The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00280

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
\ I he Jewish ^^ T
FloridiaN
of South County
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
BOCA RATON. FLORIDA
PERMIT NO. 1093
Volume 9 Numbers
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday. February 27,1987
John Demjanjuklistens attentively as his attorney, Mark O'Connor, last week AP/Wide World Photo
having herded hundreds o/th 'That's Ivan,' Says
Holocaust Survivor
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A Holocaust survivor stood
up in Jerusalem District
Court Monday morning and
identified accused war
criminal John Demjanjuk as
the Treblinka death camp
guard known as "Ivan the
Terrible." "There is the
man as he was. Here he is
standing. Here he is stan-
ding," cried Pinhas Epstein,
who arrived at Treblinka
when he was 17.
The emotional outburst, the
dramatic highlight of the first day
of the second week of Demjan-
juk's trial, came after Epstein had
scanned photographs of Treblinka
shown to him by the prosecution.
He had apparently identified the
face of "Ivan the Terrible," who
was then in his middle 20s.
HIS WORDS, "the man as he
was," referred to a photograph,
and "Here he is standing" to the
Continued on Page 7-
Iosif Begun
In Moscow After Soviets Release Him
IOSIF BEGUN: unconditional pardon
AP/Wide World Photo
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Former Soviet Prisoner of
Conscience Iosif Begun ar-
rived in Moscow Monday
morning following his
release last Friday from
Chistopol Prison in the
Tatar Republic of the
USSR. He was pardoned
last week after serving
three years for "anti-Soviet
activities" as a result of his
teaching of Hebrew.
Begun was met at the Moscow
train station by throngs of sup-
porters in the Jewish movement
and hoisted on their shoulders in a
jubilant celebration, the Hebrew
song Heveinu Shalom Aleichem
could be heard reverberating
through the streets of the Soviet
capital.
BEGUN, an observant Jew,
chose not to desecrate the Sab-
bath by traveling after his release
from prison Friday morning. In-
stead, he and his wife, Inna, and
son, Boris, spent Shabbat in a
hotel near the prison.
In a telephone conversation
Monday morning with his wife's
cousin, Chaim Tepper of Far
Rockaway, N.Y., Begun said that
"It was a very great Shabbat." He
also said that, "We shall continue
the struggle for all Jews to leave
Continued on Page &
0\


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 27, 1987
Historian Arad in Painful
Description of Death 'Factory'
EMBRACING HIS SON, John Demjanjuk
gazes at John Jr. moments before Demjanjuk's
trial opened Monday (Feb. 16) in a Jerusalem
court. Demjanjuk, a former auto worker from
Refusenik's
Condition
Improves
TORONTO (JTA) The con-
dition of recently released long-
time refusenik Leah Maryasin is
much better than doctors here
first believed. Physicians at
Toronto General Hospital
originally feared that Maryasin,
61, was suffering from multiple
myeloma upon being admitted last
week. However, Dr. Michael
Baker, head of the hospital's
cancer treatment and research
program, said that original
diagnosis has been changed.
Baker told the Canadian Jews
News that Maryasin is suffering
from skin plasmacytomas, a much
more common variant of the
disease. She can be treated with
oral medication, and is expected
to enjoy several years of good
health, he said.
Hussein
Meets Assad
Jordan's King Hussein met
with Syrian President Hafez
Assad last week in Damascus
to discuss the current situation
in Lebanon (Jordan Television,
Feb. 10). In Washington, State
Department officials asserted
that Jordan needed to mobilize
its I-Hawk anti-aircraft missile
batteries to defend against a
threat from Syria.
AP/Wide World Photo
Cleveland, Ohio, went on trial on charges that
he tortured and gassed 850,000 Jews in World
War II in Treblinka concentration camp.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
An historian of the
Holocaust, Dr. Yitzhak
Arad, presented a detailed
description of the "death
factory" at Treblinka Tues-
day (Feb. 17), the second
day of the trial of John Dem-
janjuk, the alleged
Treblinka guard accused of
war crimes.
Arad, the director of the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Memorial in
Jerusalem, told the Jerusalem
District Court how nearly 900,000
Jews were put to death in the gas
chambers. At the height of the
operation, some 15,000 victims
were killed at Treblinka every
day.
At one point, Arad said, the
three gas chambers at the exter-
mination camp were unable to
cope with the load, and many vic-
tims died of exposure and other
causes while they were kept
waiting in packed railroad freight
cars.
THE THREE-JUDGE court
overruled an objection by Demjan-
juk's American attorney, Mark
O'Connor, that the historv of the
Holocaust should not be presented
at the trial. But the case hinges on
the positive identification of Dem-
janjuk, a Ukrainian-born former
automobile worker in Cleveland,
Ohio, as the Treblinka guard
known to inmates as "Ivan the
Terrible" because of his brutality.
O'Connor contends that the ac-
cused is not the Treblinka Ivan
and in fact never was in
Treblinka. According to the
defense, Demjanjuk became a
German prisoner of war in 1942,
and "at no time during the war
was he at any concentration or ex-
termination camp."
The trial opened Monday (Feb.
16) in a converted movie house,
but the 300-seat hall was not full!
Haim Guri, Israel's national poet,
reported in Davar. He noted that
this was in stark contrast to the
trial here in 1961 of Adolf
Eichmann, the principal organizer
of the "Final Solution," the mass
murder of European Jews.
Guri suggested m his commen-
tary that Israel may be too involv-
ed with itself and its current pro-
blems to bear the pain of reliving
the Holocaust. Labor MK Shevah
Weiss, a Holocaust survivor and,
Continued on Page 6-
Some Of Us Will
Be Pampered
This Passover.
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1
Reaganites Strain
Friday, February 27. 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
But Shamir Says No to Int'l. Talks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion tried to persuade Israeli
Premier Yitzhak Shamir,
who arrived in Washington
last Tuesday (Feb. 17), to
consider an international
conference if it would lead
to direct negotiations.
"The United States believes it is
important to explore all possible
approaches to direct negotiations,
to see whether any of these, in-
cluding an international con-
ference, would lead immediately
to direct negotiations," a senior
Administration official said.
Shamir said in Israel prior to his
departure that he would try to
dissuade the U.S. from consider-
ing an international conference, a
position in which he differs with
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
with whom he traded jobs last Oc-
tober as part of the national unity
government agreement.
THIS WAS Shamir's first visit
to Washington since becoming
Premier, although he was here
several times as Foreign Minister.
His last visit as Premier under the
old Likud government was in
November, 1983.
The Administration official,
briefing reporters on the Shamir
visit, called him an "old friend"
who was here to renew his
"already close personal relation-
ship" with President Reagan and
Secretary of State George Shultz.
Shamir met with Shultz shortly
after his arrival and then held a
second meeting with Shultz in the
afternoon. He was scheduled to
have a breakfast meeting with
Shultz Wednesday before going to
the White House for a meeting
and working lunch with Reagan.
The U.S. official said topics of
discussions during Shamir's
three-day visit here included
U.S.-Israel relations, the peace
process, the Israeli economy,
Soviet Jewry and international
terrorism.
THE IRAN arms deal and the
case of Jonathan Pollard, the
former civilian Navy employee
who has confessed to spying for
Israel, were expected to come up,
but neither was "an important
focus of the discussions," the of-
ficial stressed.
He said the U.S. "understands"
the positions of both Shamir and
King Hussein of Jordan on an in-
ternational conference. Hussein
has said that he needs an interna-
tional conference as an "um-
brella" for talks with Israel.
Shamir charged last week that
an international conference is an
"Arab-Soviet idea" where Israel
would be isolated and subject to
demands that it return to its 1967
border.
State Department deputy
spokesman Phyllis Oakley said
that any international conference
"would have to be agreed to by
the parties themselves. Whatever
the format, it should lead im-
mediately to direct negotiations
and should not interfere with
those negotiations."
TniS POSITION was reaffirm
ed by the Administration official
Tuesday. "We are convinced that
face-to-face discussions on the
hard issue of the Arab-Israeli con-
flict and proposals for their
peaceful resolution is the only way
to achieve a peace that will be
lasting and fair to all the parties,"
he said.
Peres has argued that an inter-
national conference is the only
way to bring Jordan into the
negotiations. However, as for
Hussein's demand that the five
permanent members of the
United Nations Security Council
participate, Peres has stressed
that the Soviet Union could not
participate in Mideast peace talks
until it restores diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel and allows Soviet
Jews to freely emigrate.
This was the same position
taken by the U.S. and reconfirmed
by the Administration official
Tuesday.
However, he stressed that a Jor-
danian delegation to negotiations
with Israel would have to include
Palestinians. He noted that the
makeup of the Palestinian
representatives was one of the
issues discussed. Israel has made
it clear it will not talk to members
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
THE OFFICIAL noted that
Setting the Record Straight
A story featuring Temple Israel's Cantor Rachelle Nelson in
last week's issue of The Jewish Floridian incorrectly identifies
Cantor Nelson as the daughter of Miami's distinguished im-
presaria Judy Drucker. In fact, she is the Cantor's aunt.
Cantor Nelson's mother is Sarah A. Nelson, a well-known
music teacher in the Greater Miami area for the past 30 years.
The Jewish Floridian regrets the error.
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212-594-0836 800-221-2791
Shamir, as have previous Israeli
leaders, was expected to urge the
Administration to make it man-
datory that Soviet Jewish
emigrants go directly to Israel
and not be free to immigrate to
the U.S. But the official said the
U.S. still supports the position of
"freedom of choice."
The official confirmed that
Israel, like Japan and Australia,
has been given the status of "of-
ficial major non-NATO ally." This
will allow Israel to bid on Defense
Department research and
development contracts. Given
Israel's "high technological
capabilities" it should be in a
"good position to compete" for
these contracts, the official said.
54 Jews Detained
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Sudanese authorities have recent-
ly detained 54 Ethiopian Jews
who crossed the border into
Sudan, according to a Sudanese
newspaper which was quoted here
by Al Hamishmar. The Sudanese
paper, All-Ittihad Al-Asbui,
reported that the supervisor of
refugee affairs in Sudan said the
country's security authorities will
continue to hold the Ethiopian
Jews until a decision is made
regarding their fate. There has
been no independent confirmation
of the detention.
LIOR HOD, a resident of Atlanta, and a junior at Yeshiva
University in New York, goes for his 1,000th point as a member of
the Yeshiva University Maccabees. Hod, a 6 '5" forward and co-
captain of this year's team, crossed the 1,000 mark in a game
against Stevens Tech at the University's Max Stern Athktic
Center. The Maccabees won that game 67-61, with Hod scoring 22
points and taking his career total to 1002. His brother, Ayal Hod,
however, led the scoring during the game with 2U points. Lior Hod
is a junior majoring in computer science.
Spring Break
for Senior
* Citize
Now, let SeaEscape take you on a day cruise
for just $69.
Our price includes port charges,
three generous meals, and round-
trip motorcoach transportation
from numerous locations in
Broward, Dade and Palm Beach
Counties including all major hotels.
Our Senior's fare, 55 years and
older is normally $89. But for the
months of April, May and June
we're giving Senior Citizens a
Spring Break. We've reduced this
price to a low $69. Every departure,
seven days a week, subject to space
availability.
SeaEscape departs Miami every day
at 8:30 a.m., spend the afternoon
in Freeport/Lucaya and return to
Miami at 11:00 p.m. You'll get all
the magic of a longer cruise in just
one day. Dine and dance. Relax by
the pool. Play bingo. Take in the
SeaEscape revue. Big band every
Monday. You can do as much or
as little as you like.
And when your club or homeowners
association books a group of 40 or
more, we'll take $5 more off each
fare and provide a special motor-
coach to/from most points of your
choice in Broward, Dade or Palm
Beach Counties.
So don't miss our special Senior
Citizen's Spring Break. See your
travel agent today or call SeaEscape
at 1-800-432-0900 or in Dade
County, 379-0000. SeaEscape
accepts American Express, Visa
and MasterCard.
^
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cruise to the Bahamas. 0
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i


Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 27, 1987
Brotherhood Dinner
A Happy Occasion
The 35th annual Brotherhood Awards din-
ner of the National Conference of Christians
and Jews Saturday evening at the Omni In-
ternational Hotel promises to be a happy oc-
casion when men and women of our multi-
ethnic community will come together to
honor three distinguished representatives of
their religious faiths in South Florida.
This year's Silver Medallion honorees
from the Protestant, Catholic and Jewish
faiths, respectively, are Larry Adams,
Carlos Arboleya and Cal Kovens.
Because of his concern for refugees in our
community, an NCCJ Distinguished Com-
munity Service Award will be bestowed on
the Most Rev. Edward A. McCarthy, Ar-
chbishop of Miami. And ABC-TV anchor and
senior editor, Peter Jennings, will be
presented with the NCCJ National
Headliner Award and be featured speaker of
the evening.
The 200th anniversary of the United
States Constitution, being celebrated this
year, provides the occasion for America to
invest in the stability and vitality of the con-
stitutional process and to "sign on" to our
democratic way of life begun in Philadelphia
in 1787.
The National Conference of Christians
and Jews annual Brotherhood Awards din-
ner Saturday night will therefore be a splen-
did time for hardworking individuals in our
community, not only at their various profes-
sions and occupations but also in the cause of
that most noble of human aspirations,
brother-and-sisterhood, to relax and pay
homage to those who best symbolize the
highest ideals of their efforts.
Link to New World
The Jewish Forward, a Yiddish-language
newspaper published in New York, is now
celebrating its 90th anniversary. There are
few newspapers in the world, in any
language, that have achieved this record.
It is to help celebrate this 90th anniver-
sary that a gathering was scheduled Thurs-
day noon this week at the Seville Beach
Hotel.
Few are the older members of the
American Jewish community who cannot
join in spirit with this gathering to
remember their parents and grandparents
pouring over what was then called the
Jewish Daily Forward the Vorwerts as
well as other Jewish immigrants who came
from eastern Europe to America to be guid-
ed by that newspaper's columns in their new
life in a strange land.
For it was in the Vorwerts that they
discovered the meaning of the customs and
culture of their new world and how to
become an integral part of it.
Kahane's Radical Views
Rabbi Meir Kahane won a round in his
struggle to regain his American citizenship
when a New York judge ruled in his favor
this week. But with Kahane's sense of cer-
tainty that, one day, he will be Prime
Minister of Israel, we wonder why he should
care.
Recent political polls in Israel suggest
that, at least at this time, his view of the
future are not so far-fetched. What the polls
do not suggest, their numbers apart, is the
frustration of the Israeli electorate over the
possibility of a peaceful solution to their
Arab problem.
While the results of the poll-taking may
reflect the frustrations, they can hardly ex-
plain them. For Rabbi Kahane is nothing if
not violently threatening to the future of
Israel's Arab population. How can threats
advance peace?
Certainly, the American Jewish communi-
ty sees this. As early as in 1986, a total of 12
national Jewish agencies and organizations
drafted with the help of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory Council a
statement of "abhorrence of (Kahane's)
policies, goals and practices: namely, his op-
position to democracy in Israel in favor of
Torah law as he interprets it and applies it to
his program to disenfranchise if not entirely
expel Israel's Arabs.
It is precisely to underscore this Kahane
agenda, as well as to see how it works in his
view of Cardinal John O'Connor's trip to
Israel last month, that we feature his
analysis of the relations between the Roman
Catholic Church and Israel on our Op-Ed
Page this week.
His radical views, especially on this latter
subject, are in many ways as self-defeating
and as offensive as is his political agenda.
But to understand the man, we must know
him fully. And we must understand him if
only because of those disauieting polls that
showed Kahane's view of his role in Israel's
future as not so far-fetched.
New Jewish Center
With South Florida's incredible population
growth in recent years has come a parallel
growth in the Jewish community. Now, that
growth in the South Dade County area will
culminate in groundbreaking Sunday for a
new Jewish Community Center.
For Territories
To emphasize the multi-generation
character of South Dade Jewry's explosion,
from tots to their doting grandparents, a
human rainbow of representatives will be
featured on the program.
The new South Dade Jewish Center envi-
sions an ambitious array of facilities for a
community whose numbers are still
expanding.
Human Rights Mean State of War
By JUDITH COLP
Human rights in Israel
continue to be marked by a
"state of war" within the
occupied territories, accor-
ding to a senior State
Department official.
Richard Schifter, Assistant
Secretary of State for Human
Rights and Humanitarian Affairs,
made his comments Thursday
(Feb. 19) at a briefing on the State
Department's 1986 "Country
Reports on Human Rights Prac-
tices," presented annually to the
Congress. The report assesses
human rights conditions in all
countries that are members of the
United Nations.
Schifter described Israel as a
democratic state which, like other
democratic states, has its "defi-
ciencies and strengths."
ISRAEL'S "complex human
rights situation in the occupied
territories reflects the fact that, in
the absence of a peace settlement,
the territories remain under
military administration and there
is friction between occupation
authorities and the Palestinian
population," the report stated.
"Among the signs of friction are
active resistance to the occupa-
tion, including episodes of
violence, sometimes encouraged
by outside extremist groups."
The Human Rights report noted
that this friction "arises from
security measures taken by Israel,
advocacy of annexation of perma-
nent control of the territories by
some Israeli political figures, as
well as the refusal of the main
Palestinian organization to
recognize Israel or to promote a
negotiated peace."
However both Arab and Jewish
residents suffered somewhat
fewer violent acts in 1986 com-
pared to 1985. The report said the
Palestine Liberation Organization
"factions and various PLO dissi-
dent groups claimed responsibility
for nearly all violent acts against
the IDF (Israel Defense Force),
Israeli civilians, or Palestinians
who disagreed with such groups.
Most of the violence appears,
however, to have been spon-
taneous and local."
HUMAN RIGHTS abuses
against Jews in other Middle East
countries were less frequent than
against other religious groups,
although discrimination remains,
according to the report.
In Syria, the 3,000-4,000 Jews
are allowed to practice their
religion and "enjoy a relatively
high standard of living, access to
higher education and entrance in-
to the professions," the report
noted. But Syrian Jews are also
bound by restrictions of foreign
travel and religious training is
prohibited.
In Iraq, where the Jewish com-
munity totals only 400, there is
"no evidence of persecution," the
report says.
In Morocco, Jews, with a
population of 10,000, are promi-
nent in the business and govern-
ment, and operate schools and
social institutions, according to
the report. King Hassan II's
meeting with then Premier
Shimon Peres showed his support
for a Jewish community abroad.
TUNISIAN JEWS are permit-
ted to practice their religion free-
ly, according to the report,
although during periods of tension
synagogues and Jewish-owned
shops have been attacked. But in
1985, after the raid on PLO head-
quarters, the government took
"extraordinary measures to pro-
tect the Jewish community."
In the Yemen Arab Republic,
there are no synagogues, but Jews
are permitted to worship freely,
according to the report. They are
not permitted to communicate
with Jews in Israel.
Ethiopian Jews suffer economic
discrimination, the report stated
although "the stories of genocidai
actions by Ethiopian authorities
or of highly brutal behavior
toward Ethiopian Jews has not
been substantiated by American
visitors to the area."
In Egypt, the small Jewish com-
munity "appears to practice their
faith without restriction or
harassment."
In Argentina, which boasts the
largest Jewish community in
South America, occasional anti-
Semitic incidents occur, the
report said. Legislation providing
penalties for racial, religious and
other form of discrimination has
been passed by the executive
branch and the House and is
awaiting approval by the Senate.
IN HUNGARY, with a Jewish
population of 100,000, the first
new synagogue since 1945 opened
in June, the report states. But
when a number of young people
held informal meetings to discuss
Jewish culture, "the sponsors
were told to desist by the police,"
added the report.
Jews fare somewhat better in
Czechoslovakia, where there are
two Jewish community councils
financially supported and controll-
ed by the government, according
to the report, as well as
synagogues and a Jewish museum
in Prague. However there are no
Jewish schools.
In Rumania, whose government
has permitted an active Jewish
community, there were several
anti-Semitic incidents last year,
including demolition of a major
synagogue by the government and
"anti-Semitic overtones in two re-
cent publications," noted the
report. However, when fire
damaged a synagogue, the
government convicted and im-
Continued on Page 11
FlorCmaN
FREDSMOCHEr
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28SHEVAT5747
Number 8
_


Organizations
Friday, February 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
AMIT WOMEN
Amit Women, Beersheva
Chapter will meet on March 11 at
the American Savings Bank,
Kings Point, Delray Beach at
12:30 p.m. Rose Rifkin, a renown-
ed lecturer will be guest speaker
for the afternoon. Refreshments
will be served. All are welcome.
B'NAI B'RITH
Over 200 members of eight
chapters of B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization are participating in
the 1987 Flag Football season.
B'nai Israel of Hollywood and
Genesis of North Miami Beach are
tied for first place at 5-0. L'Chaim
of Boca Raton is in second place
with 3-2.
Jacob Lodge 3246, B'nai
B'rith, will conduct its monthly
membership breakfast meeting on
Tuesday, March 3, 9:30 a.m., at its
permanent headquarters, Temple
Anshei Shalom of West Delray,
7099 West Atlantic Ave., one mile
east of Florida Turnpike, Delray
Beach, Exit 32. The public is
invited.
An Insurance executive will
speak on the various types of in-
surance available to senior
citizens, including Medicare Sup-
plement ana Catastrophic illness
Insurance.
Jacob Lodge is the newest B'nai
B'rith organization formed in the
Delray area, and is open for
membership to all local residents.
B'nai B'rith members who are
part-time Florida residents are in-
vited to attend meetings and join
with local friends and neighbors.
For further information contact
Jack M. Levine at 498-1564.
WASHINGTON BALLET TO
PERFORM AT FAU
The Washington Ballet, based in
the District of Columbia, will per-
form on March 13 at 8 p.m. in the
Florida Atlantic University
Center Auditorium. The
internationally-acclaimed com-
pany will present the final event
in FAU's Student Government
Program Board 1986-87 Special
Events Series.
To help defray the cost of this
fine entertainment, the FAU
Foundation is offering a limited
number of tickets for preferred
seating for this event at $24 per
person, half of which is tax deduc-
tible. These tickes can be obtained
from the FAU Foundation Office,
Room 383 of the Administration
Building, 393-3010.
Other tickets at $12 per person,
$6 for children 12 and under, are
available at the University Center
Ticket office, 393-3758.
Tickets for FAU faculty and
staff and alumni are $8 each. FAU
students will be admitted at no
charge.
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel, the oldest
National Jewish Fraternal and
Benefit Order in the U.S., has em-
barked on a membership drive at
Delray Beach Lodge No. 224 and
Boca Raton Lodge No. 229.
Membership benefits include
Scholarship Funds for members,
wives and children, special blood
bank, a Social Action Committee,
low cost life insurance, placement
for ailing members to convales-
cent facilities and a wide range of
service oriented activities in-
cluding a toy drive for handicap-
ped children.
For more information, call Max
Rosenbaum (Delray Beach Lodge)
at 499-3696 or Harry Steinfeld
(Boca Raton Lodge) at 483-6272.
NAAMATUSA
Na'Amat-USA, Shoshonna
Club of Delray Villas will hold a
general meeting on Monday at
9:30 a.m. in the Clubhouse of
Delray Villas, located on Circular
Drive, Delray Beach. A mini-
breakfast will be served.
At that time an interesting slide
show will be presented.
For information call Roz
Friedland, 495-1029.
MAE VOLEN
SENIOR CENTER
Beginning Saturday, March 7,
from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., there will be
Duplicate Bridge for novices.
Beginning Sunday, March 8
from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. there will be
Duplicate Bridge.
The cost for both events is $2
per person for a session. Contact
Joanne Weppner, 395-8920, for
information.
The Second Annual Senior
Follies will be presented by Irene
Bagdon, "The Singing Lady" on
Tuesday, March 3 at 2 p.m. The
Heritage Park High Notes will
lead off the program follwed by a
musical afternoon of song and
dance. The free program will be
held at the Mae Volen Senior
Center.
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6 cups all-purpose flour
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Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 27, 1987
Shamir Vows
Israel Will Respond to Questions on Iran-Contras
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Shamir stressed Thursday
(Feb. 19) that the Israeli
government "will respond
to every question and re-
quest to clarification" from
Congressional committees
investigating the Iran-
Contra affair.
"It will become clear that Israel
acted in accordance with its
obligations as a friend and ally of
the United States," he said in
response to a question after his
address at a luncheon of the Na-
tional Press Club.
DURING HIS speech before
some 300 persons, Shamir
declared that "Israel was not in-
volved in any way in the diversion
of funds (from the sale of
American arms to Iran) to Con-
tras." He maintained that Israel's
participation in the sale of arms to
Iran was a result of its belief that
Iran is a strategically important
country and there is a need to in-
fluence its policies.
After Shamir met with some 60
members of Congress Wednes-
day, Sen. Daniel Inouye (D.,
Hawaii) and Rep. Lee Hamilton
(D., Ind.), chairmen of the Senate
and House special committees in-
vestigating the Iran affair, said
the Israelis agreed to answer
questions in writing and submit a
chronology of Israeli financial
transactions and contacts with
Iran.
Shamir refused to answer any
specific questions Thursday, such
as whether President Reagan ap-
proved Israel's sale of arms to
Iran in 1985. There has been a
conflict in testimony on whether
Reagan authorized the sale or not.
Asked whom he expected to win
the Iran-Iraq war, Shamir shrugg-
ed his shoulders and replied, "I
realize I come from Jerusalem,
but I am not a prophet."
HE SAID it was a "silly war"
which "no one understands the
reason" for, but which could con-
tinue for years. He said Iran has
the advantage in manpower and
Iraq in sophisticated arms, but it
would be "a disaster" if either
side won.
According to Israeli sources,
Shamir was not asked any tough
questions during his meeting with
the members of Congress. But he
got those questions at the Na-
tional Press Club luncheon.
Asked about the case of
lunathan Pollard, the former
mlian Navy employee who is
iwaiting sentencing after
puiiding guilty to spying for
Israel, he again said this was a
painful experience" for Israel.
H- stressed the operation was
<>h Israelis "against the policy" of the
Israeli government. "We regret it
very much," he added. He said
Israel cooperated with the in-
vestigation and now that the caw
is in the L'.S courts. Israel "has
PRIME MINISTER SHAMIR: With Reagan in Washington in
1984.
nothing to say about it."
Asked about Israel investing or
divesting in South Africa, Shamir
replied: "We are looking for in-
vestments in Israel. We are look-
ing for investments of Jewish peo-
ple coming from South Africa to
Israel." Shamir stressed that
Israel opposes apartheid, but in its
relations with that country it must
take "into consideration" the ex-
istence of an "important Jewish
community."
He said Israel is a "small coun-
try" and cannot lead the struggle
against apartheid. But he added,
Israel's dealings with South
Africa are less than those of many
black African and West European
countries.
In his address. Shamir repeated
his opposition to an international
conference which King Hussein of
Jordan wants to precede negotia-
tions with Israel. He said the ideas
were inspired by the Soviet
Union, which wants to play a "ma-
jor role" in the Mideast.
Shamir added that he would ac-
cept an international conference
that would include only Jordan,
Egypt, Palestinians and the U.S.
HE AGAIN urged Jordan to
agree to "face-to-face" negotia-
tions, "if not in the region, which
would be the most desirable, then
right here in Washington or at
Camp David."
Shamir said the U.S. can play
host because it is "interested in
peace and stability" in the
Mideast and has "excellent rela-
tions" with both Israel and
Jordan.
At the same time, Shamir said
that despite his criticism of the
Soviet Union, "we are interested
in improving relations with Soviet
Russia." He said it was not "nor-
mal" for the USSR to reject
diplomatic relations with Israel.
He said that the first topic he
would discuss with Soviet officials
is Jewish emigration.
ON WEDNESDAY night (Feb.
18), Shamir called for an end to
the policy of providing "homeless
refugee" status for Soviet Jewish
immigrants that allows them to go
to the United States and other
countries rather than Israel.
"We are most anxious to put an
end to the dropout phenomenon,
which has caused much harm," he
Historian
Testifies
Continued from Page 2-
like the defendant, born in the
Ukraine, attended the opening of
the trial.
"I WAS in shock. I imagined
him (Demjanjuk) killing butcher-
ing, strangling," he told reporters
afterwards, recalling his
childhood ordeal hidden away
with his immediate family by
"Righteous Gentiles," while other
relatives were murdered.
But Weiss admitted to doubts as
to whether the man in the
prisoner's dock was indeed "Ivan
the Terrible." Whereas "there
was no uncertainty" about
Eichmann's guilt, "now the uncer-
tainty eats away at me," he said.
WINTER
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told some 600 Jewish leaders from
the U.S. and Canada at an Israel
Bond dinner at the Capitol Hilton
Hotel.
During his three days of
meetings with the Reagan Ad-
ministration, Shamir has urged
that the U.S. no longer grant
refugee status to Soviet Jews
since their Soviet visas are for im-
migration to Israel.
But Administration officials
have rejected this plea, arguing
that the U.S. supports "freedom
of choice."
"In Israel they are free to apply
for a permit to go to any country
of their choice," Shamir stressed
to the Bond leaders. "Our State
was not established for the pur-
pose of enabling the transfer of
Jews from one dispersion to
another."
Noting that there are "rumors"
of a change for the better in the
Soviet emigration policy, the
Premier said so far there is "no
confirmation" of this. "We have
to redouble our efforts to get the
Soviet Union to let our people go
and to do it right now," he said.
Peres Agrees Differences With
Likud Are Extremely 'Serious'
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres
acknowledged Monday that
his differences with Premier
Yitzhak Shamir over an in-
ternational conference for
Middle East peace are
"substantive and serious."
Everyone agrees on the need
for direct negotiations, and only
an international conference could
create the framework for such
negotiations, Peres said during a
visit to a Jerusalem school.
Shamir, for his part, has denounc-
ed an international conference as
a "Soviet-Arab notion" which
could lead to Israel's isolation.
DURING HIS visit to
Washington last week, Shamir
urged the Reagan Administration
to oppose such a forum in which
the Soviet Union, as a permanent
member of the United Nations
Security Council, would par-
ticipate. Shamir returns from the
U.S. later this week.
The sharp divergence between
the two leaders of the Labor-
Likud unity government has rais-
ed speculation that a coalition
crisis is imminent. It may be trig-
gered when Peres meets with
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak in Cairo shortly. Their
last meeting, in Alexandria in
September, when Peres was
Premier, ended with an agree-
ment to prepare the groundwork
for an international conference.
Meanwhile, Labor and Likud
are accusing each other of seeking
to end the coalition. Labor charg-
ed that Shamir's tough stand in
Foreign Minister Shamir
Washington against an interna-
tional conference was aimed at
early elections.
LIKUD COUNTERED that
this was Peres' intention when he
criticized the Premier while he is
still overseas.
Labor Party Secretary General
Uzi Baram said in a radio inter-
view Sunday that the party and
Peres indeed favor elections now
because Israel was missing oppor-
tunities for peace.
Strauss Appointed
NEW YORK (JTA) Ina
Strauss of New York has been ap-
pointed director of the Israel Pro-
gram Center of the American
Zionist Youth Foundation.
i
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V


Behind the Trial
Friday, February 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Legal Arguments To Shield Demjanjuk's Identity
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The trial of John Demjanjuk
opened in Jerusalem
District Court last week
(Feb. 16) and immediately
became embroiled in legal
argument over the defen-
dant's identity and the
court's right to try him.
Demjanjuk's American at-
torney, Mark O'Connor, maintain-
ed that the accused is not the
former Treblinka death camp
guard who was known to the in-
mates as "Ivan the Terrible"
because of his brutality and who
was held responsible for the
deaths in the gas chambers of
850,000 Jews and thousands of
Gypsies.
FURTHERMORE. O'Connor
insisted, the Ukrainian-born
retired automobile worker from
Cleveland, Ohio, is a victim of
evidence fabricated in the Soviet
Union, the victim of a KGB plot;
and that he was extradited from
the U.S. on a murder charge but is
now being charged with war
crimes, crimes against humanity
and crimes against the Jewish
people.
O'Connor also challenged
Israel's right to bring him to trial
because the alleged crimes were
not committed on Israel's soil,
Labor, Likud Agreement
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Likud and the Labor Party were
reported to have reached an
understanding last week that
might result in approval of the 33
billion Shekel ($23.8 billion) na-
tional budget scheduled for its
first reading in the Knesset. But
the fate of the budget still ap-
peared to hinge on how the coali-
tion partners will act on several
matters in dispute between them.
Ross Perot, the Texas
businessman, will be guest of
honor at a dinner on Mar. k in
New York that will benefit
Shaare Zedek Medical Center
in Jerusalem and the scholar-
ship programs of the Raoul
Wallenberg Committee of the
United States. Perot is the
founder of the Dallas-based
Electronic Data Systems
Corp.
Demjanjuk
Fingered
Continued from Page 1-
66-year-old Demjanjuk, a
Ukrainian-born former
automobile worker from
Cleveland, Ohio, who is the first
suspected Nazi war criminal ex-
tradited to Israel.
Epstein's putative identification
was greeted by resounding ap-
plause from the spectators. But-
the court promptly restored
order. Epstein insisted that he
could never forget the images of
Treblinka, particularly the brutal
'van, who operated the gas
chambers.
"I see Ivan every night ... I
dream about him every night... I
cannot rid myself," the witness
declared, trembling and in tears
as Demjanjuk's American at-
torney, Mark O'Connor, cross-
examined him in an attempt to
prove his memory was faulty.
EPSTEIN BROKE down
several times, notably when he
recalled seeing a 12-year-old girl
emerge miraculously alive from
gas chamber. "She came out
speaking. The people who took the
bodies out of the gas chambers
made her sit at the side, and her
words still ring in my ears," Eps-
tein said. They were Yakktze
mother."
One question that remains open
is whether financial aid for the
Labor-affiliated United Kibbutz
Movement will be approved
before the Knesset vote and
whether Likud MKs will endorse
it even if a parallel proposal for
aid to Jewish settlements in the
West Bank is not on the agenda.
were not committed against
Israeli citizens, and were not com-
mitted by a citizen of Israel.
Judge Don Levin, president of
the three-judge panel hearing the
case, enjoined O'Connor repeated-
ly to confine himself strictly to the
matter of jurisdiction and to leave
the question of identity to a later
stage, after the prosecution has
presented its evidence.
BUT O'Connor insisted that the
issues were intertwined, and the
court allowed him to present his
arguments on both jurisdiction
and substantial proof. In addition
to Levin, who is a Justice of the
Supreme Court, the panel consists
of two Jerusalem District Court
judges, Dalia Dorner and Zvi Tal.
The U.S. Immigration and
Naturalization Service (INS)
began legal proceedings in 1977 to
strip Demjanjuk of his American
citizenship on grounds that he lied
about his collaboration with the
Nazis when he entered the U.S. In
1984 he was ordered deported as a
suspected war criminal. He was
extradited to Israel for trial in
February 1986, a year almost to
the day before the opening of his
trial.
The courtroom is a 300-seat con-
verted cinema house. Its gallery
was packed Monday with local and
foreign reporters and television
camera crews. The 66-year-old
Demjanjuk, father of two, entered
the prisoner's dock flanked by two
policemen. He wore an ill-fitting
brown suit and waved to the
spectators.
SEATED DIRECTLY behind
him was his son, John Demjanjuk
Jr., and a Ukrainian Orthodox
cleric, Bishop Antony, who came
from the U.S. to attend the early
state of the trial and offer his
assistance to the defendant.
Ukrainian-American gi oups are
believed to be financing Demjan-
juk's defense.
The trial is expected to last at
least three months. The pro-
ceedings are conducted in Hebrew
and translated simultaneously in-
to English and Ukrainian. At-
torney O'Connor's words are
translated from English to
Hebrew by an interpreter at his
side.
His assertion that the charges
brought against Demjanjuk are in-
consistent with the charge of
murder on which he was ex-
tradited from the U.S. was rebut-
ted by State Attorney Yona Blatt-
man, who noted that the
American courts and the U.S.
Department of Justice were fully
aware of the crimes that Israel at-
tributes to Demjanjuk and
therefore the legal technicalities
of the charge sheet were not
relevant.
Blattman is assisted by State
Attorneys Dennis Goldman,
Michael Shaked and Michael
Horovitz. O'Connor has an Israeli
lawyer, Yoram Sheftel, assisting
him on points of Israeli law.
Sheftel told reporters before the
trial opened that he was "eager to
do battle" because he is convinced
Demjanjuk is a victim of mistaken
identity. He said he would not
have taken the case otherwise.
A DECLARED purpose of the
trial is to acquaint the younger
generation of Israelis with the ter-
rible realities of the Holocaust.
The Israel Defense Force and the
Education Ministry plan to bring
soldiers and high school students
to attend the sessions, which will
be held four days a week.
LENDER'S AND PHILLY,
A BREAKFAST TRADITION
SINCE 1927
For nearly 60 years sitting
down to a breakfast of Lender's
Bagels and PHILADELPHIA
BRAND Cream Cheese has
been a delicious tradition.
Recognized as the first
name in bagels since 1927,
the Lender family tradition of
quality still exists today in the
baking of their bagels-guar-
anteeing that every variety
has a taste and texture
second to none In just
minutes. Lenders
Bagels toast up crispy
on the outside and soft
and chewy on the inside,
ready to be spread with either
plain PHILLY or one of the
tempting fruit or vegetable fla-
vors. And because PHILLY
has half the calories of butter
or margarine, you can enjoy
this satisfying combination
everyday.
And, of course, both are
certified Kosher.
So if you want
to enjoy a tradition
tomorrow, pick up
the Lenders and
Soft PHILLY today.
[KRAFT]
C tflMKrtft Inc
J


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 27, 1987
Iosif Begun
In Moscow After Soviets Release Him
Continued from Page 1
the Soviet Union." Begun said he
had not yet heard from Soviet
authorities regarding a visa to
leave for Israel.
The Beguns were surprised to
hear from Tepper that Iosif Begun
had appeared on American televi-
sion. He sounded amazed at the
amount of attention he has receiv-
ed in the world press.
BORIS BEGUN, who was sup-
posed to have served 15 days' im-
prisonment for demonstrating in
Moscow on behalf of his father,
was saved the experience.
Iosif Begun, 56, was sentenced
in October 1983 to seven years'
imprisonment and five years' in-
ternal exile. Since his incarcera-
tion, he has been a focus of ac-
tivities and statements by Soviet
Jewry activists and by public
figures around the world.
In Jerusalem, Soviet Jewry ac-
tivists were elated over the
release of dissident Iosif Begun
from prison, but highly skeptical
of any fundamental change in
Soviet policy toward emigration
and refuseniks.
Haim Chessler, head of the
Public Council for Soviet Jewry,
said at a press conference that it
was as hard as ever for Soviet
Jews to get exit visas.
"ON ONE hand we see a bit of
change, but on the other hand we
get information that families get
refusals until the year 2000," he
said.
Yuri Stern of the Soviet Jewry
Information Center thought
Begun's release was significant
because it demonstrated the effec-
tiveness of the Western campaign
to free him. But he expressed ap-
prehension that Begun"s friends
in the USSR would "pay for his
release" by being refused exit per-
mits themselves.
Settlement
Delayed
Joshua Greene
Susan Bell
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
TEL AVIV (JTA) Premier
Yitzhak Shamir said last week
that the dispute between Labor
and Likud over budgetary alloca-
tions to kibbutzim, development
towns and Jewish settlements in
the West Bank was delaying the
government's presentation of its
33 billion Shekel ($23.8 billion) na-
tional budget to the Knesset.
The budget, approved by the
Cabinet, was to have gone to the
Knesset for a vote last week.
SUSAN BELL
On Saturday, February 28,
Susan Deborah Bell, daughter of
Barbara and Dr. Jack A. Bell, will
be called to the Torah of Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bat
Mitzvah. Susan is an 8th grade
student at Boca Raton Academy
and attends the Temple Beth El
Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
simcha are her brothers, David
and Steven, and her grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Halperin of Lighthouse Point and
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bell of
Tamarac. Dr. and Mrs. Bell will
host a Kiddush in Susan's honor
following Shabbat Morning
Services.
JOSHUA GREENE
On Saturday, March 7 Joshua
David Greene, son of Laurie and
Dr. Jonathan Greene, will be call-
ed to the Torah of Temple Beth El
of Boca Raton as a Bar Mitzvah.
As an ongoing Temple project he
will be "Twinning" with Valensas
Glinskene of the Soviet Union.
Joshua is a 7th grade student at
Pine Crest School and attends the
Temple Beth El Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
simcha are his brother, Daniel, his
sister, Elizabeth as well as his
grandparents, Annalee and
Herbert Schwarz of Lake Worth
and Dora Greene of Paterson,
New Jersey. Dr. and Mrs. Greene
will host a kiddush in Joshua's
honor following Shabbat morning
services.
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Jerusalem of Gold
Two energetic housewives and mothers, Paula Norkin and
Joyce Robinson, with a great love for Israel, formed a company
called Jerusalem of Gold-JOG Tours.
Both women have been active in Jewish organizations as well
as their local synagogues, but felt a need to be productive and to
do what they could as individuals for the State of Israel. "What
better way to help Israel than to promote tourism to Israel. It is
so important for our generation and our children to visit and
develop a love and understanding of the Holyland," said Paula
Norkin.
"It was during my first trip to Israel ten years ago, that I
developed a strong attachment, returning many times since, and
sending hundreds of people to Israel from Florida," added Paula.
The women would like other Jewish families to appreciate and ex-
perience the same warm positive feelings.
Through their experience they have put together a unique trip
which can be enjoyed by all age groups.
"We feel the Jewish community here in South Florida wants
quality group trips originating from Miami direct to Tel Aviv,"
said Joyce Robinson. The wonderful friendships and attachments
made while touring Israel, often continues back home in Florida,
and friends are reunited during annual reunions.
One of the unique features of the tour include the composition
of the buses according to the ages of the children, families travel-
ing with grandparents, couples only, single adults, and young
adults. At all times the ages of the participants is a key factor in
making up the buses.
Many families come to Israel to celebrate a Mitzvah. Paula
and Joyce feel the Bar/Bat Mitzvah service on Massada is not a
substitute for one in Temple, but rather a reaffirmation of a
youngster's Judaic studies. Those celebrating a Bar/Bat Mitzvah
are given tapes to learn their Torah reading prior to departure,
and then rehearse with the rabbi the evening before the Massada
service. D
There are many memorable events during the two weeks in
Israel. A special memorial service at Yad Vashem, a kiddish on
Massada following the Bar/Bat Mitzvah services, and a farewell
gala dinner with Bar/Bat Mitzvah cake and candle lighting
ceremony.
JOG Tours is offering many departure dates to meet the in-
dividual needs of those in the South Florida community.
Prestigious organizations such as the Hebrew Home of Greater
Washington D.C. with over four thousand supporters, as well as
synagogues here in Florida are sponsoring this trip. JOG Tours
will include a Teen Tour to coincide with the August 1988 trip.
Paula and Joyce feel it is imperative for the growing Jewish
community in South Florida to support Israel, and visiting Israel
is by far the best support an American Jew can show. Rabbi Abba
Hillel Silver over forty years ago said, "that Jewish homelessness
was the principal source of our millennial tragedy. The only solu-
tion is to normalize the political status of the Jewish people in the
world by giving it a national basis in its national and historic
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Synagogue cAWs
Friday, February 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
CONGREGATION
ANSHEI EMUNA
SISTERHOOD
The Siaterhood of Congrega-
tion Anshei Eraana will met on
Tuesday, at the Shul at 16189
Carter Road, Delray Beach. A col-
lation will be served at noon. Mr.
Max Rubin will entertain us by
relating a saga of Israel and Yid-
dish humor.
The Sisterhood of Congregation
Anshei Emuna this year voted
that all ladies will be granted a
reprieve from cooking, and will
spend the entire Passover, April
13-27, at the Deauville Hotel. Br-
ing your family and friends. You
will enjoy the two Seders, and
three meals a day! Cost is $690
double occupancy, and includes
roundtrip transportation and
gratuities. The atmosphere will be
just like home! Call Nora Kaliah at
the Shul 499-9229 or 499-2644 for
your reservations.
senior at Spanish River High
School, has been wearing a metal
bracelet with Zelichonok's name
engraved upon it, similar to the
ones worn to remember American
POWs and MIAs. He has en-
couraged other teenagers to wear
the bracelets in solidarity with
Zelichonok and other Jews of the
Soviet Union. On Friday night,
Feb. 20, all the bracelets bearing
Alec's name that could be retriev-
ed were "retired" hung up on
the frame of the picture of Alec
and his wife, Galina, that is
displayed in the congregation.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
The Sisterhood of Temple An-
shei Shalom, Delray Beach, will
have a Rummage Sale March 8 at
9 a.m. in the parking lot of the
Fidelity Federal Bank, Atlantic
Ave., corner of Military Trail. For
more information call Selma
Creston, 498-1785 or Irma
Lissauer, 499-1198.
The Sisterhood of Congregation
Anshei Emuna is having a Purim
Party on March 15 at the Shul at
16189 Carter Road, Delray Beach
at noon. Come and see who will be
crowned "Queen Esther" this
year! Lunch will be served. Call
Harriet Herskowitz at 498-7568
or Nora Kaliah at 499-9229 or
499-2644 for your tickets.
The Sisterhood of Congregation
Anshei Emuna will be serving a
mini-lunch on March 17 at 11:30
a.m. at the congregation, 16189
Carter Road, Delray Beach.
Sylvia Riggs will review, "The
Rest of Us," by Seven Birm-
ingham. The cost is $3.50. Call
Ann Lakoff at 499-5584 or Nora
Kalish at 499-9229 or 499-2644.
TEMPLE ANSHEI EMUNA
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks of
Temple Anshei Emuna will
preach the Sermon on the theme
"Ki Tisa The Weekly Torah
Biblical Portion" at the Sabbath
Morning Service on Saturday,
March 21, at 8:30 a.m. Kiddush
will follow Service.
The Se'udat Shl'isht with the
Rabbi's D'var Torah in Yiddish
will be celebrated in conjunction
with the Sabbath Twilight Minyon
I Services.
Daily classes in the "Judaic
I Code of Religious Law" (Shulchan
Ouch) led by Rabbi Sacks, are at
7:30 a.m., preceeding the Daily
Morning Minyon Services and at 5
Ip.m., in conjunction with the Daily
|Twilight Minyon Services.
Mr. Harry Cope, Mrs. Lucille
ICohen, Dr. Nathan Jacobs and
IMrs. Nora Kalish are chairpersons
lof the Membership Committee.
|For further information call
199-9229.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
Roald (Alec) Zelichonok, 50, the
ingregation's adoptive refusenik
ind prisoner of conscience, who
had been imprisoned for teaching
'lebrew and "circulating anti-
sviet correspondence" in 1985,
'as released last weekend after
living served only half of a three
pear prison sentence.
Rabbi Richard Agler, spiritual
|eader of the congregation, Met
zelichonok in his Leningrad home
luring a trip to the USSR in 1983.
~he Rabbi has been making a
Special effort to secure his release
fever since.
Zelichonok suffers from several
erious health problems, including
[leart and kidney disease, and has
en unable to receive adequate
itment while in prison. Said
Jer, "We hope now that he has
en released, he'll be able to
rive the medical attention he
quires."
Mitchell Bertman. age 17 and a
Rabbi Pinchas Aloof of Temple
Anshei Shalom will speak on
"Higher Education" on Friday,
March 6, "Remembrance and
Purim's Lesson" on March 13,
"Eighteen Which Are Nineteen"
on March 20, and "The Resurrec-
tion" on March 27 during the Fri-
day night Sabbath Services. Can-
tor Louis Hershman and the Tem-
ple Liturgical Choir augment the
services each week.
An Oneg Shabbat follows
services.
Rabbi Aloof will interpret the
portion of "Terumah" on Satur-
day, March 7, "Teteaveh" on
March 14, "Kee Tissa" on March
21, and "Vay Akhel-Pekude" on
March 28 at Saturday Morning
Shabbat Services. A Kiddush
follows services.
At 5 p.m. each Saturday, Rabbi
Aloof conducts a special study
class durag Seudah Shelishi. The
public is invited.
Daily services are held at 8:30
a.m. and 5 p.m.
Temple Anshei Shalom will pre-
sent a program of entertainment
featuring three Superstars, Ed-
die, Connie and Mischa, Comedy
and Songs, Saturday at 8 p.m. in
the Temple Auditorium. Donation
is $5 per person.
The Temple ticket office is open
Monday through Thursday, 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. Phone 495-1300.
Temple Anshei Shalom of West
Delray is situated on West Atlan-
tic Avenue, one mile east of
Florida Turnpike, Delray Beach
Exit 32, or five miles west of 1-95,
Delray Beach, Atlantic Avenue
Exit.
Temple Anshei Shalom of West
Delray will sponsor the second
segment of the Theodore Herzel
Institute, 1987 Distinguished Lec-
ture Series. The first lecture in
this segment will be held at the
Temple, March 10, 10:30 a.m.,
and will continue for three addi-
tional Tuesdays, also at 10:30 a.m.
No admission fee.
Temple President Ben Simon
announced that the March 10 lec-
ture will be given by Journalist
Philip Warshofsky, with the sub-
jects, "Salute to Hadassah at 75,
Harmony with Bubby, and A New
World Symphony." ... With
Shalom Delray Chapter
Hadassah.
Hillel Foundation Director, Kari
Ellison, and Florida Atlantic
University students, will conduct
a symposium on "The Dilemma of
Intermarriage," and its effect on
the individual and the community
on March 17.
The March 24 lecture will be by
Louise Shure, Palm Beach County
Regional Director of the Anti-
Defamation League, with Head-
quarters in West Palm Beach. Her
subject will be, "The New Flori-
dians, Rockaway Beach to Delray
Beach."
March 31 will bring Judaic
Studies Educator Irving
Tobachnikov, with the lecture sub-
ject, "How Yiddish Became a
Mentch."
Rabbi Pinchas Aloof, Temple
Anshei Shalom Spiritual Leader,
will coordinate the Lecture Series
with Herzl Institute Director Is
Aronin.
For further informaton, contact
Jack M. Levine, public relations
vice president, at the Temple,
495-1300.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El Brotherhood
will hold its Second Annual Din-
ner Dance in honor of Alvin Cohen
on Thursday, March 5, at the
Sheraton of Boca Raton, located
near Town Center on Sheraton
Way.
Dinner, dancing and entertain-
ment are included in the $30 per
person charge, and a cash bar will
also be provided. Reservations
limited ato 175 people.
Temple Beth El Brotherhood is
sponsoring a cruise to Nassau in
the Bahamas. The four day, three
night cruise will begin at the Port
of Miami on Friday, Mary 1 and
return Monday, Mary 4. Free bus
transportation to the port from
the Temple will be provided.
The cost of an inside cabin is
$318 per person, and an outside is
$388 per person. Both are double
occupancy. Port charges of $22
per person are extra, and a $100
deposit is required with the
balance due March 5.
For more information, contact
Irv Kolman, 781-7527.
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton,
333 SW 4th Ave., will present
Lynn Harrel, cellist, through its
Distinguished Artists Series on
Wednesday, March 25, 8:15 p.m.
at the Temple.
Tickets cost $25, $15, and $10
each. All seats are reserved.
Call the concert office
391-8600 for information.
at
The Young Artists Series on
Temple Beth El will present
Sharon Isbin, classical guitarist,
on Sunday, March 8, 3 p.m. at the
Temple.
Tickets are $7.50 each. For in-
formation contact the concert
office.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
On Shabbat Eve, seventh day of
Shevat, year 5747, (Feb. 6) at 7:30
p.m., six women, members of the
Congregation of Temple Beth
Shalom, received their Bat Mitz-
vah certificates after concluding
their reading of the Haftorah
selection from the Prophet
Jeremiah-Parsha BO.
The celebration was the
culmination of a year long
preparation and teaching of
Hebrew reading skills under the
tutelage of Blanche Fialkow, and
the training of cantillation by Jack
Rosenthal, both volunteer leaders
of the congregation.
This event was part of a series
of such Bat Mitzvah celebrations
which were instituted three years
ago by Reuben Saltzman, Temple
president, and Dr. John M. Lowe,
vice president and chairman of the
Adult Education Program Com-
mittee. Following the reading of
the Haftorah and the awarding of
the certificates and gifts by Hilda
Kravitz, Sisterhood president, the
celebrants were charged by Can-
tor Joseph M. Pollack; acting in
the absence of Rabbi Donald D.
Crain, who was called to Israel
unexpectedly for a meeting of the
President's Bond Cabinet.
After the final hymn of the
evening service the celebrants had
a collation. The celebrants were:
Dorothy Avner, Rachel Goodman,
Thelma Hirschhorn, Paula Kalina,
Gertrude Wiener and Gloria
Schill.
Sisterhood
Sisterhood of Temple Beth
Shalom of Century Village West,
will have the next card/luncheon
Monday, at noon. Chaired by
Ethel 483-2559 and Bea 483-2474.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth wishes to an-
nounce that during their Sabbath
Services, March 6 and 7, Rabbi
Elliot J. Winograd's sermons will
be: "Gifts of the Heart" on Friday
at 8 p.m. and "Sanctuary of Tin"
on Saturday at 8:45 p.m.
Temple Emeth, 5780 W. Atlan-
tic Ave., Delray Beach, wishes to
inform the public that their Mon-
day morning lecture series will
feature Rose Rifkin, of the South
County Federation on March 9, at
10:30 a.m. Her subject will be
"Jewish Humor." She is a past
president of Women's B'nai B rith
and Hadassah.
Temple Emeth of Delray Beach
will hold its Annual Bazaar and
Auction on its premises, 5780
West Atlantic Ave., on Sunday,
March 8, beginning at 8 a.m. and
continuing through the rest of the
day. A large variety of new mer-
chandise will be on sale.
A three day cruise for two and a
five inch personal TV set will be
raffled off. Food and beverages
will also be available.
Sisterhood
Siaterhod of Temple Emeth is
celebrating its Bar Mitzvah Year,
with a special paid-up luncheon on
March 25 at 11 am. Fantasy
Fashion Show Gourmet
Luncheon.
TEMPLE SINAI
PALM BEACH COUNTY
Shabbat services will be held at
Temple Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray Beach at 8:15 p.m.
Friday with Rabbi Samuel Silver
and Cantor Elaine Shapiro. Ser-
mon: "Income and Out Come."
Saturday services will take
place at 10 a.m.
The Temple will conduct
Duplicate Bridge games on Thurs-
day evenings starting at 7:30 p.m.
They are open to the public.
Refreshments will be served. Fee
is $2 per person. These games are
sanctioned by the ACBL and
master points will be awarded.
For more information, call Jack
Alter at 498-0946.
The Temple invites anyone in-
terested in new membership to
contact the membership chairman
at 276-6161.
Brotherhood
The Temple Brotherhood an-
nounces its final review, "Light in
Heart," illusion combined with
music, on March 29. Seats are
reserved. Tickets are $5. For
reservations call 276-6161.
Temple Sinai is offering a com-
plete educational program. For
more information call the Temple
office at 276-6161.
The Temple, in coordination
with the Herzl Institute, will pre-
sent the last lecture in the series
entitled, "The Bintl Brif' with
William Stern, past president,
Jewish Daily Forward and Past
Gen. Secretary of the Workman's
Circle on April 8 at 2 p.m. at the
Temple. The lecture > free and
open to the public. For more infor-
mation, call the Temple at
276-6161.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
World Renowned painter,
sculptor and printmaker Irving
Amen will be the guest at Sabbath
services on Friday evening, March
27 at Congregation B'nai Israel.
He will speak on "Religious
Themes in Classic Art."
Mr. Amen, whose work is
represented in museum collec-
tions throughout the United
States and the world, is now a full
time resident of Boca Raton.
Services are at 8 p.m. at the
Center for Group Counseling,
22455 Boca Rio Road. All who
come in the spirit of peace are
welcome.
On Friday night, March 6,
Father Daniel Barrett of St.
Jude's Roman Catholic Church,
Central Boca Raton parish, will
address Congregation B'nai Israel
from the pulpit. His theme will be
"Recent Developments in
Catholic-Jewish Relations."
All are welcome.
Mrs. Sue Kagan's 5th Grade
Class will participate in and help
lead Sabbath worship at Con-
gregation B'nai Israel on Friday
evening, March 20. The Torah will
be read and there will be members
of the local Scout Troops in atten-
dance on this Scouting Sabbath.
All are welcome.
Sisterhood Sabbath will be
observed at Congregation B'nai
Israel on Friday evening, March
13. Participating in the service
will be members of the Sisterhood
and their theme will be "All That
We Must Remember."
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 27, 1987
Cautious Reaction
Israel Watches As Syria Returns to Beirut
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel reacted cautiously
Sunday to reports that
Syria has deployed infantry
and tanks in West Beirut at
the invitation of a coalition
of Moslem and Druze
leaders, but over the objec-
tions of Lebanese President
Amin Gemayel.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
briefed the Cabinet on the situa-
tion in closed session, convening
as a Ministerial Security Commit-
tee, the deliberations of which are
classified.
that Israel would watch the situa-
tion closely and review its position
only if circumstances required. He
said that naturally Israel would
prefer not to see Syrian troops in
West Beirut.
GEMAYEL AND other
Lebanese Christian leaders spoke
out Sunday against the Syrian
presence. But there was no
resistance as armor-led Syrian
columns moved into the Lebanese
capital from their bases in the
Bekaa Valley in eastern Lebanon
and from Khalde in the south.
According to reports here, Syria
intends to deploy about 10,000
troops in West Beirut in an at-
tempt to end the fierce battles in
recent weeks between Moslems
and Christians and between rival
Moslem factions.
Prison Exchange Okay Rabin
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin has indicated that he would not "object in principle"
Rabin told reporters afterward to a prisoner exchange deal for Israeli soldiers held captive
in Lebanon.
Program
Grant
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
How can the frail and dependent
elderly be helped to remain in-
dependent? The B'nai B'rith In-
ternational Senior Citizens Hous-
ing Committee reports receiving a
$16,000 grant to set up a model
program to create criteria for ac-
complishing that goal.
The grant, from the Aaron and
Lillie Strauss Foundation of
Baltimore, follows its $11,000
grant last year for a study of this
issue conducted for the committee
by scholars. The model program
will be based on the study, which
concluded that a battery of sup-
portive services could keep these
elderly independent.
"IDF soldiers who are sent to attack the enemy should
know that the State of Israel is behind them, not only in
words, but also in deals if there is no other military op-
tion," Rabin told reporters during a visit to Ashdod.
"I CANNOT SAY that I will object in principle to
(such) deal. No government in Israel has ever objected," he
said, noting that when there is no military option to release
prisoners and kidnap victims, there is the option of "deals."
Israel has made clear, however, that it will not release
400 convicted prisoners as demanded by the Islamic Jihad,
an extremist group in Lebanon, for the lives of three
Americans and one Indian national kidnapped in Beirut last
month. There were hints that Israel might negotiate for the
freedom of an Israel Air Force navigator taken prisoner by
the Shiite Amal militia after his plane was shot down over
Lebanon last October.
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Observers here noted that the
Syrian move completes a full cir-
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Israel Defense Force invaded
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Palestine Liberation Organization
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HOWEVER, commentators
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The "red lines" evolved during
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'Building the Dream'
Friday, February 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
Cabinet Calls on U.S. To Abolish
New Jewish CC To Be Dedicated Political Refugee status
"Building the Dream" will become
reality to Jewish residents in South Dade
County on Sunday. That's the day when a
21-acre, lakeside site is officially
dedicated for a new Jewish Community
Center. The 4 p.m. dedication will be at
SW 112th Street and SW 112th Avenue,
site of the new center.
In addition to the ground dedication ceremony, a
human rainbow, bringing together all generations
of the community center's participants, will be
featured. Winners of the "Building the Dream"
poster contest, a child's view of the Community
Center, also will be named.
THE NEW South Dade facility will house a
Holocaust Memorial, Israeli Resource Center,
theatre, library, education center, game room,
child-care and nursery, teen lounge, film lab,
health clubs and a spectacular atrium.
The groundbreaking ceremony is tentatively
scheduled for September, 1987.
Shamir Warns:
Talks Could Break Up Unity Gov't.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Shamir indicated here Mon-
day that Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres' discussions
of an international peace
conference for the Middle
East when he meets Egyp-
tian President Hosni
Mubarak in Cairo, possibly
this week, could cause the
disintegration of the Labor-
Likud unity government.
Speaking to journalists at a lun-
Israel Continuing Lavi Test
Flights Despite U.S. Objections
TEL AVTV (JTA) Israel is
continuing to test its second-
generation jet fighter plane, the
Lavi, despite uncertainty about its
future due to U.S. objections that
it costs too much. A Lavi pro-
totype last week made its 10th
test flight in leas than two mon-
ths. It was flown by Menahem
Shmuel, chief test pilot of Israel
Aircraft Industries (IAI), which
designed and built the technically
advanced plane.
According to IAI, test flights
will continue at an accelerated
rate of two a week. A second pro-
totype will enter the program in
April and three more prototypes
will be built and tested after that
IAI said a total of 1,800 test
flights will be made with all pro-
totypes before the best is selected
and put into production in about
two years.
But the U.S., which is financing
the Lavi through military grants,
has urged Israel to abandon the
project in favor of an American-
built aircraft, the F-16C.
cheon at the Regency Hotel,
Shamir replied "maybe" when
asked if Peres' trip to Cairo could
affect the future of the Israel
government. Peres can go to
Egypt to discuss "whatever he
wants to discuss," but he cannot
decide anything with President
Mubarak without the approval of
the Israel government, Shamir
said.
ASKED IF HE had approved
Peres' trip, Shamir said: "I didn't
give any approval, but I knew
about the trip. He (Peres) doesn't
need any approval from the Prime
Minister to go wherever he wants
to go. The government has to ap-
prove it"
He said that if Peres' trip to
Cairo yields any results, the
Foreign Minister will have to br-
ing them back to Jerusalem as
recommendations to the full
government.
Sharp differences between
Shamir and Peres over an interna-
tional peace conference have rais-
ed speculation in Israel that the
issue could bring down the
government. Shamir is adamantly
opposed to such a forum.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Israeli Cabinet Sunday
called on the United States
to abolish political refugee
status for Jews leaving the
Soviet Union on grounds
that there can be no such
status for any Jew since the
founding of Israel.
The call, presented by Acting
Premier Shimon Peres and
adopted unanimously as a resolu-
tion of the government, was tim-
ed, according to observers, to
coincide with meetings here this
week of the Council of Jewish
Federations and the Jewish Agen-
cy Board of Governors. Both are
key diaspora bodies whose fun-
ding efforts and political influence
are critical in the struggle for
Soviet Jews.
IT ALSO coincided with signs
of possible dramatic new openness
inside the Soviet Union, giving
rise to hope here that the trickle
of Jewish emigration in recent
years may soon swell to substan-
tial numbers. The release from
prison Friday of long-time
refusenik and dissident Iosif
Begun has fueled those hopes.
The statement said, "The
government of Israel believes that
the status of refugee accorded to-
day to Soviet Jewish emigrants
whose declared destination is
Israel should be abolished ...
From the day the State of Israel
was established and its gates
opened to all Jews there is no
more validity to the term Jewish
refugee...
The statement bolstered the ef-
fort of Premier Yitzhak Shamir,
currently visiting the United
States, to persuade the U.S. Ad-
ministration to no longer grant
the special refugee status to
Jewish emigres from the Soviet
Union which enables them to go to
the U.S. instead of to Israel.
Shamir apparently made little
headway in that regard in his
talks with President Ronald
Reagan and Secretary of State
George Shultz last week. The Ad-
ministration stressed that the
U.S. supports "freedom of
choice."
THE CABINET addressed that
argument, noting that its state-
ment "does not imply any attempt
to prevent any person from choos-
ing where to live." But that deci-
sion ought to be made only after
the immigrants have reached
Israel, which is the destination on
their exit documents from the
Soviet Union, the Ministers said.
Once in Israel, they could proceed
elsewhere.
Nevertheless, the statement is
expected to renew the long, often
angry debate between Israelis and
some sections of the American
Jewish leadership who advocate
not only freedom of choice, but
the right of emigrants to choose
their country of settlement
without being required to go to
Israel first.
Rabbis Support
Boycott
HOUSTON (JTA) Like its
peer groups in Southern Califor-
nia, Colorado and New York City,
the Houston Rabbinical Associa-
tion has voted to support the
United Farm Workers'boycott of
California table grapes.
The Jewish Herald-Voice
reports that the association felt
the boycott sent a positive and
constructive message to Hispanic
leaders. Houston is home to
several Jewish-Hispanic
dialogues.
Halacha Must Take Priority Over Intra-Jewish Politics Human Rights 'State of War'
NEW YORK-(JTA)-A
leading Israeli Orthodox
rabbi made clear his view
that Halacha (Jewish law)
must take precedence over
intra-Jewish politics in
issues of personal status,
such as divorce and
conversion.
Rabbi Aharon Lichtenstein.
who heads a yeshiva in the Etzion
block of settlements south of
Hebron, said, in a statement made
available to the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that it was
necessary for him to clarify
remarks he made before a Na-
tional Religious Party forum in
Jerusalem last month which
"were grossly distorted in certain
press reports."
HIS REMARKS were inter-
preted in some quarters as a hint
that Orthodox refusal to regard as
valid the authority of non-
Orthodox rabbis on documents of
personal status may have to be
modified in the interests of Jewish
unity.
With respect to the area of per-
sonal status, Lichtenstein said in
his statement: "We should strive
to minimize the emphasis upon
symbolic questions of pride and
prestige and focus, instead, upon
the substantive halachic issues.
We should try to ensure that pro-
per procedure be followed by
halachically qualified personnel,
and be less concerned with who
pains some recognition by
superintending or signing what."
He said "this would entail our
asking others to direct their
adherents to obtain a kosher 'get'
(religious divorce) wherever
necessary this not by way of
compromising their principles but
simply as part of a compassionate
enterprise ..."
In the matter of "the composi-
tion of the Beth Din (rabbinical
court) actually engaged in the
specific formal steps" of conver-
sion, "we should entertain an ar-
rangement which would
guarantee that the composition
and procedures to be applied by
the actual Beth Din meet our stan-
dards, although it might act under
the aegis of a sanctioning Reform
or Conservative authority,"
Lichtenstein said.
Lichtenstein emphasized in his
statement that the non-Orthodox
institutions acting in conversion
cases would have to demonstrate
the standards and "minimal scope
and depth of commitment" as
defined by "the leading poskim
(rabbinical interpreters of
halacha) of the age."
"THIS WOULD admittedly
grant that authority an inevitable
modicum of implicit recognition,
but given the gravity of the issue,
I believe we can live with that, in-
asmuch as we need not actually
accord formal recognition but
could simply skirt the issue."
The Jewish Telegraphic Agency
reported from Jerusalem on Jan.
26 that Lichtenstein suggested
that Orthodox conversion courts
might have their decisions formal-
ly approved by a Conservative in-
stitution as a way to break the
impasse.
prisoned four suspects.
JEWISH EMIGRATION from
the Soviet Union totaled 914,
significantly lower than the 1,140
Jews permitted to leave in 1985.
"The authorities have continued
to attack Jewish consciousness
through harassment and intimida-
tion, the suppression of cultural
activities, and the persecution of
persons for teaching Hebrew.
Soviet Jews have been subject to
arrests, beatings, and vilification.
Continued from Page 4
as well as dismissal from work and
illegal searches," the report
stated.
In Iran, Jews are permitted to
practice their religion, but they
are discriminated against in
employment and public accom-
modation, according to the report.
"Jews are subject to travel
restrictions which are not applied
to members of other recognized
religious groups," the report
noted.
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Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 27, 1987
AJComm. Fires Editor After Six Months on Job
WASHINGTON (JTA) The American
Jewish Committee has fired its represen-
tative here, M.J. Rosenberg, after six months
on the job, allegedly because of his article
fiublished in The New York Times defending
srael's role in the Iran arms affair.
Jewish newspapers report that David Gor-
dis, AJ Committee executive vice president.
acknowledged that Rosenberg was dismissed
two weeks ago, but said "it was due to an
evolving incompatibility with the organiza-
tion" and "had nothing to do with The New
York Times piece."
ROSENBERG PREVIOUSLY was editor
of the Near East Report, a weekly newsletter
published by the American Israel Public Af-
fairs Committee, the major pro-Israel lobby.
He declined to comment publicly on his
dismissal from his $82,000-a-year job on the
advice of his attorney.
Sources close to Rosenberg claim that
AJCommittee threatened to fire him if he
published the article, which appeared on The
Times' op-ed page last month. They also
alleged that AJCommittee refused to print
Rosenberg's defense of Israeli soldiers who
wounded two Arab youths in a West Bank
riot. That piece was set for AJCommittee's
bi-weekly newsletter, Washington Report.
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Full Text
Reaganites Strain
Friday, February 27, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
But Shamir Says No to Int'l. Talks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion tried to persuade Israeli
Premier Yitzhak Shamir,
who arrived in Washington
last Tuesday (Feb. 17), to
consider an international
conference if it would lead
to direct negotiations.
"The United States believes it is
important to explore all possible
approaches to direct negotiations,
to see whether any of these, in-
cluding an international con-
ference, would lead immediately
to direct negotiations," a senior
Administration official said.
Shamir said in Israel prior to his
departure that he would try to
dissuade the U.S. from consider-
ing an international conference, a
position in which he differs with
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres
with whom he traded jobs last Oc-
tober as part of the national unity
government agreement.
THIS WAS Shamir's first visit
to Washington since becoming
Premier, although he was here
several times as Foreign Minister.
His last visit as Premier under the
old Likud government was in
November, 1983.
The Administration official,
briefing reporters on the Shamir
visit, called him an "old friend"
who was here to renew his
"already close personal relation-
ship" with President Reagan and
Secretary of State George Shultz.
Shamir met with Shultz shortly
after his arrival and then held a
second meeting with Shultz in the
afternoon. He was scheduled to
have a breakfast meeting with
Shultz Wednesday before going to
the White House for a meeting
and working lunch with Reagan.
The U.S. official said topics of
discussions during Shamir's
three-day visit here included
U.S.-Israel relations, the peace
process, the Israeli economy,
Soviet Jewry and international
terrorism.
THE IRAN arms deal and the
case of Jonathan Pollard, the
former civilian Navy employee
who has confessed to spying for
Israel, were expected to come up,
but neither was "an important
focus of the discussions," the of-
ficial stressed.
He said the U.S. "understands"
the positions of both Shamir and
King Hussein of Jordan on an in-
ternational conference. Hussein
has said that he needs an interna-
tional conference as an "um-
brella" for talks with Israel.
Shamir charged last week that
an international conference is an
"Arab-Soviet idea" where Israel
would be isolated and subject to
demands that it return to its 1967
border.
State Department deputy
spokesman Phyllis Oakley said
that any international conference
"would have to be agreed to by
the parties themselves. Whatever
the format, it should lead im-
mediately to direct negotiations
and should not interfere with
those negotiations."
THIS POSITION was reaffirm
ed by the Administration official
Tuesday. "We are convinced that
face-to-face discussions on the
hard issue of the Arab-Israeli con-
flict and proposals for their
peaceful resolution is the only way
to achieve a peace that will be
lasting and fair to all the parties,"
he said.
Peres has argued that an inter-
national conference is the only
way to bring Jordan into the
negotiations. However, as for
Hussein's demand that the five
permanent members of the
United Nations Security Council
participate, Peres has stressed
that the Soviet Union could not
participate in Mideast peace talks
until it restores diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel and allows Soviet
Jews to freely emigrate.
This was the same position
taken by the U.S. and reconfirmed
by the Administration official
Tuesday.
However, he stressed that a Jor-
danian delegation to negotiations
with Israel would have to include
Palestinians. He noted that the
makeup of the Palestinian
representatives was one of the
issues discussed. Israel has made
it clear it will not talk to members
of the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
THE OFFICIAL noted that
Setting the Record Straight
A story featuring Temple Israel's Cantor Rachelle Nelson in
last week's issue of The Jewish Floridian incorrectly identifies
Cantor Nelson as the daughter of Miami's distinguished im-
presaria Judy Drucker. In fact, she is the Cantor's aunt.
Cantor Nelson's mother is Sarah A. Nelson, a well-known
music teacher in the Greater Miami area for the past 30 years.
The Jewish Floridian regrets the error.
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J
Shamir, as have previous Israeli
leaders, was expected to urge the
Administration to make it man-
datory that Soviet Jewish
emigrants go directly to Israel
and not be free to immigrate to
the U.S. But the official said the
U.S. still supports the position of
"freedom of choice."
The official confirmed that
Israel, like Japan and Australia,
has been given the status of "of-
ficial major non-NATO ally." This
will allow Israel to bid on Defense
Department research and
development contracts. Given
Israel's "high technological
capabilities" it should be in a
"good position to compete" for
these contracts, the official said.
54 Jews Detained
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Sudanese authorities have recent-
ly detained 54 Ethiopian Jews
who crossed the border into
Sudan, according to a Sudanese
newspaper which was quoted here
by AI Haminhmar. The Sudanese
paper, All-Ittihad Al-Asbui,
reported that the supervisor of
refugee affairs in Sudan said the
country's security authorities will
continue to hold the Ethiopian
Jews until a decision is made
regarding their fate. There has
been no independent confirmation
of the detention.
LI0R HOD, a resident of Atlanta, and a junior at Yeshiva
University in New York, goes for his 1,000th point as a member of
the Yeshiva University Maccabees. Hod, a 6'5"forward and co-
captain of this year's team, crossed the 1,000 mark in a game
against Stevens Tech at the University's Max Stem Athletic
Center. The Maccabees won that game 67-61, with Hod scaring 22
points and taking his career total to 1002. His brother, Ayal Hod,
however, led the scoring during the game with 2k points. Liar Hod
is a junior majoring in computer science.
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FILES


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 27, 1987
Historian Arad in Painful
Description of Death 'Factory'
EMBRACING HIS SON, John Demjanjuk
gazes at John Jr. moments before Demjanjuk 8
trial opened Monday (Feb. 16) in a Jerusalem
court. Demjanjuk, a former auto worker from
Refusenik's
Condition
Improves
TORONTO (JTA) The con-
dition of recently released long-
time refusenik Leah Maryasin is
much better than doctors here
first believed. Physicians at
Toronto General Hospital
originally feared that Maryasin,
61, was suffering from multiple
myeloma upon being admitted last
week. However, Dr. Michael
Baker, head of the hospital's
cancer treatment and research
program, said that original
diagnosis has been changed.
Baker told the Canadian Jews
News that Maryasin is suffering
from skin plasmacytomas, a much
more common variant of the
disease. She can be treated with
oral medication, and is expected
to enjoy several years of good
health, he said.
Hussein
Meets Assad
Jordan's King Hussein met
with Syrian President Hafez
Assad last week in Damascus
to discuss the current situation
in Lebanon (Jordan Television,
Feb. 10). In Washington, State
Department officials asserted
that Jordan needed to mobilize
its I-Hawk anti-aircraft missile
batteries to defend against a
threat from Syria.
AP/Wide World Photo
Cleveland, Ohio, went on trial on charges that
he tortured and gassed 850,000 Jews in World
War II in Treblinka concentration camp.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
An historian of the
Holocaust, Dr. Yitzhak
Arad, presented a detailed
description of the "death
factory" at Treblinka Tues-
day (Feb. 17), the second
day of the trial of John Dem-
janjuk, the alleged
Treblinka guard accused of
war crimes.
Arad, the director of the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Memorial in
Jerusalem, told the Jerusalem
District Court how nearly 900,000
Jews were put to death in the gas
chambers. At the height of the
operation, some 15,000 victims
were killed at Treblinka every
day.
At one point, Arad said, the
three gas chambers at the exter-
mination camp were unable to
cope with the load, and many vic-
tims died of exposure and other
causes while they were kept
waiting in packed railroad freight
cars.
THE THREE-JUDGE court
overruled an objection by Demjan-
juk's American attorney, Mark
O'Connor, that the historv of the
Holocaust should not be presented
at the trial. But the case hinges on
the positive identification of Dem-
janjuk, a Ukrainian-born former
automobile worker in Cleveland,
Ohio, as the Treblinka guard
known to inmates as "Ivan the
Terrible" because of his brutality.
O'Connor contends that the ac-
cused is not the Treblinka Ivan
and in fact never was in
Treblinka. According to the
defense, Demjanjuk became a
German prisoner of war in 1942,
and "at no time during the war
was he at any concentration or ex-
termination camp."
The trial opened Monday (Feb.
16) in a converted movie house,
but the 300-seat hall was not full,
Haim Guri, Israel's national poet,
reported in Davar. He noted that
this was in stark contrast to the
trial here in 1961 of Adolf
Eichmann, the principal organizer
of the "Final Solution," the mass
murder of European Jews.
Guri suggested m his commen-
tary that Israel may be too involv-
ed with itself and its current pro-
blems to bear the pain of reliving
the Holocaust. Labor MK Shevah
Weiss, a Holocaust survivor and,
Continued on Page 6
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