The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00274

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v* The Jewish m_ ?
FlomdiaN
of South County
Volume 9 Number 3
Serving Boca Raton, Defray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, January 16,1987
PEACE MISSION American Middle East envoy Richard Murphy (Uft) talks Israeu peace prospects specifically, the possibility of King Hussein joining such
with King Hussein last Wednesday (Jan. 7) at the King s royal palace Ml Amman. taUcs ^^ Israel and E t -s president Hosni Mubarak. AP/wide World Photo
It was the first stop on Murphy s tour to explore prospects for reviving Arab-
Israel, Egypt, Jordan Meet Possible
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A "three-way summit"
meeting between Israel,
Egypt and Jordan was
described as "possible" by a
top aide to Premier Yitzhak
Shamir following Shamir's
meeting Thursday (Jan. 8)
with U.S. Assistant
Secretary of State Richard
Murphy who arrived from
Jordan, Israel Radio
reported.
In Paris
Peace Must Come Soon,
Or Chaos WillHussein
The radio report quoted a
remark by Yosef Ben-Aharon,
director general of the Prime
Minister's Office, in a television
interview taped for broadcast
Thursday evening.
ACCORDING to the report,
Ben-Aharon said "It is possible to
expect a three-way summit bet-
ween Premier Shamir, the Presi-
dent of Egypt (Hosni Mubarak)
and King Hussein" (of Jordan).
He said the meeting would be held
"in Aqaba (Jordan) or El Arish"
in Egypt.
Ben-Aharon was also quoted as
saying that Shamir would meet
shortly with Palestinian leaders in
the West Bank to urge them to
form a delegation for peace talks
with Israel and Jordan.
Murphy, who is Assistant
Secretary for Near Eastern and
South Asian Affairs and the State
Department's leading expert on
the Middle East, is on his first
visit to the region since last
September. His mission has been
described as exploratory, to see
how the stalled peace process
could be advanced. But American
diplomats have cautioned against
expectations of a breakthrough at
this time.
MURPHY scheduled meetings
with Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres and
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
left for Cairo Friday.
In Amman Wednesday (Jan. 7),
Murphy indicated that the U.S.
does not favor a joint preparatory
committee for an international
conference on Middle East peace.
BULK RATE
U.S. POSTAGE
PAID
BOCA RATON, FL
PERMIT NO. 1093
Castro Sends Five
Jews to Venezuela
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) King
Hussein of Jordan, warning
of chaos unless there is
speedy movement in the
Middle East peace process,
urged Monday the conven-
ing of an international peace
conference on the Middle
East with the participation
of the five permanent
members of the United Na-
tions Security Council and
"all those concerned by this
problem, including the
Palestinians."
"Something must be done rapid-
ly. Otherwise, all hope will be lost
and the entire region will be
plunged into a chaotic situation,"
Hussein said in an interview with
Le Monde, published as the Jorda-
nian monarch arrived here for an
official three-day visit.
HE WAS greeted at Orly Air-
port by President Francois Mit-
Continued on Page 6-
NEW YORK (JTA) A
rabbi from Caracas recently
obtained personal permis-
sion from President Fidel
Castro to bring five Cuban
Jews to Venezuela to be
reunited with their families
there, the Rabbinical Coun-
cil of America disclosed
Monday.
Rabbi Pynchas Brener, spiritual
leader of the Union Israelita de
Caracas, quoted Castro as telling
him he was allowing the Jews to
leave "on humane grounds of
reuniting families, a worthy
cause, and we are going to permit
Continued on Page 12-
Fidel Castro


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday. January 16, 1987
O'Connor Visibly Angered
By American Jewry's
Statement on His Trip
NEW YORK (JTA) -
John Cardinal O'Connor
was taken aback and visibly
angered Sunday by a state-
ment sharply critical of his
conduct and remarks during
his visit to Israel and Jordan
last week. The statement,
which expressed disquiet
and distress about some of
his remarks, was released
Saturday.
U i.Al.l'..'! n-Mii'i 119,
It was signed by the leaders of
53 major American Jewish
groups, including community, rab-
binical, Zionist and fund-raising
organizations.
O'Connor, the Archbishop of
New York, told reporters after
conducting Sunday Mass at St.
Patrick's Cathedral, that he
feared the "fruits" of his trip and
his meetings afterwards at the
Vatican could be "destroyed" by
the response of the Jewish
organizations.
HE EXPRESSED "deep, deep
disappointment" at the state-
ment. "I hope there is nothing in
that statement that will make it
more difficult than it has been for
me in trying to support the Jewish
cause," he said.
He described his trip to the Mid-
dle East as the most difficult he
ever made, one that involved
"great personal and professional
risk." He went to Israel "in good
faith," the Cardinal said.
The trip was fraught with con-
troversy and embarrassment. The
Cardinal was forced to cancel ap-
pointments he had made with
Israeli leaders because Vatican
policy which does not recognize
the status of Jerusalem as Israel's
capital, forbade him to meet with
them at their offices in Jerusalem.
He did meet, however, with
President Chaim Herzog at the
Presidential residence in
Jerusalem and with Vice Premier
and Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres at the latter's home.
THE CARDINAL apologized
profusely during his trip for any
offense he might have given the
Israeli people and their leaders
and faulted himself for failing to
recognize the ramifications of the
constraints placed upon his
movements by Vatican policy.
The Jewish leaders said in their
statement that they were "dis-
quieted and distressed" by
remarks made by O'Connor sym-
pathetic to the Palestinians and
that they "found disturbing and
painful" his statement at the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Memorial in
Jerusalem that the Holocaust
"may be an enormous gift that
Judaism has given the world."
O'Connor was particularly
stung by the latter criticism. He
said he meant it as "an enormous
compliment to the Jewish people
... If this is considered demean-
ing to the Holocaust, then it de-
means my entire theology because
mine is a theology of suffering,"
he said.
HE ALSO said that the compas-
sion he expressed when visiting a
Palestinian refugee camp in Gaza
was not meant as an indictment of
Israel. "I said repeatedly that this
was not to be blamed on Israel,"
the Cardinal declared, adding that
the blame rests on the entire Mid-
dle East. Both Arabs and Jews
are "involved and responsible."
The Israel government promptly
dissociated itself from the state-
ment by the Jewish leaders.
Barak). Binah. press spokesman
'-" .late in New
I Suriu that "It was ah
American response and not an
Israeli response."
The statement acknowledged
that the Cardinal has been an
outspoken foe of anti-Semitism
and a strong supporter of Jewish
causes, particularly the struggle
of Soviet Jews for civil rights and
the right to emigrate.
O'Connor, however, saw the
statement as a whole as amoun-
ting "to a unilateral censure,
which I do not appreciate and
which makes it difficult for me to
move farther toward peace.
Serious damage could be done if
this line is pursued," he said.
IRONICALLY, O'Connor last
week sent flowers to Israel's Con-
sul General in New York, Moshe
Yegar, thanking the Israeli of-
ficial for having helped arrange
his trip to Israel. The Archbishop
sent the flowers upon his arrival
in Rome through his New York
office.
A handwritten letter by O'Con-
nor accompanied the flowers sent
"in gratitude for your wonderful
assistance" in arranging the
Israel visit. Yegar was instrumen-
tal in arranging the details of the
Cardinal's trip from the
beginning.
Cardinal John O'Connor meets with
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek in Jerusalem
during the Cardinal's visit to Israel last week.
But O'Connor specifically refused to go on a
guided tour with the Mayor on the ground that
it would constitute Vatican acknowledgement
of Jerusalem as Israel's capital city. APAVide
According to an Israeli official
here, O'Connor's aides kept
Yegar regularly informed
throughout the Cardinal's stay in
the Mideast "The flowers and the
letter to Yegar are a clear sign
that the Cardinal came out from
his visit to Israel with a good feel-
ing," the Israeli official said.
Vatican Careful
No Modofication on 'Prerequisites' for Recognition
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) The
Vatican is taking pains to
allay any notion that the
visit to Israel by John Car-
dinal O'Connor, the Ar-
chbishop of New York, in-
dicates a modification of the
"prerequisites" it has set
for establishing diplomatic
relations with the Jewish
State.
O'Connor, who arrived here
last Tuesday (Jan. 6) from Israel,
said he encountered not the
''slightest evidence of
displeasure" by the Holy See over
his trip and the fact that he met
with two Israeli leaders, Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog and Vice
Premier and Foreign Minister
Shimon Peres, at their homes in
Jerusalem.
VATICAN spokesman Joaquin
Navarro Vails issued a statement
to the press last Wednesday
noting that Pope Paul VI met with
Golda Meir in 1964, and Pope
John Paul II met with Peres in
1985.
"The State of Israel or its
sovereignty is not at issue," he
added.
"As is known, the issue regards
the status of the city of Jerusalem,
the problem of the occupied ter-
ritories and the Palestinian issue.
I think the acts of courtesy of Car-
dinal O'Connor do not involve
these problems which must be
solved in appropriate
circumstances."
Journalists were reminded that
the contents of Pope John Paul
IPs Apostolic Letter on Jerusalem
of April 20, 1984, are still valid.
THE LETTER stated: "I am
convinced the failure to find an
adequate solution to the question
of Jerusalem and the .
postponement of the problem, on-
ly compromise the longed-for
peaceful and just settlement of the
crisis of the whole Middle East."
The fetter-called for the applica-
tion of "special status" to "not "on-
ly the monuments of the sacred
places, but the whole historical
Jerusalem and the existence of
religious communities, their situa-
tion and future" which "cannot
but affect everyone and interest
everyone."
A month before that letter was
issued, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency was given ?. background
briefing by a ranking official of
the Roman Curia. The official said
that one of the primary' concerns
of the Holy See was that each
religious community receive
guarantees for complete freedom
to develop and grow physically
and economically, including rights
of ownership, investments and the
possibility of urban expansion.
The official said the Vatican
sought a 'three-fold agreement
between Jewish, Christian and
Islamic authorities" in Jerusalem
because Israel's guarantees alone
were not sufficient. They had to
be of an international character,
he said.
THE VATICAN'S second de-
mand, creation of "a homeland for
the Palestinian people," is con-
tained in all of its documents
relating to the Middle East. The
Vatican perceives this to be inex-
Pathologist
Due for Bundle
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
American plant pathologist, Dr.
Theodor Diener, will be this years
recipient of the Wolf Foundation's
$100,000 prize for agriculture, the
Education Ministry has announc-
ed. Diener will be cited "for his
discovery and pioneering fun
damental research on viroids, the
smallest subviral pathogens, and
his applied work on viroid detec-
tion in crops." Diener was born in
Zurich in 1921 and educated in
Switzerland. He has been a
pathologist at the Plant Protec-
tion Institute of the U.S.
Agricultural Research Service in
fleltsviHe, Md., since-1969
tricably tied to "the necessity of
simultaneously guaranteeing the
security of all peoples in the
region."
The Pope told the international
diplomatic corps accredited to the
Vatican on January 14, 1984 that
these principles imply a com-
prehensive peace treaty for the
area. They are the only conditions
under which the Vatican would
establish diplomatic relations with
Israel, formalizing what already
exists on an "unofficial" level.
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Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Tax Reform
Worries Arabs
SCREAMING EAGLES IN NEW POSITIONS. Two U.S.
troopers from the 101st Airborne Division (The Screaming
Eagles) stand guard in their mostly northern positions on the
disputed Taba Beach area on the edge of the Sinai Desert. The
AP/Wide World Photo
U.S. troopers are serving with the peacekeeping forces in the
Sinai between Israel and Egypt. The question of who has jurisdic-
tion over Taba is currently under international arbitration.
Israeli IDF Wounded
Shamir Shaken By Death of Irish UNIFIL Soldier
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli soldier was wounded
in the south Lebanon securi-
ty zone Monday morning
when his armored personnel
carrier struck a land mine
eight kilometers from the
Israel border. The soldier
was taken by helicopter to
Rambam Hospital in Haifa.
Meanwhile Maj. Gen. Yossi Pel-
ed, commander of the northern
region, has ordered a full in-
vestigation into the circumstances
of the death of an Irish soldier
under fire from an Israel Defense
Force Patrol in south Lebanon
last Saturday night.
History Prof. Named
CHICAGO (JTA) Josef
Altholz, history professor at the
University of Minnesota, is the
first Jew to serve as president of
the American Catholic Historical
Association.
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THE SOLDIER, Cpl. Dermot
McLaughlin, 33, a member of the
Irish contingent of the United Na-
tions Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) was hit by shell
fragments when the IDF tank
patrol opened fire on "a large ter-
rorist squad in the village of
Barashit" at the edge of the
security zone, an IDF spokesman
said Sunday.
According to the IDF, the
soldier was at a UNIFIL post
close to the terrorist positions and
"was accidentally killed by the
shots."
Premier Yitzhak Shamir called
the incident a "tragic mistake."
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe
Levy have already apologized and
expressed regrets. The Irish
government lodged a strong pro-
test with Israel. McLaughlin was
married and the father of five
children.
THERE WAS initial confusion
here over who was responsible.
Early reports said he was killed by
soldiers of the Israel-backed
South Lebanon Army (SLA) who
opened fire on "suspicious" per-
sons. Later reports confirmed the
responsibility of an IDF unit that
took up positions in what was
previously an SLA stronghold in
Barashit near a UNIFIL outpost.
The SLA position was overrun
by the Shiite extremist Hezbullah
last month resulting in the deaths
of six SLA soldiers. The post was
later retaken by the SLA and tem-
porarily occupied by an IDF tank
unit.
UNIFIL spokesman Timor
Goksel said Sunday that the
UNIFIL post in the village has
been there since 1978 and was
clearly marked by a large sign and
a United Nations flag which is
floodlit at night.
HE SAID when the first tank
shell hit the UNIFIL structure the
unit commander went to the roof
and fired red flares, an identifica-
tion signal agreed upon with the
IDF. But the firing continued, he
said. One shell exploded in a room
where McLaughlin was sleeping.
UNIFIL has complained fre-
quently about what it describes as
"indiscriminate shooting" by SLA
units. Goksel said shells fired by
the SLA have exploded on or near
UNIFIL positions 59 times in the
past three weeks. He said
UNIFIL was reconsidering its
standing orders not to return fire.
Marrack Goulding, UN
Undersecretary for Special
Political Affairs, who was in Israel
last week in connection with the
impending renewal of the
UNIFIL mandate, said that 20
UNIFIL soldiers were killed in
1986 as a result of attacks by
"various armed groups in the
area." A total of 139 UNIFiL
soldiers have been killed since the
international peacekeeping force
was sent to Lebanon more than 10
years ago.
FRANCE RECENTLY reduc-
ed its contribution to UNIFIL
from 1,400 to 500 soldiers because
of severe casualties. UNIFIL
sources indicated Monday that
Ireland might pull its trops out
altogether. Goulding held the
SLA responsible for most of the
UNIFIL casualties. He charged
that it often "deliberately fires on
UN positions."
The SLA claims that terrorists
often use UNIFIL positions as
cover and that UN casualties oc-
cur when their men are caught in
cross-fire. The IDF said that while
it supplies and trains the SLA it
does not give it orders.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Arab governments are con-
cerned over the effects of
the Tax Reform Act of 1986
on investments by foreign
governments in U.S. enter-
prises, according to Boycott
Report, a bulletin on
developments and trends af-
fecting the Arab boycott of
Israel and Arab influence in
the U.S., published here by
the American Jewish
Congress.
The oil-rich Persian Gulf state of
Kuwait is a case in point. It may
lose its tax-exempt status on so-
called passive investments in the
United States. Kuwait, a heavy in-
vestor, was exempt under Section
892 of the old Internal Revenue
Code from federal taxes on
stocks, bonds or other domestic
securities it owned and interest
from deposits in American banks.
THE OLD code declared as tax-
able, income derived from com-
mercial activities including that
earned by a "controlled entity" of
a foreign government. Commer-
cial activities were defined as
those "ordinarily conducted with
a view toward the current or fur-
ther production of income," the
Boycott Report said.
Section 892, as amended in the
new tax law, makes taxable in-
come derived from the conduct of
any commercial activity "whether
within or outside the United
States." If the foreign govern-
ment owns at least 50 percent of
the stock of the enterprise engag-
ed in such commercial activity, the
exemption on its "passive in-
vestments" in the U.S. could be
jeopardized.
The Kuwaitis could thereby lose
their exempt status on the passive
investments of the Kuwait
Petroleum Co. in Santa Fe Inter-
national, an American oil explora-
tion company it purchased several
years ago for $2.5 billion, the
Boycott Report said.
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, January 16, 1987
President Reagan
Unfurls His Defense
The powers that be in Jerusalem may well
have cause to be concerned now that the
White House has gone public with two
memoranda one having to do with Presi-
dent Reagan's January 17, 1986 authoriza-
tion of clandestine operations by the United
States with respect to Iran; the second, a
document in the form of a brief memo to the
President by Admiral John Poindexter,who
was at the time National Security Adviser,
in which Poindexter referred to a plan by
which Israel ... can create conditions to
help bring about a more moderate govern-
ment in Iran."
It is difficult to tell which is more damag-
ing to Israel. Reckoned in these terms,
perhaps neither is as bad as what both
together produced a media report the day
before the two memoranda were revealed by
the White House which stated that Reagan
had been told as late as last September that
Israel was shipping arms to the Contras.
The source, according to the report, was
American intelligence, hence placing the
alleged Israeli shipments in the clandestine
category. It does not matter that not even
President Reagan is purported to have
known about the Israeli connection until he
was filled in on the intelligence reports on
the eve of his Sept. 30 meeting with then-
Prime Minister Peres.
Sudden Candor
More significant is that the Administra-
tion's intent now is to go scapegoat-hunting.
All of this sudden White House candor ap-
pears to have as its purpose to shove the
burden from the shoulders of the President
where it frankly belongs onto Israel.
Indeed, there is something in the maneuver
that reminds us of a petulant child who,
when caught after having misbehaved,
ruefully blames someone else with the plea,
"He made me do it."
Can anyone honestly picture Israel mak-
ing the Administration do anything the Ad-
ministration didn't want to do?
Beyond these matters, a sadder issue yet
is the seeming schizophrenia in the Ad-
ministration's scapegoat-hunting, par-
ticularly in the assurance voiced Monday by
U.S. Ambassdor Thomas Pickering to Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir that the White
House's release of the two memoranda did
not mean to carry with it any intention to
cast blame on Israel. Said an Administration
official who reported Pickering's assurance:
"We wanted to explain the background, to
tell the Israelis, we definitely did not intend
to cast aspersions."
Will Shultz Resign?
If all of this nonsense adds up to anything
coherent so far, it is that the Administra-
tion's backstage maneuverings after all of
its clandestine and perhaps even illegal
operations may well mean the impending
resignation of Secretary of State George
Shultz.
Shultz, together with Secretary of
Defense Caspar Weinberger, is said to have
opposed the Iran operation from the beginn-
ing of his learning about it. There is some
variance at question as to just when Shultz
did find out about the Poindexter-Col. Oliver
North (another now-ousted National Securi-
ty Council aide) scheme.
Apart from this, Shultz is one of the few
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inside Administration officials close to the
President who can honestly say that not only
did some of the Reaganites circumvent
State Department powers by carrying out
foreign policy maneuvers without letting the
Congress know about them but by cir-
cumventing what may well be the law, as
well.
Because the White House memoranda
were made public last week when Shultz was
6,000 miles away in Africa, the offense to
him may now appear to be redoubled and his
impulse to resign overwhelming.
And that would be a pity of enormous
magnitute.
Martin Luther King
Monday, Jan. 19 is a day in our national
consciousness that will focus on Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr., the internationally
revered black civil rights leader who strove
to achieve through peaceful means the
liberation of all people from bigotry and the
agony of discrimination.
There is little doubt that Dr. King had his
black brothers and sisters dominantly in his
mind. But there is also clear evidence that
he set himself apart as the enemy of racism
and prejudice of every kind.
In this enlightened approach to the family
of humankind, he rose rapidly as the
spokesman for tolerance and mutal respect
among all people. In this context, he once
said, "Through our scientific genius, we
have made of our nation and even of the
world a neighborhood, but we have failed
-s/TA
to employ our moral and spiritual genius to
make of it a brotherhood.
It is painfully tragic that such a man as Dr.
King, imbued as he was with the principles
of Ghandi's satyagraha the force of We
should have had his life snuffed out in the
prime of his power of peaceful persuasion by
the force of an assassin's bullet.
In honoring Dr. King on Monday, we will
be saying as a nation that was blessed by the
presence of such a son among its people that
his force of love has not been forgotten.
That it will yet inspire us again and again to
the achievement of his dream.
'Neshira'
It Dominated Opening of Zionist Assembly
Friday, January 16, 1987
Volume 9
15TEVETH5747
Number 3
By MARGIE OLSTER
Philadelphia
The urgent need
for North American aliya
and the problems of Soviet
Jewish emigration and drop-
outs (neshira) dominated
the opening session of the
First Zionist Assembly
here.
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives, and
Israeli Deputy Prime Minister
David Levy addressed about 1,000
delegates of American Zionist
organizations, youth movements
and aliya support groups atten-
ding the convention organized by
the American Zionist Federation.
Highlight of the opening session
was a live satellite broadcast by
Israeli President Chaim Herzog
from the presidential residence in
Jerusalem.
HERZOG, who answered ques-
tions from the delegates over the
phone, quipped: "The fact that
your opening plenary session is
devoted entirely to aliya is no less
than a landmark in American
Zionist history. I would even dare
to suggest that the Shehecheyanu
blessing would be appropriate."
Herzog reminded the assembly
that not long ago, the subject of
aliya was taboo at Jewish gather-
ings in the "affluent diaspora."
He called on Zionists to come to
Israel, not only for the benefit of
the State, but for their own per-
sonal growth. "Aliya is most
precious when it is a response to
the ideal of Zion rather than to
brutal necessity ... We need you
and we know how much you can
mean to democracy in Israel. But
your olim will not only give, they
will surely also receive."
Levy echoed Herzog's call in a
passionate speech delivered in
Hebrew with a simultaneous
English translation. "The essence
of Zionism is the return to Zion. A
free people in its own country,
master of its destiny." Levy sug-
gested that Zionists have divided
into two camps, one in land and
one in the diaspora and this divi-
Leon Dulzin
sion can only cause problems.
DULZIN FORCEFULLY ad-
dressed the problems of Soviet
Jewish emigration and neshira, or
Soviet Jews who choose to settle
in the U.S. instead of Israel.
"The issue of Soviet Jewry must
be raised constantly by the Zionist
movement, by the State of Israel
and by Jewish communities
everywhere." He noted that the
Soviet government's oppressive
emigration policies are not the on-
ly cause for the plight of Soviet
Jews. Those Soviet Jews who do
receive exit visas but choose to
settle in America are hurting the
struggle for freedom im-
measurably, he said. "Neshira
should be condemned in the
strongest terms as should all the
organizations that assist them.
Soviet Jews are not refugees.
Neshira undermines the effort to
open the gates of the Soviet Union
and provides the Soviet Union
with an excuse not to open them."
Dulzin also pointed out that
assimilation of Jews in the
diaspora and decreasing birth
rates are the biggest threats to
Jewish existence. "One of the
most serious problems of our time
is the safeguarding of our people's
national existence," Dulzin told
the assembly.
Regarding the plight of Jews in
Syria and Ethiopia, Dulzin
declared: "Securing their release
is the historic mission of our
generation."
Herzog, responding to one of
several questions from the youth
movement delegates over the
phone, also discussed the pro-
blems of Soviet Jewry.
"THE PRESSURE Israel can
bring from an international point
of view is very limited. We are not
a major power or an important
power. We can do our best with
feeling. When it comes to
pressure, this must be the duty of
the diaspora Jewry and in par-
ticular of American Jewry. It is
the Western world in the final
analysis that can bring about a
change."
Levy said the two major pro-
blems facing the Zionist move-
ment are yerida, the massive im-
migration of Israelis to the West,
and assimilation. It is paradoxical
that Jews survived centuries of
oppression but that in this era of
wealth and equality, Jews are
assimilating and disappearing,
Levy said.
Herzog was also questioned on
the tensions between Orthodox
extremists and non-Orthodox in
Israel. This is the most serious
problem Israel faces today, he
said.
"I would say that the source of
many of these problems lies in the
United States, in the American
Jewish community .. But I have
to emphasize here again that
many of the peripheral problems
that we have, racist problems, ex-
treme fanatical forms of Or-
thodoxy that really do riot
recognize the State of Israel,
these are problems that have
come from the United States and
are incidentally to this day funded
from the United States."
ONE OF Herzog's questioners,
Sam Shube, national chairman of
Continued on Page 9


Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Israel Reacts With Concern to Arms Scandal
By LEORA FRUCHT
The Israeli government
has reacted cautiously to
news reports that Israel has
been helping the United
States to supply arms to
Iran. While Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir has em-
phatically denied the
charge, the reactions of
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin have been
more equivocal. *
Peres, who was in the United
States when the story appeared
on the covers of Time and
Newsweek, refused to confirm or
deny the reports, but said:
"Whether they are correct or not,
in my view Isrel did what it had to
do. If they are correct, everyone
understands it; if they're incor-
rect, then there is certainly no
problem."
Elaborating, Peres said that
"... in principle, if the United
States asked us for help to
liberate hostages, in my view,
from the viewpoint of moral com-
mitment and political common
sense, Israel should accede, and
would certainly do so."
DEFENSE MINISTER Rabin
maintained that Israel is a
sovereign state and, as such, "will
decide to whom and when to sell.
If we want to make this public, we
will; in most cases we prefer not
to do so. And we do not consider
ourselves obligated to report to
anyone in the world on this sub-
ject." Rabin insisted, however,
that Israel had never sold
American arms or weapons con-
taining American components
"without having received
authorization from the United
States." .
Sources here say that even if the
news reports are accurate,
Shamir's outright denial could be,
at least, technically true. It is like-
ly that any arms deals with Iran
were negotiated by private in-
dividuals and not by the State of
Israel-. Further, if only spare parts
and ammunition were involved,
that would not technically-
speaking constitute "arms," say
the sources.
Even the Knesset is still in the
dark regarding the alleged arms
sales. In an address to the
.^>^iM
The Iranian Connection
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Relations Committee, Peres said
that the wisest course for Israel
would be to ignore the many er-
roneous news reports linking
Israel to the arms issue.
THE GOVERNMENT has
hinted that any alleged arms deals
with Iran were undertaken only in
order to help the United States
win back its hostages. "A
democratic state does everything
it can to save human lives," com-
mented Peres.
But that argument has been met
with skepticism by analysts here.
Ron Ben-Yishai of the Hebrew
daily Yediot Achronot raises this
issue: A year ago, two Israeli
soldiers were taken prisoner in
south Lebanon by Hezbollah, the
same organization that was
holding the American hostages.
Why hasn't the Israeli govern-
ment been able to negotiate their
safety, or at least ascertain their
whereabouts? "Charity," he
writes, "begins at home."
Writing in the Jerusalem Post,
Gideon Rafael, former director
general of the Foreign Ministry,
questions the whole premise of
trading arms for hostages. "Has
anyone in Israel, of sound mind,
ever contemplated trading
rockets for prisoners with Ahmed
Jibril?" he asks. "Why then sug-
gest such an eccentricity to our
best friends?"
WHILE acknowledging that
Israel would and should go out of
its way to help the United States,
analysts say that any alleged
Israeli involvement in arms sales
to Iran was likely undertaken in
order to serve Israel's own policy
a policy that may have been in
effect long before the American
arms for hostages deal was
struck.
The thrust of this policy is
believed to be the desire to stave
off an Iraqi victory in the Gulf
War and to establish a relation-
ship with the moderate elements
in the Iranian government.
These are the arguments former
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon is
said to have raised, in trying to
convince Washington of the
wisdom of providing arms to Iran
in 1981. There are conflicting
reports as to the outcome of the
meeting.
But in light of the recent
reports, these policy objectives
have become the subject of debate
in Israel.
WHILE/MANY Iran-watchers
agree that it may have been in
Israel's best interests to help
bolster Iran's fledgling military at
the beginning of the war, an Ira-
nian victory now seems imminent.
A win for Islamic fundamentalism
would not be to Israel's advantage
any more than an Iraqi victory
would be. Many Israelis think the
longer the war drags on the bet-
( ontinued on Page 8-
Who Is Vanunu?
From Nude Modeling to Leftwinger
m0
Iranian forces strike at Iraqi positions war the port of Basra.
By JAMES CHESKY
Perhaps the only Israelis
not shocked that nuclear
reactor technician
Mordechai Vanunu sold
what he claimed are the
secrets of Israel's atomic
weapons program are those
who knew him personally
students and lecturers at
Ben-Gurion University of
the Negev, where he was a
Master's degree candidate.
"I'm only surprised that it took
the Shin Bet (the General Security
Services) so long to find out that
he was a potential traitor," sug-
gested David Zigdon, the
manager of the university
cafeteria, where Vanunu spent
much of his free time arguing on
behalf of a Palestinian state.
"He felt deeply that the State of
Israel was discriminating against
the Arabs," said David Yussub,
who served with Vanunu on the
student council. "If any Israeli
could sell Israel's most highly
guarded secrets, it would have to
be Motti."
MORDECHAI VANUNU, 32,
was born in Marakesh, Morocco in
Mordechai Vanunu during his
army service.
1954. His father, Solomon, ran a
small store in Morocco until 1963,
when he. his wife, Mazal, and
their six sons and three daughters
immigrated to Israel and settled
in Beersheba.
Solomon Vanunu, 75, says that
his second son "Motti" was his
favorite. "He had a head for learn-
ing Torah, and I sent him to the
Wolfson Yeshiva (an ultra-
Orthodox school). I used to take
him there every day and would
take an interest in his studies."
After his second year at the
yeshiva, Vanunu lost interest in
Jewish studies and left Wolfson
the following year.
He volunteered for the army
three months before his 18th bir-
thday, hoping to become a pilot.
After he was rejected from pilots'
training, he went into the combat
engineering corps, rising to the
rank of first sergeant. Soldiers
who served with Vanunu describe
him as anything from an indif-
ferent to a naive, ineffective com-
mander. Although his unit has had
numerous reunions, Vanunu has
attended none of them.
AFTER MILITARY service,
Vanunu began to study physics at
Tel Aviv university, but quit dur-
ing his first year. He got a job at
Israel's experimental nuclear
reactor in the southern town of
Dimona, where he worked until he
was dismissed last November.
While working as a reactor
Continued on Page 8-



Pmge ft^ The 3ew\h Ftortduw ot South County/Friday, January 16, 1987
Synagogue cAfews
TEMPLE SINAI
v
ANSHEI EMUNA
Rabbi Dr. Louis L Sacks will
preach the Sermon on the theme
"Vayechi ... the Weekly Torah
Biblical Portion" at the Sabbath
Morning Service on Saturday,
commencing at 8:30 a.m.
Kiddush will follow the Service.
The Se'udat Shl'isht with the
Rabbi's D'var Torah will be
celebrated in conjunction with the
Sabbath Twilight Services, com-
mencing at Sunset.
Daily classes in the "Judaic
Code of Religious Law" (Shulchan
Ouch) led by Rabbi Sacks begin
at 7:30 a.m. preceding the Daily
Morning Services and at 5 p.m. in
conjunction with the Daily
Twilight Minyon Services.
Rabbi Yonason Sacks will be the
Scholar-in-Residence on Saturday
and Sunday, Jan. 31 and Feb. 1.
Harry Cope, Mrs. Lucille
Cohen, Dr. Nathan Jacobs and
Mrs. Nora Kalish are the
chairmen of the Membership
Committee.
For further information call
499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
Rabbi Pincus Aloof of Temple
Anshei Shalom of Delray Beach
will conduct a Bris on Saturday at
11:30 following services. The child
is the grandson of Rabbi and Mrs.
Pincus Aloof. The entire com-
munity is invited to attend the
joyous occasion.
Temple Anshei Shalom of West
Delray announces as series of
entertainment programs, to take
place in the Temple auditorium.
Tickets are now on sale for all per-
formances, with all seats reserv-
ed. Tickets can be purchased at
the Temple, Monday through
Thursday, 10 am. to 1 p.m. The
phone number is 495-1300.
Sunday, Jan. 25, 8 p.m.. Forest
J. Willinghams Songs of Broad-
way, new 1987 edition. In its 15th
year, the show features the very
best from generations of immor-
tals, with new songs, new skits,
and new costumes. Donation is $5
t-ach.
Temple Anshei Shalom of West
Delray is situated on West Atlan-
tic Ave.. one mile east of Florida
Turnpike. Delray Beach Exit 32.
The Sisterhood of Temple An-
shei Shaiom. Delray Beach, will
meet in the Tempi.- Monday. Jan.
[nstallatio
.
CONGREGATION
B'NAI ISRAEL
Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. at the
ler for Group Coun.- ii K on
Boca Rio Road. The B
Peace Must
Come Hussein
Continued from Page 1
terrand and Premier Jacques
Chirac, both of whom he will be
meeting later during his stay.
Hussein is expected to urge
France and other Western Euro-
pean countries to convene a
preparatory conference on the
Middle East at the earliest
moment.
According to Arab diplomats
here, Hussein will call on France
and Western Europe to persuade
the United States not to veto an
international peace conference.
The U.S. and Israeli leaders are
opposed to any forum that would
replace direct Arab-Israel
negotiations and reintroduce the
Soviet Union into Middle East
affairs.
"Jewish Perspectives on Current
Sexual Issues III Role of the
Public Schools."
TEMPLE BETH EL
Jan. 18, 1 p.m.: The Temple
Beth El Solos (over 49 Singles) is
having a Paid-Up Membership
Brunch at the Temple. The Theme
is socialization, starting the New
Year off right and getting to know
one another. We will have enter-
tainment. The Brunch will be free
for members and $5 for guests.
For further information, please
call Sylvia 395-2226 or Ruth
482-4340.
Jan. 21, 8:15 p.m.: The
Distinguished Artists Series of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
presents Bella Davidovich,
pianist, on Wednesday evening,
Jan. 21. Single tickets are
available at $25, $15, and $10
each. All seats are reserved. Call
Concert Office at 391-8600 for
further information.
Jan. 24, 8 p.m.: The Contem-
poraries of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton (Young Couples
Group) are planning "A Western
Night." It will include a barbecue
dinner, square dancing with a pro-
fessional caller, and good times
for all the guests. Those attending
are requested to wear western
style outfits. The party will be
held at Temple Beth El. The
charge for this event is $45 per
couple for Contemporaries, and
$55 per couple for their guests.
For further information, please
call the Temple Office at
391-8900.
Jan. 25. 12-3 p.m.: Club 6 (6th
graders) of Temple Beth El will
have a Pizza Party at the Temple
and a Bowling Party at Don
Carter Lanes. For further details,
call Mindy at 344-1938.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
LAKE WORTH
The Men'i Club of Temple Beth
Sholom of Lake Worth will hold a
breakfast meeting Jan. 18.
Speaker William F. Saulson will
talk on "A World of Difference."
TEMPLE EMETH
The adult classes of Rabbi Elliot
J. Winograd which meet at Tem-
ple Emeth, Delray Beach on
Tuesdays at 1:30 p.m. will concen-
trate on the subject, "Dissenting
Movements in Judaism" during
the next three weeks. It will be
divided into three segments,
origin, philosophy and future.
Temple Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray Beach, is having the
dedication of their Milton and Ber-
nice Weisenbrg Meditation
Garden on Wednesday, Jan. 28 at
3 p.m. The impressive ceremony
wilt include local and national
celebrities who will participate in
also memorializing the Astronauts
on the anniversary of the
Challenger's tragic mishap last
year. Beautiful trees with ap7-
propriate markers have been
planted for each astronaut.
Kulanu, Temple Sinai, Delray
Beach announces its fourth annual
Art Exhibition and Auction to be
held at Temple Sinai, 2475 West
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach on
Saturday evening, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m.
Beverly Kamin will serve as
chairman of the Exhibition and
Auction which will feature
original works of art, by world
renowned artists, in oils, water-
colors and lithography, as well as
graphics, enamels, etchings,
posters, ceramic pottery and
sculptures.
A donation of $2.50 per person
includes admission, a door prize
drawing and refreshments prior
to the auction. Proceeds will
benefit Temple Sinai.
For further information and
ticket sales contact Joan Barnett
at 276-6161.
Friday, at 8:15, services will be
held at Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach. Rab-
bi Samuel Silver's sermon will be
"How to Forgive." Cantor Elaine
Shapiro will be in attendance.
Saturday, the Pirke Avot study
group will meet at 9 a.m., followed
by Saturday services at 10 a.m.
For information regarding
membership please call Temple of-
fice 272-6161.
Theodore Bikel, star per-
former/social activist will lecture
at Temple Sinai of Delray Beach
on: NOTE DATE CHANGE
Saturday, Feb. 14 at 8 p.m. His
topic will be "Jewish Music: A
Borrowed Garment Made Our
Own." Ticket donations are $7.50
and $25 patron, which includes
post champagne reception with
Bikel. All seats are reserved. Call
Temple office for information
276-6161. All Feb. 1 ticket* will be
honored for Feb. U.
Temple Sinai of Delray Beach is
running a complete Adult Educa-
tion program. Interested parties
call Temple office 276-6161.
The Brotherhood of Temple
Sinai of Delray Beach announces
upcoming musical revues: The
Great American Musical on
Parade, performed by the Gold
Coast Opera, on Jan. 25; the
music and dancing of the Mora
Arriga Family on Feb. 15; and
Light In Heart, illusions combined
with music on March 29. All per-
formances will be on Sunday even-
ings at 8 p.m. and all seats are
reserved. Tickets are $5 per show.
For information call 276-6161.
It Costs So Little
And It Means So Much.
Southern Bell Long Distance is a great
way to stay in touch with friends and
family at reasonable rates.
A10-MINUTE CALL FROM PALM BEACH TO:
Ft. Lauderdale $1.89
Boca Raton $1.89
Miami $2.49
Ft. Pierce $1.89
Call on weekends or after 11 p.m and save even more.
Rates listed above are in effect 5-11 p.m., Sunday-Friday.

Southern Bell Long Distance
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Dial Station (1 ?) charges apply These charges do not apply to person-to-person, coin, hotel guest, calling card. coHeci calls calls charged lo another number or to time and
charge calls Rates subfect to change Daytime rates are higher Rates do rv* -rtlect applicable federal, state and local taxes Applies to intra-LATA long distance calls only



Historian^ Publicizes
Ida Nuiel's Appeal to West
Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
By SUZAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An appeal to the West by
refusenik Ida Nudel has
been publicized by British
historian Martin Gilbert.
Gilbert, who campaigns
worldwide on behalf of
Soviet Jews and has written
several books about them,
wrote a letter on Nudel's
behalf for the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews.
Gilbert read this letter, which
includes Nudel's appeal for
freedom, at a gathering in Tel
Aviv on Dec. 25 commemorating
Prisoners of Conscience Day. At
that time, Gilbert and Natan
laransky placed a phone call to a
loscow apartment in which
tfuseniks and former Prisoners
of Conscience were gathered to
discuss their present situation in
light of the pardon of Andrei
Sakharov.
THE DISSIDENT physicist
and spokeperson for human rights
and Jewish refuseniks and
prisoners was allowed to leave his
six-year exile in the closed city of
Gorky and return to Moscow with
his wife, Yelena Bonner, who was
also pardoned. Nudel is exiled to
the closed city of Bendery.
"With the return of Academi-
cian Sakharov from Gorky to
Moscow," Gilbert wrote, "a
leading dissident and courageous
Shamir Due To Meet
With Reagan in D.C.
NEW YORK (JTA) Prime Minister Yitzhak
Shamir is scheduled to meet President Reagan Feb. 17 at
the White House, a spokesman for the Israeli Consulate
here said Monday.
ACCORDING TO the spokesman, Shamir will arrive in
New York Feb. 15 to begin a 10-day U.S. visit with
meetings and appearances in New York, Washington, Los
Angeles and Houston. The spokesman stressed, however,
that the Premier's itinerary is not complete and many
changes are likely to take place.
The main topic of discussion between Reagan and
Shamir will be American-Israeli relations, the spokesman
said.
Ivan Lendl Golf-Tennis
Event To Benefit
Cystic Fibrosis
The Second Annual Ivan Lendl
Golf and Tennis Festival will be
held at Gleneagles Country Club
in Delray Beach Feb. 20 and 21.
The announcement was made by
Christina Bischoff of the Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation, the event's
charity beneficiar
The weekend event will consist
tennis pro-am tournamei
golf pro-am event, breakfast,
lunch an.I a tennis exhibi
vorld-renown
star Ivai Lendl, Ms. Bisd
The exhibition match will pit
Lendl against high ranked tennis
pro inez. Tick
available for $10.
Tickets for the event are now
available and cost $200 per golfer
and $300 per amateur tennis
player. Tickets are available from
the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation's
Fort Lauderdale Regional Office,
772-8727.
"This is the second year that
Ivan Lendl has agreed to host this
tournament weekend for us and
we are very pleased to be able to
work with him again," Ms.
Bischoff said. "Ivan's dedication
to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
will go a long way towards helping
us raise the necessary funds to
find a cure for this disease."
Cystic Fibrosis is the leading
genetic killer of children in the
U.S. Every four hours a child is
born with CF and every eight
hours a child dies from the
disease, which attacks the
respiratory and digestive
systems.
For more information on the
golf and tennis weekend or for
ticket reservations, phone the
Cystic Fibrosis Foundation office
at 772-8727.
spokesman for human rights has
been allowed home. Jews
throughout the world recall with
gratitude his long and outspoken
championship of the right of the
Jews of Russia to be reunited with
their people in Israel...
"Academician Sakharov returns
to Moscow, but one of those Jews
on whose behalf he many times
protested, remains in enforced ex-
ile in southern Russia, in the
remote town of Bendery ... Ida
Nudel ... first applied to leave
Russia for Israel in the very year,
1971, in which Sakharov set up his
Human Rights Committee."
GILBERT NOTED that in
Nudel's letter of appeal she
"writes of that festive moment
when the people of Israel, and
Jewish throughout the world,
light the candles which symbolize
the resistance of the Maccabees."
Nudel wrote: "Remember those
who are so far off, so isolated by
distance and hostility ... whose
life is being destroyed now in
punishment cells, half hungry,
half getting frozen for no crime at
all, but only for being a Jew.
Remember those who, despite
persecutions and harassment, will
celebrate our holiday, who will
light up candles, who will tell their
children about the history and
dignity of the people they belong
to."
Gilbert, writing from Oxford
University, asked, "Is it beyond
the ability of the Western world to
end her 16-year separation from
the Jewish State, to enable her to
light the candles of freedom next
year at her sister's side?"
Volunteers For Israel
It's one way to see Israel, but certainly not the most
usual. A program called Volunteers for Israel, in its fourth
year, arranges for U.S. residents to spend three weeks in
Israel, replacing an Israeli reservation!st who could
therefore remain in his civilian job.
Groups of about 30 volunteers ranging in age from 17 to
65, eat, sleep and work at various military bases and have
specially-arranged day-long trips around the country. The
cost is about $600, and that includes round trip airfare from
JFK in New York aboard El Al to Israel. Meals and housing
and uniforms are provided.
Each volunteer relieves one reserve soldier and saves the
Israeli economy about $600 per reservist, according to of-
ficials of the program, which has sent over 3,400 American
volunteers to the Holy Land since the program was
launched.
The Volunteers, according to one report, are doing
everything from putting new bolts into the undercarriage
of a captured Soviet T-54 to peeling potatoes and scrubbing
latrines."
For more information, contact Volunteers for Israel, 40
Worth Street, Room 710, New York, NY 10013.
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All four cereals are fortified with at least
jht essential vitamins and they're abso
her.
So look for POST* the natural choice.
fr/T^ Where keeping Kosher is a delicious tradition. 5g
Ql
.i


Page The Jevrtah FXortdian of South County/Friday, January 16, 1987
From Nude Posing to Leftwing:
Who Is Mordechai Vanunu?
Continued from Page 5
technician, Vanunu registered to
study economics at Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev in Beer-
sheba. He transferred from
economics to geography and then
to philosophy, in which he obtain-
ed a BA after eight years of study.
"He was one of the students we
called 'the founding genera-
tion,' says one university stu-
dent who did not want to be
quoted by name. "It seemed as if
Motti had always been here and
would always be here."
"When Vanunu first entered
the university, his views were ex-
treme rightwing," says Avner, a
student who has known Vanunu
for eight years. "He gradually
shifted to the left and then to the
extreme left."
MANY OF the students believe
Vanunu's political views were an
expression of extreme loneliness
and craving for attention. Several
recall one particularly odd inci-
dent at a student clubhouse in
which Vanunu stood on a chair
and, for no apparent reason, drop-
ped his pants.
Other students said that
Vanunu suffered from an in-
feriority complex as a Sephardi
Jew. "He just never seemed to fit
in with the Jewish students," says
Avner. "Although many Sephardi
Jews fill positions of responsibility
here, he saw his own isolation as
part of an overall system of
discrimination by Ashkenazi Jews
against Sephardi Jews. So he
started eating with the Arab
students and soon became their
defender at meetings."
Vanunu founded the BGU
chapter of the leftist group Cam-
pus and attended dozens of
demonstrations on behalf of Arab
rights at Ben-Gurion University.
Photographs in Israeli
newspapers show Vanunu
demonstrating on behalf of a
Palestinian state.
"He is a person who cares about
the underdog," says Fawzi Mussa,
head of the Arab Students Com-
mittee at BGU. "He believed that
we were not getting our fair share
of dormitory rooms and grants.
And he was willing to come out
and say so publicly."
IN OCTOBER. 1985. Vanunu
attended an Arab student gather-
ing at the University. After a
huge PLO flag was unfurled on
the stage, Vanunu stood up and
called for the establishment of a
Palestinian state.
Vanunu was fired from his job
at the nuclear reactor in
November, 1985. The next month,
he applied for membership in the
Rakah Communist Party. On his
application, he answered the ques-
tion as to why he wanted to join
with the statement, "because I
identify with your position."
Shortly after his dismissal,
Vanunu tried nude modelling at
the School of Visual Arts in Beer-
sheba. He received IS50 ($33) for
a three-hour session. Interviewed
Vote Postponed
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
religious parties agreed last
Wednesday (Jan. 7) to postpone a
Knesset vote on the controversial
Who is a Jew amendment to the
Law of Return after a headcount
indicated they lacked the vote to
pass it.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir, who
said he supports the measure in
principle, suggested that its spon-
sors wait a few weeks. The Labor
Party served notice it would vote
en bloc against the amendment
which would invalidate conver-
sions by non-Orthodox rabbis.
When a bill is defeated in the
Knesset, six months must pass
before it can be reintroduced. The
Who is a Jew amendment has
been consistently defeated over
the years.
by an Israeli newspaper at the
time, Vanunu said that he was
also considering performing nude.
After his second session as a
model, Vanunu was told that he
was "not suitable." One of the art
instructors at the school, who did
not want to be identified by name,
said that Vanunu was "too ner-
vous and moved too much."
Several days later, Vanunu told
his classmates that he was leaving
Israel for an indeterminate time.
He sold his apartment and board-
ed a ship for Greece and the Far
East.
HE FINALLY surfaced in
August in Sydney, Australia,
where he converted Jo Christiani-
ty. He sold information on Israel's
nuclear capability to the London
Sunday Times for a reported half
million dollars. But before the
story was published and before he
could collect, Vanunu
disappeared.
On Nov. 9, the Israeli govern-
ment announced that Vanunu was
being held in an Israeli prison and
would be tried for treason.
Vanunu's father says he no
longer regards Mordechai as his
son. Solomon Vanunu, who sells
religious articles in the Beersheba
market, disowned his son when he
converted to Christianity.
"Whatever Mordechai did," says
his father, "he will have to pay for
it. Perhaps that will clear the
family of the shame he has
brought on us."
Israel Scene
Israel Reacts With Concern
To Iran Scandal in U.S.
Brian Greenwald
Bar
Milzvah
BRIAN GREENWALD
On Saturday, January 17, Brian
Howard Greenwald, son of
Shelley and Dr. Richard Green-
wald, will be called to the To rah of
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton as
a Bar Mitzvah.
Family members sharing in the
Simcha are his brother, Michael
and grandparents, Lillian Green-
wald, Dr. Henry Greenwald,
Henrietta Katz and Augusta Katz.
Brian is a 7th grade student at the
Clarke School in Northampton,
Massachusetts and has attended
the Temple Beth El Religious
School. Dr. and Mrs. Greenwald
will host a Kidduah in Brian's
honor following Shabbat morning
services.
Continued from Page 5
ter. Analysts ask why Israel did
not foresee that Iran was getting
the upper hand in the war.
Said Aharon Yariv, a former
head of military intelligence: "We
have a long-term interest in rela-
tions with Iran. I can understand
selling arms to Iran when the
country is in a difficult situation
. What I do not understand, and
I hope this did not happen, would
be the sale of arms to Iran in quan-
tity and kind that could result in
victory for the Khomeini regime
because this could be a disaster
for us."
Also being questioned is the
assumption that there are any
"moderates" in the Iranian
government. What assurances are
there that any so-called moderates
would emerge in control of the
country? And how likely is it that
they would be grateful to the
Jewish State for having supplied
them with arms?
THE LEFTIST daily Al
Hamishmar, questions whether
Israel's alleged aid to Iran did not
jeopardize relations with the one
Arab country with whom she is at
least officially at peace Egypt.
The paper suggests that at one
point Egypt was struggling to
draw Jordan and Iraq into a
moderate pro-Western alliance
which might have been willing to
talk to Israel.
However, in supplying arms to
Iran, writes the paper, Israel sid-
ed with the radical Arab states
(Syria and Libya), alienating
Egypt and frustrating the chances
of forming such a moderate Arab
alliance.
Above all, the reports concern-
ing Israel's alleged arms sales to
Iran have prompted a debate on
how such decisions are arrived at
and by whom. There is fear that
the interests of the country's arms
dealers may be influencing
foreign policy.
THE GOVERNMENT is sup-
posed to raise all arms transac-
tions at a subcommittee of the
Knesset Foreign Affairs and Rela-
tions committee. But in this case,
it seems that only the prime
minister and foreign and defense
ministers know the full story
behind the reports.
Several members of the subcom-
mittee have complained that this
is not the first time the govern-
ment has failed to keep them in-
formed of its arms transactions.
The latest reports on arms sales to
Iran have already triggered a call
for a reevaluation of that policy.
Israel Scene
Ferrying Fighters
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Palestine Liberation
Organization is using civilian
aircraft with Red Crescent
markings to ferry PLO
fighters from a base in Sanaa,
North Yemen, to Beirut by
way of Jedda in Saudi Arabia.
The same family?
RHUBARB and BUCKWHEAT
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lion ) Redemptions not honored
through brokers or other outside
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I
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I



I
I
I
I
I



'"
etters to Editor
No Voice of Outrage Heard
Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
Religious Directory
-
)ITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
he full page of pictures in the
. 9 edition of The Jewish
oridan about the Alexander S.
Hebrew Academy's 39th
[ scholarship affair brought
: back to a recent, intense and
eply-felt discussion among a
oup of intelligent people about
removal of the Hebrew
demy sign from the building
its replacement with a new
e, Fana Holtz High School.
! of us, in unison, expressed a
ot outrage and anger
it not only about the
imia (pronounced ego-name-
family, but also anger about
! in the Hebrew Academy and
\ie Jewish Floridian who failed to
. outrage and opposition to
i a sacrilege: the changing of a
Parties Trade
Charges
By DAVID LANDAU
RUSALEM (JTA) The
,-Orthodox Shas Party and
more mainstream National
ligious Party traded charges
t Thursday (Jan. 8) over the
idling of converts to Judaism.
fcabbi Yitzhak Peretz, leader of
as, who resigned as Interior
nister last week rather than
mply with a Supreme Court
der to register American im-
grant Shoshana Miller as a Jew,
cause she was converted by a
form rabbi, charged that the
RP, when it held the Interior
inistry portfolio, "registered
ntiles as Jews."
Peretz was responding to NRP
urges that he had mishandled
e Miller case. Shas has threaten-
to quit the unity coalition
>vernment unless the definition
a Jew in the Law of Return is
nended according to Orthodox
mands. Shas has four seats in
le Knesset, as does the NRP.
If Shas leaves the coalition it
ould be difficult for the other Or-
lodox factions to remain, par-
cularly if a non-Orthodox person
appointed to replace Peretz and
gisters Miller as a Jew, as
dered by the court.
The religious parties planned to
Iring the controversial Who is a
ew amendment to the Knesset
>r a vote last week. They backed
f when it became clear they lack-
Id the votes to pass it.
locket Explodes
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
ityusha rocket exploded in nor-
lern Galilee last week causing
ither casualties nor damage.
name synonymous with Judaism,
Jewish learning and Jewish roots
and tradition.
The new name should be remov-
ed and the name, Hebrew
Academy School, restored so that
the multitude may still point with
pride as alumni of the Academy.
In expressing these sentiments, I
must, however, point to the
satisfaction I felt that only the
name of the Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy was mentioned
in The Jewish Floridian picture
Pge.
It is proper and of tremendous
benefit to have a building or wing
of a hospital, school, university, or
any institution of academic intent
named after the generous donor.
But it is an affront and a sacrilege
to uproot for a price an old and
sacred, hallowed name to be
replaced by the name of the
donor.
This goes also for imposing for a
price the names of Gil and Adela
Holtz, Abel Holtz's parents, on
Rabbi Abraham Korfs yeshiva.
For that, Rabbi Korf is also to be
blamed, as well as those responsi-
ble at the Hebrew Academy.
It is also embarrassing to the
Jewish community to see the
change of name of an historic
Miami Beach landmark and
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I read the article regarding
Chanukah Menorahs in public
places, and I was disappointed
that Greater Miami was not men-
tioned as one of the cities in which
the Lubavitcher Chassidim had
erected the giant Chanukah
Menorahs.
As a member of the local Jewish
community I can only say that it
did my heart good and gave me a
sense of pride to see those lovely
symbols of our holiday displayed
in prominent places.
I give the Lubavitcher great
credit for their spunk and
perseverance. We need more
Jewish awareness, and they're the
ones who are spreading it.
HARRIET ALON
Miami Beach
EDITOR'S NOTE: Reader AUm
refers to the column by Andrew
Muchin in the Jan. 9 edition of
The Jewish Floridian whose in-
tent was not to praise the
Lubavitcher for the program of
placing menorahs in public
places. On the contrary,
Muchin reported on a series of
Supreme Court cases brought
by litigants against the pro-
gram as a violation of the
separation of church and state
principle.
Needed
Full Time Educator
FOR REFORM CONQREQATION
330 Students Grades Pre K-12
Masters level Degree in Education Required.
Experience in Curriculum and Administration.
Salary and Benefits Negotiable. Replies Will
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Send Resume To:
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Congregation Schaarai Zedek
3303 S itfann Avenue
Tampa, Florida 33609
t^tttumastitaaitttttttTfft't l'f......."**
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recreation facility in a public park
and public property from Flam-
ingo Park Stadium to the Abel
Holtz Stadium, and hitting the
streets, roads and byways with
diverting Abel Holtz Stadium
direction signs. Even the Flam-
ingo Park Tennis Court has been
changed to Capital Bank Tennis
Center, Abel Holtz's bank.
For old traditional and
established names, we now have
an Abel Holtz Stadium, we have a
Fana Holtz High School, and we
have a Gil and Adela Holtz yeshiva
wing. What's next?
HERSCHELLEVITZ
Miami Beach
EDITOR'S NOTE: Reader
Herschel Levitz em. The
name of the school of which
he is a proud alumnus re-
mains the Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross Hebrew Academy.
Neshira' Big
Session Topic
In Philly
Continued from Page 4
Telem Movement for Zionist
Fulfillment challenged the
Zionist establishment's concep-
tion of aliya. "The American
Zionist Federation is promoting
the slogan that a real Zionist is
one who pays dues. Do you agree
with this statement and what kind
of dues do you want from
American Zionists?" Shube asked
Herzog.
Herzog replied, "The dues I
want from the American Zionists
are the American Jews. That's
really what is the most important
thing of all." He stressed that
Israel is short of manpower,
especially in the high technology
fields, and needs a critical mass of
people to retain its independence.
"I would say that while paying
dues is very important in the
American Zionist Federation and
everywhere else ... the most im-
portant task world Jewry and
American Jewry has is to come as
far as they can to Israel. and in
particular to encourage the youth
to come to Israel."
Center Honors
96 Survivors
ST LOUIS (JTA) The
Center for Holocaust Studies here
has honored the 96 people,
primarily Holocaust survivors,
who have given their oral history
to the center's archives. In other
local news, Nobel Prize-winning
novelist Saul Bellow has received
the 19th St. Louis Literary Award
from St Louis University.
7th Annual Deerficld
Beach Festival of
The Arts Event
The City of Deerfield Beach is
proud to present the 7th Annual
Deerfield Beach Festival of the
Arts, an exhibition of artists and
craftsmen from all over the U.S.
and Canada, exhibiting a variety
of arts and crafts including pain-
ting, pottery, jewelry, sculpture,
and much more.
The festival will be held on
Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 24 and
25 from 10 to 5:80 in the Cove
Shopping Center, East Hillsboro
Boulevard and the Intracoastal
Waterway, in Deerfield Beach.
There will be 170 artists and craft-
smen displaying their original
works and a variety of interna-
tional foods for everyone's enjoy-
ment. The public is invited to this
event free of charge.
ANSHEI EMUNA ORTHODOX CONGREGATION
Orthodox, Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks, 16189 Carter Road, Delray
Beach, Florida 33446. Phone 499-9229. Daily Torah Seminars
preceding Services at 7:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Sabbath Eve Services
at 5 p.m. Sabbath and Festival Services 8:30 a.m.
BETH AMI CONGREGATION
2134 N.W. 19th Way, Boca Raton, Florida 33431. Conservative.
Phone (305) 994-8693 or 276-8804. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer, Cantor
Mark Levi; President, Joseph Boumans. Services held at Mae
Volen Senior Center, 1515 Palmetto Park Road, Boca Raton. Fri-
day evening at 8:15 p.m., Saturday morning at 9:30 a.m.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8666, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30
a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2262, Boca Raton, Fla. 33427-2262.
Phone: 394-5732. President: Dr. Israel Bruk. Services Friday
evening 6:45 p.m. Shabbat morning 9:00 a.m. Mincha-Maariv 7:30
p.m. For additional information call above number or 393-6730.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio Road,
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler. Cantor
Norman Swerling. Sabbath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday
at 10:16 am. Mailing address: 8177 W. Glades Road, Suite 214,
Boca Raton, FL 33434. Phone 483-9982. Baby sitting available
during services.
CONGREGATIONI TORAH OHR
Located in Century Village of Boca Raton. Orthodox. Rabbi
David Weissenberg. Cantor Jacob Resnick. President Edward
Sharzer. For information on services and educational rliwes and
programs, call 482-0206 or 482-7156.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
7099 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33446. Conser
vative. Phone 495-1300. Rabbi Pincus Aloof. Cantor Louis Her
shman. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:80 a.m.
Daily services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at
8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month, Saturday morning services 10:30 am.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FL 33434. Con-
servative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday 8:30 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 483-5557. Joseph
M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Conser-
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd. Zvi Adler,
Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:45 a.m.
Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Barwick
Road), Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Reform. Sabbath Eve. ser-
vices, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver,
phone 276-6161. Cantor Elaine Shapiro.
WINTER SEASON
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Ceanctertea Funeral Chapels Mausoleum Pre-Necd Planning


PmgC 10 Tha 3w\V\ F\ortdin o< South County/Friday, January 16, 1987
Israel Forced To Repeat
Denial of Complicity
In Weapons To 'Contras'
I
BY DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel was forced once again
over the weekend to
reiterate forcefully that it
was in no way involved in
the shipment of weapons to
the Nicaraguan rebels,
known as Contras, and that
it acted in American arms
sales to Iran only at the
behest of the United States.
A government spokesman said
Sunday that Israel was prepared
to answer any questions by the
U.S. with respect to the Iran arms
affair.
These responses were to reports
that surfaced in Washington last
Thursday (Jan. 8) and Friday (Jan.
9) alleging that Israel had in fact
initiated the U.S.-Iran arms sale
and was shipping weapons to the
Contras last year, apparently on
its own initiative.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
characterized as "distorted and
baseless" information leaked from
the unpublished Senate In-
telligence Committee's interim
report on the Iran arms sale that
cast Israel in the role of initiator.
VICE PREMIER and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres, who flew
to Rome Friday morning (Jan. 9)
for a 36-hour visit in connection
with the 40th anniversary celebra-
tions of the Italian Social
Democratic Party, strongly
denied any Israeli link to the
transfer of funds from the Iranian
weapons purchases to the
Contras.
The matter came up briefly at
Sunday's Cabinet meeting.
Cabinet Secretary Elyakim
Rubinstein referred reporters to
earlier official government
statements disclaiming any link
between Israel and Contra fun-
ding. Rubinstein also reiterated
earlier official statements to the
effect that Israel was only respon-
ding to an American request in
the Iran arms deal.
"If the United States poses
questions to us, we will answer
those questions," Rubinstein told
reporters after the Cabinet
meeting.
Shamir advised the Cabinet that
the entire matter would be subject
to detailed review by the Inner
Cabinet (five Labor and five Likud
Ministers) which meets in camera.
Communications Minister Amnon
Rubinstein urged that Israel hold
a full-scale inquiry of its own to
counter the reports coming out of
Washington.
THERE IS GROWING concern
here and among Israeli diplomatic
circles in Washington that leaks
and disclosures in the Iran affair
could harm U.S.-Israel relations.
Israeli sources in Washington
were quoted by Israel Radio Sun-
day as "fearing that Israel was
now being made a scapegoat" by
the White House.
The developments giving rise to
these fears and putting Israel
once more on the defense were:
The release by the White House
Friday of two key documents on
Iran policy. One was President
Reagan's "Intelligence Finding"
of Jan. 17, 1986 authorizing
clandestine operations by the U.S.
government with respect to Iran.
The other document was a brief-
ing memorandum to Reagan by
his then National Security Ad-
viser Admiral John Poindexter,
which stated that an emissary of
then Premier Shimon Peres came
to Washington with "a plan by
which Israel, with limited
assistance from the U.S., can
create conditions to help bring
about a more moderate govern-
ment in Iran."
A media report Thursday (Jan.
8) stated that Reagan was told by
his advisers last September that
American intelligence had
detected Israeli arms shipments
to the Contras. Congressional and
Administration sources were
reported to have seen a White
House memorandum on that
subject.
REAGAN WAS said to have
been advised of the alleged Israeli
weapons shipments to the Contras
on the eve of a White House
meeting with Peres last
September. According to the
sources who purportedly saw the
memorandum, Reagan was advis-
ed by his aides to thank the Israeli
Premier. But the subject appears
not to have come up at their
60-minute meeting on Sept. 15.
There were no indications in any
of the reports what Israel's
motivation could have been for
allegedly unilaterally arming the
Contras. One source alleged that
Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin favored Contra aid.
A spokesman for the Israeli
Foreign Ministry, Ehud Gol,
issued a statement Thursday say-
ing: "We can only reiterate our
previous unequivocal denial.
Israel has not sold, delivered or
transferred arms to the
Nicaraguan Contras. The subject
never came up in the conversation
between President Reagan and
Prime Minister Peres."
ISRAEL HAS yet to address
itself directly to the content of
Poindexter's memorandum to the
President. It stated, in part:
"The Israelis are very concern-
ed that Iran's deteriorating posi-
tion in the war with Iraq, the
potential for further radicalization
in Iran and the possibility of
enhanced Soviet influence in the
Gulf all pose significant threats to
the security of Israel. They believe
it is essential that they act to at
least preserve the balance of
power in the region.
"The Israeli plan is premised on
the assumption that moderate
elements in Iran can come to
power if these factions
demonstrate their credibility in
defending Iran against Iraq and in
deterring Soviet intervention.
"To achieve the strategic goal
of a more moderate Iranian
government, the Israelis are
prepared to unilaterally com-
mence selling military materiel to
Western-oriented Iranian factions
.. The Israelis are convinced
that the Iranians are so desperate
for military materiel, expertise
and intelligence that the provision
of these resources will result in
favorable long term changes in
personnel and attitude within the
Iranian government..."
"AS DESCRIBED by the
Prime Minister's (Peres)
emissary, the only requirement
the Israelis have is an assurance
that they will be allowed to pur-
chase U.S. replenishments for the
stocks they sell to Iran. .. The
Israelis are also sensitive to a
strong U.S. desire to free our
Beirut hostages and have insisted
that the Iranians demonstrate
both influence and good intent by
an early release of the five
Americans. Prime Minister
Peres had his emissary pointedly
note that they well understood our
position on not making conces-
sions to terrorists..."
The memorandum did not name
the Israeli emissary but described
him as the Prime Minister's
"special adviser on terrorism."
In another development Thurs-
day, the White House
Cardozo Bet Tzedek Legal Services Clinic of
Yeshiva University's Benjamin N. Cardozo
School of Law has received the Eleanor
Roosevelt Community Service Award. The
Clinic is one of 11 winners out of afield of 500
nominees from throughout New York State.
The Cardozo Bet Tzedek Clinic provides free
legal services to the elderly poor and disabled
primarily in the field of health care,
Medicaid, and Medicare. Shown at the
Roosevelt Awards ceremony in Albany are
(left to right) Matilda Cuomo, New York
State's First Lady; Tony Feldmesser, a
second-year student at Cardozo, who
represented his student colleagues; Toby
Golick, Bet Tzedek director; and Bishop
Joseph Sullivan, chairman of the judging
panel.
mmMMKflMHNMMMM!
White House Memos May Push Shultz To Resign
WASHINGTON Reagan Administration
officials declared Monday that U.S. Am-
bassador to Israel Thomas Pickering has
assured Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir that
the White House's release of documents last
Friday of two key documents on Iran policy
was not intended to cast blame on Israel.
"WE WANT to explain the background, to
tell the Israelis we definitely did not intend to
cast aspersions," said one Administration
official.
Meanwhile, sources close to Secretary of
State George Shultz revealed Monday that
White House publication of President
Reagan's "Intelligence Finding" of Jan. 17,
1986 and of a briefing memorandum to
Reagan by the President's former National
Security Adviser Admiral John Poindexter
may well have pushed Shultz closer to a deci-
sion to resign.
Shultz and Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger are both described in the memo
as having opposed the Iran arms sale.
THE SOURCES close to Secretary Shultz
said that the White House publication of the
documents has jeopardized his ability to con-
tinue functioning as Secretary of State.
Shultz was on a trip to Africa when the
documents were revealed last Friday.
acknowledged that it had deleted
information about high level U.S.
contacts with Israel from the un-
published Senate Intelligence
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
The seventh birthday meeting
of B'nai B'rith Women, Boca
Raton Chapter, will be celebrated
with a complimentary mini-lunch
for members on Monday, Jan. 19,
at 12:30 p.m., to be held at Temple
Sinai, Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach.
Entertainment will consist of an
original musical score performed
by chapter members.
For spouses and guests (dona-
tion) $2.50, by reservations only.
Call Fan 482-0561 or Janet
482-1495.
B'nai B'rith Women Integrity
Council will hold its third annual
"Outreach" program and lun-
cheon at 10 a.m. on Wednesday,
Jan. 28, at Temple Anshei
Shalom, West Atlantic Avenue in
Delray Beach.
Mayors of Boca Raton, Delray
Beach, Boynton Beach and Deer-
field Beach have been invited to
attend and to issue Proclamations
in the Organization's name.
In addition, notable speakers
will be Harriet Shulman, Alice
Pomerantz, Doris Holtzman and
Harvey Grossman. Each will
speak on a phase of B'nai B'rith
Women.
MAE VOLEN
SENIOR CENTER
Experience first hand our many
programs and meet Thea Childs,
our new executive director on
Tuesday, Jan. 20 at 12:30 p.m.
The center offers many oppor-
tunities to people of all ages in
their beautiful new facility. Please
call center desk at 395-8920 to
Committee report. One deletion
concerned Vice President George
Bush's meeting in Jerusalem last
July 29 with an Israeli counter-
Organizations
register.
The new "Sunday is for
Singles" Dance on Sunday, Jan.
18, sponsored by the Mae Volen
Senior Center will feature
Entertainment by the Rock-
Ettes, Live Music,
Refreshments and Door Prizes
For Men. Center is located at
1515 W. Palmetto Park Road,
Boca Raton from 2-4:30 p.m. $2
Members, $2.50 non-Members.
Telephone: 395-8920.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
Lakeside Chapter of Women's
American ORT is having a lun-
cheon and fashion show at Indian
Spring Country Club on Monday,
Jan. 26 at noon. Cost of the Lun-
cheon is $16.50 per person
(member or non-member). For
further information or tickets,
please call Lee Barack 278-7134.
terrorism expert, Amiram Nir, at
which U.S. hostages in Beirut
Continued on Page 12-
The Del Pointe Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
meet for their paid-up member-
ship luncheon, Tuesday, Jan. 20,
at Temple Sinai, 2745 W. Atlantic
Aye., Delray at 12:30 p.m. There
will be a musical program by
Veronica and Peter. New
members are welcome. Admission
by check or membership card. Call
Ruth 498-2416 or Miriam
498-1325.
Monday, Feb. 2, there will be a
"Mother to Another" luncheon at
Boca Pointe.
Saturday, Feb. 7, we are off to
Pompano Park. $15 covers reserv-
ed seats, good food, free parking.
Call Shirley 498-4667.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Nathanya South Chapter of
Women's League for Israel will
hold its regular monthly meeting
at 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 20,
at Patch Reef Park Community
Center, 2000 Yamato Road, Boca
Raton, just West of Military Trail.
Leo Stein, author of "The
Triangle Fire," will be featured,
speaking on "The Great Flanken
War of 1902." Refreshments
(Continental Breakfast) will be
served. Members, prospective
members and friends are invited
and welcome.
For further information call
Helen 498-3207, Norma 499-4432
or Ruth 498-3167.
"Will Judaism Survive?" That is
the question the Women's League
for Israel has asked William F.
Saulson to address during the 11
a.m. Meeting Monday, Jan. 19 in
the Administration Building at
Century Village in Boca Raton.
Saulson is family consultant and
director of the Speakers Bureau
and vice president of the River-
side Memorial Chapels.
Bomb Dismantled
TEL AVIV (JTA) A bomb
disposal squad safely dismantled a
booby-trapped car at a busy in-
tersection in Beersheba. They
were alerted by a passer-by who
became suspicious of the way the
car, a white Subaru, was parked.


Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
New York Cardinal John 0'Conner meets
with President Chaim Herzog at the Presi-
dent 's residence last week. The visit was a con-
.1TA/WZN News Photo
troversial one due to the Vatican position on
Israel and Jerusalem.
O'Connor Chides Jews
On 'Stereotyping' of Palestinians
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
John Cardinal O'Connor last
week ended his tour of
Israel by chiding Americans
for stereotyping Arabs. "I
feel we have a stereotype in
the U.S. for the Arab and
Palestinian. If you use
either term, Arab or Palesti-
nian, many people see ter-
rorist," he told reporters at
Ben-Gurion Airport last
Monday evening (Jan. 5),
just before leaving for
Rome.
"We are talking about an an-
cient, noble people with which we
have much in common," he said.
"There are very many Arab and
Palestinian leaders looking for a
peaceful solution" of the Middle
East conflict, the Roman Catholic
Archbishop of New York
declared.
HE ADDED that he "was en-
couraged to find so much talk of
peace in Israel. You don't hear in
the Arab world now things you
heard just a few years ago:
"We're going to push the Israelis
into the sea.' "
O'Connor said he would inform
Pope John Paul II in Rome that "I
think there's good will on all sides,
and that's what you need. I see a
lot of good will here in the Arab
world and in Israel toward the Ho-
ly See."
But O'Connor's visit to Israel
was fraught wkh controversy and
strains since he crossed the Alien-
by Bridge from Jordan. The
prelate made it clear that he
would have to abide by Vatican
guidelines not to meet with Israeli
leaders in their official capacity at
their offices in Jerusalem because
the Vatican does not recognize
Jerusalem as Israel's capital.
HE APOLOGIZED profusely
for any offense he might have
given Israelis and their leaders
and faulted himself for not fully
realizing before this trip the con-
straints put upon him by Vatican
policy. Nevertheless the Cardinal
met with President Chaim Herzog
at the Presidential residence in
Jerusalem and breakfasted with
Vice Premier and Foreign
Minister Shimon Peres at the lat-
ter's home.
He described Peres as a
"friend" and said he was
delighted to have been able to
return Peres' visit to his residence
in New York last October. It was
on that occasion that Peres in-
vited the Cardinal to visit Israel.
O'Connor emphasized repeated-
ly in his remarks to reporters that
the visits to Herzog and Peres
were entirely informal and unof-
ficial. On both occasions he wore
plain clerical garb instead of the
crimson robes and decorations of
a Cardinal which he displayed
elsewhere during his stay in
Israel.
HE SEEMED nonplussed when
reporters reminded him that the
Presidential residence (Beit
Hanassi) also serves as Herzog's
office. "If it is not the President's
residence, then there has been a
gross mistake, because ... it was
very clear that it would not be ap-
propriate for me within my
guidelines to visit the President
officially in his office in
Jerusalem," O'Connor said.
The problem did not arise at
Peres' home, which is not used as
an office. Peres himself implied
that the nature of the Cardinal's
visit lay in the eyes of the
beholder. "Jerusalem is the
capital of Israel and it makes no
differences if anybody recognizes
that fact or not. And if someone
comes to me and says I am coming
to you as a private individual so
what? Does that make me a
private individual?" Peres asked.
The final event of O'Connor's
tour was a visit to the ad-
ministered Gaza Strip where he
inspected the Shatti refugee camp
housing some 40,000 Palestinians.
Earlier, O'Connor visited the
Western Wall in the Old City of
Jerusalem where he kissed the
stones, and the Yad Vashem
Holocaust Memorial in West
Jerusalem. Near tears, he found it
difficult to express in words the
horror he felt at viewing the
Holocuast exhibits.
THE INVITATION to visit
Israel, extended to O'Connor by
Peres stemmed in large measure
from concern over the Ar-
chbishop's relationship with the
Jewish State. Peres said he in-
vited the Roman Catholic leader
to learn the Israeli side of the Mid-
dle East conflict.
Last July, during a visit to
Lebanon, u Connor said the
Vatican would establish
diplomatic relations with Israel
only after three preconditions
were satisfied: Israel should
"assist substantially" in finding
"a Palestinian homeland"; it
should help achieve peace in
Lebanon; and should also aid the
security of some eight million
Christians living in the Arab
World.
On that occasion, the Cardinal
made no mention of Syria the
Shiite and Sunni Moslems, Iran or
Libya, all of which have con-
tributed to the destabilization of
Lebanon and the massacre of
Lebanese Christians.
Before leaving Israel, O'Connor
seemed to indicate that he
thought Vatican-Israel relations
could develop in the future.
HE TOLD reporters, after
meeting with Peres, that "I have
found, contrary to disappointment
I found in New York, I found here
that the Foreign Minister is open
to an extraordinary number of
possibilities."
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Page 12 The Jwtah FlorkHmn of South County/Friday, January 16, 1987
Castro Sends Five Jews to Venezuela
f
Continued from Pace 1- -L
them to leave with you.
ACCORDING TO Rabbi Milton
Polin, president of the Rabbinical
Council, Brener flew to Havana
last Nov. 24, accompanied by
Bishop Alfredo Rodriguez, vice
president of the Committee of
Relations Between Synagogues
and Churches in Venezuela, of
which Brener is president.
After meeting with Castro and
other Cuban officials, and with
Jewish community leaders,
Brener was permitted to take the
five Jews back with him on the
same plane that brought him from
Venezuela.
The five were identified as Dr.
Julio Imiak and Dr. Solomon
Mitrani; Imiak's mother; and
Alberto Fernandez Vinas and
Abraham Shujman, all who have
kin in Venezuela. The Cuban
authorities had previously forbid-
den the physicians to leave
because of the local shortage of
medical doctors.
BRENER REPORTED that
Castro expressed interest in
knowing more about the Jewish
people and that he had explained
to him the history and travails of
the Jews, the Holocaust and the
importance of Israel to them.
Brener said that 12,000 Jews
lived in Cuba prior to the revolu-
tion led by Castro in 1959. Today
only about 1,000 Jews remain in
Havana and 300-400 elsewhere in
Cuba. Brener said he brought with
him prayer books and religious
items for the community.
Israel Denies Role
Continued from Page 10
were discussed.
Another deletion was a letter to
Reagan from an unnamed head of
state. According to media reports,
the letter was from Peres urging
the President not to give up on his
arms to Iran policy and assuring
him it would eventually succeed.
"VCe give our patients
confidence, security..all
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Few surgical procedures are
more critical to life itself than open
heart surgery. And, clearly, there are
few procedures where the experience
of the physician is more critical, more
essential.
So if you must have open heart
surgery, it should be of great comfort
to know that, led by Dr. James Jude,
the surgeons at The North Ridge
Heart Institute perform more open
heart procedures than any other hos-
pital in South Florida.
In fact, over 4,000 people have
come to us for open heart surgery in
the last 10 years. For the experience
of our physicians. And the excellence
of our care.
Because along with our physi-
cians, Cardiovascular Clinical Nurse
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and support to you and your family
throughout your hospital stay
And after surgery, a comprehen-
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return to your normal life as quickly
as possible.
But we'd rather help you avoid
open heart surgery entirely. So we
offer one of the most advanced diag-
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If you'd like to learn more about
our cardiac services, talk with your doc
tor or call us. In Broward, at 776-6000,
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Full Text
Friday, January 16, 1987/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Israel Reacts With Concern to Arms Scandal
By LEORA FRUCHT
The Israeli government
has reacted cautiously to
news reports that Israel has
been helping the United
States to supply arms to
Iran. While Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir has em-
phatically denied the
charge, the reactions of
Foreign Minister Shimon
Peres and Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin have been
more equivocal. *
Peres, who was in the United
States when the story appeared
on the covers of Time and
Newsweek, refused to confirm or
deny the reports, but said:
"Whether they are correct or not,
in my view Isrel did what it had to
do. If they are correct, everyone
understands it; if they're incor-
rect, then there is certainly no
problem."
Elaborating, Peres said that
"... in principle, if the United
States asked us for help to
liberate hostages, in my view,
from the viewpoint of moral com-
mitment and political common
sense, Israel should accede, and
would certainly do so."
DEFENSE MINISTER Rabin
maintained that Israel is a
sovereign state and, as such, "will
decide to whom and when to sell.
If we want to make this public, we
will; in most cases we prefer not
to do so. And we do not consider
ourselves obligated to report to
anyone in the world on this sub-
ject." Rabin insisted, however,
that Israel had never sold
American arms or weapons con-
taining American components
"without having received
authorization from the United
States." .
Sources here say that even if the
news reports are accurate,
Shamir's outright denial could be,
at least, technically true. It is like-
ly that any arms deals with Iran
were negotiated by private in-
dividuals and not by the State of
Israel-. Further, if only spare parts
and ammunition were involved,
that would not technically-
speaking constitute "arms," say
the sources.
Even the Knesset is still in the
dark regarding the alleged arms
sales. In an address to the
The Iranian Connection
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Relations Committee, Peres said
that the wisest course for Israel
would be to ignore the many er-
roneous news reports linking
Israel to the arms issue.
THE GOVERNMENT has
hinted that any alleged arms deals
with Iran were undertaken only in
order to help the United States
win back its hostages. "A
democratic state does everything
it can to save human lives," com-
mented Peres.
But that argument has been met
with skepticism by analysts here.
Ron Ben-Yishai of the Hebrew
daily Yediot Achronot raises this
issue: A year ago, two Israeli
soldiers were taken prisoner in
south Lebanon by Hezbollah, the
same organization that was
holding the American hostages.
Why hasn't the Israeli govern-
ment been able to negotiate their
safety, or at least ascertain their
whereabouts? "Charity," he
writes, "begins at home."
Writing in the Jerusalem Post,
Gideon Rafael, former director
general of the Foreign Ministry,
questions the whole premise of
trading arms for hostages. "Has
anyone in Israel, of sound mind,
ever contemplated trading
rockets for prisoners with Ahmed
Jibril?" he asks. "Why then sug-
gest such an eccentricity to our
best friends?"
WHILE acknowledging that
Israel would and should go out of
its way to help the United States,
analysts say that any alleged
Israeli involvement in arms sales
to Iran was likely undertaken in
order to serve Israel's own policy
a policy that may have been in
effect long before the American
arms for hostages deal was
struck.
The thrust of this policy is
believed to be the desire to stave
off an Iraqi victory in the Gulf
War and to establish a relation-
ship with the moderate elements
in the Iranian government.
These are the arguments former
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon is
said to have raised, in trying to
convince Washington of the
wisdom of providing arms to Iran
in 1981. There are conflicting
reports as to the outcome of the
meeting.
But in light of the recent
reports, these policy objectives
have become the subject of debate
in Israel.
WHILE/MANY Iran-watchers
agree that it may have been in
Israel's best interests to help
bolster Iran's fledgling military at
the beginning of the war, an Ira-
nian victory now seems imminent.
A win for Islamic fundamentalism
would not be to Israel's advantage
any more than an Iraqi victory
would be. Many Israelis think the
longer the war drags on the bet-
Continued on Page 8-
Who Is Vanunu?
From Nude Modeling to Leftwinger
Iranian forces strike at Iraqi positions near the port of Basra.
By JAMES CHESKY
Perhaps the only Israelis
not shocked that nuclear
reactor technician
Mordechai Vanunu sold
what he claimed are the
secrets of Israel's atomic
weapons program are those
who knew him personally
students and lecturers at
Ben-Gurion University of
the Negev, where he was a
Master s degree candidate.
"I'm only surprised that it took
the Shin Bet (the General Security
Services) so long to find out that
he was a potential traitor," sug-
gested David Zigdon, the
manager of the university
cafeteria, where Vanunu spent
much of his free time arguing on
behalf of a Palestinian state.
"He felt deeply that the State of
Israel was discriminating against
the Arabs," said David Yussub.
who served with Vanunu on the
student council. "If any Israeli
could sell Israel's most highly
guarded secrets, it would have to
be Motti."
MORDECHAI VANUNU, 32,
was born in Marakesh, Morocco in
Mordechai Vanunu during his
army service.
1954. His father, Solomon, ran a
small store in Morocco until 1963,
when he, his wife, Mazal, and
their six sons and three daughters
immigrated to Israel and settled
in Beersheba.
Solomon Vanunu, 75, says that
his second son "Motti" was his
favorite. "He had a head for learn-
ing Torah, and I sent him to the
Wolfson Yeshiva (an ultra-
Orthodox school). I used to take
him there every day and would
take an interest in his studies."
After his second year at the
yeshiva, Vanunu lost interest in
Jewish studies and left Wolfson
the following year.
He volunteered for the army
three months before his 18th bir-
thday, hoping to become a pilot.
After he was rejected from pilots'
training, he went into the combat
engineering corps, rising to the
rank of first sergeant Soldiers
who served with Vanunu describe
him as anything from an indif-
ferent to a naive, ineffective com-
mander. Although his unit has had
numerous reunions, Vanunu has
attended none of them.
AFTER MILITARY service,
Vanunu began to study physics at
Tel Aviv university, but quit dur-
ing his first year. He got a job at
Israel's experimental nuclear
reactor in the southern town of
Dimona, where he worked until he
was dismissed last November.
While working as a reactor
Continued on Page 8


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< .
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, January 16, 1987
President Reagan
Unfurls His Defense
The powers that be in Jerusalem may well
have cause to be concerned now that the
White House has gone public with two
memoranda one having to do with Presi-
dent Reagan's January 17, 1986 authoriza-
tion of clandestine operations by the United
States with respect to Iran; the second, a
document in the form of a brief memo to the
President by Admiral John Poindexter,who
was at the time National Security Adviser,
in which Poindexter referred to a plan by
which Israel can create conditions to
help bring about a more moderate govern-
ment in Iran."
It is difficult to tell which is more damag-
ing to Israel. Reckoned in these terms,
perhaps neither is as bad as what both
together produced a media report the day
before the two memoranda were revealed by
the White House which stated that Reagan
had been told as late as last September mat
Israel was shipping arms to the Contras.
The source, according to the report, was
American intelligence, hence placing the
alleged Israeli shipments in the clandestine
category. It does not matter that not even
President Reagan is purported to have
known about the Israeli connection until he
was filled in on the intelligence reports on
the eve of his Sept. 30 meeting with then-
Prime Minister Peres.
Sudden Candor
More significant is that the Administra-
tion's intent now is to go scapegoat-hunting.
All of this sudden White House candor ap-
pears to have as its purpose to shove the
burden from the shoulders of the President
where it frankly belongs onto Israel.
Indeed, there is something in the maneuver
that reminds us of a petulant child who,
when caught after having misbehaved,
ruefully blames someone else with the plea,
"He made me do it."
Can anyone honestly picture Israel mak-
ing the Administration do anything the Ad-
ministration didn't want to do?
Beyond these matters, a sadder issue yet
is the seeming schizophrenia in the Ad-
ministration's scapegoat-hunting, par-
ticularly in the assurance voiced Monday by
U.S. Ambassdor Thomas Pickering to Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir that the White
House's release of the two memoranda did
not mean to carry with it any intention to
cast blame on Israel. Said an Administration
official who reported Pickering's assurance:
"We wanted to explain the background, to
tell the Israelis, we definitely did not intend
to cast aspersions."
Will Shultz Resign?
If all of this nonsense adds up to anything
coherent so far, it is that the Administra-
tion's backstage maneuverings after all of
its clandestine and perhaps even illegal
operations may well mean the impending
resignation of Secretary of State George
Shultz.
Shultz, together with Secretary of
Defense Caspar Weinberger, is said to have
opposed the Iran operation from the beginn-
ing of his learning about it. There is some
variance at question as to iust when Shultz
did find out about the Poindexter-Col. Oliver
North (another now-ousted National Securi-
ty Council aide) scheme.
Apart from this, Shultz is one of the few
FlorIdiaN
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inside Administration officials close to the
President who can honestly say that not only
did some of the Reaganites circumvent
State Department powers by carrying out
foreign policy maneuvers without letting the
Congress know about them but by cir-
cumventing what may well be the law, as
well.
Because the White House memoranda
were made public last week when Shultz was
6,000 miles away in Africa, the offense to
him may now appear to be redoubled and his
impulse to resign overwhelming.
And that would be a pity of enormous
magnitute.
Martin Luther King
Monday, Jan. 19 is a day in our national
consciousness that will focus on Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr., the internationally
revered black civil rights leader who strove
to achieve through peaceful means the
liberation of all people from bigotry and the
agony of discrimination.
There is little doubt that Dr. King had his
black brothers and sisters dominantly in his
mind. But there is also clear evidence that
he set himself apart as the enemy of racism
and prejudice of every kind.
In this enlightened approach to the family
of humankind, he rose rapidly as the
spokesman for tolerance and mutal respect
among all people. In this context, he once
said, "Through our scientific genius, we
have made of our nation and even of the
world a neighborhood, but we have failed
to employ our moral and spiritual genius to
make of it a brotherhood.
It is painfully tragic that such a man as Dr.
King, imbued as he was with the principles
of Ghandi's satyagraha the force of love
should have had his life snuffed out in the
prime of his power of peaceful persuasion by
the force of an assassin's bullet.
In honoring Dr. King on Monday, we will
be saying as a nation that was blessed by the
presence of such a son among its people that
his force of love has not been forgotten.
That it will yet inspire us again and again to
the achievement of his dream.
'Neshira'
It Dominated Opening of Zionist Assembly
Friday. January 16, 1987
Volume 9
15TEVETH5747
Number 3
By MARGIE OLSTER
Philadelphia
The urgent need
for North American aliya
and the problems of Soviet
Jewish emigration and drop-
outs (neshira) dominated
the opening session of the
First Zionist Assembly
here.
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization and
Jewish Agency Executives, and
Israeli Deputy Prime Minister
David Levy addressed about 1,000
delegates of American Zionist
organizations, youth movements
and aliya support groups atten-
ding the convention organized by
the American Zionist Federation.
Highlight of the opening session
was a live satellite broadcast by
Israeli President Chaim Herzog
from the presidential residence in
Jerusalem.
HERZOG, who answered ques-
tions from the delegates over the
phone, quipped: "The fact that
your opening plenary session is
devoted entirely to aliya is no less
than a landmark in American
Zionist history. I would even dare
to suggest that the Shehecheyanu
blessing would be appropriate."
Herzog reminded the assembly
that not long ago, the subject of
aliya was taboo at Jewish gather-
ings in the "affluent diaspora."
He called on Zionists to come to
Israel, not only for the benefit of
the State, but for their own per-
sonal growth. "Aliya is most
precious when it is a response to
the ideal of Zion rather than to
brutal necessity We need you
and we know how much you can
mean to democracy in Israel. But
your olim will not only give, they
will surely also receive."
Levy echoed Herzog's call in a
passionate speech delivered in
Hebrew with a simultaneous
English translation. "The essence
of Zionism is the return to Zion. A
free people in its own country,
master of its destiny." Levy sug-
gested that Zionists have divided
into two camps, one in land and
one in the diaspora and this divi-
Leon Dulzin
sion can only cause problems.
DULZIN FORCEFULLY ad-
dressed the problems of Soviet
Jewish emigration and neshira, or
Soviet Jews who choose to settle
in the U.S. instead of Israel.
"The issue of Soviet Jewry must
be raised constantly by the Zionist
movement, by the State of Israel
and by Jewish communities
everywhere." He noted that the
Soviet government's oppressive
emigration policies are not the on-
ly cause for the plight of Soviet
Jews. Those Soviet Jews who do
receive exit visas but choose to
settle in America are hurting the
struggle for freedom im-
measurably, he said. "Neshira
should be condemned in the
strongest terms as should all the
organizations that assist them.
Soviet Jews are not refugees.
Neshira undermines the effort to
open the gates of the Soviet Union
and provides the Soviet Union
with an excuse not to open them."
Dulzin also pointed out that
assimilation of Jews in the
diaspora and decreasing birth
rates are the biggest threats to
Jewish existence. "One of the
most serious problems of our time
is the safeguarding of our people's
national existence," Dulzin told
the assembly.
Regarding the plight of Jews in
Syria and Ethiopia, Dulzin
declared: "Securing their release
is the historic mission of our
generation."
Herzog, responding to one of
several questions from the youth
movement delegates over the
phone, also discussed the pro-
blems of Soviet Jewry.
"THE PRESSURE Israel can
bring from an international point
of view is very limited. We are not
a major power or an important
power. We can do our best with
feeling. When it comes to
pressure, this must be the duty of
the diaspora Jewry and in par-
ticular of American Jewry. It is
the Western world in the final
analysis that can bring about a
change."
Levy said the two major pro-
blems facing the Zionist move-
ment are yerida, the massive im-
migration of Israelis to the West,
and assimilation. It is paradoxical
that Jews survived centuries of
oppression but that in this era of
wealth and equality, Jews are
assimilating and disappearing,
Levy said.
Herzog was also questioned on
the tensions between Orthodox
extremists and non-Orthodox in
Israel. This is the most serious
problem Israel faces today, he
said.
"I would say that the source of
many of these problems lies in the
United States, in the American
Jewish community .. But I have
to emphasize here again that
many of the peripheral problems
that we have, racist problems, ex-
treme fanatical forms of Or-
thodoxy that really do riot
recognize the State of Israel,
these are problems that have
come from the United States and
are incidentally to this day funded
from the United States."
ONE OF Herzog's questioners,
Sam Shube, national chairman of
Continued on Page 9