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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( May 30, 1986 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 1986

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00250

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
May 30, 1986

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00250

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
ONE DREAM ... ONE PEOPLE .. ONE DESTINY
w*| The Jewish ^^ y
FloridiaN
of South County
Volume 8 Number 21
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, May 30,1986
t*4 thocht Price 35 Cents
Inside
A Book for Grandfathers
...page2
Synagogue Affiliation
Drive... page 3
Fern Allen on Jerusalem
. page 5
AJComm. 80th Annual
Meet... page 10
South County Explodes In Celebration
Of Israel Independence Day
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
"The day went perfectly,"
said Israel Independence
Day coordinator, Marianne
Lesser. Her sentiments of
the JCC-sponsored celebra-
Continued on Page &
Artukovic Sentenced to Death
By Tribunal in Zagreb
PARIS (JTA) Andrija Artukovic, who was the In-
terior Minister of the Nazi puppet state of Croatia during
World War II, was last Wednesday (May 14) sentenced to
death by a five-panel tribunal in Zagreb, Yugoslavia, for his
war-time activities, according to reports here. Artukovic's
lawyers have 15 days to file a written appeal of the court
decision.
THE SENTENCE was handed down by District Judge
Miklo Gaiski, culminating a month-long trial against the
86-year-old Artukovic. He was accused of complicity in the
murder of some 900,000 Serbs, Jews, Gypsies and others in
his post as minister in the fascist Ustasna government that
ruled Croatia from 1941-1945.
Artukovic has denied all charges against him. He was
extradited from the United States to Yugoslavia last
February after living in California for 37 years. He had suc-
cessfully battled extradition and deportation proceedings
against him for 30 years, but was turned over to Yugoslav
authorities only after a new case was brought against him
in 1984 by U.S. authorities.
Rockets in Upper Galilee
TEL AVTV (JTA) A man and two children
were slightly injured by Katyusha rockets fired into
Upper Galilee early last Tuesday afternoon (May 13).
The 107 mm. rockets appeared to have been fired from
outside the south Lebanon security zone. The attack
did not affect Memorial Day observances for Israel's
war dead or the Independence Day festivities which
began last Tuesday night.
Israeli singer Danny Maseng
entertains at Israel In-
dependence Day celebration.
\

A Miracle Amidst Tears
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
"We are here tonight becauseTHe
world didn't care. We are here
tonight because our fellow human
beings turned their backs. We are
here tonight because human beings
behaved like depraved animals.
We are here tonight because all the
world said "We do not care."
- Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd
The first time 30 Holocaust sur-
vivors stood on the bima last
Wednesday night at Temple
Emeth, tears streamed down
most of their faces as the El Maleh
Rahamim and the Kaddish were
chanted. Later in the program, as
they reassembled on the bima
with small Israeli flags in hand,
their faces were radiant.
The occasion was a combined
program in commemoration of
Yom HaShoa (Holocaust Day) and
in celebration of Yom Ha'Atzmaut
(Israel Independence Day) which
was open to the community.
The intense emotional climate
of the evening had been signalled
by Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd as he
forewarned his congregation that
what was to follow was not for the
faint-hearted.
He then proceeded to read of
the actual events recorded at five
death camps, material taken from
the Eichmann trial transcripts.
"It must be told, lest humanity
once again turn itself into
monsters," rang the Rabbi's voice
with bitterness.
"At the Maidanek camp," he
read, "Mothers who clung to their
children were separated by the
lash ... A woman obstinately
refused to let go of her baby. An
SS man approached her, smashed
the child's head on the ground and
handed the woman the blood-
soaked body with the words, 'Now
take your child." That's when the
world looked the other way," Rab-
bi Winograd inveighed as he con-
cluded the accounting of atrocities
Continued on Page 8
Rabbi Winograd and Cantor
Adler danced a hora as ser-
vices concluded on Yom
Ha'Atzmaut.
Carnival booths occupied young people throughout the day.
Tiny Israeli Radiation Detector
Hits Europe's Market With A Bang
TEL AVIV (JTA) The hot-
test item on Israel's export list to
Europe is a personal radiation
detector the size of a package of
cigarettes, according to a
spokesperson for its manufac-
turer, the Amcor Electric Equip-
ment Co.
The gamma radiation detection
device developed by Amcor can be
worn on the belt line like a beeper.
It emits a beeping sound and
flashing light when radiation five
times the normal dosage is pre-
sent. The price is $140.
Evy Meirovitch, of Amcor. said
According to Meirovitch, the
Europeans favor the Israeli detec-
tor because it is the smallest and
cheapest on the market.
his company sold 2,000 of the
detectors in Europe during the six
months before the accident at the
Soviet nuclear power station at
Chernobyl near Kiev. Since the
disaster, the Amcor factory has
gone from one to three shifts a
day to handle orders for 10,000
more of the device. He said a
batch of 1,500 was air-freighted to
Holland, Austria, West Germany
and France last week.
\


Page 2 The Jewish Horidan of South County/Friday. May 30. 1986
Innovative Books To Help Grandparents
RememberAnd Be Remembered
By MARTY ERASN
Research into gilugj pro-
duces names and dates, but it is
not capable of transmitting or
eraonalibe*. feeJ-
anc nnagw Yet.
people seek their family
roots they are actually looking for
more than names and dates.
Ir. a brilliant stroke, a Boca
Raton grandmother came op sM
a soiuooc to this problem three
years ago. whet she }iuhliw>cd a
book ca.le: Grandmother
Remembers ." Though she was the
sole author, the book was only
t*r"L';. wrrner. by Judith Levy
to be written by
reader for her
rent, by filling in
thereat of it
each
the blanks.
The brilliance of Levy's innora-
taoc lay. among; other
making this a aoafc with
rhyme and umstraooos (the latter
bv" Judr PehlatU It made the Mm
-.- Txmm beat-adler bat, and
has sold over 750.000 copies to
date Next month it wiE be
]***-* m Hebrew is Israel: it
has beer translated into Dutch.
Germar. and Japanese, as weft.
The natural follow-up to Grand
mother's book wffl make its ap-
pearance next week, whet Harper
and Row will publish "Grand
father Remembers." which Judith
Lery has written in response to
p"T^rfr demand.
Levy is a product of an Or-
thodox cantor's family from Boro
Park. Brooklyn, which struggled
through the financially difficult
times of the Great Depression.
She was the eighth of 10 children.
aD of whom wandered away from
the Orthodox tradition in an effort
to assimilate into American
society
A: age 16. Judith Lew. who at-
tended the High School of Perfor-
ming Arts in New York, became a
professional singer with the Eddy
Theological Seminary Chief in Valedictory
Chancellor Germ D.
Jewish Theotogka. ;

-
DM
N
ames In The
IliW^
M ooaa-
t'nder Dr Cabas's direction.
Seminary "s admmistraoor.
anc curriculum were reorgamaed
and the insiitutjoc achieved a new
fmanruL stability which allow-
rroadec its aiready illustrious
faculty. He wffl mntanue to serve
a: the Seminary as a faculty
aaaaaber. and wfli be aacceedec by
Dr. laaaar Seharach. who wffl
'f office iu Jury.
Responding to a question about
Saudi Araou's cctrmutxc to the
peace process during the recent
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee hearings on the proposed
arms sale to Sand: Arabia Mur-
saw that Sand: Arabia haa
a) au fei s^to I -_--
process by as fbira-
tions to Jordan and the PLO.
prime uiuweis to get the peace
process going.
The Chan-mar. of Americans for
a Safe Israe. Herbert Zweabaa.
has called "outrageous" a state-
men: by Assistant Secretary of
State for Sear East AfJars
Richard Marshy that the PLO s
a '"prime mover" hl the peace
Bvuaaai
B uaa State Departmerjt
beheves that the PLO. which
seecs k destroy lsrae. and uses
violence and terror against
erribans as its chief method, is the
thee there is
wrong with American poorr m the
aaaftgiiSaai
t
KASHRUTH ALERT

Erev Peaach it was diau.'t-iec tztrougi rmaucl
the t'mcc of Orthooox Hebrew Cong-egaaons staff ana the V
Hataahms of Baltimore that SOFEC1A. a major importer of
aicohol under the i am ill ceroficuana of OX Laos nac ahegeo-
ta Men muwrtmg for apia ujmuaterr am montbs a wine aicohol.
tnus raising a queaooa of non-aoaher wme OX Laos nac eer-
taSee ttau tney nac maoe a thorough mapernnr of the mgre-
eaeuu" and found "it to be koaher for year round use '' i^kg
aleobo was aoic hi many companies, under various super-
to be in im in i ii into vinegar The natsumri ahouid be
aware tna: eapeenuy witznx the Metropoiitat. New York area
many products taat contair vinegar may have beet derrvee fnr.
tnis wme
The drfSeurry began last fat wner. Sew York State prohibited
the use of petrochemicals for rintamr production AJthougt Sew
York's Governor Cuomo reaeaaiad ans aw mat before Peaach.
moat major producers of food iteaas. oamg tamgai produced from
synthetic aicohol were forced to seek other sources for then- pro-
ductions. When some of our food producers sought alternative
sources, we permitted them to pm chase from SOFECLA. a mayor
distributor of ethyl alcohol, certified by OX Laos.
To date we know that the following products may be
they do not contain vmegar made from aicohoi
SOFECTA
bj
AE 01" Peaach products are accepcabie
All Golds products are also acceptable
Mayonnaise Admiration. Doxsee. Helbnans. Festive
Prides Left* Batampte Pickles
Mustard Hemz. Golds. Left*
Fisr Springfield Smoked Fish Lyor. Food Products
Feature Foods.. Nova Scotaa. Vita Underwood.
ObVes Ai Gooc
Vmegar Demier-Lj iiduniuV. Indiar. Summer. AJ.
Wayim. Heinz
I rseradisr a Hemz. Golds with Aug. 22 date
Saiad I>resamg Admiratior. Doxsee. Conway. Pfeiffers
Rabtn Moshe Hememan of the Yaad Hakaahru,
Baltimore Star mfmined the RCA tnat al Tnuva products
-ao approved all Hadar
- some time for the various kashrutr ageacies to
researcr. eacfi aroduct tnat uses vroep at mterim. people
ahouid suapead uamg vinegar products which are not yet or. u
proved hat undi their Haaarhir status y en-aiuated
That the gala anniversary lun-
cheon of United Israel Appeal
hekj recently tkm York, Henry
Task, of Engiewcod. N wW
eiectec chairman of the organiza-
tion s Board of Ehrectors. Alex
Grass, of Hamsburg. Pa., became
treasurer, and Raymond Epstein.
of Chicago was chosen as a life
trustee
Sylvia Hasseafeld of Palm
Beach and New York City, and
Beraiee Taaaenbaam. of New
York, were reelected vice
chairmen Stanley L. Sloane of
Sew York, will serve another
term as secretary
In the wake of Yom Hashoah.
the Memorial Foundation for
Jewish Culture has announced
progress its project of recor-
daraj the history of each communi-
aestroyed in the Holocaust
"frorr. its beginning until its final
destruction."
This is the most extensive
research project in the field of
Jewish history." according to Dr.
Yitzhak Arad. director-general of
Yad Vashem. which is carrying
out the project with the finar
port of the Memoria
Foundation.
President Philip M. klatznirk
said that its uniqueness lies m its
ocal and regional approach, which
combines intensive, monographic
research of the history of in
termediate and large communities
aeh country together with lex-
icographic coverage of al) Jewuh
communities in Europe, including
the remotest anc nes.'
Vj omen s American Organiza-
tion for RehabiliUtion Through
Training and the .It ish Con.
munity Relations Bureau
Greater Kansas Cit> have joined
together in a special projec:
help farmers and simultaneo..
combat an alarrr of ant'
Semrusm which has been trig
gered by th* farm cr
"'The agricultural crisis ha.-
duced a oenasne despair which
tan r^.- meant a rapidly in
creasing rate ie.
alcoTJohsm. mental illness, child
abuse, and spo;.- ^,,-j
Dark) GoldsteiR -^
tor of the .lev
Reia reater Kari
sas C:> These are the cla-
-ike
and for c
More* Sckapira.

.icevi thai
Duchin Orchestra. "I remember
my father asking me once, 'are
you religious?' 'I'm neither
religious nor non-religious I'm
in the middle,' I responded. Peo-
ple walk on one side of the road or
on the other.' my father respond-
ed. 'Horses walk in the mid-
dle___'" By age 20 she was
married.
Judith Levy says she marks the
major Jewish Holidays, now. but
does not follow Orthodox rituals.
However, she and her husband
Herbert are ardent Zionists and
have been to Israel numerous
times. In fact, when she wrote the
first book, she had put a note in
the Western Wall (the Kotel) on a
visit V) Jerusalem, and on her
return to the U.S. found the
publishers had acceptad her
book. .
"I was a Cinderella of the
publishing industry." she notes.
' ine publisher told me he liked it.
but it would not sell. ... I have his
letter on my wall alongside the
clipping from the New York
Times best-sellers list."
The hook has been, for Judith,
like the American Dream, a small
idea which germinated and grew
into a great success.
Word of the book spread by
word of mouth, from one grand-
mother to another. It sold with lit-
tle or no promotion.
The idea was born while Judith
was attending a course on writing
one's family history at Florida
Atlantic University. Many of the
grandparents attending had dif-
ficulty in organizing their
thoughts and deciding what and
Judith Lery
how to write. Judith came up with
the idea for the book as "a method
of putting your foot on the right
path."
The Grandmother book is like a
gentle hug. she says. The Grand-
father book about to come out is
more like a bear hug. reflecting
the grandfather's maacuiinity in
both words and format, including
the illustrations. "Both books are
a hug that reaches across the
years and the generations They
help the resurgence of family
values which people are
experiencing.
"The i love you' that is ir. these
books will be beard 100 years
from now. full of meaning which
names and dates alone cannot pro-
vide." Judith points out.
Judith and Herbert have three
daughters, two in California and
one in New York. Judith has but
one basic mr-wagf to grand-
parents: Make a memory, spend
some time with your grandchild
on a project, or a special activity
they will cherish the memory
and it will be better than any gift
3-WEEKS1,30e-1t6
WEBaYRATESt3Q7. S
2Great trmmmm c?^
VOani9io4rjreaaalraj
F rat Gaf on To *-Ho* Gog Counts
Skatno MaaOub.b
Sro9ram$*Spa-,
* Aarobcs md ArtsT&Ss
f


Unique Program For Synagogue Affiliation
Synagogue Affiliation
Promoted by Federation in
South County
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
Jewish Federation in coopera-
tion with Rabbinical Association
of South County, is spearheading
a campaign for synagogue
membership in South County. "I
think that it is the only such in-
stance of Federation support for
the synagogues in the country,"
said Rabbi Bruce Warshal, ex-
ecutive director of the Federation.
Concerned about statistics
revealing only a 13 percent rate of
synagogue affiliation in South
County (less than one-half the
tigure lor comparably sized towns
in the country), the Federation
Board last spring issued a man-
date to appoint a task force for the
purpose of determining what, if
anything, could be done to in-
crease synagogue affiliation. To
finance the first stages of the ef-
fort, Marianne Bobick, past presi-
dent of the Federation, said that
the Task Force will be allocated
$5,000 from the Community Rela-
tions Council budget.
Rabbis, synagogue presidents
and synagogue representatives
were in attendance Monday even-
ing, May 12, to initiate the forma-
tion of the Task Force. Five con-
gregations were represented in
the joint program of the Rab-
binical Association and the Jewish
Federation.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman, presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion, told the group that the pro-
ject is intended to facilitate
cooperation in our community
to reach out to the unaffiliated
and hopefully, as the program
moves forward, we will find
various levels of cooperation
which might ultimately serve as a
synagogue council for the
community."
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer, of Con-
gregation Beth Ami eleborated on
the synagogue council concept. He
explained there have been indica-
tions in recent months that the
Synagogue Council of America is
gearing its programming towards
local needs.
A local synagogue council, he
noted, might deal with joint pro-
gramming and issues such as:
Periodic reviews of synagogue
interests in relation to other
organizational groups.
Synagogue exchange pro-
grams involving the sharing of
methodologies to meet synagogue
needs.
And the establishment of a
system to deny synagogue
privileges to those who are in
Warning: Lyndon LaRouche May Be Calling You
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
Ben Schmelkin of Century Vil-
lage in Boca Raton was contacted
May 1 by someone who identified
herself as Lyndon LaRouche's
secretary in Baltimore. Describ-
ing the caller as having a "very
sweet personality," Schmelkin
said that she began the conversa-
tion by making reference to
several world issues to which she
probably knew he would react
positively as: the bombing of
Libya, aid to farmers and money
for AIDS research.
Then she started to make anti-
Semitic statments. "Ariel Sharon
and Israeli bankers will destroy
the American banking system,"
she said. "She might have figured
that Schmelkin was a German
name," he said. "I think my blood
pressure went up 90 points." She
wanted his Visa account number
and the amount of his donation to
the LaRouche Democratic cam-
paign for the Presidency.
Schmelkin said he remained
Israel Bonds
Advisory


Equity Bank Makes
Large Bond Purchase
To the delight of capacity
crowds during recent Israel Bond
functions at Del-Aire and the
Hamlet, Equity Bank of Delray
announced its purchase of
$100,000 in Israel Bonds.
Although Equity is new to the
area, having only opened in Oc-
tober. 1985, they feel it is impor-
tant to "demonstrate to the local
community their support of the
State of Israel," according to
Charles Brier, president.
Directors and/or organizers of
the bank include Marianne
Bobick, Charles Brier, Norman
Broad, Roy Flack, Arnold Ganz,
Stanley Katz, Patricia LaBow,
Dick Siemans and Leon Weekes.
Unanimously, they feel it is the
bank's civic responsibility "to give
back to the community," said
Jane Themell, Bank Manager.
Therefore they committed,
without hesitation, to this wonder-
ful purchase
Shelley Halperin To
Coordinate Models
Model Shelley Halperin will
be coordinating modeling for the
Annual Israel Bond Fashion Show
and Luncheon on Nov. 5 at
Bocaire. Her flair will add pizzaz
to the afternoon and help display a
rising industry in Israel.
Shelley's career in modeling
k-gan at 15 when she lived in
Milwaukee. Gimbels selected her
as a Teen Board Representative.
From there she went on to win
pageant titles culminating in
Model of the Year in Miami. Her
career took her to Boston where
she did runway modeling for
Filenes, Jordan Marsh and many
other major stores.
Later in New York, Shelley ap-
peared on the pages of Vogue.
Harper's Bazaar, People, Time,
Newsweek and Gentlemen's
Quarterly. She also did staff
modeling for Saks Fifth Avenue,
A & S. and Bloomingdales.
Shelley's husband. Barry, now
has a bevy of beauties. Shelley is
the devoted mother of Lauren and
Heather and still finds time to be
Shelley Halperin
active in many organizations. She
does take occasional modeling
assignments in the area.
Coordinating the Israel Fashion
Show for South County Israel
Bonds is a special project for
Shelley because of her concern for
a successful campaign. "This
enables me to combine my voca-
tion with a strong dedication to
Israel." said Shelley.
calm and politely asked for some
literature in order to consider the
request. At this point, the
"secretary" denied being
LaRouche's secretary and hung
up on Schmelkin.
Schmelkin, however, could not
allow the situation to pass without
notice. As a retired CPA, who is
listed in both the Who's Who in
the World and Who's Who in
World Jewry, Schmelkin is con-
cerned that others in the area are
being contacted and they should
be alerted.
Lyndon LaRouche is an ultra-
conservative and extremist whose
political machinations achieved a
stunning political victory for his
party in the recent Illinois
Democratic primaries. His Na-
tional Democratic Policy Commit-
tee has backed hundreds of can-
didates in recent years for
primary and general election con-
tests. LaRouche himself has thus
far made three unsuccessful bids
for the U.S. Presidency.
Friday, May 30, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
financial arrears with other area
synagogues.
Rabbi Warshal reiterated the
Federation's willingness to fund
the effort as either a task force or
as a synagogue council. He also
responded to a question as to why
the affiliation rate was so low in
South County. Saying there could
be many reasons, he cited only
five:
People tend to retain
synagogue affiliation "up north."
Few people have "roots" in
Florida.
It takes time for newcomers
to acclimate in the community.
Condominium/developent liv-
ing situations tend to isolate peo-
ple and focus lifestyles around the
developments.
People frequently join
synagogues to educate young
children Jewishly.
Positive approaches to recruit-
ment became the next topic of
discussion. Among the several
proposals, Rabbi Elliot J.
Winograd of Temple Emeth sug-
gested an "Ask the Rabbi Night,"
modeled after a regularly schedul-
ed monthly program in his own
synagogue. A panel of rabbis
would make themselves available
one evening for questions from
the community. He also proposed
that all the synagogues gather in a
"revival tent" or shuk type set-
ting and thereby permit potential
congregants "to visit many
temples and synagogues
simultaneously."
Rabbi Feldman mentioned that
discussion at a previous Rab-
binical Association meeting had
centered around that shuk con-
cept, as well as the Super Sunday
concept. The telephone bank
facilities of the Federation might
be used to announce a synagogue
open house date.
Phil Kaye, representing Temple
Sinai retorted that programs
would not resolve the situation.
The problem was a lack of
spirituality, he said. He announc-
ed that the Reform Movement
was sponsoring a Spirituality Day
locally on September 14 and he
suggested perhaps the other
movements could offer com-
parable experiences for their
followers then.
Rabbi Warshal expressed his en-
thusiasm for the "fair" idea,
where people could become ac-
quainted with a synagogue by
meeting its rabbi and lay leader-
ship. He also felt that a brochure
highlighting the synagogues and
the advantages of synagogue af-
filiation would be appropriate too.
Committees were formed to
follow through on the various pro-
posals and June 16 was targeted
as the next meeting date for the
task force.
Pure Savings
100% PURIFIED
President Charles Brier of Equity Bank stands to make an-
nouncement of their $100,000 purchase of Israel Bonds.
Ys"6Vf
I
WATERS
l/E>
MANUFACTURER'S COUPON /EXPIRES 08/31/86
Save 259 on ALL Syfo Packages.
Applicable to the purchase ol either two 28 oz bottles or
One 10 oz S pack or One 2 Liter Bottle or two 1 Gallon Bottles
MR Hf lAlliR ManuiacMer Mlpay 'da*'* ie staled 'ace value plus 8C
Mndlino, lot eaci' coupon received m connection *iin II* retail salt ol Ihe
product mucaleO Reproduced rmni condition and qanq cul coupons will not
Be accepled Coupon void and torieited .1 invoices providinq purchase ol
>MeM slot" 10 cnvei '"demotions are not pioducM on request or il
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Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 30, 1986

A Place for Travel Without Fear
This Year, Jerusalem
There are two Israels. The first is the Israel of the evening
news. That is the Israel of the Arab-Israel conflict, of West Bank
disturbances, of war threats, and of politics. Then there is the
other Israel. That is the place where 4,000,000 people live, love,
raise their kids and spend the week deciding what they will do
on the weekend.
The first Israel can best be experienced from afar. Israel's pro-
blems are more readily apparent on American television than on
Ben-Yehuda Street (any of the Ben-Yehuda streets). As for the
other Israel the real Israel you can only experience it by be-
ing there. For some reason, it just doesn't come through on video
tape.
That is why it's time to start thinking about going to Israel this
summer or autumn. Israel does not need its supporters spending
their time and energy agonizing over its fate. Israel certainly
doesn't need tears. It does need support and, right now, support
for Israel can best be demonstrated by booking an El Al flight and
going.
Spending time in Israel is no hardship. The fact is that Israel is
a "fun" country of beautiful beaches and landscapes, fascinating
historic sites, and an unusually friendly population. You can't
worry about the "Middle East" when you are strolling along the
Mediterranean promenade in Tel Aviv nor when you are sitting
on the balcony overlooking Jerusalem's old city at the King David
Hotel. The Middle East of the headlines just disappears
obscured as it should be by the Israel of reality.
The best thing about visiting Israel is that your trip is enhanced
by the sense of connectedness that you feel. Visiting most foreign
countries is a passive experience. You look, admire, and take
home photographs that look like postcards. Sure, it's very nice to
check out the ruins in Greece or the cathedrals in Italy. But these
places have very little to do with most of us. Israel is different.
Seeing the ancient "City of David" in Jerusalem is exciting
because our ancestors lived there. Tel Aviv is thrilling because the
people there look like and sometimes are relatives. You just
do not leave a kibbutz the way you do a Scottish castle, remarking
on how "nice" it is. You leave proud. Because that kibbutz has
something to do with you. Everything in Israel does.
Of course, visiting Israel is a two-way street. It is good for the
tourist. And it is good for Israel. Last year, 1.4 million tourists
(430,000 from the United States) came to Israel. While there,
they spent $1.3 billion more foreign currency than the country
derived from all its exports. Israeli officials had hoped that 1986
would be an even bigger year. In fact, Israelis were counting on
an increase in tourism revenues to help sustain and advance the
economic recovery of the last year. Any drop in tourism could
seriously retard that recovery.
Unfortunately, it is a drop in tourism that seems to be happen-
ing. This winter the number of tourists visiting Israel was down
41 percent. If the summer figures are anything like that, Israel's
economy could face some serious new troubles.
But there isn't much that Israel can do to attract tourists who
are afraid of becoming the victims of a terrorist attack. Israel
already runs the world's most secure airline, El Al. The country
itself is about as terrorist-proof as any nation can be. The U.S.
Congress is now considering erecting a fence around the Capitol.
In Israel, it is not only the Knesset that is guarded. Every major
and minor public place is protected. Purses and shopping bags are
routinely checked in theaters and in supermarkets. This may
make some people feel insecure. It should have just the opposite
effect. In Israel, the entire instrumentality of the state works full
time to prevent attacks on the entire population. This is true
nowhere else.
In short, there is no reason to avoid traveling to Israel out of
fear. There is, of course, a small element of risk in traveling
anywhere. Take Manhattan, for instance, or Miami. The only safe
place, really, is at home. But, then again, you may live near the
San Andreas fault or within a few miles of a nuclear reactor. Risk
is simply a part of life. Fortunately, in Israel, the risk is very small
indeed. As for the rewards, they are obvious. You will be doing
Israel a favor if you go there this year. But it is you who will be
the real beneficiary.
(Near East Report)
Shcharansky Backs Jackson-Vanik
The Jewish
RID]
of South County
w-^ The Jewish ^ y
FloridiaN
FHEI
I'M P .t.iisti."
buVANNE SMOCMl '
f erulivi- i
MH'Y (MANN
O'f^i i'i' o' Con*mn"K nitons South Countv j#*isti FadafatiOfl
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BOCA RAION OFFICE 336 Spanish River Blvd N W Boca Raton Fl 33431 Phone 368 2737
Mam Office Plant 120 N E 6th St Miami Fla 33132 Phone 373 4606
AdvertiaiHg Director. SUri l^aaer. Phone JHM-IC&2
Combined j<.. Appeal South County Jewish Federation .nc Otticets President
Marianne B i Vice Presidents Marione Baer Eric W Deckinger Larry Charme
Secretary Ar- ,, l Rosenthal Treasurer Sheldon Jontitt Executive Director Rabbi Bruce S
Warsnai
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum $71 by membership South
County Jewish Federation 336 Spanish River Blvd N W Boca Raton Fla 33431 Pftone
3*0-2737
Out ot Towr iion Request
By MORRIS J. AMTTAY
While visits by foreign dignitaries,
celebrities and heads of state are anything
but unusual in Washington. Natan Shcharan-
sky's recent visit here generated an unusual
interest and excitement. Having fought an
empire and won, Shcharansky emerged a
hero his grace, humor and unbroken spirit
were praised in Washington by journalists,
politicians and the White House. What was
particularly noteworthy to the future of
Soviet Jewry were Shcharansky's repeated
statements of support for the Jackson-Vanik
Freedom of Emigration amendment, which
was adopted by the U.S. Congress over a
decade ago.
This legislation, which tied increased
U.S.-Soviet trade with a freer Soviet emigra-
tion policy (applying not only to Jews), has
been criticized by some members of the
Jewish community and by U.S. companies
seeking to expand their ties with the Soviet
Union. Shcharansky's statements underscore
the fact that this act of Congress is a powerful
weapon in obtaining the release of more
Soviet Jews. His call of support for this
amendment coircides with an abysmally low
level of Jewish emigration, but also at a point
when the Soviets need U.S. technology and
trade to modernize their society. With the
U.S. tightening restrictions on the transfer of
high-tech strategic items to Russia, Gor-
bachev will have to increasingly seek U.S.
trade if he is to demonstrate economic pro-
gress to his people.
By continuing to deny the Soviet Union
most-favored-status until its emigration
policies improve, the United States will have
a valuable negotiating tool when the hard
bargaining begins. Given the usual Soviet
behavior, cynical and self-serving, the situa-
tion probably will change only when it is avan-
tageous to the Soviets to improve it. It is
mystifying, therefore, why we should be will-
ing to unilaterally surrender this weapon. But
it is heartening that Shcharansky is urging
that the Amendment be retained. Surely his
judgment is based on so much sad experience.
Jordan Arming Against Israel
A recent interview in a relatively obscure
defense journal with the Comrnander-in-Chief of
the Jordanian Armed Forces was a much greater
cause for pessimism than the more publicized
television network appearances of King Hussein.
Gen. Ben Shaker. Jordan's senior military of-
ficer and long-time close advisor to the king. let
the cat out of the bag when answering questions
about Jordan's forthcoming arms purchases and
modernizaton plans. Shaker as the "moderate"
head of the army of a "moderate" Arab nation,
made statements during this interview that are
most disturbing:
"The number of aircraft required was hardly
adequate for defense, let alone the conduct of of-
fensive air operations against targets within Israel
. despite what the Jewish lobby in the United
States would have us believe."
And just in case anyone missed the point. Ben
The Paul Greenberg Column
Shaker added, "Israel received every piece of
equipment that they ask for from the Americans.
We cannot hope to compete with them in this field
and therefore we must be prepared to oppose their
numerically superior forces with highly trained
and committed troops."
Nowhere in this particular interview was there a
single reference to potential conflict with Syria.
The conclusion was unmistakable that Jordanian
modernization of its armed forces was to fact' west
against Israel.
While Jordan should undoubtedly be concerned
a(K)ut Syria's aggressive designs, you couldn't get
that from the interview. If Jordan, widely reported
tn t>e eager to make peace with Israel, is sending
this kind of signal, it only underscores the difficul-
tj of Israel's achieving real peace with her
neighbors
Why the Waffling Over
Armes To The Saudis?
Friday, May 30,1986
Volume 8
21IYAR5746
Number 21
By PAUL GREENBERG
Something strange is happen-
ing in this debate over sending
still more missiles to Saudi
Arabia: Congress seems to be
responding to the popular will.
and the analysts don't know what
to make of it.
Here the Israelis aren't moun-
ting their usual, full-court press
against arms shipments t<> an
Arab country. After all. it's "on-
ly" $354 million worth of
miscellaneous missiles. The
Jewish Lobby back home, which
once was ranked with the Na-
tional Rifle Associaton in terms of
clout, hasn't exercised it on this
issue; it's staying almost neutral
by its usual, hyperactive stan-
dards. Nevertheless, in both the
Senate and the House, the arms
deal is l>eing opposed by massive
majoritu
A resolution to stop the salt'
went through the Senate 73 to 22,
and at last count it had 288
members co-sponsoring it in the
House, which means many more
would vote for it. It's enough to
give the lie. again, to J. William
Fulbright's neo-Gerald L.K.
Smith claim that the Israelis con-
trol the United States Senate a
claim that has been echoed by
many others irked because they
didn't. But without any of the
usual pressures being exercised, a
runaway Congress is refusing to
follow the State Department's
lead. What's happening?
Can the senators and con-
gressmen, like a lot of Americans,
finally have had it with the
Saudis? If so, what do you think
did it? When the Saudis broke
Paul Greenberg
with Egypt over that country's
d.vision to make peace with
Israel, the American arms kept
flowing. At least since the 1970s,
the Saudis have been bankrolling
the chief obstacle to peace in the
Middle East, the Palestine Li-
quidation Organization, at more
than $100 million per annum. The
American reaction has been to in-
crease the size and sophistication
of American arms shipments. The
Saudis embargoed oil shipments
to this country in '73 preparatory
to quintupling the price; still the
American arms kept coming.
Now the Saudis are flooding the
world market with their oil.
They're doing to American oil pro-
ducers roughly what John D.
Rockefeller and the old Standard
Oil Company planned to do before
the tru8tbu8ters came ng; the
Saudis are driving the competition
out of business so they can come
back and raise the price at will.
And nobody in the Administration
s-ems interested in busting this
trust. Far from taking even the
simplest step against this interne
tional cartel like an oil im|>ort
fee that would preserve the rem-
nants of the American oil industn
- this Administration propose! to
send the Saudis more missiles,
many more than they might need
for defense.
Adding Up The Score
On Saudi Arabia
an all this have caught the at
tention of Congress at last' Or
was it the $500 million a year that
the Saudis give Syria, another ter-
rorist outpost? Maybe the last
straw was the fanatic defense oi
Libya that the Saudi delegate to
the United Nations delivered after
this country struck back at Col-
onel Khadafy's terrorist
enterprise.
Perhaps the members of Con-
gress added up the amount of
military aid that has gone to Saudi
Arabia since 1950 some $5"
billion with another $20 billion in
the pipeline and realized that
$50 billion of military aid is more
than any other country in the
world has received over that time.
$44 billion of it since 1971 and $22
billion during this administration
alone.
It's as if, every time the Saudis
distanced themselves from a
peace effort or kicked an
American interest, Washington
responded with more and better
Continued on Page 10
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-'.i' i1


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Friday, May 30, 1986/The Jewish FloridianofSouth County Page 5
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7% ,/eunsA Quarter reconstructed.
Jerusalem DayJune 6
The Jewish Quarter in 1967.
Living Jewish History In Jerusalem
By FERN ALLEN
OLD CITY, Jerusalem Puah
Minhahar Steiner often stops
while walking to her home here
and listens to tour guides recount
the 1948 siege of the city to their
groups. Occasionally, she is temp-
ted to correct the guides and
elaborate certain details. For her,
the events are more than an in-
teresting period in Israel's
history. It is the story of her life.
Steiner is among the handful of
people who lived in the Old City
prior to 1948 and later moved
back to the Jewish Quarter after
the Six Day War. This year marks
the 19th anniversary of the swift
June 1967 recapture of Israel's
ancient capital from Jordanian
rule.
Steiner and others reflected on
their experiences before the city's
division as well as on the changes
for better and worse since
1967.
Malka Taragan's desire to
return to the Jewish Quarter
never ebbed throughout the 20
years that the area was under Jor-
danian control. To her, the Tem-
ple mount is the holiest place in
the world, and the Old City is the
center of the universe. Yet for the
64-year-old woman, the newly
paved stone streets and cour-
tyards hold haunting memories of
the days during the War of In-
dependence when she served as a
young Haganah recruit in charge
of distributing food and general
supplies to the Jewish residents of
the Old City.
"At one point during the
fighting there were 60 dead
bodies and no one to dig their
graves, since most of the young
boys were soldiers fighting the
Arabs. So I had to get the
residents to bury the dead. At
nightfall, I went into a synagogue
and made people come out and dig
the graves.
"You have no idea what kind of
.
fear there was as we carried and
buried those 60 bodies at night,"
Taragan recalled. After the Six
Day War, the bodies were exhum-
ed and reburied on the Mount of
Olives.
Steiner, now 45, was then seven
years old and lived in cramped
quarters in the Old City with her
family when the Independence
War began. One day a massive
amount of firing and shelling hit
their area.
"We were cut off from the outer
fortification for several days. We
didn't have any news from the
outside. Our spirits were low. We
were all aware of how few soldiers
and weapons we had.
"Suddenly, there was a flood of
people, mostly women and
children, pouring into the streets.
The Arabs broke through the
Street of the Jews. I saw them
with knives. Why are you just sit-
ting here? Flee; soon they will
come and slaughter everyone!"
one woman cried.
"The fear spread and soon all of
the houses were empty of their
residents. My father took my
younger sister Ruthie on his
shoulders and we started to run
with the crowd. We did not feel as
though a miracle was going to oc-
cur. The sea of enemies didn't
split and our escape route didn't
appear before us._____________
"Everyone entered a
building and
immediately the men
and women separated
to each side and began
to pray with cries from
the heart. I saw death
in the eyes of the
men," recalled Steiner.
"Although it was spring, people
Draved the prayers of the High
Holy days. Everyone said their
prayers and beat their hearts. The
cries seemed to be trying to tear
open the gates of heaven."
"I asked a woman what they
were saying. "They are confess-
ing,' she answered, 'confessing
before death.' In our great despair
we awaited our bitter end.
"Father motioned for me and
my sister Nomi to come near him.
His face was serious. 'I want to
talk to you. There are things that
men must command their
children. You are big girls and I
have to tell you what is in my
heart.
" 'Soon the mob will come. This
isn't the first time that they have
slaughtered Jews and we don't
know what our fate will be. Maybe
a miracle will occur and they will
spare the women and children, but
the men they will surely kill.
" 'I want you to know, now and
forever, that Torah is the most im-
portant thing in life. There is
nothing else equal to it.
Remember this when you grow
up,' he said.
"Suddenly, a man entered the
room dressed in khaki clothing.
He whistled and asked for quiet.
All eyes were on him. 'Our
soldiers have repelled the at-
tackers and soon they will be out-
side of the quarter. When they are
finished, we request that you
return home,' he said.
Steiner and Taragan were
among the hundreds of Jewish
Quarter residents who were even-
tually evacuated to the new city of
Jerusalem when the Old City sur-
rendered to the Arabs., They
found their homes and beloved
synagogues, such as the once ma-
jestic Hurva Synagogue, in ruin
when they returned to the Old Ci-
ty after Israel gained control of
e area in 1967.
"The Arabs did the destruction
I
after we left in 1948," Steiner
said.
The Jewish Quarter however
has been markedly transformed
during the past 19 years that it
has been under Israeli control.
Once a poor, dilapidated area, the
Old City is now among the most
luxurious and desirable
neighborhoods in Jerusalem.
"It's much prettier now. The
houses are spacious and are equip-
ped with modern conveniences
such as electricity and running
water," Steiner said.
She added that there no longer
is the sharp division between the
Sephardic and Ashkenazi com-
munities that had existed in the
Jewish Quarter when she was
growing up. Steiner, a mother of
eight, is herself a sixth generation
Jerusalemite from an Ashkenazi
family.
However Taragan, a Sephardic
Jew, has been disappointed in the
lack of communal feeling among
the various Jewish groups in the
Jewish Quarter. "The Old City
hasn't succeeded in a certain
respect because people moved
here with their own lifestyles
from their former neighborhoods
and didn't create a special com-
munity here," said the petite
woman who teaches Talmud at
Ben-Gurion University in
Beersheva.
"There are also many people
who just bought apartments here
as an investment when they were
very cheap. Now they are using
the property for speculation," she
said disapprovingly.
Steiner and Taragan have
relatively little contact with the
Arab population of the Old City
who live only blocks away from
their homes. "I don't feel their
hatred, but I am aware that they
still haven't made peace with us.
When I walk through the Arab
market, I don't think, "This person
did something against the Jews in
1948,' Steiner said.
She had anticipated she would
be haunted by her traumatic
childhood memories when she
moved back to the Old City. "But
all my fears and memories left the
first day we came back to live
here," Steiner said. "Children liv-
ing here today just don't have to
cope with the same fears I had as
a child."
Taragan often goes to the Arab
market to buy her fruits and
vegetables. "When I go shopping,
the Arab merchants are very
friendly. But when they go out on
strike they tell me, 'It is against
you.' Then the next day, when it is
back to business, they are very
friendly again and greet me. Their
hatred is not personal.
"I feel safe because I know that
the Israeli army and police are
here. But if there weren't Israeli
soldiers walking around and the
Arabs saw we were weak, they
would kill us," she said.
Special to Ou South County
Jewish Flondia*
Essay Contest
The Labor Zionist Alliance an-
nounces the establishment of a
David Ben Gurion Essay Contest
to honor the centennial of his
birth. The contest theme is:
"David Ben Gurion: The
Significance Of His Contribu-
tion To Jewish History"
Essays not to exceed 3,500
words, in English. Hebrew or Yid-
dish, must be received by Aug. 31,
1986. A distinguished panel of
judges will announce prize win-
ners by Nov. 1, 1986.
For farther information please
contact: Labor Zionist Alliance,
275 Seventh Avenue, New York
NY 10001, or phone (212)
989-0300.


p
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 30, 1986
<*>
ft
(Left to right) Albert Natvy, Sylvia Lowe, Dr. John Lowe and Ed
I listened to Rose Riflcin the (jffi f fg*> Speaker Al Ostrick converses with speaker Phil
other day. She had her au- ^rshafsky and his wife Ann.
dience spellbound," said fellow
speaker Al Ostrick of the above
pictured Rose Rifkin.
Speaker's Bureau Availability
To Entire Community Honored
*-
Twenty speakers/entertainers
on Jewish topics ranging from
singing and writing Jewish music
through "Coping with
Widowhood" have been available
to local organizations throughout
the past year at no charge. There
were 103 requests for these South
County Jewish Federation
speakers during the year and all
requests were filled.
On Tuesday, May 13, members
of the Speakers' Bureau were
honored at a cocktail party held at
the Levis Jewish Community
Center. The honorees included:
Ed Bobick, Alfred Friedlieb, Ann
and Joseph Geneles, Dr. John
Lowe, Albert Nawy, Al Ostrick,
Rose Rifkin, Frances Sacks, Rab-
bi Samuel Silver and Philip War-
shafsky. The chairperson for the
Speakers' Bureau this past year
was Barbara Stein.
Marianne Bobick, past presi-
dent of the Federation, whose
new position as chairperson of
Federation Public Relations will
encompass the Speakers' Bureau,
thanked all the participants and
presented each with a certificate
of recognition.
T.R.H.
Defense Ministry Denies Role In Weapons Scandal
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The Defense Ministry said
last Thursday that it is in no
way connected with Ze'ev
Reiss, an Israeli national ar-
rested at JFK Airport in
New York and charged by
U.S. authorities with an at-
tempt to smuggle American
weapons to a Persian Gulf
country.
Reiss, an Israel Defense Force
reservist with the rank of Lt. Col-
onel and a former basketball
player for the Hapoel Sports Club
International, is not known to
have requested assistance from
any Israeli official. The Foreign
Ministry in Jerusalem said it has
no intention of intervening in the
case.
REISS WAS the seventh
Israeli the U.S. authorities ar-
rested in the past month, or issued
warrants for their arrest. Six
were charged with an alleged
scheme to sell more than $2 billion
in American weapons to Iran in
violation of the U.S. arms em-
bargo against that country.
But sources here said there ap-
peared to be no connection bet-
ween Reiss and the six other
Israelis charged by the U.S. last
Apr. 22.
The latter include a retired IDF
general. Avraham Baram, and
William Northrop, who holds dual
U.S.-Israeli citizenship. They are
presently in Bermuda fighting ex-
tradition to the U.S.
The Defense Ministry's state-
ment said Reiss has no present or
past connections with the
Ministry, is not known to the
Ministry staff and has no
authorization to trade in arms.
Spring Break
Our Price includes
port charges, three generous meals,
and roundtrip motorcoach from selected locations
in Browud, Dade and Palm Beach Counties.
The regular Senior's fare. 55 years and older
is $83.00. BUT FOR THE MONTHS OF
APRIL. MAY AND JUNE. WERE GIVING
SENIOR CITIZENS A SPRING BREAK BY
REDUCING THIS PRICETOA LOW $6,100.
Every departure, seven days a week, subject
to space availability.
Depart Miami at 8:.'{0 a.m.. spend the
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And when your club or homeowners
association books a gmup of 4(1 or more,
we'll take $4.00 more off each fan- and
pnvide a special motorcoach to from anv
point of your choice in Hnward. Dade or
Palm Beach Counties.
So don't miss our special Senior Citizens
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orcallSeaEscapeai l:800-432-0900orin
Dade County. :579-0000. Proof of age may
he requested. Cabins optional.
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i ^


YLD Celebrates Successful
First Year At Dinner Dance
Friday, May 30, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Peres: Syrian Military Threat to
Israel Less Serious Than Thought
The Boca West Country Club
came alive with the sounds of 70
members of the Young Leader-
ship Division (YLD) dancing to the
beat of the "Dancers" at a Dinner
Dance celebrating the first com-
plete year of the newly formed
division.
Craig Richman, vice-chairman
of YLD and the chairman of the
Dinner Dance, was more than
pleased with the successful out-
come. "It was a memorable even-
ing of music and dance."
Jerome Gleekel addressed the
group with a moving speech that
chronicled his participation in the
formation of the State of Israel
and his current involvement with
it.
According to Richman, "It was
about time that our division was
hit hard with the responsibility of
being a Jew in a non-Jewish
world." Gleekel made it clear that
it is time for members of our
group to take a more active role in
worldwide Jewish affairs by in-
creasing efforts through greater
monetary and social responsibility
to the Jewish community.
Gleekel's address was followed by
a few minutes of silent reflection
and a rousing round of applause.
Donations of over $30,000 were
pledged by those present at the
affair.
Newly-elected president of the
Federation, James Nobil, address-
ed the group commending the ef-
forts of Stanley Fishbein, chair-
man of the Young Leadership
Division, and Craig Richman. Jef-
frey Kune, Stephen Melcer, Larry
Pitt and Gary Scharf. members of
the Young Leadership Division
executive committee were also
recognized for their participation
and commitment to the Jewish
world.
Members of the executive com-
mittee presented staff YLD coor-
dinator, Dr. Robert Fishman with
a gift as a token of their apprecia-
tion of his efforts on their behalf.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
military threat Syria poses to
Israel is not as serious as some
analysts contend, Premier
Shimon Peres told the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee. He said he did not
share the view of those who are
impressed by Syria's armed
might.
MOREOVER, he said, Syria is
in the throes of a severe economic
crisis. Its foreign currency
reserves are down to $50 million.
The country is plagued by internal
terrorism and its involvement in
Lebanon "is far from enviable,"
Peres said.
He addressed the Knesset com-
mittee in connection with Syrian
President Hafez Assad's State
visit to Jordan, his first since
1977. According to Peres, the re-
cent rapprochement between
Syria and Jordan was intended,
among other things, to pressure
the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
Lynn Persoffand SCJF president James Nobil.
Craig Richman, chairman of Dinner Dance addresses the group.
VM4
(Left, to right) James Ken Lebersfeld, speaker Jerome Gleekel.
In Israel Colleges...
And Local Friends
#
Japanese Share Some
Stereotypes About Jews
HEBREW U.
JERUSALEM Japanese share
some of the same stereotypes
about Jews that are known in the
West, but they do not necessarily
interpret them in blatantly anti-
Semitic ways.
This was one of the observations
made by Akifumi Ikeda, research
officer in charge of Middle East
politics at the Institute of
Developing Economies in Tokyo
and currently a visiting resear-
cher at the Harry S. Truman
Research Institute for the Ad-
vancement of Peace at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
In a talk given recently at the
Truman Institute, Ikeda said that
anti-Semitic concepts were "im-
ported" to Japan beginning with
the negative image of the Jew por-
trayed in Shakespeare's "Mer-
chant of Venice." first performed
in Japan in the late 19th Century,
and later developing with the in-
troduction of the Japanese
translations of the nefarious
"Protocols of the Elders of Zion."
These influences and later the
alliance with Nazi Germany made
the "international Jewish con-
spiracy" theory widespread
among Japanese "quasi-
intellectuals," said Ikeda. But in
spite of the introduction of these
elements into Japanese society,
violent anti-Semitism has been
unknown in Japan (a country with
a miniscule Jewish population), he
continued. Indeed the anti-
Semitic stereotype of the Jew as
an international power in finance
and communications has if
anything created the sense that
the Jews are a people to be taken
seriously and dealt with, rather
than hated, he said. Also, the
knowledge of the Holocaust
created a pro-Jewish sympathy
after World War II that had not
been known before, he said.
This positive attitude has erod-
ed in more recent years, he con-
tinued, as a result of Israeli
military successes in the Arab-
Israeli conflict, with "intellectual
progressives" looking with
disfavor on Israeli rule over the
West Bank and Gaza and its inva-
sion of Lebanon. This negative im-
age is prevalent among most Mid-
dle East scholars in Japan,
although Ikeda said he believes
there is a more balanced attitude
developing as more Japanese
students enter the field. Ikeda
said that he personally deplores
what has been the Japanese pro-
clivity to identify only with the
Arab cause.
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Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 30, 1986
Holocaust/Independence Day Marked
At Congregation Anshei Shalom
Nearly 400 people took part in a
dual ceremony at Congregation
Anshei Shalom in Delray, com-
memorating the Holocaust
memorial with the lighting of a
special six-candle menorah by
some 40 Holocaust survivors, and
making the transition to the
celebration of Israel's 38th an-
niversary with songs and
speeches.
The Holocaust survivors lined
up in front of the bima, lit the
candles and passed them to each
other toward the center, where
they were placed in the menora,
A color guard of the Jewish War
Veterans initiated the ceremony
with a flag presentation and the
singing of the anthems, and the
24-voice choir led by Cantor Louis
Hershman sang Ani Ma'amin dur-
ing the ceremony. The cantor then
sang the El Maleh Rahamim
followed by a special Kaddish
recitation, with Rabbi Dr. Morris
Silberman listing the names of
various communities destroyed by
the Nazis and those of concentra-
tion camps.
The Holocaust memorial portion
of the program, a first for the con-
A candk-lighting ceremony was held in memory of the six
million. Memorial candles were passed through the hands of some
50 Holocaust survivors.
gregation in its new temple
building, was chaired by Jack
Levine, who was visibly moved by
the proceedings.
Outgoing temple president Ed-
ward Dorfman then took over the
second portion, in which Rabbi
Silberman, himself a sabra whose
grandfather trekked from
Eastern Europe to Palestine on
foot in the 1800's, gave the au-
dience an in-depth insight of what
the establishment of the Jewish
state meant to him and to
American Jews.
Cantor Hershman led the
assembly in a medley of Israeli
songs, and his choir entertained.
M.E.
A Miracle Amidst Tears
Continued from Page 1
at all five camps. "Never again,
never again, never again."
The descriptive horrors were
followed with a ghetto song sung
by Cantor Zvi Adler and an
English recitation of the Yiddish
essay "Yom Kippur in Camp
Yanover," read by David J. Leon,
a retired cantor.
An assemblage of the congrega-
tion's Holocaust victims on the
bima followed with a
candlelighting ceremony to
memorialize the sue million who
died. Prayers for the dead con-
cluded the first half of the
program.
Birth of Israel Predicted in
1750
"From Ashes to Light and
Joy." As the program promised,
Rabbi Winograd opened the Yom
Ha'Atzmaut celebration by focus-
ing on an 18th century miracle,
the written prediction of the birth
of a State of Israel in 1750 by
the Vilna Gaon.
The Vilna Gaon was considered
to be the greatest Rabbi of his day
and a "man of unparalleled
genius," according to Rabbi
Winograd. His "computer-like
mind" had discovered in the
+
Torah that if one counted 5,708
verses from the beginning of the
Book of Genesis, that would coin-
cide with the Jewish year 5708 or
1948. At this point in the Bible,
Deuteronomy 30:3-5, the in-
gathering of the Children of Israel
from their exile was predicted.
"So indeed would it happen as it
did happen," said Rabbi
Winograd. The Vilna Gaon chose
South County Explodes In Celebration
Continued from Page 1
tion last Sunday were un-
doubtedly the same as those
of some 2,000 people in the
community who attended
the event.
Held at the Baer Jewish
Campus in Boca Raton, the
weather was balmy as buses
transported participants
back and forth to their cars
parked at Florida Atlantic
University throughout the
four hours of festivities.
There was a parade, game
booths, a fun house and a magi-
cian for the children. Adults could
peruse the organization and
synagogue booths or enter the
pool races. All could partake of
the international food array or en-
joy the continuous entertainment
provided under the big tent.
Leaser said that four months of
planning went into the celebration
which was held in cooperation
with all the agencies of the
Federation, with the synagogues,
the local Jewish organizations and
the Community Relations Council.
She noted that some of the
changes in this year's In-
dependence Day agenda included
a childrens' carnival of 10 booths,
a lemonade and cotton candy con-
cession, youthful gymnasts from
the Boca Academy of Gymnastics
and s prominent Israeli enter-
tainer, singer Donny Maseng.
Local entertainers featured this
year were singers Karen Weiss,
Jaacov Sassi and Izzy Siegel with
the Kings Point Glee Club.
Jewish Independence Week
Proclaimed
Special Independence Day
ceremonies included Mayor S.
Doak Campbell of Delray Beach
who proclaimed the coming week
as "Jewish Independence Week,"
urging all the people throughout
the county "to remember what
that great Independence Day
means, not only today, but as a
guiding light to the entire world."
Rabbi Gregory S. Marx, assis-
tant Rabbi at Temple Beth El
spoke on Israel's independence
saying: "Never before has a na-
tion restored itself to its homeland
after 1,897 years of wandering.
... We can be proud that
miraculously, we held tight to our
traditions in exile and then came
home to strengthen them."
The new president of the South
County Jewish Federation, James
Nobil, had some special thoughts
on the significance of Israel's In-
dependence Day. "It is important
to us as Jews to recognize what
the State of Israel means to us. It
is a haven for Jews in need from
around the world as has been pro-
ven throughout the years most
recenUy with Ethiopian immigra-
tion. Israel is also important to
America and the rest of the free
world as the one democracy in the
Middle East and the consistent
friend of the United States."
Presentation of colors by the Honor Guard of the Jewish War
Veterans, Delray Post No. 266.
**'.

..A
Temple's SO member liturgical choir sang for the two-part
program.
UN Documents List
Murder System Leaders
Holocaust survivors at Temple Emeth assemble on the bima in
celebration of Yom Ha'Atzmaut.
not to reveal this discovery to his
followers. "How do you say this to
a people who would not live to see
it?"
The Rabbi told his congregation
that Israel is now here forever "to
fulfill its mission to nations." The
Holocaust survivors returned to
the bima as the program conclud-
ed, this time, waving Israeli flags
in the spirit of "Never Again."
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Israel received
Monday copies of 347 files
on Nazi war criminals from
the UN archives, compiled
by the long-defunct UN War
Crimes Commission.
The files were given to
Binyamin Netanyahu, Israel's
Ambassador to the UN who
was escorted by Yitzhak Arad,
chairman of Yad Vashem, Israel's
Memorial and Research Institute
on the Holocaust in Jerusalem
at the UN archives which are
stored at 345 Park Avenue South
in Manhattan. They addressed a
press conference later.
ISRAEL RECENTLY asked to
inspect the UN archives to see if
they contain files on any of 1,379
Nazi war criminals still wanted by
Israel. According to Netanyahu,
the 347 files obtained by Israei
were the only ones which cor-
responded with the list submitted
by Israel earlier.
According to Arad, "the infor-
mation stored in the UN archives
is of enormous value to the
Holocaust research done by Yad
Vashem." He said that among the
files Israel received Monday there
are names of leaders of "the Nazi
murder system." He said the files
will be sent soon to Yad Vashem
for closer inspection.
Netanyahu, who spoke at the
press conference, called on
Secretary General Javier Perez de
Cuellar to open all the files in the
UN archives to the public. Noting
that the rules of confidentiality
governing access to the files were
determined by the UN
Secretariat, the Israeli envoy said
that "it was this confidentiality
that enabled such things as the
election of Kurt Waldheim to be
Secretary General of the UN."
Waldheim, who is accused of
havig a Nazi past, is one of 40,000
suspected Nazis whose files are in
the UN archives. Israel obtained
his file recently.
"There is no reason whatsoever
why these self-imposed rules of
confidentiality should not be im-
mediately lifted," Netanyahu
said, adding that "the decision is
in the hands of the Secretary
General and the Secretary
General alone." Netanyahu,
however, praised the cooperation
of the UN so far on Israel's re-
quest to inspect files of Nazi war
criminals.
Arms to Honduras Not to Contras
xtt,, By YITZHAK RABI
7hJ^ XORK (JTA) Israeli Foreign Minister Yit-
tfJ22* m Hondur*s last week that Israel will be
rmin 2* re sTreZi tt2*ftj ? an,I1Srae,i spokesoerson in New York,
naTnoThinC T*' M*r|"m^ness to searms to Honduras
has nothing to do with the situation in Nicaragua.
CmhS^fi' WJLxr N0T extend *V assistance to the
hXoW Sk "fc-NKanwan government rebels within
Se^rsont qMtod the *
Pala^TJo^ ? P^88, inference at the Presidential
SClite* Honduras, capital, where he opened
at the m i. K Py 2&,n *** ^y- Shamir w 2ved
vited APiZ ^T^. Jse Ascona Hoyo. Shamir in-
clotedlCuR t cepted, the Israeli spokesperson said.


Friday, May 30, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
1 j^ J J pntt* **'**>"** WMfBiM and femptet
Independence Day
Celebration


. '-
Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 30, 1986
80th Anniversary Annual Meeting
Single Issue Agendas Stand Rejected By AJC
WASHINGTON The ex-
ecutive head of the American
Jewish Committee vigorously
defended his agency's rejection of
"a single issue agenda" "the
assertion that there is only one
issue for Jews, and that issue is
Israel" adding that "our sup-
port for Israel gains in effec-
tiveness because we are recogniz-
ed not as narrow advocates of self-
interest, but as fully involved par-
ticipants in the full range of
American and international
issues."
Speaking to a plenary session of
the AJC's 80th anniversary an-
nual meeting in mid-May at the
J.W. Marriott Hotel here, David
M. Gordis, executive vice presi-
dent, told 500 delegates from
around the country:
"The validity of our traditional
AJC agenda has been challenged
recently by powerful and promi-
nent voices urging a sharp nar-
rowing of Jewish concerns." Dr.
Gordis elaborated on this "single
issue" theme:
Support for Israel is put for-
ward as "the single criterion" by
which candidates for elected office
Political Health of Community Addressed
WASHINGTON Howard I.
Friedman, President of the
American Jewish Committee,
declared that the health of the
Jewish community was directly
related to its diverse approach to
public issues, and to political af-
filiation as well.
Delivering the presidential ad-
dress at the Committee's 80th an-
niversary celebration at the J.W.
Marriott Hotel here, Friedman
said:
"The increasing number of
thoughtful, committed Jews who
identify themselves with the
Republican Party matches the
profound commitment of equally
thoughtful, committed Jews
devoted to the Democratic Party
and both the Jewish community
and this nation as a whole are
enriched by this phenomenon."
Commenting on the interna-
tional scene, "where there are
tangible and vital Jewish concerns
threatened and under attack,"
Friedman declared that rarely has
the survival of major segments of
the Jewish people been so depen-
dent on the support ol a major
power.
"We are most fortunate," he
said, "that that power is the
United States."
In the present century, the AJC
leader asserted, the ultimate in-
ternational question is the sur-
vival of free nations and free in-
stitutions in the face of a broad
totalitarianism.
This, he said, "is as much a part
The Paul Greenberg Column
Continued from Page 4
arms. Maybe Congress noticed.
Surely the American people have;
oil sheiks are scarcely popular
figures in this country.
Seeking Signs
Of Friendship
The State Department is rely-
ing on the same old wispy line to
get this latest arms shipment
through Congress, to wit: No, the
Saudis never come out and actual-
ly take a stand for peace, the way
Anwar Sadat did, but if you read
carefully between the lines with
one eye closed, you can find a
glimmer of hope here and there.
Yes, the Saudis may support
Libya at the United Nations, or
the PLO with an annual subsidy,
and Syria, too but they're not
terrorists; they only supply
terrorists.
To grasp the reasoning of the
State Department's experts, it is
necessary to appreciate the
elusive distinction between (a) ex-
tremist terrorists like the Syrians
and Libyans, and (b) moderate ter-
rorists like the Saudis or, on cer-
tain days, the PLO. These for-
mulations are presented with an
air of vague sophistication, as if
making them required con-
siderable diplomatic expertise,
not to mention the right contacts
and a ouija board. But increasing-
ly they seem less sophisticated
than arbitrary.
The State Department's experts
have told Congress that Saudi
Arabia needs some tangible sign
of America's friendship. It does
not seem to occur to said experts
that after $70 billion in military
assistance (how's that for tangi-
ble?) Americans might like some
sign of Saudi Arabia's much
touted dedication to friendship
and peace much touted by the
State Department, anyway. The
Saudis tend to remain vague on
the subject when they're not being
bellicose. At this point, the ex-
perts at State seem bent on
demonstrating mainly how
unrealistic Realpolitik can be. And
Congress is demonstrating that
even Uncle Sucker may catch on
after a while
The Administration and its ex-
perts, with their air of baseless
condescension, may yet pull these
additional 2,500 missiles out of
Congress for the Saudis. The con-
dition may be another pledge
about how supplying these
weapons will contribute to the
"stability and security" of the
Middle East, enhance "the at-
mosphere and prospects for pro-
gress toward peace," and assure
"significant progress toward that
goal with the substantial
assistance of Saudi Arabia."
Those were the worthless words
used to rationalize the sale of
sophisticated intelligence-
gathering aircraft to the Saudis in
1981. Those AWACS planes now
have been delivered. And the
American people are fully capable
of judging for themselves whether
what was promised in return has
materialized: stability and securi-
ty, and significant progress
toward peace in the Middle East
with the substantial assistance of
Saudi Arabia.
The answer must be obvious to
all except perhaps a certain
species of Westerner whom the
denizens of Eastern bazaars love
to see coming. The idea that Saudi
Arabia is a great friend of
America's, and a bulwark of peace
and stability in the Middle East to
boot, is presented at congres-
sional hearings with brazen
regularity and even a placid
panache by various under-
undersecretaries of Near and Far
Affairs. It's not a bad show but
it's getting dated. By now it
demonstrates mainly that Will
Rogers knew what he was talking
about when he said that simple ig-
norance isn't as dangerous as all
the things we know "that ain't
so."
When Goethe said nothing was
more frightening than ignorance
in action, he may have overlooked
the immense possibilities for
mischief in a combination that has
been all too characteristic of
American diplomats in this less
than peaceful century: a little
knowledge and a lot of arrogance.
Copyright, 1986,
Freelance Syndicate
of our reality in 1986 as it was in
the 1930s and 1940s. Jewish life
cannot meaningfully survive in a
totalitarian milieu, and since the
principal responsibility for the
defense of freedom rests upon the
United States, Jewish interests
are unalterably entwined with
America's willingness to carry
that responsibility."
Friedman told the large au-
dience of AJC members and
others from all parts of the coun-
try that the most important lesson
he had learned during his tenure
as president of the organization
was that "Jewish interests in the
United States are best pursued,
not from an impulse of a perceived
jeopardy, but from the wellspr-
ings of communal well-being and
welcomed participation in public
affairs."
It is surely the primary objec-
tive of Jewish communal activity
today, he said, given its relative
well-being and security, to sup-
port the surrounding culture and
its institutions that nourish that
security.
"In our 4,000-year history,"
Friedman asserted, "the Jewish
community has never been more
organically involved in its sur-
rounding society than it is in
America. In this reality, effective
communal action mandates a con-
structive and positive mindset
that welcomes the challenge to
participate in all aspects of
American public life."
AJC
Kutsher's
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Financial support is forthcom-
ing from individuals and single-
iss le PACs (political action com-
mittees) on the basis of
statements and positions on
Israel, "without regard to other
issues."
Political and religious leaders
whose views on separation of
church and state, matters of social
policy, and other public concerns
run counter to the views of most
American Jews, "and which may
even threaten vital Jewish in-
terests," sometimes "are
transformed overnight into
Jewish heroes" on the basis of a
carefully crafted statement or too
supportive of Israel.
Alliances are urged on the
basis of this single issue.
In rejecting this "single issue
agenda," Dr. Gordis reemphasiz-
ed AJC's commitment "to Israel's
strength, security and vitality" as
"unshakable." He went on to
argue against confusing that
Israel portion of the Jewish agen-
da, "as important as it is," with
the whole, pointing out that "we
are a world people" with a
heritage of "pursuing justice and
compassion."
"As Jews," he added, "we have
been outstanding participants and
leaders in promoting human
rights and intergroup relations.
We have made an outstanding
contribution to the growth and
enhancement of American life. I
am convinced that the overwhelm-
ing majority of American Jews re-
mains committed to that
participation."
Yet, he stated, some influential
leaders "who have grown
disheartened because these ef-
forts are never easy and
sometimes painful" urge us to
turn away from our traditional
social concerns and to formulate
positions in the narrowest self-
interest.
"The agenda of this weekend's
meeting," he told the delegates,
"is eloquent testimony to our re-
jection of this turning away and to
our continuing efforts to focus the
attention of the community on
issues of human rights, dignity
and pluralism, from an American
Jewish perspective."
AJr
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raeli Bone Marrow Specialist Back from
14II ft VU* |
Friday, May 30, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
r
hion
By HUGH ORGEL
;EL AVIV (JTA) -
i Yair Reisner, the Weiz-
,n Institute biophysicist
flew to the Soviet
on May 10 to help
ssian doctors treat vic-
is of the Chernobyl
dear accident, returned
m Moscow Sunday night
Ji a grim prognosis for
jse who suffered radia-
m poisoning and a sober
ing that the Western
intries are no better
jpped than the Soviet
ion to cope with the
dical casualties of
iclear accidents.
leisner, who volunteered his
;rtis<- in bone marrow and cell-
ing techniques after the
iets finally made known the
extent of the Chernobyl
jter last month, also reported
it he entered the USSR with his
li passport without a Soviet
He said he was met at
iscow airport by Ministry of
Ith officials who issued him a
on the spot, well aware that
is an Israeli.
EISNER SAID that of the
persons directly affected by
accident at the Chernobyl
iclear power station techni-
cs, fire-fighters and guards
io were inside the building 35
ire severely ill with radiation
lisonintf.
lut hone marrow transplants
uld be performed on only 19,
\d another six victims were
lyond treatment, he said. Others
're not believed to be in urgent
ed of transplants. For those
io received them, it will not be
lown for another three weeks
lether the procedure was suc-
isful, he said.
he 38 year-old Israeli-born
ientist said at a press con-
wee here that the Israeli
Ithorities knew of his trip to
'scow to take part in health
cue work together with a small
m of American doctors. He had
n invited by Dr. Robert Gale,
American bone marrow
geon who planned to return to
scow later this week to check
the results. Reisner said he had
plans to return.
HE SAID he and the Americans
orked with a Soviet woman doc-
s marrow separation and tissue
ansplant techniques from
ading about them in interna-
onal medical and scientific
plications. He said the team
ught 16 crates of equipment to
oscow, and he was able to set up
is laboratory within 24 hours of
ls arrival. Reisner and his
mencan colleagues had warm
raise for the Soviet medical team
*>' worked with at Moscow
lospital No. 6.
But according to Reisner,
'odern medical facilities have
me way to go to fully meet the
emands of potential nuclear ac-
cents m the future. "No coun-
ts in the West are really
spared for such accidents. It is
ot only a Russian problem but
ne which must be considered
verywhere," Reisner said.
He suggested the establishment
bone marrow banks and
*-"'t'es for tissue typing, and an
""rgt'ney reserve fund to
PfH-ade hospital and laboratory
""Paredness. One of the pro-
"ems in Moscow was the delay in
JJ'ng blood samples for tissue
yP'nK "It is an example of poor
Manning, but not only on the part
"' th' Russians but also the
ncana and everyone else,'
mistier said.
TJ,'R HIS press conference,
"'r went to Jerusalem to
:""rl to Premier Shimon Pel
I said later thai Pere wai
ex
Aiding N-Disaster Victims
question didn't crop up," Reisner
said he told Peres.
Reisner, born in 1948, obtained
his Bachelor of Science degree
from the Hebrew University in
Jerusalem in 1972 and his
Master's degree from the Univer-
sity of California at Berkeley in
1974. He received his PHD at the
Weizmann Institute in Rehovot in
1980 and was appointed senior
scientist in 1981.
He filled a post-doctoral
fellowship at the Sloan-Kettering
Institute for Cancer Research in
New York in 1978-79 and was a
visiting investigator there from
1980-81. Since 1983, he has oc-
cupied the Dr. Phil Gold Career
Development Chair in Cancer
Research, in perpetuity, at the
Weizmann Institute. The chair
was established by the Montreal
chapter of the Canadian Society
for the Weizmann Institute.
'SS' Letters
Outlawed

PARIS (JTA) The ad-
ministrative governor of the
Champagne-Ardenne province
last week outlawed car registra-
tions carrying the letters "SS."
Normally, registration for all
motor vehicles consists of two let-
ters and up to five digits.
i. m Rexgner faft), a specialist in bone marrow transplants
at the Wtezmann Institute of Science in Israel, back from Moscow
where he helped patients suffering damage from the Soviet
nuclear power plant explosion at Chernobyl last month, is shown
conferring with Dr. Nathan Sharon, head of the Institute's
Biophysics Department and Dr. Reisner s mentor.
periences in Moscow, what he
learned of Soviet medicine and if
he met any Jews there. "I met lots
of people but I don't know if they
were Jews or not. They all knew I
was an Israeli, but the Jewish
Come Grow With Us
Temple Beth David's rapidly growing Pre-School in
Northern Palm Beach County is accepting applications
for the following part-time positions for the Fall:
Administrator/Teacher: Early Child Certification
required. Administrative experience preferred.
Certified Early Childhood Teacher for 2Vi -year-olds.
COMPETITIVE SALARY.
For information and interview, call: 694-2350
where shopping is a pleasure 7days o week
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Choose from a Wide Assortment
Cake Donut Holes........dozen 69*
Hamburger or
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Prices Effective
May 29 thru June 4.1986



Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 30, 1986
THE ADOLPH and ROSE LEVIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
HAPPENINGS
An Agency of the South County Jewish Federation
Camp Maccabee Goes International
This Summer's Camp Maccabee
will have an international flair
with Staff and Campers from
abroad. Darren Kelley, who is our
Sports Assistant, is from South
Africa. Diane Hunt, a Waterfront
Specialist, is from England. Noa
Borda, a Senior Counselor, is
from Israel. We also have five
campers that will attend from
Costa Rica. "We must have a 'far
reaching' reputation," explains
David Sheriff. Camp Director.
Adding to the International
flavor is our Israeli Schiliach,
Hagit Goldring. We will also be
visited by the Israeli Scout
Caravan which is an ensemble of
Israeli's best teenagers who will
perform songs and dances for our
campers. Camp Maccabee will
also play host to a troupe of
Yemenite Dancers.
This Summer our Campers will
get a chance to test International
waters with new and exciting
"Club-Med" packages. Every
week our Campers will be exposed
to a different "Club-Med package
so that they can enjoy new ex-
periences and try new activities.
Our "Bahama" package includes a
day at the Spa, weaving straw
hats, cooking Bahamian fudge and
playing Island games like the
limbo.
The Club Med activity periods
will take place every day after
lunch. "It creates a schedule with
variation. I know the Campers
will love all the different activities
and surprises we have planned for
them," says Bari Stewart, Assis-
tant Director of Camp Maccabee.
Camp Maccabee definitely has
gone international this Summer.
Excellence is a hard thing to keep
tied down in the home port. The
Camp "Sets Sail" on June 23.
Projenet Celebrates 1st Year
Projenet, the young Profes-
sionals Jewish Network of the
Adolph and Rose Levis Jewish
Community Center, met recently
at the JCC.
The group, which meets mon-
thly to perpetuate a Business Net-
work amongst members of the
Jewish Professional and Business
Community, held its first Annual
Meeting to elect its 1986-87
officers.
Past President, Scott Stein, of
Dean Witter, acknowledged the
accomplishments of the past year
and added that the group needs to
work at creating a better identity
in the community." Former Vice-
President Jeff Jerome noted that
the group is "not yet at the point
of fruition. He is looking forward
to continual growth and added
networking potential.
Dale Filhaber. newly elected
president and former secretary of
Projenet, had a "very rewarding
year." She looks for the group to
"plan their future growth and
become strong members of (the)
community."
Former treasurer Gary J.
Rosenberg, MD, was unable to at-
tend due to professional reasons,
but has always been a guiding
force for Projenet to maintain its
"professionalism."
Other newly elected officers for
1986-87 include. Allen J. Britt,
DC, as Vice-President; Natalie
Goldbaum, of America Girl
Uniforms as Secretary; and Lisa
Weisenfeld of Barnett Bank as
Treasurer.
Projenet will be holding its First
Annual Dinner-Dance at the
Hyatt Palm Beaches on June 21.
If you would like information on
Membership please call Dale
Filhaber (994-0525) or Les
Scheinfeld at the Levis JCC
(395-5546).
The Israeli Caravan will once again make a stop at Camp
Maccabee this summer.

m
m
Uri, Jon, and Itamar "scoot around" during a fun-filled
day at Six Flags Atlantis, just one of the many Sunday Pro-
grams sponsored by the JCC Tween Club. For more infor-
mation, call Bari at 895-5546.
Homework Assistance
Program Available
Past vice president Jeff Jerome and past president Scott Stein.
Jewish Family Service and the
South County Jewish Day School
have organized a Homework
Assistance Program at the
Satellite campus as part of the
After-School program.
Homework assistance is available
to second through eighth grade
students on Monday-Friday from
3:30-4:30 and began on Monday,
May 12.
This program gives the students
an hour of supervised time to
work on homework assignments,
read, work puzzles, write letters,
etc. It will allow extra time for
parents and their children to enjoy
time together at home. This will
be especially helpful to working
parents.
The after school schedule for se-
cond to eighth graders is as
follows: 3-3:30: outside snack and
play; 3:30-4:30: homework
assistance; 4:30: play.
Parents and teacher volunteers
have offered to help with the pro-
gram, however, more volunteers
are greatly needed at this time,
and even more in the fall when
school resumes. Anyone willing to
volunteer their time are asked to
call the Jewish Day School at
395-3521 or Jewish Family Ser-
vice at 395-3640.-

Newly elected officers of Projenet (left to right), Dale Filhaber,
president; Lisa Weisenfeld, treasurer; Allen Britt, D.C., vice-
president, and Natalie Goldbaum, secretary.
CANTOR NEEDED
For
High Holy Day Services.
Male or Female.
Call after 5 p.m.
482-4834


Friday, May 30, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 13
Chai-Lights
afthe
Jewish Community Day School
Yom Ha'Atzmaut At The Day School
By ROBIN BRALOW
After studying Israel's birth
and development for nearly a full
school term, the Day School
students were eager to celebrate
an Independence which they
understand was not easily
achieved.
Beit Yeladim (Preschool) par-
ticipated in numerous activities in
preparation for Israel's 38th bir-
thday. They decorated a birthday
cake with blue icing, tied-dyed
white T-shirts blue, and made
their own Israeli flags. A parade
was scheduled from the Satellite
campus to the Day School where
the students joined together to
sing in celebration of Israel's
birthday.
The first graders combined a
history lesson with arts and
crafts. They colored-in pictures of
Israel's prime ministers from Ben
Gurion to Shamir which were
later hung up to admire. They
learned new Israeli songs, drew
Israeli flags and decorated the
school's hallway with pictures of
Jerusalem.
Students in the kindergarten
through the Middle School sang
songs while marching with other

E

**
'
m
Leah Temor's 1st Grade class celebrates Israeli Independence
Day.
students from area congregations
on Yom Ha'Aztmaut, celebrated
Sunday, May 18, to the James and
Marjorie Baer Campus of the
Jewish Community Center. They
then took center stage and enter-
tained community members with
their songs.
Many parents joined their
children in the Yom Ha'Aztmaut
celebration. They were
celebrating together a birthday of
a nation that many parents
remember as just an idealistic
vision.
Dr. Arye Gilai, director ofShaare Zedek'a Neurological Institute
in Jerusalem, examines little Hebi Asma during comprehensive
tests she underwent recently as her anxious mother looks on.
Poster and Essay Contest For Israeli Independence Day
In honor of Israeli In-
dependenoe Day, the Educator's
Council, comprised of ad-
ministrators of the various Con-
gregational Schools, Day Schools,
and other educational institutions
in conjunction with the Jewish
Community Center, sponsored a
poster and essay contest.
The essay contest asked
students to express their feelings
toward "Aliyah" (a return by the
lews to Eretz Israel) on a per-
sonal level. The introduction to
the contest asked students some
of the following questions: "How
do you feel about Israel?" Why
should Jews live in Israel?" and
"Why do many of us continue to
live in the Diaspora?" The
categories were broken down into
two areas: second through fourth
grade and fifth through eighth
grade. Rabbi Mark Dratch judged
all the essay entries.
Leah Schilit, Rachel Zinns, and
Shaari Gross, second graders at
the South County Jewish Com-
munity Day School placed first,
second, and third, respectively in
tin' second through fourth grade
level. The following excerpts from
the three winning essays ex-
emplify the touching relationship
that today's Jewish children have
with their homeland an Israel
that is older than they. Their love
"I Israel is clear as well as their
knowledge of the country and its
meaning for all Jews. "In the year
1949 the United Nations gave the
land of Palestine to the Jewish
people. The Jewish people then
decided to call the Jewish state
Israel," wrote one winner. "I
woud like to move to Israel
because I'll make friends with the
Jewish children and go to the
Wailing Wall," expressed another
essay winner. Wrote another win-
ning contestant on her reasons as
to why she would not choose to
make Aliyah: "If I moved to Israel
it wouldn't be easy. I would like to
move to Israel except I'm used to
the United States. I probably
wouldn't be comfortable in Israel.
I do like Israel. I like it a lot.
There's another reason why I
don't want to move to Israel and it
is because there are unfriendly
Arab countries surrounding Israel
and I dont' want to get killed."
Haven't we heard ourselves ex-
press the same mixed emotions?
Rachel Zloczover, an eighth
grader at Temple Sinai won first
prize in the fifth through eighth
grade category. Her thoughts on
living in the Diaspora are well ex-
pressed in her essay, "It's
wonderful that I have this option,
but I, along with many other peo-
ple don't know if I will indeed
make Aliyah ... I also think it is
very important that Jews con-
tinue living in the Diaspora, that
is, outside Israel. Judaism, in
order to be recognized, should be
widespread, extending across the
world as it does today."
Tali Feilich, a sixth grader at
the South County Jewish Com-
munity Day School, was born in
Israel giving her an interesting
reference point and perspective.
She wrote, "I feel about the
Aliyah that Jews should go to
Israel because Israel needs some
people to fight in the army and
support the promised land. .
Yes, I will consider moving to
Israel because I feel that I belong
there and not outside of Israel. I
was born in Israel. No matter if
my parents tell me that I cannot
go to Israel I will still go. I would
like to join the army and help fight
in wars." Her patriotism at 11
tells us something about
"sabras."
Meredith Gould, a sixth grader
at the Jewish Day School placed
third. "The dream of Israel in my
opinion is going to be fulfilled by
the youth. I would not consider
Aliyah as a child because of the
many things the Diaspora has to
offer."
The poster contest entitled
"Israel, A Children's Mosaic"
stimulated the creativity and sen-
sitivity of all those that entered.
The heartwarming posters proved
that Israel is an integral part of
every Jew's life no matter how
young. This contest was broken
down into three categories,
kindergarten through second
grade, third through fifth grade.
and sixth through eighth grade.
Heidi Tuby, fine arts editor of the
Boca Raton Magazine and Cheryl
Rappaport, an arts and crafts
teacher in area private schools,
served as judges.
Aliza Bregman placed first in
the kindergarten through second
grade category with Debbie Brod-
sky in second place, and Danielle
Kotaska and Adina Zeev tied for
third. All of the above winners at-
tend the Jewish Day School in
South County. Honorable mention
in this category were Mrs.
Furash's kindergarten class,
Marisa Frieman, Sara Lazaravic,
Mychal Teman, Jesse DeBrowner,
Eric Albert and Heather Shapiro.
The winners in the third
through fifth grade division were
Vanessa Porudominsky in first
place, Brian Alalu who placed se-
cond, and Marisa Kamin who was
the third place winner. All of the
above students attend Temple
Sinai. Honorable mention in this
category were Sareet Ingber,
Roger Sponder, Mitchell
Ziskinder, Britt Posner, and
Jessica Lanning from the third
grade at the South County Jewish
Community Day School. Cari Bar-
sher and Hillary Enselberg also
were mentioned in the Honorable
Mention list. They, too, attend the
Day School.
Methew Fox from Temple Sinai
won first prize in the sixth
through eighth grade category, a
very competitive group. Meredith
Gould and Lori Enselberg from
the South County Jewish Day
School tied for second place.
Keep your eyes open for Rosh
Hashanah cards sold throughout
the Jewish community that will
have reduced versions of the win-
ning posters on their front covers.
The wonderful material col-
lected through these two contests
reflects Jewish children who have
gained a love and respect for their
spiritual homeland through
Jewish education. The winners of
both contests were recognized and
awarded prizes at Israeli In-
dependence Day celebrated at the
Rose and Adolph Levis Jewish
Community Center on Sunday,
May 18.
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 30, 1986
Local Club&
Organization News
There Was No Rebbitsin Among The Top Ten
Left to right: Marc Goldin, Allison Freidman, and Gayle Weins-
tein pictured at Halev Elections.
BBYO Elects New Officers
Halev Chapter No. 2362 of the
B'nai B'rith Girls recently elected
new chapter officers. The new
board is headed by N'siah (Presi-
dent) Alissa Bloom.
Other officers include Program-
ming Vice-President, Merrilyn
Regent; Membership Vice-
President, Pam Chase; Recording
Secretary, Lisa Browner;
Treasurer, Elly Goodman; Cor-
responding Secretary, Erin
Forster; Historian, Stacy Bloom;
Sergeant at Arms, Deborah
Kamstock; and Chaplain, Allison
Freedman.
Installations will be held on Sun-
day, May 25 and the new officers
will serve for six months.
Halev is a chapter of the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization, the
oldest and largest Jewish youth
organization in the world.
Centered in Boca Raton the
chapter is now in its 2nd year of
existence and currently has 39
members. The adult Advisor of
the group is Amanda Turk.
If you are a Jewish teen aged
14-18 and are interested in joining
one of the many chapters in Palm
Beach, Broward and Dade coun-
ties, please contact Jerry Kiewe
or Billy Rubin at 581-0218.
NA'AMAT USA
Kinneret Chapter, Na'Amat
USA, of Palm Greens in Delray
Beach will install its new officers
at a luncheon Monday, June 2,
11:30 a.m. at the Indian Spring
Country Club in Boynton Beach.
The following officers will be in-
stalled: Adele Fried, President;
Blanche Gottlieb, Executive Vice
President; Lillian Silver and
Miriam Levy, Vice Presidents for
Programming; Sylvia Snyder,
Vice President for Membership;
Bea Wasserman and Hazel Krop,
Secretaries; Shirley Fayne, Vice
President for Fund Raising;
Florence Kretchmer, Treasurer.
Alex Redhill will entertain. The
cost is $12.50 per person. For fur-
ther information call Estelle
Leibowitz, 499-8890 or Pauline
Glassberg, 499-8248.
Their last meeting of the season
will be a card party/luncheon,
June 16, at noon at Palm Greens
Clubhouse, Delray. The cost is $5
per person.
ORT
Boca Glades Chapter of
Women's American ORT will
feature Installation of Officers
and Luncheon at its final meeting
of the season to be held on Mon-
day, June 9 at noon at the Patch
Reef Park Community Center on
Yamato Road (Vt mile west of
Military Trail).
Reservations are requested.
Call Ida Schwartz at 487-7620 or
Jean Frieder at 482-7287. A dona-
tion of $3 per person is payable at
the door.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
The next meeting of the
Snydrr-Tokson Poet No. 459,
Jewish War Veterans will take
place June 5 at 10 a.m. in the Ad-
ministration Building of Century
Village West, 13146 Lyons Rd.,
Boca Raton. For information, call
Phil Chesler, 496-3249.
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
Mother's Day was a special oc-
casion this year at Congregation
Anshei Emuna as over 300 con-
gregants gathered to honor their
Rebbitsin, Frances E. Sacks as
the "Mother of the Year."
Addressing the congregation,
she told them, "I am only a
representative of all the women
here today. In Judaism, a Jewish
woman is a mother to
everyone... ."
The Rebbitsin had an in-
teresting theory as to why she had
been selected from so many can-
didates at the synagogue. She
cited an article in the April 22 edi-
tion of the Sun Sentinel listing
"Ten Outstanding Moms of
1986." Included were such
luminaries as sex therapist Dr.
Ruth Westheimer, golfer Nancy
Lopez and actress, Janet Leigh.
"But, there was no Rebbitsin!!"
exclaimed Mrs. Sacks.
Actually, the Men's Club of the
Temple selected Mrs. Sacks
because of her numerous activities
in the congregation and in the
community. Currently, the Reb-
bitsin is Chairman of the Com-
munity Relations Council and she
serves on the Federation's
Speakers' Bureau. She continues
to lead mini-missions for the
Federation which introduce the
community to Federation
projects.
Rabbi and Mrs. Sacks are the
parents of three married children,
one daughter and two sons and
they are grandparents to four
grandchildren. Their oldest son,
Selig, is a corporate lawyer in
Manhattan. He is married to an
attorney, too.
Daughter Debbie lives in
Sharon, Mass. She is a former
educator, now involved in real
estate and is married to a CPA.
A younger child, Jonathan,
received his formal rabbinic or-
Israel, China
Open Phones
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
and the People's Republic of
China opened their first telephone
connections Monday. Calls now go
through the telephone exchanges
in each country, but direct dialing
will become possible in the not too
distant future.
Israel Radio recorded and
broadcast the first telephone con-
versation between countries at
the opposite ends of the Asian
continent. It was between the
supervisors at their respective ex-
changes.
, HAVE
YOU BEEN
comparing
APPLESandORANG
AMONG PRE-ARRANGEMENT PLANS?
If you've shopped lor funeral pre-arrangements,
f you've lound there are some big differences among'
'them. Some "package'' plans look economicaL but then you
read the fine print and discover the add-ons. surcharges, hidden costs
they lorgot to mention. At Menorah. you'll find the custom-designed
pre-need plan for your pocketbook with extra value, extra attention
and no extra charges. If you have a plan now, bring it in and well
write a Menorah Pre-Need Plan tor less and give you a dozen oranges.
Now isn't that a peach of an offer?
627-2277
9321 Memorial Park Road 7 minutes west
of 1-95 via Northlake Blvd. Exit
Gardens and Funeral Chapels Cemetery Funeral Chapel Mausoleum Pre Need Planning
Other locations in North Miami Beach. Sunnse Margate and Deertleld Beach
LIMITED TIME OFFER A FREE SET OF JEWISH HOLIDAY PRINTS FOR THE FIRST 500 VISITORS TO
MENORAH GARDENS
Meng&hT
dination in April from Yeshiva
University. In June, he will
receive a higher level ordination
which will allow him to sit as a
judge on civil matters in Jewish
communities. Jonathan's wife will
graduate this week from the New
York Medical College, number-
one in her class.
The Sacks will have been mar-
ried 40 years in July. "We became
engaged on Mother's Day after a
long relationship," she quipped.
"We had a date on Wednesday
and Friday and became engaged
on Sunday. The wedding was two
and one-half months later."
She says that the secret to a
long marriage is commitment
"to each other and to Judaism.
When I decided to become a reb-
bitsin, I was going to be the best
one I could be and I also became a
professional volunteer from the
beginning. With children, the
most important ingredient is
mazel."
Shabbat, 22 lyar, 5746
Weekly Sldrah Behukotai
Candlelighting 7:47 p.m.
Sabbath Ends 8:58 p.m.
(Friday, June 8 is Jerusalem Day)
gious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30
a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101, Boca Raton, Florida
33433. Orthodox services held at Verde Elementary School
Cafeteria, 6590 Verde Trail, Boca, Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
For information regarding Friday, Sundown services Mincha-
Maariv, call Rabbi Mark Dratch. Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd., Delray
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Daily
Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m. Sab-
bath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class 5 p.m.
Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION BETH AMI
2134 N.W. 19th Way, Boca Raton, Florida 33431. Conservative.
Phone (305) 994-8693 or 276-8804. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer; Cantor
Mark Levi; President, Joseph Boumans. Services held at the
Jewish Federation, 336 N.W. Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton;
Friday evening at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio Road,
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler. Cantor
Norman Swerling. Sabbath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday
at 10:15 a.m. Mailing address: 8177 W. Glades Road, Suite 214,
Boca Raton, FL 33434. Phone 483-9982. Baby sitting available
during services.
CONGREGATIONI TORAH OHR
Located in Century Village of Boca Raton. Orthodox. Rabbi
David Weissenberg. Cantor Jacob Resnick. President Edward
Sharzer. For information on services and educational classes and
programs, call 482-0206 or 482-7156.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
7099 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33446. Conser-
vative. Phone 495-0466 and 495-1300. Rabbi Morris Silberman.
Cantor Louis Hershman. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m.,
Saturday at 8:30 a.m. Daily services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at
8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month, Saturday morning services 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FL 33434. Con-
servative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday 8:30 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Grain. Phone: 483-5557. Joseph
M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Conser-
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd. Zvi Adler,
Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:45 a.m.
Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Barwick
Road), Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Reform. Sabbath Eve. ser-
vices, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver,
phone 276-6161.


Women's American ORT
South Palm Beach County
Honor Roll Luncheon
J South Palm Beach County
lonor Roll Luncheon held recent-
at the Hyatt in the Palm
ches was attended by more
an 400 women who attained
onor Roll status by contributing
eir time and effort to earn
nney to support ORT schools
Ld projects around the world.
I After the delicious luncheon,
oyce Portner, vice president of
lonor Roll, delivered a short
ch which expressed apprecia-
i for the tireless efforts of
latalie Berman and the Honor
oil Chairpersons of each of the
Boca and Delray ORT Chapters
of the South Palm Beach County
Region.
Guest speaker and regional
education coordinator. Harriet
Shatin proudly presenty
ORT's first Scholarship Awards
to three students from South
Technical Education Center, after
she introduced the school's direct-
tor, Dr. Leonard Goforth. The
three students, Kerri Boozer,
Marilyn Martinez, and Richard
Cedola were presented with Cer-
tificates of Recognition and the
two students who pay for their
vocational education were given
$50 each towards educational
expenses.

g5
I
A
^resent on the dais during the ORT Honor Roll Luncheon were
to right): Joyce Portner, vice president of Donor; Natalie
Serman, luncheon chairperson; Harriet Shatin, education coor-
dinator; Pepi Dunay, District VI president; Anita Kessler, S.
alm County Regional president; Elayne Fischer, executive vice
resident.
)r. Leonard Goforth (left,) of the South Technical Education
center and the three student recipients of ORT scholarship
wards.
B'nai Mitzvah
A
\
'm'l.v Cohen
EMILY COHEN
Lm" rh}urd&y- May 10, Emily
I nen, daughter of Kattj
"nen and Charles Chen wm
called to the Torah of Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bat
Mitzvah. Emily is a 7th grade stu-
dent at Boca Raton Middle School
and attends the Temple Beth El
Religious School. Family
members sharing in the Simcha
were her sister, Gail and grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Bernat
Weiner of Sausalito, Calif, and
Phyllis Cohen of Boca Raton.
Emily's parents hosted a Kiddush
in her honor following Havdalah
Services.
RYAN CUTLER
On Saturday, May 24, Ryan
Cutler, son of Laura Cutler and
Charles Cutler, was called to the
Torah of Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton as a Bar Mitzvah. Ryan is a
7th grade student at Loggers Run
Middle School and attends the
Temple Beth El Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
Simcha were his sister.-. Etas
JMM and his grandparents.
M.irissa and Kenneth Queen of
Delrav Beach. Ryan's pan
n his honor
following Shabbat Morning
Friday, May 30, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 15
In The Synagogues
And Temples ...
TEMPLE EMETH
Brotherhood Temple Emeth
will sponsor a Sea Escape. June
16, 17, 18 at the Deauville Hotel
and Tennis Club. Trip includes
one day cruise to Grand Bahamas.
Transfers to and from cruise
port. Round trip transportation
Delray to Miami Beach. Cost $145
per person. For more information
call Jules Daroe 498-7422,
499-2318.
Singles Club
The last meeting of the season
of the Temple Emeth Singles
Club will be held on Monday, June
9 at noon, and will be for members
only. Please bring your member-
ship cards. Entertainment will be
Frank Wundohl
Dead At 56
NEW YORK (JTA) Frank
Wundohl, director of communica-
tions for JWB since 1981 and a
member of the board of directors
of the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy, died Saturday at St.
Elizabeth's Hospital in Elizabeth,
N.J., after a lingering illness. He
was 56. Funeral services took
place Monday in Philadelphia.
Recently, Wundohl received the
Joseph Polakoff Award of the
American Jewish Press Associa-
tion (AJPA). The presentation to
him was made at the hospital.
Wundohl joined JWB's ex-
ecutive staff on June 15, 1981,
after eight years as editor of the
Jewish Exponent of Philadelphia.
by Veronica, singer-actress and Luncheon will be served. No
Peter, Pianist-Arranger. A Mini guests please.
Obituaries
ATTENBERG
Sidney. 67, of Palm Greens, Delray Beach,
was originally from Massachusetts. He is
survived by his wife Esther, mother Ger-
trude; son Stephen; daughter Karen Kahn
and Eileen Graff; sister Renee Wilcox and
four grandchildren. (Beth Israel-Rubin
Memorial Chapel)
BEIL
Lillian, 85, of Kings Point, Delray Beach,
was originally from New York. She is sur-
vived by her daughter Marilyn Kaplan.
(Beth Israel-Rubin Memorial Chapel)
CHESNER
Irving, 77, of Kings Point, Delray Beach,
was originally from New York. He is surviv-
ed by his wife Shirley; son Gary; daughters
Maxine Milander. Koslyn Marx, and Sylvia
Alpert; sister Dorothy Klenet, Betty Lipton
ind Marian Zaichick; nine grandchildren
ind eight great-grandchildren. (Beth Israel
Rubin Memorial Chapel)
COHEN
Morton, 68. of Kales of Delray. was original-
ly from New York. He is survived by his
wife Bloome; son Joel; sisters Muriel
Weinberg, Irma Moskowitx and Shirley
Allen. (Beth Israel Rubin Memorial Chapel)
GOUNKIN
Edith. 78, of Kings Point, Delray Beach,
was originally from Illinois. She is survived
by her husband Louis; daughter Gail Mitxen-
macher; four grandchildren. (Beth Israel-
Rubin Memorial Chapel)
HALBRICK
Gladys, 72, of Delray Beach, was originally
from New York. She is survived by her son
Howard. (Gutterman-Warheit Memorial
Chapel)
HORNREICH
Samuel, 77, of Kings Point, Delray Beach,
was originally from New York. He is surviv-
ed by his wife Mollie, daughter Ariene;
brother Joseph; sister Geraldine Paper and
Laura Weinstock and two grandchildren.
(Beth Israel-Rubin Memorial Chapel)
JACOBSON
.'dies, 71, of Delray Beach, was originally
from Pennsylvania. He is survived by his
wife Martha; son Richard; daughters Wilma
Dannenbaum, Sandra Sorkowilz; sister
Rose Arinsberg; brother Charles, and seven
grandchildren. (Gutterman-Warheit
Memorial Chapel)
LITTMAN
Rubin. 79, of Kings Point, Delray Beach,
was originally from New York. He is surviv-
ed by his sons Seymour and Morton;
daughters Alicia Cohen, Ellen Littman;
brothers Harry and Abraham; sister Bessie
Rubin, and six grandchildren. (Beth Israel-
Rubin Memorial Chapel)
MARGOLIS
Herbert, 37, of Boca Del Mar, was originally
from New York. He is survived by his wife
Stephanie; mother and father Harry and
Gloria; son Michael; daughter Magen; sister
Ariene Auerback. (Gutterman-Warheit
Memorial Chapel)
SOCHIN
Anne, 75, of Palm Greens, was originally
from Massachusetts. She is survived by her
son James Eric; daughter Stephanie Green
wald. Jackie Sochin-Bish; brother Herbert
Kane; sisters Betty Hoffman and Lee
Kitover and four grandchildren. (Beth
Israel-Rubin Memorial Chapel)
STEINBERG
Abraham. 73, of Kings Point, Delray Beach,
was originally from Russia. He is survived
by his wife Beatrice; son Ira; sister Beatrice
Zimbalist and two grandchildren. (Beth
Israel-Rubin Memorial Chapel)
7.1 CKERMAN
Eva, 77, of Kings Point, Delray Beach, was
originally from New York. She is survived
by her husband Max; son Bernard; brother
Benjamin Krilov; sisters Anna Riback, Bet-
ty Nack, Minnie Eigner, Mary Weisaman,
Bella Brown, and two grandchildren. (Beth
Israel-Rubin Memorial Chapel)
Think of the Future Today
Pre-Arrangements.
Another Smart Investment and more
All your life you've taken pride
in your ability to handle
money. You've invested and
saved. You've been smart be-
cause you recognize a good op-
portunity when you see one.
Today there's another smart in-
vestment you should be think-
ing about-pre-arranged funer-
als. Nobody likes to think
about death or dying, but it is
a very real part of life and funer-
al costs have been edging up-
wards. Just a few years ago, the
average pre-arranged funeral
cost $1,525. Today, that
same pre-arranged funeral
costs $2,265. and five years
from now the projected cost is
$3,395. You can see that pre-ar-
rangements can save your
1980
1985
1990
$1,525. $2,265. $3,395.
loved ones thousands of dol-
lars. But that is only part of the
pre-arrangement story.
When you take care of these
matters yourself, you are mak-
ing a careful decision. You feel
comfortable and your loved
ones do not have to make an
emotional decision at a time
when grief hinders their
thinking
Why not call for an appoint-
ment today? Talk to Phil Wish-
na. Director of the Beth Israel-
Rubin Family Protection Plan.
There's no charge or obliga-
tion to find out how you can
know peace of mind, while
making a farsighted. smart
investment
CBETH ISRAEL
RUBIPi
c_A Family Protection Plati Chapel
Pre Need Conference Center
6578 W. Atlantic Ave. Delray Beach. FL 33446 305-498-5 700
Chapel
5808 W. Atlantic Ave. Delray Beach, Fl. 33446 305-499-8000/732-3000


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, May 30, 1986
THE NEW YORK TIMES, FRIDAY, MAY It, 196*
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r

Under Present Tax Law
Stock Market Gains
Can Benefit You
And The Jewish
People
Iff you've held securities for at least six months which have grown
in value, you can contribute them to the South County Jewish
Federation or the Jewish Community Foundation and take a tax
deduction for the appreciated value.
FOR EXAMPLE: Suppose stocks purchased more than six months
ago for $1,000 are worth $1,500 when you give them to the SCJF:
1. The Federation credits you with a $1,500 gift.
2. You pay no capital gains tax on the $500 increase in the value
of your stocks.
3. You may take a $1,500 charitable deduction on your Federal
income taxes.
Pay your SCJF pledge or establish a
Personal Philanthropic Fund now with
cash and/or appreciated stocks.
You benefit, the Federation benefits, Israel benefits, Jewish life
in all of South County benefits.
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Stock Tables Explained
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