because they are grandparents
and great-grandparents and said
they haven't seen this for awhile."
Aloof speaks six languages
English, Hebrew, Yiddish, Ger-
man, Spanish and Italian and he
can read Aramaic. His first book,
still in manuscript form, is called
"Treasures From My Library." It
is a 420-page volume on laws,
customs, ancient and modern
nractices. kashrut, circumcision.
conversion and adoption,
betrothal and marriage, divorce,
laws of mourning. He worked on it
for 25 years.
WITH HIS flurry of activity,
Aloof has been called "in with the
wind," the opposite of Gone With
The Wind. Anshei Shalom is hous-
ed in a building only two years old,
and already there is talk of an
expansion.
Yet with this outreach, Aloof
realizes that he cannot be the rab-
bi by name alone. "I want to know
every member of the congrega-
tion personally. I want to know
their joys and their sorrows."
Aloof s weekly discussion of the
Torah portion of the week will ap-
pear in the South County edition
of The Jewish Floridian.
Temple Anshei Shalom
Delray Beach
announces our new caterers
K & K CATERERS
Phone 683-3781 975-5363
Undor ttM supervision of Vaad Hakashrut of South County
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, March 27, 1987
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Stephen and Phyllis Lyons, will be
called to the Torah of Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, April 4. As
an ongoing Temple project he will
be "Twinning" with Isai
Khayamov. Adam is a 7th Grade
student at The Henderson School
at Florida Atlantic University,
and attends The Temple Beth El
Religious School. Family
members sharing in the simcha
are sister, Dena Rochelle Lyons,
and grandparents, Evelyn and
Lawrence Lyons of Roslyn, New
York and Jean Heyer of Coconut
Creek, Florida. Dr. and Mrs.
Lyons will host a Kiddush in
Adam's honor following Shabbat
morning services.
JOSEPH RESNICK
Joseph (Joey) Resnick, son of
Dr. Peter and Diane James and
Justin Resnick, will be called to
the Torah of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, April 4. Joseph is a 7th
Grade student at Boca Raton Mid-
dle School, and attends The Tem-
ple Beth El Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
simcha are sister, Elyse Resnick,
and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs.
Eli Speiser of New York, New
York, and Mr. and Mrs. Harry
Resnick of North Miami Beach,
Florida. Joseph's parents will host
a Kiddush in his honor following
Havdallah services.
ADAM LYONS
Adam Eric Lyons, son of Dr.
TODD RUBIN
Todd Rubin, son of Barbara and
Herbert Rubin of Boca Raton, will
become a Bar Mitzvah at Con-
gregation B'nai Israel at Saturday
morning services on April 11.
Todd will read portions of the
Shabbat morning service and will
lead the congregation in a
dialogue of the weekly Torah por-
tion, Tzav.
He is enrolled in the gifted
students program at Loggers Run
Middle School, where he is on the
editorial staff of the school
newsletter and Logger Run
Legend. Todd has been a longtime
participants in Little League
baseball, and collects baseball
cards, comic books, etc.
Sharing in the celebration of
this occasion will be a brother
Scott and grandfather Sol Rubin
of New York.
M **fi**"*
This Summer;
Escape To A Friendlier Cumate.
Don't let the Florida heat get to you!
Head north for the Fallsview. You'll he
greeted with tool, comfortable surroundings
and warm, friendly receptions.
Plan to make your summer reservations
now and take advantage of our special
Extended Stay Rates At that rate, you'll enjoy
the Fallsview activities even more.
There's indoor and outdoor tennis and
swimming, a championship Robert Trent
Jones golf course, racquetball, boating and so
much more. There's even a choice of two or
three sumptuous meals a day
So this summer, come to where the
atmosphere is as inviting as the weather.
c EVLLSVllW x
fk CALL TOLL FREE: 1-800-431-0152 *\
{f^^m ELLENVILLE, N.Y. 12428 ;
mothers, Florence Leder ot
Delray Beach and Bella KaU of
Brooklyn, N.Y. Mr. and Mrs Kati
will host a Kiddush in Jason s
honor following Havdalan
services.
MEREDITH PASEKOFF
Meredith Jill Pasekoff,
daughter of Hilary and Dr.
Howard L. Pasekoff will be called
to the Torah of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton as a Bat Mitzvah on
Saturday, March 28. Meredith is a
seventh grade student at Boca
Raton Middle School and attends
the Temple Beth El Religious
School.
Family members sharing in the
Simcha are her sister, Lauren,
grandparents, Helen Pasekoff
Ziegler of Miami, Olga and
William Stark of Pittsburgh, Pa.
and great-grandmother, Ida Bern-
stein also of Pittsburgh. Dr. and
Mrs. Pasekoff will host a Kiddush
in Meredith's honor following
Shabbat morning services.
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Jason Eric Katz, son of Carolyn
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Jason is a seventh grade student
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Shamir Tells Women
Friday, March 27,' 1987/The Jewish Flondian of South County
Page 7
Pollard Case Is 'Painful Episode'
By MARGIE OLSTER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir bade farewell to
some 2,000 participants to
Hadassah's 75th jubilee con-
vention's closing session
last week reiterating his
controversial stand on
Soviet Jews' refugee status
and discussing briefly the
"painful episode" of con-
victed American Jewish spy
Jonathan Pollard.
Natan Sharansky, who shared
the platform with Shamir, gave an
impassioned plea for unrelenting
activism on behalf of Soviet
Jewish refuseniks.
Shamir assured the delegates
that Israel was investigating both
the Pollard affair and the Iran
arms controversy and would
remedy the problems.
"BOTH THE United States
and Israel governments have ad-
mitted errors and expressed
regrets. I shall not go into any
details because the subjects are in
the process of scrutiny and in-
vestigations. But, I can say that,
in both matters, Israel offered to
cooperate fully with the American
investigating process on a
government-to-government level.
In some respects, we went beyond
the accepted norms in relations
between states and provided the
personnel that needed to be ques-
tioned and examined by the
American representatives,"
Shamir said.
Shamir called the Pollard affair
"a painful episode in the relation-
ship between the United States
and Israel. It is a tragedy in every
respect. It has hurt United States-
Israel relations. It has upset many
of our friends in the United
States."
The Pollard and Iran affairs
have been a "test" that Shamir
said he hopes both countries will
pass. He said he was optimistic
that the valuable relationship bet-
ween the two countries based on
mutual strategic interest and
values will remain unchanged.
SHAMIR NOTED his stand on
the Soviet Jewish drop-out
phenomenon, or neshira, has
"initiated a debate in the com-
munity, in the leadership and in
the press."
His policy is based on a two-part
Trial Of
Vanunu
Postponed
TEL AVIV (JTA) The trial
of Mordechai Vanunu, scheduled
to open in Jerusalem district court
last week, was postponed because
of a dispute between the defen-
dant and his lawyer. No new date
was announced, and legal
observers doubt the proceedings
will begin until late next month.
Vanunu, a former technician at
the Dimona nuclear facility, is ac-
cused of selling secret material
about Israel's alleged nuclear
weapons capabilities to a British
newspaper. He and his family
fired defense attorney Amnon
Zichroni over differences in
defense strategy.
Zichroni prepared a purely legal
defense. Vanunu demands that his
trial be made into a public forum
against Israel's nuclear research
and development programs. The
court has not officially accepted
Zichroni's dismissal. If a new
lawyer is named he will need time
to familiarize himself with the
case.
interest, Shamir said. "First, we
must get the Jews out of the
Soviet Union. We all agree on
this," he said. "Second, it is in the
national interest of the Jewish
people that they should come to
Eretz Yisrael. This is where they
are needed by the Jewish people."
But Sharansky called for a dif-
ferent approach to the problem.
The fate of Soviet Jews is not in
the hands of Mikhail Gorbachev or
the KGB, Sharansky said, "It is in
our hands."
Sharansky said continuous
pressure from the West will bring
freedom for Soviet Jews and said
"it's only enough when all our
brothers and sisters will be here."
He said there is a perception
within the Soviet Union that
Soviet Jews are a threat to the
regime. "Sometimes we
underestimate our own strength,"
Sharansky said. Hadassah
honored Sharansky with its
Henrietta Szold Award for his
"steadfastness in faith" and for
being "an inspiration to his peo-
ple" and a symbol of Jewish
freedom.
PASSOVER1987
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Pagfr j The Jewish Floridian of South County/Fruiay, March 27, 1987
Weekly PortionVayakhel-Pekude
By RABBI
PINCHAS ALOOF
Anshei Shalom, Del ray Beach
March 28
THE PEOPLE'S RESPONSE
Moses transmitted to the people
the details of G-d's commands
relating to the Sanctuary and its
contents, but first emphasized the
holiness of the Sabbath Day on
which no work was to be done.
The Israelites responded willingly
and generously, and men and
women alike made contributions
according to their ability. Women
with the requisite skill spun the
linen as spices and oil for the in-
cense and lamp. Some devout
women even donated their mir-
rors of burnished copper to be us-
ed for the making of the laver and
its base.
Moses made special mention of
the fact that G-d had singled out
Bezalel of the tribe of Judah, a
man of wisdom, understanding
and experience, to supervise the
work. With him was associated
Oholiab, of the tribe of Dan, who
was a skilled engraver and
weaver. The gifts poured in to
such an extent that the workmen
reported to Moses that they had
more than they needed, so the
people were told to cease bringing
their offerings.
Section by section the Sanc-
tuary and its contents began to
take shape.
SUMMARY OF THE COSTS
The total cost incurred in the
construction of the Sanctuary was
counted at Moses' command
under the direction of Ithamar,
Aaron's youngest son. The weight
of the gold amounted to 29 talents
and 730 shekels; of the silver to
100 talents and 1,775 shekels; and
of the brass to 70 talents and
2,400 shekels. The work, having
been completed with the making
of the priestly garments, was in-
spected and approved by Moses,
who blessed the people for their
magnificent achievement.
THE TABERNACLE IS
ERECTED
On the first day of the first
month (i.e. Nisan, almost a year
after the departure from Egypt)
the Tabernacle was erected under
Moses' persona] supervision and
the contents arranged in the
prescribed order. Cloud covered
the Tabernacle which was filled
with G-d's glory. Whenever the
cloud lifted it gave the signal to
the Israelites to continue their
journey. CHAZAK!
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SHABBAT SHALOM
SHABBAT HACHODESH,
EZEKIEL, XLV, 16-XLVI,
18-read on the Sabbath before or
on the first of Nisan. In the New
Temple conceived by the prophet,
the Prince of the nation was to be
responsible for the supply of
sacrifices, brought from public
contributions, at the appointed
seasons. Among the festival
sacrifices were the offerings to be
brought on the Passover.
The additional reading of the
Law is taken from Exodus XII,
1-20, This month shall be unto
you the beginning of the months.'
April 4
Vayikra
The Sidra presents the laws
relating to sacrificial offerings,
which could be brought only in the
Sanctuary, and later in the
Jerusalem Temple.
The Five Principal Sacrifices
After the Sanctuary had been
erected and the priests con-
secrated, Divine legislation
Drescribed the rituals and
ceremonies-commencing with the
sacrificial offerings-to be perform-
ed in the place of worship ap-
pointed by G-d. The ancient prac-
tice of bringing sacrifices satisfied
a natural desire in man to express,
in material form, his feelings of
contrition, supplication and
thanksgiving towards his Creater.
The underlying purpose of the
laws relating to sacrifice was to
inculcate a moral sense of refine-
ment and discipline in man. The
essential principles were
therefore that sacrifices could not
be offered indiscriminately but on-
ly to the One G-d and on the altar
in the courtyard of the sanctuary;
repentance or restitution of the
wrong done must precede any of-
fering; and the main ceremonies
were to be performed by the
priest.
There were five principal
sacrifices which could be brought
voluntarily by the individual, pro-
mpted by the desire to atone for
his sins committed in error, or as
an expression of thanksgiving to
G-d.
(I) The Burnt-Offering. The en-
tire animal was consumed by fire
upon the Altar.
(II)The Meal-Offering-
generally brought by a man of
humble means.
(Ill) The Peace, or Thank-
Offering-as its name implies, such
a sacrifice expressed gratitude to
G-d on occasions of joy and
thanksgiving.
IV) The Sin-Offering-brought as
atonement for sins committed in
error not only by a layman but by
the High Priest, or by the com-
munity as a whole, or by a secular
head. Sin-Offerings were also to
be brought by the witness to an of-
fense who failed to testify; a per-
son who contracted impurity by
contact with a dead carcase or
unclean person and forgot to com-
ply with the laws of purification;
and one who negligently failed to
fulfil his vow. Conscience-
stricken, the wrongdoer confessed
his fault and was obliged to bring
this sacrifice.
(V)The Guilt-Offering-brought
for sins requiring restitution
before the sacrifice could be of-
fered. The two cases expressly
mentioned are the unintentional
withholding of the holy things of
the L-rd, i.e., the tithes or other
dues belonging to the priests, and
falsely retaining property belong-
ing to one's fellow man. In each
case, the wrongdoer, after con-
fessing his guilt, must restore the
property to its rightful owner with
the addition of one fifth of its
value. Then, and only then, could
the sacrifice be offered, and the
sin forgiven.
Shabbat Shalom
Haphtarah-Iiaiah XLIII
21-XLIV, 23
A Message of Hope
The exiles in Babylon, declares
the prophet, show ingratitude to
G-d. They are not put to the trou-
ble of bringing sacrifices (forbid-
den on foreign soil) yet they fail to
worship Him even by prayer.
Nevertheless. G-d will pardon
Israel's sins, for they are His peo-
ple whom He has chosen. Just as
rain refreshes the dry land, so will
G-d's spirit restore their offspring
who will be proud to be called by
the name of Israel. The prophet
calls on the people to contrast the
greatness and supremacy of G-d
with the absurdity of idols fashion-
ed from wood, part of which the
workman uses to make his fire
and cook his meals. In spite of
past iniquities, G-d will forgive
and redeem them.
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Jewish Leaders in Israel
Seek To Quiet Effect
Of Spy Case, Arms Sale
Friday, March 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
Diplomats Assured
Their Testimony Won't Go to U.S.
By MARGIE OLSTER
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Jonathan Pollard ,
"Irangate," South Africa
and Soviet Jews are men-
tioned in one breath with
few exceptions by every
Israeli official who ad-
dresses members of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations here on a
week-long mission.
The "affairs" or "unfortunate
incidents," as they are often call-
ed, have emerged as hot potatoes
which few Israeli leaders want to
touch for more than a moment or
two.
THE HIGHLY controversial
issues were at the top of the
Presidents' agenda upon their ar-
rival here Tuesaay to a barrage of
media attention. By now, the
American Jewish leaders have
been thoroughly saturated with
the party line on all these affairs.
They heave small sighs of ex-
asperation when a fresh Minister
or government official begins his
speech with, "Before I start, let
me say a word or two on the
Pollard affair."
As Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres put it in his remarks Thurs-
day (Mar. 19) to the Presidents,
they are the burning issues of the
day, but far from the most impor-
tant issues in the larger picture of
Israeli political life.
Upon the arrival of the
Presidents, tensions were already
at near zenith levels with an angry
exchange of criticisms between
Prof. Shlomo Avineri and Morris
Abram, chairman of the
Presidents Conference.
Abram was criticized for saying
something interpreted as Pollard
got what he deserved in his life
sentence for espionage. Avineri
accused American Jews of "galut
mentality." Not surprisingly,
some conference members replied
that they live in galut (Diaspora).
UPON ARRIVAL, Abram said,
"What Mr. Pollard did was inex-
cusable. It offends all
Americans." But what really
upset the Presidents, and likewise
the American government, was
the promotion of the two Israelis
castigated for leading the so-
called "rogue operation" that
recruited Pollard to spy.
Aviem Sella and Rafael Eitan
are coming into their own as a
separate affair in recent weeks. In
no uncertain terms, Abram and
the other Presidents let the
Israelis know that they could not
get away with this. Analogies to
Oliver North's fall from grace and
Admiral John Poindexter's volun-
tary resignation abound in the
Presidents' friendly advice to
Israeli officials.
Abram said in a press con-
ference which opened the mission
that he is confident the
Rotenstreich Commission, Israel's
"Tower Commission" on the
Pollard affair, and a separate
Knesset committee will uncover
mistakes and take corrective
action.
PREMIER Yitzhak Shamir has
effectively avoided questions on
the Pollard affair. Nevertheless,
several of the Presidents said they
felt Shamir had talked to them
honestly about the various scan-
dals. He didn't miss the opportuni-
ty Wednesday (Mar. 18) to
reiterate his stand on Soviet Jews'
refugee status in talking to the
1'residents. although his remarks
were met with consternation and
concern.
Peres also acknowledged that
mistakes were made. Shamir at-
tempted to explain the Sella/Eitan
affair with a quiet analogy.
"In America, there are
thousands of talented people in
the ranks of the bureaucracy. But
in Israel, people with the ex-
perience and knowledge of men
like Sella and Eitan are rare," he
said.
"Irangate" has lain in the
shadows of the Pollard affair this
week. The Israeli leadership is
anxious to give the impression
that the U.S. Tower Commission
report all but exonerated Israel
from any blame in causing the
whole affair. Ironically, Pollard
has done a good deal to help the
Israelis put "Irangate" in the
past.
But underlying all this con-
troversy is the mutual respect, ad-
miration and support of the Israeli
and American leaders expressed
at each session.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The three Israeli diplomats
who refuse to appear before
an independent Israeli com-
mission investigating the
Pollard affair can testify
without fear of their
remarks being turned over
to the United States,
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
wrote to the trio's attorney
last Friday.
The three Irit Erb, Ilan Ravid
and Yosef Yagur, all who former-
ly served in the U.S. have been
advised by attorney David Libai
not to testify before the
Rotenstreich Commission for fear
of self-incrimination which could
lead to the U.S. criminal charges.
THAT DECISION has put in
jeopardy the commission's in-
vestigation of Israel's role in
Jonathan Pollard's espionage in
the United States.
Shamir's message was written
with the consent of Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin and At-
torney General Yosef Harish. It
followed a Friday meetine bet-
ween snamir and Peres, their
first since their separate visits to
the U.S. and Egypt, respectively,
last month, which at the time
threatened to end the unity
government.
But in the shadow of the Pollard
affair the pair seem to be
cooperating more and to have
agreed to advocate together the
continuation of the commission's
probe.
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridiaa of South County/Friday, March 27, 1987
Muture Christianity
The following review was
published in the Jewish Post and
Opinion of Indianapolis.
By RABBI SAMUEL SILVER
Rabbi Norman Beck, "Mature
Christianity." The Recognition
and Repudiation of the Anti-
Jewish Polemic of the New Testa-
ment, Susquehanna Press, London
and Ontario. St7 pp. no price
listed.
Is the New Testament anti-
Semitic?
Parts of it are, with a
vengeance.
The Pharisees, exemplars of in-
tegrity, are vilified as hypocrites.
Into the mouths of Jews are plac-
ed the cry, "Crucify him ... His
blood be upon us and our
children," a canard which
engendered the relentless
persecution which prompted
Israel Zangwill to write, "The
people of Christ has become the
Christ among peoples." The gen-
tle "savior" denounces the Jews
as "snakes." Etc., etc.
Jews have protested the har-
shness of the "newer" testament
for centuries. And a skein of
Christian scholars (Herford,
Grant, Parkes, Hay, Eckhardt,
Pawlikowski et al.) have pleaded
with their fellow-religionists to re-
judge the Jews. Vatican Council II
tried to reduce the sting of the
deicide charge.
Now Norman Beck, who heads
the department of theology of
Texas Lutheran College. Sequin,
Tex., has produced a watershed
work which records, passage after
passage, the often venomous anti-
Semitism of the Christian Bible.
The Gospels may mean "good
news" to Christians, but they
have often been bad news to the
Jews. Beck seeks to repair that
situation.
He explains that the writers of
the New Testament were trying
to win Roman sympathy for their
version of Judaism and thus felt it
necessary to stigmatize the Jews
and also to exculpate Pontius
Pilate, one of history's most
savage brutes.
Beck contends that the harsh
things about Jews in the New
Testament are at variance with
the position of "the Jesus of
history," who remained Jewish
throughout his lifetime.
What makes this book outstan-
ding is the author's proposal to re-
write the New Testament. He
wants to relegate the more bla-
tant anti-Jewish passages to foot-
notes. He wants to insert into the
narrative glosses explaining the
reasons for the hostile passages.
He also wants to use euphemisms
for "Jews" and "synagogues in
the text so that the Christian
reader will not identify contem-
porary Jews with those disparag-
ed in the New Testament. He also
urges ministers to abstain from
reading the more bigoted
passages at church services.
Beck contends that to be a
devout Christian, which he is, is to
acknowledge and reject the anti-
Jewish animosity in the New
Testament.
Beck is not only proposing these
changes in the New Testament.
He is writing such a revision. He
feels that Christianity is now
"mature," hence is able to stand
on its own feet without trampling
on the feet of its mother, Judaism
Masai tov!
No New Ties
To S. Africa
TEL AVIV (JTA) Premier
Yitzhak Shamir informed U.S.
Secretary of State George Shultz
that Israel will honor existing con-
tracts with South Africa but will
not enter into any new ones,
Israel Radio reported Monday.
The question of sanctions and
Israel's trade with the Pretoria
regime was raised at Sunday's
Cabinet session by Communica-
tions Minister Amnon Rubinstein.
It will be discussed at the Cabinet
meeting next Sunday.
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Memories In A Holocaust Hourglass
Friday, March 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTAJ -
The issue of whether
Holocaust survivors,
traumatized by the tragedy,
can remember what really
happened has become a
focal point in the trial of
John Demjaniuk in
Jerusalem. His defense at-
torney, Mark O'Connor, is
trying to pry the minutiae of
their lives to show confu-
sion, amnesia and marred
recollections. He is pinning
his hopes of exonerating
Demjanjuk on memory
lapses and inability to
remember.
But it is this very inability to
remember that is the product of
the Holocaust's trauma, according
to Eva F o g e 1 m a n a
psychotherapist who works with
Holocaust survivors and is
research associate and board
member of the Sands Point, New
York, Jerome Riker International
Study of the Organized Persecu-
tion of Children, which studies
child survivors, plumbing the dep-
ths of hidden memories.
FOGELMAN told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that "the
very act of giving testimony for
some survivors is a traumatic ex-
perience in itself, and needs a sup-
portive atmosphere with which to
alleviate some of the pain and the
horror. The court situation is by
no means a supportive environ-
ment in which people can
remember and recount traumatic
experiences where they were
dehumanized." To ensure ac-
curate recall, she suggested that
witnesses be seen privately by
trained interviewers over several
weeks before giving public
testimony.
O'Connor has been chipping
away at inconsistencies in the
sworn testimony given by
witnesses in the movie-theater-
turned-courtroom in which more
people than there is seating
capacity turn out daily to wait to
watch the trial, in person and on
closed-screen television in an adja-
cent room. Radios in Israel are
tuned in to the court proceedings
wherever one goes, and witnesses
are surely aware that their
testimony is being heard by hun-
dreds of thousands of people, and
read about by millions throughout
the world.
Fogelman, who has interviewed
hundreds of survivors, said that
"most survivors can begin to re-
count their experiences, and while
they may not always remember
specific chronology of events, the
emotions and the memories, after
several sessions, begin to make a
coherent sequence of events.
WHILE it is true that in a one-
time session there may be
discrepancies between a sur-
vivor's recall of one event or
another, over several sessions a
survivor begins to feel and
remember what had actually
happened.
"One of the ways in which the
survivors have coped over the
years is by suppressing some of
the painful experiences that they
had. When they are asked to bear
witness on a witness stand, for
many of them, this is the first time
that they are piecing it together.
is difficult under such a
stressful environment, given the
trauma that they have been trying
to repress all these years, and it is
understandable that in trying to
recall it, there will initially be
discrepancies in what they recall,
because it has served them in a
way of coping and adapting with
weir life after the Holocaust."
Thus, it it this very memory
loss, subject of O'Connor's barbs,
tnat has protected the survivors
*nd enabled them to get on with
their lives despite their degrading
experiences.
FOGELMAN, who made a
documentary film several years
ago about children of Holocaust
survivors, "Breaking the
buence," explained that "Blur-
ting out the names of those killed
makes them real again. It would
be blasphemous to say that this is
the reality of the survivor's
memory if that memory has failed
or if it doesn't come out right the
first time, or if places are forgot-
ten," she said. "It is not their ac-
tual memory.
"Memory has to do with emo-
tions. It is not separated from
that. Survivors should not be
brought to the trial if this is the
first time that they bear witness.
Every recall evokes in the sur-
vivor intense feelings, whether
they be anger or helplessness, or
guilt that they were unable to do
enough."
Milton and Dr. Judith
Kestenberg, cofounders of the
Riker Study, had much to say
about the way in which witnesses
could be helped immeasurably to
positively identify Demjanjuk.
MILTON KESTENBERG, a
researcher and also a lawyer, said,
"As an attorney, I would bring in
nine other Ukrainians in a lineup
and I would ask the witness to
observe them in the following
way: I would ask them to say
something, let's say in German or
in Ukrainian, which would be tan-
tamount to the curses or crude
orders which this defendant
allegedly made while in the con-
centration camp.
"Your memory is based on
sounds, on movements of people,
their facial expressions, and the
total of it gives us the identity of a
person, the way a person talks,
the way a person gets mad, etc.
Because without a lineup, the im-
pressions might be misleading.
But I would definitely require
them to behave in such way as the
witnesses remember the way the
defendant allegedly behaved in
the camp.
"There are two kinds of move-
ment in a person," Kestenberg
continued. "One is a gesture
movement, which is typical for
people from a certain background.
A Ukrainian may move around
differently than a Turk, for exam-
ple. In addition, gesture
movements are controllable. In
other words, the defendant can
deliberately move differently to
mislead the witness.
"HOWEVER, if there are
posture movements a move-
ment where the whole body is in-
volved in the service of a certain
pattern, for example if you
show strength, if you use the
strength easily in a gesture, in a
posture it is very difficult to con-
trol it. It comes more naturally.
The subject cannot be in full con-
trol of his postural movement,
even if he would want to. And
that's one way how you can
recognize it."
Dr. Judith Kestenberg, a
psychoanalyst, said, "You can get
up from a chair in a certain way;
or you walk in a certain manner."
Regarding the tone of voice, she
observed. "There are two aspects
of the way you talk: When you
talk in your native language, there
is a certain melody of speech that
of course is native to its own
language.
"But beyond this, you have an
individuality, like a voice print,
and that is very difficult to lose,
even when you get older."
The Kestenbergs noted that a
person can be recognized by his
choice of words. But in Demjan-
juk's case, Milton Kestenberg
said, "It's probably not likely,
because Demjanjuk is careful in
his choice of words." They both
emphasized the fact that Demjan-
juk has spoken in Hebrew, not his
native Ukrainian, to greet the
witnesses, and most particularly
when he was angry.
MILTON KESTENBERG said
it helps "if one can get him angry
enough to respond in his own
language. When Eliahu
Rosenberg identified him as Ivan
the Terrible, why did Demjanjuk
call him a liar in Hebrew? Maybe
he didn't want to say that in his
own language," because that
would have lent credence to the
witness.
Dr. Kestenberg said she was
"struck that when a person gets
angry he should express it in an
entirely foreign language, so it
seems that he (Demjanjuk) may
have done it for effect. Or maybe
he was premeditatively doing
something," mused Dr.
Kestenberg.
When he spoke to another
witness, said Milton Kestenberg,
"He said 'Shalom' in Hebrew.
Why?" Dr. Kestenberg said, "It
looks like he's trying to show that
he's friendly to Jews. He learns
their language."
Perot Wins Award
NEW YORK (JTA) Dallas
businessman and philanthropist
Ross Perot has received the Raoul
Wallenberg Award of the
American Committee for Shaare
Zedek Hospital in Jerusalem and
the Raoul Wallenberg Committee
of the United States.
At Passover, your family deserves the best. And
nothing's better than Motts" Apple Sauce and Apple Juice.
Whether you prefer our regular or natural varieties, you can
be assured that our sauces and juices get their delicious
flavor from only the finest blend of apples. So this Passover
be sure to stock up on Motts."
Best wishes to you and your family during Passover.
HOflb "1*033
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, March 27, 1987
No Freedom?
Arab Student Charges Are 'Nonsense'
By JIM SHIPLEY
Activism on college campuses
seems to go through cycles. In the
1950's, when I was a student, we
went to class, we learned how to
chug beer, we interacted with
coeds, and we got an education
comensurate with the effort we
put out. It was a time of conformi-
ty and placidity on campus, and
we all fell into line. Ike was in the
White House, and we were sure
all was right with the world.
Then came the '60's. Now the
peer group of the college student
was being sent to Asia to die. The
campuses became the center of ac-
tivism. The political activity had a
lot of self-preservation to it, since
that was the age group coming
home in plastic bags, but never-
theless, it was on campus that the
country was forced to look at its
conscience.
OUR SYSTEM allows for
academic freedom, controversy
and healthy debate. The National
Guard, really a bunch of kids
themselves, overeacted at Kent
State, but other than that and an
isolated burned building, the na-
tional security was preserved and
the system worked.
Totalitarian regimes are afraid
of their universities. They are
necessary, for the next generation
must receive higher education,
but they are watched closely. In
addition, they are, for the most
part in such countries, for the
privileged few.
During the 19 years of occupa-
tion in Judea and Samaria, as well
as Gaza, not a single university
was allowed to operate under
Arab rule. These territories, now
so important to the politicians in
Ridyah and Amman, were not
worthy of any higher education
for almost two generations. Arab
governments wanted no activism,
no dissent on these campuses.
TODAY? Well, here is Israel.
"Occupiers." Now there are six,
count them, six universities
operating, including one in Gaza.
The student enrollment is nearly
14,000 and there are 600 lecturers
Arab lecturers. Do these col-
leges have any value? Or is the
education system in these areas
simply a propaganda tool for
Israel? Well, the illiteracy rate in
the two areas has dropped from
47.5 percent to 26.6 percent since
1967. The number of students in
school has more than doubled.
Has Israel forced an alien
philosophy on this basically
Moslim population? Is the cur-
riculum Israeli? In Judea and
Samaria, it is the curriculum of
the Jordanian educational system;
in Gaza, it is that of Egypt.
If all of this is true, and it is,
why do we read of the constant
student agitation on campus at
Bir Ziet and various other Arab
universities? Are the students just
naturally revolutionaries, burning
with desire for a Palestinian
State? Not any more than the
American college kid is naturally
a bomb thrower.
THE VIETNAM conflict
brought out inner feelings and ex-
tremism. The Arab-Israeli conflict
needs, even among Arab students,
an outside stimulus. Strange, isn't
it? For the disruption of the cam-
puses in Judea and Samaria is or-
chestrated from outside by, who
else? the PLO.
They appear on campus and
work on young minds. Not in just
political philosophies. That's what
student coffee houses and beer
pubs are all about. No, the PLO is
a dedicated group of killers and
thugs who do not have any
subtleties.
Take a simple thing like a calen-
dar distribued to students for
1986. It featured, as do most
calendars, important holidays and
historical events. But this was a
FLO calendar, so, what were the
important holidays? Why the
celebration of the PLO massacre
of Israeli athletes in Munich in
1972 and the murder of school
children in Maalot in 1974.
DESPITE ISRAEL'S efforts
to keep them off campus, the PLO
works its very own curriculum of
terror. They distribute pamphlets
on how to make bombs and the
vilest kind of anti-Semitic pro-
paganda. And yet, Israel allows
the campuses to continue to
operate freely.
Yes, from time to time they
have been forced to close down
the various colleges for a week or
a month, but they are always
reopened, again in complete
freedom of study and expression.
Believing in academic freedom is
one thing. Incitement to riot,
disruption of public order and
violence are another. What Israel
permits in Judea, Samaria and
Gaza would not be tolerated for
one minute at South Bend or
Chapel Hill.
Those young Arab minds could
be so helpful to their people. They
could join with Israeli technology
to turn the entire area into a Gan
Aden. But the PLO has come a-
hunting and has come up with
enough support to make life
around an Arab campus in-
teresting to say the least.
Don't ever believe for a minute
that Arab students just leave the
classroom and take to the streets.
Everytime there is a disturbance,
there is an incredible amount of
logisitical planning that goes into
it. These are not student distur-
bances any more than the
takeover of the American Em-
bassy in Teheran was the work of
"students."
AS LONG as the PLO can reach
the Arab student in Judea and
Samaria, there will be trouble. Be
it as insidious as the calendar or as
blatant as an instruction manual
on planting bombs, they have only
one goal. They cannot permit a
peaceful coexistance with Israel.
They cannot permit progress to be
made in these areas, for it would
mean that the peoples of the area
can get along and that would
thwart their goal which is destruc-
tion of the State of Israel.
Until it can be established that
those lands are indeed part of the
ancient and holy land of Israel,
and the people there allowed to
function as citizens, it will con-
tinue to be a sticky wicket. But,
let us again look to history.
For 19 years, there was no
higher education in these areas. Il-
literacy ran rampant, and the
Arab regime could have cared
less. Now Israel is valiantly cor-
recting that.
SEVENTEEN separate classes
of four-year students have
graduated during the time that
Israel has had dominance over
this part of her own land. More
than graduated in all the history
of Arab control over the cen-
turies, Israel is doing her part.
I believe it is the job of the
Arabs themselves to get rid of
those who foul the nest. There
must be enoueh clear heads on
Continued on Page 15
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Y* -m f^i __ Friday, March 27, 1987/The Jewish l*Joridian of South County Page 13
Red Cross Double-Dealing
l8r?e.' g 0^1e Society's Bounds, Victim to Politicking by Arabs
f.'L rt^^.'J...^ Oi-ifiir. ti*"\r *if If I\ 4 lir i
By ELLEN ANN STEIN
Jewish Floridian SUtff Writer
The American Jewish
community felt stung when
the countries comprising
the International Reef Cross
once again refused to
recognize the Israeli
counterpart of the Red
Cross, Magen David Adorn,
as an official voting member
of the international relief
society.
The sting went even deeper at
the Geneva conference where this
occurred late last year when the
society changed its name to Inter-
national Red Cross and Red Cres-
cent societies. The Red Crescent
is the symbol used by Arab
organizations.
THIS IS an example of political
double-dealing, some Jewish
leaders claim. There are other
religious symbols represented in
the society. The Arabs have long
had their Red Crescent and
recently contributed enough
pressure to oversee the incorpora-
tion of the Red Crescent into the
society's name, while at the same
time they have kept the Star of
David out.
"The reaction of the American
Jewish community should not, as
punishment, be to withdraw sup-
port from the American Red
Cross, which supports the MDA.
The Red Cross is itself only one of
137 participating nations.
"The American Red Cross is
Magen David Adom's best
friend," said Joe Handleman, na-
tional chairman of the MDA's
American support group, the
American Red Magen David for
Israel (ARMDI).
ALTHOUGH the MDA has
been striving for international
recognition for more than 40
years, and has thus far failed to
receive it, Handleman noted that
from a de facto standpoint the
MDA is accorded all the privileges
of other international Red Cross
and Red Crescent Societies.
But the issue goes deeper than
recognition of the Red Shield of
David as a symbol, according to
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin, spiritual
leader of Young Israel of Sunny
Isles.
Dobin is international chairman
of Operation Recognition, an
organization with committees in
52 countries around the world
whose task is to direct worldwide
recoenition of MDA.
DOBIN BELIEVES that the
American Red Cross can and must
do even more than it is currently
doing to help sway worldwide
member organizations officially to
recognize MDA.
''American Red Cross has given
unilateral recognition to the
Magen David Adorn. That is im-
portant, but in no way does it take
uie place of international recogni-
on of MDA by the Red Cross
Soaety," Dobin said.
Still, the Jewish community in
the United States and in other
democracies throughout the world
are lessening support of Red
Cross Societies, Dobin said.
"ACROSS MY desk every week
come hundreds of requests from
Jewish people in various parts of
the country asking me whether
they should send contributions to
the American Red Cross," Dobin
said. "Example, should they give
blood to the American Red Cross.
Example: Scores of synagogues
and Jewish centers throughout
the United States have cancelled
their joint blood donor program
with the Red Cross."
tion of MDA. We have always en-
couraged and promoted the
recognition at many international
conferences," she said.
There are three separate
societies of Red Cross. One in-
cludes the 137 organizations that
attend the Geneva conference
every four years and have votes.
The second body is composed of
delegates that represent the coun-
tries in the society. The third is
the International Committee of
Red Cross.
"ONLY THE governments
which are part of this body have
an actual say on which symbols
are recognized as worldwide sym-
bols. So it was a political decision.
And that's what's important for
people to understand," Cohen
said.
Cohen believes that the resolu-
tion and meeting with local ARM-
DI representatives shows the ef-
fort that the local Red Cross agen-
cy is taking to bond ties between
the Israeli and American
societies.
"We're one out of 3,000
chapters, but we can't take that
attitude," Cohen said. "We need
to start from within our local
community.
"If enough chapters within the
country have a good relationship,
we hope to move the American
Red Cross in the worldwide pic-
ture and try to get other Red
Joseph Handleman
Sonia Cohen, a spokeswoman
for the Greater Miami American
Ked Cross, recently met with
leaders of ARMDI.
"THE ISSUE we need for the
community to understand is that
the American Red Cross is not
directly responsible" for the adop-
tion of the Red Crescent as part of
the International Red Cross
name, said Cohen.
"The American Red Cross has
historically, and it is documented
expressed support for the recogni-
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Page 14 JTheJewjgh Floridian of Soutii County/Friday, March 27, 1987
He's Citizen No More,
But Linnas Still in U.S.

By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Despite having been strip-
ped of his citizenship and
having been ordered
deported from the United
States, Karl Linnas still sits
on U.S. soil. Because of
several appeals to stay the
sentence of deportation, and
a certain amount of in-
fluence in Washington by
those who resist his depor-
tation to the Soviet Union,
Linnas has not yet been
flung from U.S. shores.
Linnas, 66, was convicted and
sentenced to death in absentia by
a Soviet court in 1961. He was
charged in 1982 by the U.S.
Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations (OSI) with
lying about his wartime activities
when he entered the U.S. in 1951,
immigrating from Germany under
the Displaced Persons Act of
1948.
ACCORDING TO the charges
filed by the OSI, Linnas joined a
Nazi execution squad in 1941 in a
Tartu, Estonia, concentration
camp when Germany occupied
Estonia, in order to execute
"undesirables," mostly Jews. He
is accused of commanding firing
squads that killed men, women
and children who were forced to
kneel before mass graves, as well
as personally shooting several
camp inmates.
On December 1, 1986, the U.S.
Supreme Court refused to hear
Linnas's appeal against deporta-
tion to the USSR, a decision hail-
ed by at least nine Jewish
organizations. Today, these
organizations, and very many
others, are decidedly upset over
the failure of the U.S. Justice
system to provide for Linnas's
speedy deportation.
The Jewish Community Rela-
tions Council of New York has
sent a "Dear Colleague" letter to
its 59 constituent organizations
asking that they protest the con-
tinued presence in the U.S. of Lin-
nas. The letter, urging Attorney
General Edwin Meese to sign off
on Linnas' deportation order, will
be submitted to two Senators and
two Congressmen.
ELAN STEINBERG, ex-
ecutive director of the World
Jewish Congress, said of the
failure to, until now, deport Lin-
nas that "the whole thing is an
abomination. We're waiting for
the Attorney General to enforce
the law, as we are in the case of
(Austrian President Kurt)
Waldheim, placing him on the
watch list (of war criminals not
welcome in the U.S.) We don't
need to protect Nazis in this
country.
"The Attorney General should
send a clear message, 'Nazis are
not welcome here.' The entire
Jewish community is being
challenged by these cases. Will
they stand up in this moral strug-
gle or will they allow those in-
dividuals who protect these
heinous persons to prevail? We're
not asking for a favor we're
asking that the law be carried
out."
Linnas' counsel, former U.S.
Attorney General Ramsey Clark,
has been successful in delaying
the deportation of the wartime
Nazi partly because of an amazing
technicality: Linnas requested to
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Friday, March 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 15
Ethnic Task
Force Formed
Sensing that there are more
Lthnic groups in Miami than are
(urrently being acknowledged,
|he Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee has
formed an Inter-Ethnic Task
farce to keep track of the various
roups.
The primary goals of the task
force are to catalogue existing
kthnic groups and organizations,
kssess with which groups the AJC
[hares common goals and agen-
das, and hold an inter-ethnic
Symposium.
Dennis Turner, an officer of the
Chapter, is chairman of the task
force. He has asked that anyone
Associated with an organization
[hat represents an ethnic minority
In Miami contact the Miami
t'hapter of the AJC.
Leon L. Levy has been reelected
to serve in his second term as
president of the American
Sephardi Federation. Regional
vice presidents include
Solomon Garazi and Alberto
Benhaim of Miami. The
American Sephardi Federa-
tion, founded in 197S, is an
umbrella organization for
Sephardim.
No Freedom?
Continued from Page 12-
and around those campuses to do
what the United States did in the
1960's. It was activism, debate,
yes; violence, no. If some restraint
had not been demonstrated then,
the minority of lunatic fringe
would have taken over our col-
leges here in a destructive force
which would have outdistanced
the noble philosophies which
spawned the protest.
Israel may have to live with
neighbors dedicated to her
destruction, but she does not have
to educate them. A university
which capitulates to outside agita-
tion should be closed for a month
with a stern warning. The second
incident should shut them down
for a year, and the next should
have the university razed to the
ground.
In this manner, I believe the
students would take a hand in
cleaning their own campus. If
Israel does not take a strong hand
in this, these "students" will
make the '60's in American look
like a tea dance.
3 Beba Idelson
Awards
Presented
TEL AVIV Na'amat in Israel
fas presented its three Beba
Idelson Volunteer Awards to the
Ashdod branch of the organiza-
tion, the students of the Phyllis
^utker TIMON Vocational High
School in Tiberias, and 40 women
who devote at least a day each
week to the Raanana Center for
Assistance to Women primarily
rape victims. Idelson was
Na'amafs ftrst secretary general.
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^?
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RS. Of course it's still Kosher for Passover...
would I have it any other way?


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, March 27, 1987
Holocaust Drama
As Demjanjuk Seeks Way Out
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The issue of whether
Holocaust survivors,
traumatized by the tragedy,
can remember what really
happened has become a
focal point in the trial of
John Demjanjuk in
Jerusalem. His defense at-
torney, Mark O'Connor, is
trying to pry the minutiae of
their lives to show confu-
sion, amnesia and marred
recollections. He is pinning
his hopes of exonerating
Demjanjuk on memory
lapses and inability to
remember.
But it is this very inability to
remember that is the product of
the Holocaust's trauma, according
to Eva Fogelman, a
psychotherapist who works with
Holocaust survivors and is
research associate and board
member of the Sands Point, New
York, Jerome Riker International
Study of the Organized Persecu-
tion of Children, which studies
child survivors, plumbing the dep-
ths of hidden memories.
FOGELMAN told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that "the
very act of giving testimony for
some survivors is a traumatic ex-
perience in itself, and needs a sup-
portive atmosphere with which to
alleviate some of the pain and the
horror. The court situation is by
no means a supportive environ-
ment in which people can
remember and recount traumatic
experiences where they were
dehumanized." To ensure ac-
curate recall, she suggested that
witnesses be seen privately by
trained interviewers over several
weeks before giving public
testimony.
O'Connor has been chipping
away at inconsistencies in the
sworn testimony given by
witnesses in the movie-theater-
turned-courtroom in which more
people than there is seating
capacity turn out daily to wait to
watch the trial, in person and on
closed-screen television in an adja-
cent room. Radios in Israel are
tuned in to the court proceedings
wherever one goes, and witnesses
are surely aware that their
testimony is being heard by hun-
dreds of thousands of people, and
read about by millions throughout
the world.
Fogelman, who has interviewed
hundreds of survivors, said that
"most survivors can begin to re-
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count their experiences, and while
they may not always remember
specific chronology of events, the
emotions and the memories, after
several sessions, begin to make a
coherent sequence of events.
WHILE it is true that in a one-
time session there may be
discrepancies between a sur-
vivor's recall of one event or
another, over several sessions a
survivor begins to feel and
remember what had actually
happened.
"One of the ways in which the
survivors have coped over the
years is by suppressing some of
the painful experiences that they
had. When they are asked to bear
witness on a witness stand, for
many of them, this is the first time
that they are piecing it together.
It is difficult under such a
stressful environment, given the
trauma that they have been trying
to repress all these years, and it is
understandable that in trying to
recall it, there will initially be
discrepancies in what they recall,
because it has served them in a
way of coping and adapting with
their life after the Holocaust."
Thus, it is this very memory
loss, subject of O'Connor's barbs,
that has protected the survivors
and enabled them to get on with
their lives despite their degrading
experiences.
FOGELMAN, who made a
documentary film several years
ago about children of Holocaust
survivors, "Breaking the
Silence," explained that "Blur-
ting out the names of those killed
makes them real again. It would
be blasphemous to say that this is
the reality of the survivor's
memory if that memory has failed
or if it doesn't come out right the
first time, or if places are forgot-
ten," she said. "It is not their ac-
tual memory.
"Memory has to do with emo-
tions. It is not separated from
that. Survivors should not be
brought to the trial if this is the
first time that they bear witness.
Every recall evokes in the sur-
vivor intense feelings, whether
they be anger or helplessness, or
guilt that they were unable to do
enough."
Milton and Dr. Judith
Kestenberg, cofounders of the
Riker Study, had much to say
about the way in which witnesses
could be helped immeasurably to
positively identify Demjanjuk.
MILTON KESTENBERG, a
researcher and also a lawyer, said,
"As an attorney, I would bring in
nine other Ukrainians in a lineup
and I would ask the witness to
observe them in the following
way: I would ask them to say
something, let's say in German or
in Ukrainian, which would be tan-
tamount to the curses or crude
orders which this defendant
allegedly made while in the con-
centration camp.
"Your memory is based on
sounds, on movements of people,
their facial expressions, and the
total of it gives us the identity of a
person, the way a person talks,
the way a person gets mad, etc.
Because without a lineup, the im-
pressions might be misleading.
But I would definitely require
them to behave in such way as the
witnesses remember the way the
defendant allegedly behaved in
the camp.
"There are two kinds of move-
ment in a person," Kestenberg
continued. "One is a gesture
movement, which is typical for
people from a certain background.
A Ukrainian may move around
differently than a Turk, for exam-
ple. In addition, gesture
movements are controllable. In
other words, the defendant can
deliberately move differently to
mislead the witness.
"HOWEVER, if there are
posture movements a move-
ment where the whole body is in-
volved in the service of a certain
pattern, for example if you
show strength, if you use the
strength easily in a gesture, in a
posture it is very difficult to con-
trol it. It comes more naturally.
The subject cannot be in full con-
trol of his postural movement,
even if he would want to. And
that's one way how you can
recognize it."
Dr. Judith Kestenberg, a
psychoanalyst, said, "You can get
up from a chair in a certain way;
or you walk in a certain manner."
Regarding the tone of voice, she
observed, "There are two aspects
of the way you talk: When you
talk in your native language, there
is a certain melody of speech that
of course is native to its own
language.
"But beyond this, you have an
individuality, like a voice print,
and that is very difficult to lose,
even when you get older."
The Kestenbergs noted that a
person can be recognized by his
choice of words. But in Demjan-
juk's case, Milton Kestenberg
said, "It's probably not likely,
because Demjanjuk is careful in
his choice of words." They both
emphasized the fact that Demjan-
juk has spoken in Hebrew, not his
native Ukrainian, to greet the
witnesses, and most particularly
when he was angry.
MILTON KESTENBERG said
it helps "if one can get him angry
enough to respond in his own
language. When Eliahu
Rosenberg identified him as Ivan
the Terrible, why did Demjanjuk
call him a liar in Hebrew? Maybe
he didn't want to say that in his
own language," because that
would have lent credence to the
witness.
Dr. Kestenberg said she was
"struck that when a person gets
angry he should express it in an
entirely foreign language, so it
seems that he (Demjanjuk) may
have done it for effect. Or maybe
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Friday, March 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 17
Israel Doubts Reports
HELPING HAND: Miriam Radiwker, 80
(right), a former Israeli police investigator of
Nazi war criminals, holds her husband's hand
as he helps her off the witness stand at the
start of a midday break in her testimony in
he was premeditatively doing
something," mused Dr.
Kestenberg.
When he spoke to another
witness, said Milton Kestenberg,
"He said 'Shalom' in Hebrew.
Why?" Dr. Kestenberg said, "It
looks like he's trying to show that
he's friendly to Jews. He learns
their language."
Pollard
Continued from Page 4-
promotions palatable, but it does
dampen the debate just a bit.
I don't think that the ADL or
the president of the Conference of
Presidents of American Jewish
< >rtfanizations will raise this ques-
tion when they get home. No, bet-
ter to troop off to Israel and
strasha (Ed.: "threaten") their
leadership for the boo-boo.
And so, as the lights on stage
dim at the end of act one, the
Jewish leaders are in Jerusalem,
Pollard is in jail, Eitan is in his
fancy office at Israeli Chemicals,
Sella is at the air base, and Tevye
is stage center, alone. The
spotlight narrows to him. He
raises his arms and speaks.
"ON ONE hand, Israel needed
this information. On the other
hand, Pollard shouldn't have been
the fall guy. On the other hand,
the Israelis were only doing their
job. On the other hand, they
shouldn't have been promoted. On
the other hand, America shouldn't
have held out this information
from Israel. On the other hand .
(Tevye stops, eyes blazing). There
is no other hand."
JDC Seeks
Relief Donations
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee (JDC) is respon-
ding to the earthquake in Ecuador
is responding to the earthquake in
Ecuador by opening its mailbox to
donations for emergency relief
and by implementing an
assistance on behalf of the
American Jewish Community.
President Heinz Eppler said the
program will give people here the
opportunity to offer financial
assistance to Ecuadorians left
I homeless by the earthquake.
AP/Wide World Photo
the John Demjanjuk trial in Jerusalem last
week. Radiwker testified in behalf of the three
deceased Treblinka inmates whom she ques-
tioned in 1976.
Of U.S. Spy
Continued from Page 1
IDF who had originally made aliya
from the U.S." During the
Lebanon war he reportedly was
"bumped" by the IDF.
Yossi Ben-Aharon, director
general of the Prime Minister's of-
fice, said he knew nothing of the
affair, but added that he would
not be surprised if something like
that had happened.
"As we all know, spying is the
business of all governments
against all other governments
not against, but in favor of their
own security. I'm not very sur-
prised," Ben-Aharon said.
A SIMILAR denial was made
Friday by Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin in an interview with a
West German newspaper. He was
answering a question arising from
a statement allegedly made by
convicted spy Jonathan Pollard
that U.S. agents had been
employed in Israel.
Morris Abram, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
said here that he had no informa-
tion on the report, but added: "If
Sen. Durenberger's information
which I know nothing about
were true, I am sure the Israeli
government and officials will be
just as understanding and forgiv-
ing as the government of the U.S.
in IDF
in the form of the President and
all of his officials have been in
respect of this rogue operation by
Mr. Pollard."
The Post report quoted
Durenberger as having said that it
was the CIA activity which had
apparently led to Israel's decision
to "run" Pollard in Washington.
In Washington, Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
denied Durenberger's allegation.
Interviewed on NBC's "Meet the
Press" program Sunday,
Weinberger said the Senator's
statement was a damaging and
very wrong statement" l>ecause it
can be used to "justify further es-
pionage." He denied that there
was any American spy in the IDF.
Woman Rabbi Elected
WASHINGTON Rabbi Joy
Levitt of Roslyn, N.Y., spiritual
leader of the Reconstructionist
Congregation of the North Shore,
has been elected president of the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical
Association. She is the first
woman to head a rabbinic associa-
tion. She succeeds Rabbi Ira
Schiffer of Temple Beth El,
Newark, Del.
It Costs So Little
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fM
Southern Bell Long Distance is a great
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family at reasonable rates.
A10-MINUTE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO:
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Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, March 27, 1987
Boca Pops Offers Double Billing
Maestro Mark Azzolina and the
Boca Raton Symphonic Pops offer
a blockbuster, double header in
the next of the "Super Pops"
series on Thursday, March 19 at
the Florida Atlantic University
Auditorium at 8 p.m.
The Dave Brubeck Quartet and
trumpet virtuouso Al Hirt top the
bill for an exciting evening at
Pops.
Jazzman Dave Brubeck holds a
number of firsts in the jazz world,
including the first jazz single
record to sell a million copies with
his jazz great "Take Five." He
was also the first modern jazzman
to appear on the cover of Time
Magazine and was the first jazz
artist to perform at the White
House. He and Louis Armstrong
have the distinction of being the
first two jazzman elected to the
Hall of Fame.
His Quartet was consistently
voted number one in jazz polls
from the mid-fifties until the end
of 1967. In the 1950's Brubeck
started out with a trio which in-
cluded names like Cal Tjader.
When he added the talent of Paul
Desmond on Alto Sax the Brubeck
Quartet catapulted to national at-
tention which kept them in the
forefront of the music world for
17 years.
Hirt has 40 record albums to his
credit, with four gold records and
one Grammy under his belt.
A consummate entertainer, he
has been featured in concert with
the best of orchestras including
the New York and Los Angeles
Philharmonic, the Cleveland Or-
chestra and the Boston Pops.
Now, the Boca Pops joins this
distinctive list.
Tickets for this performance are
priced at $18, $23 and $28, and
can be obtained by calling
393-3758.
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Because along with our physi-
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and support to you and your family
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And after surgery, a comprehen-
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return to your normal life as quickly
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But we'd rather help you avoid
open heart surgery entirely. So we
offer one of the most advanced diag-
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Synagogue cAfews
Friday, March 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page '.9
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI EMUNA
The Sisterhood of Congrega-
I tion Aiuhei Emuna is holding a
I regular monthly meeting at the
Shule, 16189 Carter Road,
Delray, on Tuesday, April 7. The
I guest speaker will be Mr. Ergon
Kurz, humorist, who will talk on
"What Makes Sammy Run." Join
I us for a collation before the
meeting, and for a delightful
I afternoon!
The Sisterhood announces that
I there is still time to make your
I reservation for the entire
Passover! Call Nora Kalish at
I 499-9229 or 499-2644. This reser-
I vation will be for Monday, April
13 through Wednesday, April 22
I at the Deauville Hotel, where you
I will enjoy the two Seders, and
I three meals a day! The at-
I mosphere will be just like home!
I The cost is $690 for double oc-
I cupancy, and includes roundtrip
I transportation and gratuities!
Please join us.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
Howard Wolfman, son of Mira
Wolfman of Boca Raton, will be
I called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
I vah at Congregation B'nai Israel
I of Boca Raton on Saturday morn-
I ing. April 4. He will recite his
Torah portion, Vayikra, and will
I lead the congregation in a
I dialogue about his reading.
Howard is a student at Loggers
I Run Middle School, where he par-
I ticipates in the gifted students
I program. One of his favorite hob-
I bies is fishing.
Among the special guests on
I this occasion will be grandmother
I Florence Siegel of Boca Raton,
I great-grandmother Hattie
I Fishman of Far Rockaway, N.Y.,
I and grandparents Lorraine and
I Rubin Wolfman of Valley Stream,
NY.
Congregation B'nai Israel will
hold its Annual Second Night
Passover Seder on Tuesday, April
14, at the Sheraton of Boca Raton,
1-95 at Glades Road (Sheraton
Way), 2000 NW 19th St., Boca
Raton, FL 33432.
Rabbi Richard Agler will lead
the service beginning at 6:30 p.m.
Space is limited, so please
reserve your seats now. Seating
arrangements will be honored
upon request. Plan a table, up to
10 people, and list their names on
the back of the reservation
request.
A full traditional Passover
Seder meal will be served. Fish,
instead of chicken, may be re-
quested on your reservation form.
Grape juice will be served to
children under 13 years of age.
The new Union Haggadah,
prepared by the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis, will
be used. If you need copies of the
Haggadah, they will be ordered
for you if requested on the reser-
vation form below. It is suggested
that each family have at least one
Haggadah.
A payment of $25 per person,
$18 per child age three to 13, and
$7.50 for each Haggadah must ac-
company your reservation request
in order to guarantee your seats.
Cantor Stephen Dubov will
assist Rabbi Agler in conducting
the Seder service.
Further information is available
by telephoning the synagogue of-
fice: 483-9982.
TEMPLE BETH AHM
Saturday morning, March 21,
the Bar Mitzvah of Laurence H.
Cohen son of Mr. and Mrs. George
(Cynthia) Cohen was held.
Laurence attends Pines Middle
School and his hobbies are bowl-
ing, football and fishing. Special
guests included his grandparents,
Bea and Sol Jacobson of N. Miami
Beach and Sadie Cohen of N.
Miami Beach and his brothers
Steven and Todd and sister Shari.
Shabbat Services at Temple
Beth Ahm will begin at 8 p.m.
March 27 with Rabbi Avraham
Kapnek officiating and Cantor
Stuart Kanas chanting the
Liturgy.
Saturday morning services
begin at 8:45 a.m. During services
the Bar Mitzvah of Sidney Jacobs
the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth
(Sandra) Jacobs will be
celebrated. Sidney is a student at
Pines Middle School. Special
guests will include his sisters
Dorothy, Elizabeth and Rebecca.
The Temple Board will meet on
Wednesday, April 1 at 7:30 p.m.
Reservations are now being
taken for our Passover Seder. We
will be having a second Seder on
April 14 following services. For
more information call the Temple
office, 431-5100.
Daily minyan meets at 8 a.m.
and evenings at 7:30 p.m.
Registration is now in progress
for our summer camp, Camp Chai.
For more information call Ellin
Heilig at 431-5100.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
will be dedicating the Ten Com-
mandments Sculpture during Fri-
day night Services on March 27 at
8 p.m. at Temple Beth El. This is a
wood sculpture depicting the Ten
Words of Decalogue by which
Israel entered into a covenant
with God. Phil Rosenbloom, the
sculptor, will be present. He is a
graduate of Stanford University.
He spent a year at the University
of Haifa in Israel, specializing in
wood-carved sculpture. He studies
under master carver, Chris
Wfrem at the Wood Carving
School of Minneapolis.
Join us as we dedicate this
special work of art.
BOFTY (Senior Youth Group)
of Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
is going to the Manor Care Nurs-
ing Home to conduct services for
the elderly. All BOFTY members
are urged to attend on March 27,
6:30 p.m. at Manor Care Nursing
Home. For information contact
Marlene and Mark Isenberg,
395-7052.
You are cordially invited to at-
tend A Symposium sponsored by
The Havnrah Groups of Temple
Beth El on Saturday, March 28,
at Temple Beth El of Boca Raton,
333 SW 4th Ave., Boca Raton, FL
33432, from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The Symposium will cover the
following topics:
"What Do You As A Jew Think
About ..." Church and State
Separation, Abortion and Birth
Control, Love and Sex, Censor-
ship, Life After Death, Alcohol
and Drugs, Cults, God.
This day offers a rare opportuni-
ty for thought, challenge, intellec-
tual stimulation, spirituality and
fellowship. The Symposium will
consist of lecture and discussion
groups. Total cost for this
outstanding experience is $10 per
person, which includes lunch.
Closing date for reservations is
March 25. Contact Rabbi Gregory
Marx, 391-8900.
The SOLOS (Singles Group of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton -
49 and Up) is planning a Third
Seder at Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton, 333 SW 4th Ave., Boca
Raton. All the traditional foods
will be served plus trimmings at 6
p.m. on Thursday, April 16. The
theme is "Keeping Up With a
Jewish Tradition." Contact
Sylvia 396-2226, Lillian 487-7780,
or Esther 499-8325. Reservations
are a must.
Temple Beth El Brotherhod
sponsored cruise to Nassau
Bahamas. A four-day/three-night
cruise on the Carnivale Cruise
Ship. Ship departs Port of Miami
on Friday, May 1 and returns on
Monday, May 4. Free bus
transportaton will be provided
from the Temple parking lot to
and from the Port of Miami. Cost
of inside cabin is $318 per person
(double occupancy) Cost of outside
cabin is $388 per person (double
occupancy) Port charges of $22
per person are extra. Deposit of
$100 per person is required with
balance due by March 5. Make
checks payable to Temple Beth El
Brotherhod and mail to 333 SW
4th Ave., Boca Raton, FL 33432.
For more information, call Irv
Kolman at 781-7527.
TEMPLE EMETH
At Temple Emeth, Delray
Beach, on Monday, March 30, 10
a.m., the final installment of the
Weekly Lecture Series will occur.
Blanche Herzlich will present a
review of "The Book of
Abraham" by Marek Halter. Blan-
che Herzlich is the President of
Temple Emeth Sisterhood, a past
President of Ben-Gurion
Hadassah and a member of the
Speakers Bureau of National
Hadassah. All are welcome.
TEMPLE SINAI
If you are not affiliated with any
other Temple please consider join-
ing Temple Sinai. Call Helen
Berger, Chairperson at 276-6161.
Shabbat services on Friday,
March 27 will begin at 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Samuel Silver's sermon will
be "Would You Believe," Can-
tor Elaine Shapiro will be in atten-
dance at Temple Sinai of Delray
Beach.
Saturday morning services,
March 28 will be held at 10 a.m. at
Temple Sinai of Delray Beach.
Saturday, April 4 shabbat ser-
vice of Temple Sinai of Delray
Beach will take place at 10 a. m.
Temple Sinai of Delray Beach
will be conducting a complete
seder on the second night of
Passover. This will be led bv Rabbi
Think about
Tomorrow,
Today.
II your* tha type ol person who hat alwaya
boon thouQhtlul ol your lovad on**, you know
that lunaral cotti hava a hlatory ol rialno. You
can protect your lovad onea Irom making coaHy
motional declalons. Pre-nead lunaral
arrangement* can save money and angulah at a
time when lit mod appreciated. Ad on
tomorrow, today by calling lor a proteaalenal
consultation
Pre arrangement* beceuae you care.
CBETH ISRAEL
RUBIIl
c/4 Family Protect ioii P'a/l Chapel
Pre Need Conference Center
6578 W Atlantic Ave. Delray Beach. Tl 53446 305-498-9 70O
Chapel
5808 W Atlantic Ave Delray Beach. fL 33446 JOS 499-8000/732 3OO0
Samuel Silver and Cantor'Elaine
Shapiro. The donation is $30 a
person, $15 a child. For reserva-
tions please send your check to
Temple Sinai, 2475 W. Alantic
Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33445.
For information call 276-6161.
Shabbat services at Temple
Sinai on Friday, April 3 will
feature the annual Sisterhood
service. Sermon by Rabbi Samuel
Silver will be entitled "And He
Called." Cantor Elaine Shapiro
will be in attendance.
Temple Sinai is running their
Annual Golf Tournament at the
beautiful new Polo Club at Boca
Raton, golf pro-Don Beatti,
Thursday, April 2. Price $75 per
golfer which includes lunch, din-
ner, golf carts and green fees. Call
276-6161 for reservations.
Temple Sinai will conduct
Duplicate Bridge games on Thurs-
day evenings at the Temple, 2475
W. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach.
Master points will be awarded as
the games are sanctioned by
ACGL. The fee is $2 a person,
refreshments are served. These
games are open to the public and
start at 7:30 p.m. For further in-
formation call Jack Alter,
498-0946.
Temple Sinai in coordination
with Herzl Institute will present
the last in the lecture series, April
8 at 2 p.m. entitled "The Bintle
Brif." The speaker, Willliam
Stern, is past president of Jewish
Daily Forward and Past General
Secretary of the Workmen's Cir-
cle. These lectures are free and
open to the public. For informa-
tion call Temple office 276-6161.
The Message of Israel is heard
every Sunday on WSBR Boca 740
AM, 7:06 a.m. and WFTL, Ft.
Lauderdale 1400 AM, 6:45 a.m.
On April 5, the program will air a
talk by Rabbi Samuel Silver of
Temple Sinai of Delray Beach.
Rabbi Sheldon Harr, Temple Ko)
Ami, Plantation, will deliver a
special Passsover message on
April 12. On subsequent Sundays,
the late Rabbi Philip Bernstein of
Rochester on April 19; Rabbi Gun-
ther Plaut, Toronto on April 26;
Rabbi Jerome Davidson, Great
Neck, N.Y. on May 3; Rabbi
Robert Syme, Detroit on May 10;
Rabbi Stephen Pearce, Stamford,
Ct. on May 17; Rabbi Murray
Rothman, Rye, N.Y. on May 24
and Rabbi Gutner Hirschberg
New York City on May 31.
Rabbi Samuel Silver of Temple
Sinai will continue the Bible Study
lectures every Thursday at S p.m.,
except for the third Thursday of
the month when Rabbi Silver will
speak on Great Jewish Per-
sonalities. Cantor Elaine Shapiro
presents her Jewish Music series
every first Thursday of the month
at 10:30 a.m. For infor.nation
please call Temple ,">inai,
76-6161.
Temple Sinai of Delray Beach,
is running a night at Fympano
Raceway on March 28 at 6 p.m.
The price is $12.50 per person
which includes a full course din-
ner, grandstand admission, tax
and gratuity, free parking, official
program and a race in the name of
our Temple. Please contact the
Temple at 276-6161 for tickets or
Jerry Gilbert at 499-5563.
The Brotherhood of Temple
Sinai will be having a night at
Pompano Harness Racing, March
28 at 6 p.m. dinner is included in
the price of $12.50 per person.
Call Temple office for information
276-6161.
The Brotherhood announces its
final revue for 1987, Sunday,
March 29 at 8 p.m. Touch of Class-
Light in Heart, illusion combined
with music. Seats are reserved.
Tickets are $5. For information
call 276-6161.
The Brotherhood of Temple
Sinai will be running a special lun-
cheon for all members and non-
members on April 12. Cost is $3
per person. Call Temple office for
information 276-6161.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
Parenting Center announces the
following events to be held at the
synagogue, 333 Fourth Ave.,
Boca Raton.
March 29 "When Your Child
Asks About .,." 10:30 a.m. to
noon. Explore the questions your
child asks about God, about Life
and about Death.
April 2 Two workshops on
Pesach for Parents. 7:30-9 p.m.
"Making Your Seder an Adven-
ture." How, when, where, what
and why. Intended for parents of
children of all ages.
"A Guide to Jewish Holidays for
Jewish Families with Christian
Relatives." A time of sharing and
sensitivity to the needs of families
with non-Jewish relatives.
April 5 Jewish LaMaze. 7
p.m. A one-sesson workshop on
such topics as brit milah, bris,
naming, the first Shabbat at
home.
April 11 Tot Shabbat. 9-10
a.m. A Shabbat experience for
preschool and primary grade
children and their parents. This
session will develop Pesach theme
through songs, blessings, symbols
and stories.
For information, contact Robin
Eisenberg 391-8900.
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Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, March 27, 1987
Some great taste
in an exciting new pack*
SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Smoking
Causes Lung Cancer, Heart Disease,
Emphysema, And May Complicate Pregnancy.
9 mg. "tar". 0.7 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method.