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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( February 14, 1986 )

V
PafW-4 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
The Paul Greenberg Column
NI-I-IGE Criminals
Here we go again. Call it the Ni-
i-ice Criminal Syndrome. The
name comes from an old Arkansas
story about a laconic judge on the
circuit bench who had just found a
well known, and rather well liked,
bootlegger as guilty as he un-
doubtedly was. But before ]
sentence, the judge entertair
testimony about the character of
the defendant, and there was a lot
of it. According to a long line of
witnesses, said defendant was
faithful in church attendance, a
good family man, generous to
local charities, kind to small
children and little old ladies ... a
veritable paragon of virtue. Duly
impressed, the old judge peered
down at the distinguished defen-
dant and, on the basis of these
numerous encomiums, rendered
his own summation of the much
esteemed citizen who stood before
him: "Ni-i-ice bootlegger," mur-
mured the judge, "Ni-i-ice
bootlegger."
Comes now before the bar of
public opinion one Paul Brown,
chief executive officer of the
American Life League, in the
company of a small crowd of other
leaders of the anti-abortion move-
ment in this country and prays the
President of the United States "to
simply consider a pardon for all
pro-lifers" who in their en-
thusiasm for life have been blow-
ing up abortion clinics.
Lest there be any misunderstan-
ding, Mr. Brown adds: "We con-
demn whal they did. but we still
think they are nice people .
"Ah, there it is: the essence of the
argument, the guiding principle,
the governing rule to old judge
summarized so succinctly. These
people are ni-i-ice bombers.
Not inclined to stop while he
was behind, Mr. Brown continued
his plea for a pardon by arguing
that these nice people "never hurt
anybody: they may have
destroyed a building or two. but
they have not done anything to
hurt a person." That is a piquant
definition of not hurting anybody
One of these nice convicts ab-
ducted a physician who performed
abortions. If kidnapping someone
is not to hurt them, then
American standards in such mat-
ters begin to approach Lebanon's.
Losing one's property say, a
building or two can hurt, too.
Americans used to be known for
recognizing the close link in-
deed, the identity between per-
sonal and property rights. John
Locke's formula of life, liberty,
and property was altered only
slightly to become life, liberty.
and the pursuit of happiness in the
Declaration of Independence, that
most fundamental of American
state papers.
But let us not dwell on
philosophical essentials when in-
teresting aides beckon. After the
President met with this delega-
tion pleading for pardons, he is
said (a) to have sympathized with
their request and (b) not to have
sympathized with it, depending on
whether one was listening to a
over, not only his own persona,
but the ideal of a government of
law rather than of men. The fatal
error of the all-too-brief Kerensky
government, perhaps the only
democratic one Russia ever had,
Paul Greenberg
spokesman for the petitioners or
to the President's press secretary.
Ronald Reagan's manner is so in-
gratiating and his impromptu
language of such Eisenhowerean
flexibility that he might have been
misunderstood even if he had in-
tended to say something definite
instead of making the usual,
soothing sounds to another
pressure group.
A more illuminating question is
whether the President would have
considered, or such a delegation
requested, a pardon for criminals
with a different cause say. the
anti-war protesters who blew up
that lab at the University of
Wisconsin during the late
unpleasantness in Vietnam. All
they set out to do was destroy a
building or two, not "hurt
anybody." How were they to
know that some reckless graduate
student would still be inside doing
research at the ungodly hour? Ac-
ting in a separate but equally
idealistic cause, don't they fit the
definition of nice bombers?
Or, as one suspects, does Nice
People in such a context really
mean Our Kind of People? Name-
ly, those with a cause we can sup-
port and who therefore should be
pardoned. This is to make the law
a respecter of persons, or rather
of causes, and therefore not law at
all but the kind of shared pre-
judice Nice People approve of.
W.J. Cash used the term "savage
ideal" in his classic The Mind of
the South to explain how nice
Southerners could condone
violating the law during
Reconstruction and at sporadic
intervals thereafter. After all, it
was for a good cause, i.e. ours.
But these candidates for par-
dons are not common criminals, it
is said. That is why they may be so
dangerous, and pardoning them
so baneful a precedent. A common
criminal may be after only money
or some other purely personal
gain. The uncommon criminal
the idealist, aka the fanatic may
threaten the principle of law
itself. So could pardoning his
crimes. Richard Nixon's pardon
(without the formality of a trial
first) still casts a long shadow
The Jewish
RID]
of South County
w-1 Thejewish -|fc. y
FloridiaN
PREDSMOCMCT
SUZANNE SMOCME T
Eeculiv* Editc
MARTY ERANN
Oi'eeKy ot Commjntcaoont Sooth County Je*sn Federation
MMKM Weekly M4SWWOW' ttWoefft MU) l-NU| IHUCI 0 rH< |4IMUNI
Second Class POSTMASTER: Send address change* to The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Bex 012973. Miami. Fla. 33101
oOCA RATON OFFICE 336 Spanish Riot Bivd N W Boca Raton Fla 33431 Phone 3SS2737
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Atfvertiaiac Urartar. Stan Laeeer. Ffcaa* Witt?
ComtxnM jev .- Appeal Soot" County Jawiafi Federation, inc. Officers President
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was to allow a most uncommon
criminal named Ulyanov to escape
its grasp and seize power as
Lenin.
Contrary to the all-too-accepted
usage, "political crimes" can be
far more serious than the common
ones, for they threaten not just in-
dividuals but the whole society.
Those most concerned about the
honor of their cause and one
would like to think that category
includes leaders of the anti-
abortion movement ought to be
the most insistent on punishing
those who disgrace that cause. In-
stead, they have joined the
overflowing ranks of pleaders on
behalf of ni-i-ice criminals. The
President was embarrassed by the
brief furor over his discussing
such pardons but he's not the
only one who should be.
(Copyright 1986 Frmlanee
SymlimU Pine Bluff. Ark.)
DATELINE: ISRAEL
Urban Kibbutz
Friday. February 14,1986
Volume 8
5 1 ADAR 5746
Number 7
By FERN ALLEN
Special to the South County
Jewish Federation
Down the street from the wig
shops, religious book stores and
kosher butcher shops of
Jerusalem's ultra-Orthodox com-
munity of Mea She'arim is an
unlikely settlement a kibbutz.
The commune, called Reshet
(Hebrew for network), is Israel's
only urban kibbutz. Established in
1979, the nine founders did not set
out to push back swamps. Instead,
they wanted to alleviate the social
problems of an impoverished
neighborhood in order to help
change their plight. We've come
here to solve problems, but we
don't want to do it like social
workers who only visit the com-
munity. We want to make changes
as part of the community." said
Eli Ahdut, one of the founders.
The original urban pioneers
rented a building in the Bukharan
quarter of the city, where many
poor Sephardic families live. Over
the years, the kibbutz has grown
to about 20 members, plus 11
children.
While most of the founders are
young adults who themselves
grew up on kibbutzim, the urban
settlement now includes residents
of the neighborhood, American
immigrants and people from
moshavim.
"We don't see ourselves as
philanthropists. What we do isn't
charity to the needy. We want to
change the general situation by
living and working together," said
Ahdut, an Iranian Jew who lives
on the settlement with his wife.
Members of Kibbutz Reshet en-
courage their neighbors to par-
ticipate in their lectures, join their
outings or simply stop at the kib-
butz for coffee and informal
conversation.
The urban kibbutz has also been
able to interact with its neighbors
through its nursery school, which
many local children attend.
Mothers of the neighborhood
children take part in the decision-
making process, which is based on
kibbutz principles.
In one instance, it was decided
that the children would prepare
the morning snacks together to
avoid a situation where one child
might feel his food was inferior to
that of his friends.
Although the settlement
borders the ultra-zealous Mea
She'arim community, the kibbutz
has no contact with its ultra-
Orthodox neighbors. "They are
not a group that will accept our
ideology," Ahdut noted.
While there have not been any
clashes with the Hassidim or other
ethnic groups in the area, the kib-
butz nevertheless shuns publicity.
"We're afraid it will cause pro-
blems with our neighbors if there
is too much attention to our
lifestyle," noted Tami Ben-
Shalom, the secretary for Kibbutz
Reshet.
The urban kibbutz maintains a
dialogue with the United Kibbutz
Movement, but is not officially a
member of that secular kibbutz
organization. There are no formal
ties with the Religious Kibbutz
Movement, despite the fact that
many of Kibbutz Reshet's
members grew up on religious
kibbutzim.
"Our goal is different than that
of the Religious Kibbutz Move-
ment. Theirs is to settle the land;
ours is to build community." said
Ben-Shalom.
Filled to capacity in their sparse
living quarters, Kibbutz Reshet
cannot accept new members now.
Each family receives two small
rooms, one for parents, the other
tor the children. A communal din-
ing hall and kosher kitchen are
also on the premises.
However the members hope to
relocate to a larger building in
another part of the city which also
has social problems. Ideally, the
group would like to expand to 120
persons.
Despite the practical stumbling
blocks, the kibbutz members are
determined to remain in
Jerusalem and prove that their ap-
proach to instilling values into a
community can work.
"We feel that this is the place
where we can make a difference."
Ben-Shalom said
Albert Linden (left), national commander of the Disabled
American Veterans, and Harvey S. Friedman, national com-
mander of the Jewish War Veterans of the C7SA, place a wreath at
Yad Vashem in Jerusalem. The two veterans' leaders recently
returned from a fact-finding tour of Israel, where they met with
U.S. Ambassador Thomas Pickering and high-ranking Israeli oj-
fxcials, including Deputy Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
Auschwitz Exhibition At UN
Extended For An Additional Month
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
The exhibition "Auschwitz A
Crime Against Mankind," on
display in the visitors' lobby of the
United Nations, will be open to
the public for an additional month
through Feb. 28.
The announcement was made by
Prof. Maurice Goldstein, presi-
dent of the International
Auschwitz Committee, which
organized the exhibition toother
with the Auschwitz State Museum
in Poland. The UN display was
sponsored by the UN Center for
Human Rights.
In an interview with the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency. Goldstein
said that the UN agreed to the ex-
tension of exhibition at the re-
quest of the International
Auschwitz Committee. According
to Goldstein, about 40.000 people
have already visited the exhibition
and an estimated 30,000 more
visitors will view it bv F**

^


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Orthodox Figure Sees Centrist
Orthodoxy Growing in Boca
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
Dr. Norman Lamm, president
of Yeshiva University, painted an
optimistic picture of modern Or-
thodox Judaism in America and
particularly in Boca Raton during
a visit to the area last week. At
the same time he issued a call to
other denominational groups to
look "for that which unites us"
and to offer assistance to promote
this Orthodox presence in the
community.
Lamm said that Orthodoxy
emerged in Boca Raton two years
ago because there existed here a
core of people who were in-
terested in it. However, he advis-
ed, "There are Jews, who, no mat-
ter what the degree of their slip-
page from full Jewish observance,
are spiritually and psychologically
committed to continuing full
Jewish tradition." Within the set-
ting of a modern Orthodox
synagogue, these people would
... "sense the presence of a
millennial Jewish tradition ...
that this is how their parents and
great-grandparents prayed and
studied and gave charity and
socialized and expressed their
Yiddishkeit."
Lamm foresees no problems for
people who want to be Orthodox
in this area. The fully observant
can find a place to live within
walking distance of the future
synagogue, he said.
He also sees the establishment
of the synagogue as an opportuni-
ty for the rest of the community to
rally around this effort "... to
build it, support it, support its rab-
bi." Acknowledging that there are
deep differences in Judaism, he
suggested that this is the time to
explore ways of getting along
together for the benefit of the en-
tire Jewish community, "without
relying on phony sweetness and
disregard of one's own
principles."
As for the general state of Or-
thodoxy in America, Lamm said,
demographic statistics indicate
Germans Attempted Meeting
Between Peres, Mubarak
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) German diplomats attempted,
without success to arrange a meeting between President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and Israeli, Premier Shimon
Peres, both of whom were in Europe, sources here disclos-
ed last week. They said the efforts were rebuffed by
Mubarak's aides.
PERES WAS VISITING West Germany. Mubarak
was in Strasbourg to address the European Parliament. He
conferred with President Francois Mitterrand in Paris and
visited Bonn last Thursday, the day after Peres returned to
Israel.
Uri Savir, a spokesman for Peres, ruled out a meeting
with Mubarak on German soil. He said Israel was in-
terested in a summit meeting, but only in the Middle East.
Peres later received a detailed report on his Cabinet col-
league Ezer Weizman's meeting with Mubarak in Cairo.
Argentine, Uruguay Diplomats
Expected To Visit Israel in '86
following the establishment two
weeks ago of diplomatic relations
with Spain, El Diario/La Prensa
reported.
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
chiefs of state of both Argentina
and Uruguay will visit Israel this
year, an indication of improved
relations between Israel and Latin
America, according to Hanan
Olamy, head of the Latin
American Department of Israel's
Foreign Ministry, it was reported
recently in New York's mass cir-
culation Spanish-language
newspaper, El Diario/La Prensa.
Uruguayan President Julio
Sanguinetti plans an official visit
to Israel within the next four mon-
ths, and Argentine President Raul
Alfonsin will also visit at some
time during the coming year,
Olamy said.
language daily added that Olamy
also told reporters that two other
Uruguayan officials Vice Presi-
dent Enrique Tarigo and Foreign
Minister Enrique Iglesias were
to arrive in Israel last week in
separate visits. They are the
highest level officials form this
South American country to visit
Israel in more than a decade.
Both Uruguay and Argentina
have undergone transformation
from military to civilian rule
within the last two years.
Olamy said he anticipates that
Israel's relations with the
Hispanic world will improve,
that the movement "is moving up
quickly, certainly ahead of
everyone else." The good news,
he said, is that for Orthodoxy
there is a new momentum, a new
morale and hope for the future.
The bad news, he lamented, is
that other Jewish groups are not
increasing. "That Jews of any
identification are simply giving up
their Jewish affiliation and Jewish
selfhood, this to me, as an Or-
thodox leader, is a matter of great
distress .."
. Assessing the Other
Movements .
Asked whether there had been
any plans to place obstacles in the
path of other Jewish movements
by the Orthodox, Lamm replied
that the other groups themselves
do more to disrupt the health of
their movements than the Or-
thodox could. Alluding first to the
Conservative movement, he said:
"Every time they come along with
a new discovery, a great innova-
tion that cuts them away from
tradition, that distances them
from traditional mainstream
Jewish life .. they create their
own problems."
In the Reform movement,
Lamm mentioned Patrilineal Des-
cent as "one of the most unfor-
tunate things they've ever done."
He said that "it struck at the very
heart of Jewish identity" and his
feelings were that many in
Reform leadership now regard it
as a "tragic error" and are pro-
bably seeking "a graceful way
out"
Still more of the bad news,
warned Lamm, is the "enormous
animosity" that exists between
the religious groups and the resul-
tant fragmentation that has taken
place. "We can live with disunity,
we can't live with hatred ...
There's enough blame to go
around in every camp and every
agency."
. Halting 'Slippage'...
How does Orthodoxy contend
with the problem of "slippage
from full Jewish observance?" Is
there a plan to return Jews to the
movement?
Lamm replied that two bran-
ches of Orthodoxy provide
outreach programs in efforts to
reclaim such Jewry.
He said that the Lubavitchers
can appeal to personalities who
are affected more by the exotic
and the authority-centered con-
cepts of Lubavitch. Others, he
Rabbi Dr. Norman Lamm
said, are drawn to the "more
modernistic, more tolerant, more
rational kind of presentation" of-
fered by centrist Orthodoxy. He
described centrist Orthodoxy as
the religious direction emanating
primarily from Yeshiva Universi-
ty, the Rabbinical Council, Young
Israel and the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations.
Among the centrist programs is
a system of youth seminars aimed
at high school levels. Lamm said
that the program has been so suc-
cessful that colleges for Ba'alei
T'shuvak (returnees), have been
established at Yeshiva University,
the James Striar School for men
and within the Stern College for
women.
A special program called
Shanah enables those stsudents
enrolled at other universities (as
well as graduate students and
adults beyond the age of 50) to
spend a semester or year in full-
time Jewish studies at Yeshiva
University. Many scholarships are
available for this program, he
added.
The university's Kiruv (getting
close) Program sends college
students, rabbinical students,
young rabbis and teens to cam-
puses across the country. The
young people get others in-
terested in their views and main-
tain contact with them, said
Lamm.
... Centrist Appeal for Boca
Raton ...
Modern centrist Orthodoxy was
implemented in Boca Raton
through the Yeshiva University
Communities Program. Lamm ex-
plained that the approach was ap-
pealing to this community because
of several major principles:
First, he described the principle
of synthesis of Torah and secular
culture. Lamm said it was im-
perative that 20th Century Jews
be learned in their Judaism and be
full participants in it. "... We
have to be engaged in it, in the
professions, in business and the
culture of the world, not despite
the fact that we are Torah Jews,
but because of it"
The second principle is commit-
ment with tolerance ... "A total
commitment, uncompromising to
Jewish tradition, but with a max-
imum amount of tolerance for
others." But, he cautioned, it has
to be honest tolerance accom-
panied by mutual respect. Too
often the relationship has been
dishonest for the sake of har-
mony, he said.
A commitment to Israel, as a
reality and as desirable, is the
final major principle of centrist
Orthodox. "In that sense it marks
us off from the rest of Orthodoxy
because we see Israel as a positive
development within our own faith
and commitment."
Rabbi Dratch Works With Orthodox Jews
To Build Congregation In Boca
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
This synagogue has not just
formed a congregation, but an ex-
tended family, says Rabbi Mark
Dratch of the two and one-half
year old Boca Raton Synagogue,
and adds that the 65 families
share the greater dream of
building an entire Jewish com-
munity dedicated to a "proper
Jewish life and Torah learning."
A five-acre tract on Montoya
Circle in west Boca Raton,
southwest of the Palmetto Park
Road/Powerline Road intersec-
tion, is the setting for a religious
complex which will include a sanc-
tuary, a mikvak, classrooms, a
social hall and offices. Rabbi
Dratch said the congregation is
ready to begin the first phase of
the complex immediately. They
are awaiting a building permit, he
said.
The Rabbi described the Mon-
toya Circle tract as "aesthetically
beautiful." He noted that there is
a variety of housing available in
the area rentals, town-houses
to "very substantial" single fami-
ly homes. "Anyone at any level of
professional growth could move
Rabbi Mark Dratch
into the community and feel com-
fortable there."
As more people move into the
area, a real sense of community
will be created Rabbi Dratch said,
"especially on Shabbos and the
holidays when people can open
their homes to others .. .
The only requirement for
membership at the Boca Raton
Synagogue is that the potential
member be Jewish. All are
welcomed regardless of personal
observance, said the Rabbi. He
said that some of the congregants
cannot read Hebrew, but the
spirit and dedication of the
membership are attractive to
them. "We are tolerant... I may
not condone every behavior of
members of my congregation, but
I accept them because they are
Jews and I respect them because
of the commitments."
Rabbi Dratch admitted that
there are still problems for Or-
thodox Judaism in Boca Raton
education being foremost among
them. However, he was optimistic
that resolution will come "...
now that there is a presence of
authentic Judaism." Other pro-
blems he enumerated were in
terms of 'irking a physical
building, nut having certain con-
veniences of kosher food
available, especially quality
kosher food, and not having a
mikvak. The problems are
primarily ones of a little inconve-
nience, he emphasized.
Asked about his own personal
impact on the Orthodox communi-
ty, Rabbi Dratch responded that
his presence can be described as
"Presenting opportunity in many
areas."
He alluded first to the practical
areas. In terms of kaskrutk. Rabbi
Dratch said that as part of the
S.C. Va'ad Hakaahruth he has
been working with two local
bakeries, a caterer and two hotels
which provide kosher catering.
Then in the realm of intellectual
pursuits and religious study, the
Rabbi has organized a number of
weekly classes for people of all
Jewish educational backgrounds.
Distant residents, from as far as
north of West Palm Beach and
south throughout Broward Coun-
ty, also frequently seek t e
Rabbi's expertise concerning
religious questions. He explained
that "there is a ring of authentici-
ty here that they recognize and
are looking for. The membership
is building a Skul, providing a cen-
tral location with which they can
identify, in which they can ex-
press themselves Jewishry."
wm
_


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
February 14, 1986

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00236

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
February 14, 1986

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00236

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
ONE DREAM.. .ONE PEOPLE.. .ONE DESTINY
w^ The Jewish ^^ y
FloridiaN
of South County
Volume 8 Number 7
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, February 14.1966
mmmasmmmmmmmm
n*ttocto< Price 35 Cents
Inside
1 Urban Kibbutz... page 4
!
Federation/UJA Passes $3m. Mark
Women's Division Tops $lm.
Rabbi Lamm speaks out
...page 5
Judith Resnik... page 9 jij
SB
S
Masada Photo Spread..
pages 10 & 11
As of the second week in February, the
Federation/UJA Campaign in South County
has reached the $3-million-mark, according to
Federation President Marianne Bobick.
This is not only a record in rent campaign has been run-
the Federation's relatively ning some 30 percent ahead
Iss*:*^^ short history, but the cur- of last year s in card-for-
card increases, including
many new gifts, say cam-
paign officials.
Weizman Trip May Not
TT Tm t* i ij aii Contrary to reports in the
Have Been Failure After All general press, there is no
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ezer Weizman's hurried
trip to Cairo for a meeting
with President Hosni
Mubarak apparently did lit-
tle to advance any thaw in
Israeli-Egyptian relations
or bring a summit meeting
between Mubarak and
Premier Shimon Peres any
closer.
Weizman, a Minister-Without-
Portfolio, briefed his Cabinet col-
leagues Tuesday on his talks in
Cairo. No details were made
public, but from what is known to
the media, he is believed to have
had little of substance to report.
He seemed, inadvertently, to con-
firm this when he said the
downbeat reaction to his trip was
due to unrealistic expectations.
"I DIDN'T GO to Egypt with a
shopping bag, and I didn't come
back with one," he told reporters,
adding, "I don't have much to
say." Nevertheless, Premier
Shimon Peres, who was visiting
West Germany last week, said
Weizman's mission was impor-
tant, and he was pleased with it.
Weizman himself reportedly
relayed a positive account of his
meeting with Mubarak to Peres in
Bonn.
The trip was supposed to have
been secret, but Weizman had
hardly landed in Cairo when the
Israeli media were reporting on
his trip. His mission, reportedly,
was to convince Mubarak of the
importance of the decision by the
Inner Cabinet on Jan. 13 to accede
set campaign goal, but the
estimates of exceeding the
$5 million mark in this
year's campaign are well
justified, the campaign
leaders say, because of
several factors:
There is an air of positive feel-
ing, excitement and enthusiasm,
generated in part by the introduc-
tion of the Community Theme this
year, and also by the evidence of
growth and development of the
Jewish community in South
County ...
There are more volunteer
workers then ever before involved
in the campaign, in all its aspects,
all working not only in soliciting
funds, but also in educating the
community on what is happening,
what the needs are both locally
and abroad ...
The various divisions are all
showing growth the Women's
Division is burgeoning; the Family
Division is functioning more effec-
tively than ever with the newly-
formed Cabinet; and a new divi-
sion, the Young Leadership Divi-
sion, has been created and is
growing rapidly.
The feeling of building up for
the future is spreading, with the
Federation reaching out to all
segments of the community; as,
for example, in holding "Federa-
tion Sabbaths" in the various
synagogues and presenting them
with the framed posters of the
Theme which have been well
received. .
With some of the major events
of this year's campaign still to
come notably the Grand Ball,
which promises to be a historical,
headline-making occasion, and
Super Sunday, which will also
likely break all records there is
every reason for this community
to be proud, and to keep up the
momentum, say the campaign
leaders.
Women's Hard Work Yields Great Results
Ezer Weizman
to Egypt's demand to settle the
Taba border dispute through in-
ternational arbitration, but only
as part of a political package to
revive the normalization process
between Israel and Egypt. The
Israeli decision was received cool-
ly in Cairo.
Weizman also reportedly tried
to impress upon Mubarak the
urgency of a summit meeting with
Peres even before the political
issues between the two countries
are resolved. But the Egyptians
are adamant that a summit date
will be set only after there is a
firm date for arbitration over
Taba to begin.
WEIZMAN denied media
reports from Cairo quoting him as
saying a Mubarak-Peres summit
was inevitable. He said he discuss-
ed the possibility of a summit with
the Egyptian leader but no dates
were mentioned.
He said, in fact, that a summit
was not workable under present
conditions and that he went to
Egypt to find out exactly what the
Continued on Page 9
When the Women's Division ap-
proached the $1 million mark last
year, as the Campaign was near-
ing its end, Chairwoman Phyllis
Squires predicted it would happen
but almost in a whisper, almost
as though she could hardly believe
it herself.
This year, the rewards for the
time and energy, commitment and
hard work invested by many of the
women in South County became
apparent even sooner the $1
million mark for the Women's
Division has already been topped,
early in February. Needless to
say, Phyllis Squires and the
women working with her are pro-
ud and ecstatic.
"Reaching this point at this ear-
ly stage of the Campaign has
demonstrated just how much our
women care," said Mrs. Squires.
While she would not set a goal
publicly, one gets the sense that
Mrs. Squires, her Associate chair-
woman Dottie Lipson, and their
hard-working committee women
do have some "target" in their
minds.
"The dollars raised for our local
services and supporting those in
Israel and other countries make
the efforts well worth it," said
Mrs. Lipson. "We hope we are
confident that our women will
continue with the same dedication
and increasing impetus to make
the remaining events even more ex-
citing and productive."
Peres Briefs Cabinet On His Trip to Europe
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres
briefed the Cabinet Sunday
on his just-ended 12-day trip
Mubarak has invited King Hus-
sein of Jordan and Palestine
Liberation Organization chief
Yasir Arafat to meet with him
there this Saturday. Hussein ap-
to Europe. No details were parently was unable to persuade
released, but Peres Arafat to accept terms for PLO
reportedly avoided raising
expectations with respect to
the Middle East peace pro-
cess and said he did not
foresee an early
breakthrough in contacts
with Jordan.
There were reports from Cairo
Sunday that President Hosni
Infiltrator Identified As Jordan Soldier
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israeli soldiers were killed, and
two were wounded in a gun battle
with an infiltrator in the Jordan
Valley at dawn. The Israelis were
on a routine patrol when they
were ambushed from a dry river
bed near Mehola. The infiltrator
was killed by reinforcements who
rushed to the scene. Mehola is in
the West Bank.
The dead soldiers were iden-
tified as Sgt. Ronen Reichel. 20, of
Holon. and ("pi. Shay Singer, 19
of I'pper Nazareth. The wounded
men were helicoptered to
Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem
where their condition was
reported satisfactory. Doctors
said they underwent surgery and
would be discharged this week.
The infiltrator was in civilian
dress jeans, a checkered shirt,
and kefiya on his head.
Documents found on his body
identified him as a soldier in the
Jordanian army, but Israel
Defense Force sources were not
certain of their authenticity. A
search of the ambush area in-
dicated the infiltrator crossed the
Jordan River near a Jordanian ar-
my post.
Maj. Gen. Ehud Barak, com-
mander of the central region, told
reporters later that it was too ear-
ly to implicate the Jordanian army
in the incident or to say whether
Jordan has changed its policy of
many years to prevent incursions
against Israel from Jordanian soil.
He noted that the Jordan Valley
has been quiet since 1981.
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and chief ol Staff Gen. Moshe
Levy visited the scene of the
clash.
representation at future peace
talks during their meetings in Am-
man two weeks ago.
THERE WAS also a report
from Washington that Secretary
of State George Shultz might con-
sider a personal visit to the Middle
East next month after a further
shuttle mission to the region by
Assistant Secretary of State
Richard Murphy. Murphy had
three meetings with Peres while
the Premier was in Europe, once
in Holland and twice in London
during the previous week. He also
met in London with Hussein, who
left before Peres arrived there.
Peres, who returned home last
Thursday after three days in West
Germany and a visit to West
Berlin, faces serious differences
with his Likud coalition partners
over Israel's position on the Mid-
dle East peace process in general
and efforts to improve relations
with Egypt in particular. The
most immediate problem is a set-
tlement of the Taba border
dispute.
The Inner Cabinet agreed on
Jan. 13 to Egypt's demand to put
the matter to international ar-
bitration, but with an initial try at
conciliation, insisted on by Likud.
The process is linked to an overall
package deal aimed at normaliz-
ing relations with Egypt, in-
cluding the early return of the
Egyptian Ambassador to Tel
Aviv. The Israeli concession had a
cool reception in Cairo.
PERES WILL consult this
week with Foreign Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir, leader of Likud, and
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
prior to the resumption of talks
between Israeli and Egyptian
diplomats to draft the terms of
reference for arbitration over
Taba. The Prime Minister is said
to be resisting Likud demand for
another full-scale Inner Cabinet
debate before the diplomatic talks
resume.
Sources close to Peres, mean-
while, are putting out the word
that Ezer Weizman's hurried trip
to Cairo for a meeting with
Mubarak a week ago was not as
barren of results as Likud circles
have depicted it. They got an
unexpected boost from Mubarak,
who warned in Cairo Sunday
against writing off Weizman's
mission and hinted it concerned
much more than just the Taba
dispute.
a-


Pfe 2 TV Jewish FToridan of South County/Friday, February 14, 1966
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Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
A Rabbi
Comments
The following is brought to our
readers by the South County
Rabbinical Association. If there
are topics you would like our
Rabbis to discuss, please submit
them to The Floridian.
SIDRAH TERVMAH
(EXODUS 25:2-27:19)
By RABBI
JOSEPH M. POLLOCK
Director Chaplaincy Service
The Hebrew word "terumah,"
usually translated as "an offer-
ing," also means "that which is
elevating."
It has been said that giving is an
art. When done willingly and art-
fully, it is elevating both for the
giver and for the recipient.
However, when the offering is
done grudgingly, indelicately or
artlessly, it serves to denigrate
the donor and to embarrass the
beneficiary.
This mitzvah of "tzedakah" is
not done well when the feelings of
the recipient are hurt in the pro-
cess. Only when given with com-
passion and in a dignified manner
is the "nedavah" given properly.
That is giving at a high spiritual
level. It is being done out of love
and with gratitude to G-d for be-
ing in a position to do so, and with
a sense of responsibility to those
who need our help.
The giver must be prepared to
go even beyond what he thinks he
is obliged to do.
He should ever exercise good
sense in his choice of recipients
and causes, and should not be
wasteful.
The giving must be done to
alleviate suffering, to educate, to
promote human welfare and
freedom and to spread the world
of G-d.
Above all, it should not be done
merely for the sake of impressing
News In Brief ...
Rabbi Joseph M. Pollock
others.
Shlomo Carlbach sings a song
about the death in a small town of
a man who was known as "Motel
de Miser." Because of his bad
reputation, his funeral is shunned,
and even the Rabbi is loath to
eulogize him. Weeks later, on Fri-
day at different times of the day,
the Rabbi is approached at his
home by some of the town beggars
who seek monetary help in
preparing for the Sabbath. After
meeting their needs, he asks how
they have managed previously.
They reply that until a few weeks
before, some mysterious benefac-
tor had been leaving money on
their doorstep every Friday.
He then realizes that the money
had stopped at the same time that
Motel had died. The town had in-
deed misjudged this man who, in
giving willingly and artfully, had
been fulfilling the mitzvah of
tzedakah at nearly the highest
level.
Perhaps, if we are fortunate, we
too may come to realize that what
we give of ourselves and our
resources with common sense and
a good heart, will give us a
terumah, an uplifting in the eyes
of both G-d and man.
Sephardic Chief Rabbi Proposes
Synagogue for Temple Mount
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A proposal by Sephardic
Chief Rabbi Mordechai
Eliahu that a synagogue be
erected on the Temple
Mount, the third holiest site
of the Islamic faith, has stir-
red serious concern in
political and security circles
here that the rabbi's
remarks could trigger ex-
tremist violence.
In recent weeks, the Temple
Mount was the scene of angry con-
frontation between Moslem
religious leaders and Knesset
members. On one occasion, police
had to extricate members of the
Knesset Interior Committee from
an angry Arab crowd led to
believe they were desecrating
Islamic shrines.
ELIAHU MADE his proposal
at a meeting of The Temple Mount
Faithful, far rightwing Orthodox
Jews who have been pressuring
for years that a Jewish presence
be established on the site where
the Temple stood in ancient times.
The Chief Rabbi said the proposed
synagogue should be taller than
the two Moslem shrines, the Al-
Aksa Mosque and the Dome and
the Rock (Mosque of Omar). He
suggested it be located on the
eastern wall of the Mount with the
entrance facing outward.
Israel's policy since capturing
the Old City in the 1967 war has
been to permit visitors of all faiths
to visit the Temple Mount but to
restrict organized prayer there
exclusively to Moslems. The
shrines are maintained by the
moslem religious council, the
Waqf.
Eliahu told reporters later that
he had not proposed building a
synagogue but had merely offered
a "suggestion" in response to
questions by The Temple Mount
Faithful. He insisted the idea
should not arouse Arab anger
because the site was sacred to
both Moslems and Jews.
Israel Refuses Help To 'Spy' in India
By JTA Wire Services
JERUSALEM Israel has no
intention of helping the man who
served as an unofficial lobbyist for
Israel in the Indian Parliament
and is now facing charges of spy-
ing for Israel.
According to Sunday's
Jerusalem Post, Rama Swaroop, a
leading member of the rightwing
Hindu Nationalist Party, Jan
Sangh, has been under arrest for
sue weeks, charged with selling In-
dian military secrets to Western
powers including Israel, and with
promoting political support for
Israel.
India does not have full
diplomatic relations with Israel,
and Israel is represented there by
a consul in Bombay.
The Foreign Ministry here told
the Jerusalem Post that the
charges are fabrications and that
Israel has done nothing to help
Swaroop and knows of no legal or
financial aid intended for him.
Pope Has Audience
With Israel Envoy
ROME Pope John Paul II
had a 15-minute audience Friday
with Nathan Ben Horin, a
Minister at the Israel Embassy
here who, since 1980, has been
liaison to the Holy See. The
Vatican does not have diplomatic
relations with Israel.
Ben Horin was received private-
ly by the Pontiff, accompanied by
his Italian-born wife, Miriam Ben
Horin, who has been active in in-
terreligious affairs here.
Members of the Israel govern-
ment and ranking diplomats have
been received by Popes before.
John Paul's audience with Ben
Horin was perceived as a personal
gesture no less than a formal one.
U.S. Vetoes Anti-Israel
Resolution at UN
UNITED NATIONS The
United States last Thursday night
vetoed a Security Council resolu-
tion which deplored Israel's
"provocative acts which have
violated the sanctity of the sanc-
tuary of the Haram Al-Sharif,"
the mosque complex on the Tem-
ple Mount in Jerusalem. The vote
was 13-1 with one abstention,
Thailand. The U.S. veto was its
second this month on an anti-
Israel resolution. The first was on
a resolution condemning Israel's
actions in south Lebanon.
The 15-members Security Coun-
cil opened its debate Jan. 22 at the
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request of Morocco, as the chair-
man of the Arab Group at the UN,
to discuss recent confrontations
on the Temple Mount between a
group of visiting Knesset
members and angry Arab crowds.
Holocaust Deniers
File Suit in Calif.
LOS ANGELES (JTA)
David McCalden, long-time leader
of Holocaust revisionists and co-
founder of the Institute for
Historical Review, has brought
suit against the California Library
Association (CLA), the Simon
Wiesenthal Center, the American
Jewish Committee and the City of
Los Angeles, "alleging conspiracy
to interfere with civil rights and
breach of contract."
The suit, filed last November by
McCalden, who is also known as
Lewis Brandon, and his "Truth
Missions," a front group for the
propagation of Holocaust revi-
sionism in Manhattan Beach,
Calif., grows out of an incident in
December, 1984 when the
3,000-member CLA initially
slated and then withdrew an in-
vitation to McCalden and other
well-known Holocaust deniers to
speak at a state-wide convention
on the topic of "The Holocaust
and Free Speech."
Detention Order
Extended 15 Days
JERUSALEM Detention
orders against a prime suspect in
the murder of a Jerusalem
policeman last week were extend-
ed for 15 days by a magistrates
court here. The suspect, Omar
Faraj, is one of eight alleged
members of a criminal gang
operating from Kfar Silwan, an
Arab village outside Jerusalem ar-
rested so far in the case.
According to police, Faraj drove
the car from which police Sgt.
Maj. Avi Biazzi, 30, a plain-clothes
detective, was gunned down
gangland-style near Jaffa Gate
last Thursday morning. Biazzi was
driving an unmarked car at the
time. The killers wore masks and
used automatic weapons.
The latest arrest in the case was
made over the weekend after an
Israel Defense Force patrol shot
and wounded a 25-year-old East
Jerusalem resident believed to be
a member of the Silwan gang. He
was shot in the legs following a
lengthy chase, when he reportedly
tried to cross the border into Jor-
dan near Jericho.
Mathematician Arrives
From Russia
TEL AVIV Yasha Gorodet-
zky, a Leningrad mathematician
and a leading aliya activist for the
past six years, arrived here from
Vienna with his wife and family.
He is the second prominent
Jewish activist allowed to leave
the Soviet Union in less than two
weeks. Eliahu (Ilya) Essas also a
mathematician, arrived in Israel
with his family January 22.
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?VJ The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
I
The Paul Greenberg Column
NM-ICE Criminals
Here we go again. Call it the Ni-
i-ice Criminal Syndrome. The
name comes from an old Arkansas
story about a laconic judge on the
circuit bench who had just found a
well known, and rather well liked,
bootlegger as guilty as he un-
doubtedly was. But before passing
sentence, the judge entertained
testimony about the character of
the defendant, and there was a lot
of it. According to a long line of
witnesses, said defendant was
faithful in church attendance, a
good family man, generous to
local charities, kind to small
children and little old ladies ... a
veritable paragon of virtue. Duly
impressed, the old judge peered
down at the distinguished defen-
dant and, on the basis of these
numerous encomiums, rendered
his own summation of the much
esteemed citizen who stood before
him: "Ni-i-ice bootlegger," mur-
mured the judge, "Ni-i-ice
bootlegger."
Comes now before the bar of
public opinion one Paul Brown,
chief executive officer of the
American Life League, in the
company of a small crowd of other
leaders of the anti-abortion move-
ment in this country and prays the
President of the United States "to
simply consider a pardon for all
pro-lifers" who in their en-
thusiasm for life have been blow-
ing up abortion clinics.
Lest there be any misunderstan-
ding, Mr. Brown adds: "We con-
demn what they did. but we still
think they are nice people .
"Ah, there it is: the essence of the
argument, the guiding principle,
the governing rule to old judge
summarized so succinctly. These
people are ni-i-ice bombers.
Not inclined to stop while he
was behind, Mr. Brown continued
his plea for a pardon by arguing
that these nice people "never hurt
anybody: they may have
destroyed a building or two, but
they have not done anything to
hurt a person." That is a piquant
definition of not hurting anybody
One of these nice convicts ab-
ducted a physician who performed
abortions. If kidnapping someone
is not to hurt them, then
American standards in such mat-
ters begin to approach Lebanon's.
Losing one's property say, a
building or two can hurt, too.
Americans used to be known for
recognizing the close link in-
deed, the identity between per-
sonal and property rights. John
Locke's formula of life, liberty,
and property was altered only
slightly to become life, liberty,
and the pursuit of happiness in the
Declaration of Independence, that
most fundamental of American
state papers.
But let us not dwell on
philosophical essentials when in-
teresting aides beckon. After the
President met with this delega-
tion pleading for pardons, he is
said (a) to have sympathized with
their request and (b) not to have
sympathized with it, depending on
whether one was listening to a
over, not only his own persona,
but the ideal of a government of
law rather than of men. The fatal
error of the all-too-brief Kerensky
government, perhaps the only
democratic one Russia ever had,
Paul Greenberg
spokesman for the petitioners or
to the President's press secretary.
Ronald Reagan's manner is so in-
gratiating and his impromptu
language of such Eisenhowerean
flexibility that he might have been
misunderstood even if he had in-
tended to say something definite
instead of making the usual,
soothing sounds to another
pressure group.
A more illuminating question is
whether the President would have
considered, or such a delegation
requested, a pardon for criminals
with a different cause say. the
anti-war protesters who blew up
that lab at the University of
Wisconsin during the late
unpleasantness in Vietnam. All
they set out to do was destroy a
building or two, not "hurt
anybody." How were they to
know that some reckless graduate
student would still be inside doing
research at the ungodly hour? Ac-
ting in a separate but equally
idealistic cause, don't they fit the
definition of nice bombers?
Or, as one suspects, does Nice
People in such a context really
mean Our Kind of People? Name-
ly, those with a cause we can sup-
port and who therefore should be
pardoned. This is to make the law
a respecter of persons, or rather
of causes, and therefore not law at
all but the kind of shared pre-
judice Nice People approve of.
W.J. Cash used the term "savage
ideal" in his classic The Mind of
the South to explain how nice
Southerners could condone
violating the law during
Reconstruction and at sporadic
intervals thereafter. After all, it
was for a good cause, i.e. ours.
But these candidates for par-
dons are not common criminals, it
is said. That is why they may be so
dangerous, and pardoning them
so baneful a precedent. A common
criminal may be after only money
or some other purely personal
gam. The uncommon criminal
the idealist, aka the fanatic may
threaten the principle of law
itself. So could pardoning his
crimes. Richard Nixon's pardon
(without the formality of a trial
first) still casts a long shadow
fl The Jewish <|*T
FloridiaN
of South County
FREDSHOCHET
Editor and Publisher
SU/ANNESMOCHE'
EieculiveEdno'
MARTY ERANN
Oirecto* ol Comm jnications South County Jewisn Federation
Published Wee*i, Mid Septembac Ihroufh Mid-May aft Weekly balance ot yea- (43 issuesi
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Maclanna Borck. Vice Presidents Mariorie Beer Eric W Oeckinger. Larry Charme
Secretary Arnold Ftosenthai Treasurer Sheldon Jontitl. Executive Director. Rabbi Bruce S
War anal
Jewish F>oridian does not guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area S3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7i by membership South
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5 1 ADAR 5746
Number 7
was to allow a most uncommon
criminal named Ulyanov to escape
its grasp and seize power as
Lenin.
Contrary to the all-too-accepted
usage, "political crimes" can be
far more serious than the common
ones, for they threaten not just in-
dividuals but the whole society.
Those most concerned about the
honor of their cause and one
would like to think that category
includes leaders of the anti
abortion movement ought to be
the most insistent on punishing
those who disgrace that cause. In-
stead, they have joined the
overflowing ranks of pleaders on
behalf of ni-i-ice criminals. The
President was embarrassed by the
brief furor over his discussing
such pardons but he's not the
only one who should be.
(Copyngkl 1986 Freelance
Syndicate Pine Bluff. Ark.)
DATELINE: ISRAEL
Urban Kibbutz
By FERN ALLEN
Special to the South County
Jewish Federation
Down the street from the wig
shops, religious book stores and
kosher butcher shops of
Jerusalem's ultra-Orthodox com-
munity of Mea She'arim is an
unlikely settlement a kibbutz.
The commune, called Reshet
(Hebrew for network), is Israel's
only urban kibbutz. Established in
1979, the nine founders did not set
out to push back swamps. Instead,
they wanted to alleviate the social
problems of an impoverished
neighborhood in order to help
change their plight. We've come
here to solve problems, but we
don't want to do it like social
workers who only visit the com-
munity. We want to make changes
as part of the community," said
Eli Ahdut, one of the founders.
The original urban pioneers
rented a building in the Bukharan
quarter of the city, where many
poor Sephardic families live. Over
the years, the kibbutz has grown
to about 20 members, plus 11
children.
While most of the founders are
young adults who themselves
grew up on kibbutzim, the urban
settlement now includes residents
of the neighborhood, American
immigrants and people from
mosharnm.
"We don't see ourselves as
philanthropists. What we do isn't
charity to the needy. We want to
change the general situation by
living and working together," said
Ahdut, an Iranian Jew who lives
on the settlement with his wife.
Members of Kibbutz Reshet en-
courage their neighbors to par-
ticipate in their lectures, join their
outings or simply stop at the kib-
butz for coffee and informal
conversation.
The urban kibbutz has also been
able to interact with its neighbors
through its nursery school, which
many local children attend.
Mothers of the neighborhood
children take part in the decision-
making process, which is based on
kibbutz principles.
In one instance, it was decided
that the children would prepare
the morning snacks together to
avoid a situation where one child
might feel his food was inferior to
that of his friends.
Although the settlement
borders the ultra-zealous Mea
She'arim community, the kibbutz
has no contact with its ultra-
Orthodox neighbors. "They are
not a group that will accept our
ideology," Ahdut noted.
While there have not been any
Movement, but is not officially a
member of that secular kibbutz
organization. There are no formal
ties with the Religious Kibbutz
Movement, despite the fact that
many of Kibbutz Reshet's
members grew up on religious
kibbutzim.
"Our goal is different than that
of the Religious Kibbutz Move-
ment. Theirs is to settle the land;
ours is to build community," said
Ben-Shalom.
Filled to capacity in their sparse
living quarters, Kibbutz Reshet
cannot accept new members now.
Each family receives two small
rooms, one for parents, the other
tor the children. A communal din-
ing hall and kosher kitchen are
also on the premises.
However the members hope to
relocate to a larger building in
another part of the city which also
has social problems. Ideally, the
group would like to expand to 120
persons.
Despite the practical stumbling
blocks, i he kibbutz members are
determined to remain in
Jerusalem and prove that their ap-
proach to instilling values into a
community can work.
"We feel that this is the place
where we can make a difference."
Ben-Shalom said
Albert Linden (left.), national commander of the Disabled
American Veterans, and Harvey S. Friedman, national com-
mander of the Jewish War Veterans of the USA, place a wreath at
Yad Vashem in Jerusalem. The two veterans' leaders recently
returned from a fact-finding tour of Israel, where they met with
U.S. Ambassador Thomas Pickering and high-ranking Israeli of-
ficials, including Deputy Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
Auschwitz Exhibition At UN
Extended For An Additional Month
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
clashes with the Hassidim or other The exhibition "Auschwitz A
ethnic groups in the area, the kib- Crime Against Mankind" on
butz nevertheless shuns publicity, display in the visitors' lobby' of the
"We're afraid it will cause pro- United Nations, will be open to
blems with our neighbors if there "* Public for an additional month
is too much attention to our trough Feb. 28.
lifestyle," noted Tami Ben The announcement was made bv
Shalom, the secretary for Kibbutz
Reshet.
The urban kibbutz maintains a
Friday, February 14, 1986
Volume 8
Prof. Maurice Goldstein, presi
dent of the International
Auschwitz Committee, which
dialogue with the United Kibbutz orSnized the exhibition together
with the Auschwitz State Museum
in Poland. The UN display was
sponsored by the UN Center for
Human Rights.
In an interview with the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency. Goldstein
said that the UN agreed to the ex-
tension of exhibition at the re-
quest of the International
Auschwitz Committee. According
to Goldstein, about 40.000 people
have already visited the exhibition
and an estimated 30,000 more
visitors will view it bv F*



Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Orthodox Figure Sees Centrist
Orthodoxy Growing in Boca
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
Dr. Norman Lamm, president
of Yeshiva University, painted an
optimistic picture of modern Or-
thodox Judaism in America and
particularly in Boca Raton during
a visit to the area last week. At
the same time he issued a call to
other denominational groups to
look "for that which unites us"
and to offer assistance to promote
this Orthodox presence in the
community.
Lamm said that Orthodoxy
emerged in Boca Raton two years
ago because there existed here a
core of people who were in-
terested in it. However, he advis-
ed, "There are Jews, who, no mat-
ter what the degree of their slip-
page from full Jewish observance,
are spiritually and psychologically
committed to continuing full
Jewish tradition." Within the set-
ting of a modern Orthodox
synagogue, these people would
. "sense the presence of a
millennial Jewish tradition .
that this is how their parents and
great-grandparents prayed and
studied and gave charity and
socialized and expressed their
Yiddishkeit."
Lamm foresees no problems for
people who want to be Orthodox
in this area. The fully observant
can find a place to live within
walking distance of the future
synagogue, he said.
He also sees the establishment
of the synagogue as an opportuni-
ty for the rest of the community to
rally around this effort "... to
build it, support it, support its rab-
bi." Acknowledging that there are
deep differences in Judaism, he
suggested that this is the time to
explore ways of getting along
together for the benefit of the en-
tire Jewish community, "without
relying on phony sweetness and
disregard of one's own
principles."
As for the general state of Or-
thodoxy in America, Lamm said,
demographic statistics indicate
Germans Attempted Meeting
Between Peres, Mubarak
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) German diplomats attempted,
without success to arrange a meeting between President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and Israeli, Premier Shimon
Peres, both of whom were in Europe, sources here disclos-
ed last week. They said the efforts were rebuffed by
Mubarak's aides.
PERES WAS VISITING West Germany. Mubarak
was in Strasbourg to address the European Parliament. He
conferred with President Francois Mitterrand in Paris and
visited Bonn last Thursday, the day after Peres returned to
Israel.
Uri Savir, a spokesman for Peres, ruled out a meeting
with Mubarak on German soil. He said Israel was in-
terested in a summit meeting, but only in the Middle East.
Peres later received a detailed report on his Cabinet col-
league Ezer Weizman's meeting with Mubarak in Cairo.
Argentine, Uruguay Diplomats
Expected To Visit Israel in '86
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
NEW YORK (JTA) The
chiefs of state of both Argentina
and Uruguay will visit Israel this
year, an indication of improved
relations between Israel and Latin
America, according to Hanan
Olamy, head of the Latin
American Department of Israel's
Foreign Ministry, it was reported
recently in New York's mass cir-
culation Spanish-language
newspaper, El Diario/La Prensa.
Uruguayan President Julio
Sanguinetti plans an official visit
to Israel within the next four mon-
ths, and Argentine President Raul
Alfonsin will also visit at some
time during the coming year,
Olamy said.
language daily added that Olamy
also told reporters that two other
Uruguayan officials Vice Presi-
dent Enrique Tarigo and Foreign
Minister Enrique Iglesias were
to arrive in Israel last week in
separate visits. They are the
highest level officials form this
South American country to visit
Israel in more than a decade.
Both Uruguay and Argentina
have undergone transformation
from military to civilian rule
within the last two years.
Olamy said he anticipates that
Israel's relations with the
Hispanic world will improve,
following the establishment two
weeks ago of diplomatic relations
with Spain, El Diario/La Prensa
reported.
that the movement "is moving up
quickly, certainly ahead of
everyone else." The good news,
he said, is that for Orthodoxy
there is a new momentum, a new
morale and hope for the future.
The bad news, he lamented, is
that other Jewish groups are not
increasing. "That Jews of any
identification are simply giving up
their Jewish affiliation and Jewish
selfhood, this to me, as an Or-
thodox leader, is a matter of great
distress ..."
. Assessing the Other
Movements .
Asked whether there had been
any plans to place obstacles in the
path of other Jewish movements
by the Orthodox, Lamm replied
that the other groups themselves
do more to disrupt the health of
their movements than the Or-
thodox could. Alluding first to the
Conservative movement, he said:
"Every time they come along with
a new discovery, a great innova-
tion that cuts them away from
tradition, that distances them
from traditional mainstream
Jewish life ... they create their
own problems."
In the Reform movement,
Lamm mentioned Patrilineal Des-
cent as "one of the most unfor-
tunate things they've ever done."
He said that "it struck at the very
heart of Jewish identity" and his
feelings were that many in
Reform leadership now regard it
as a "tragic error" and are pro-
bably seeking "a graceful way
out."
Still more of the bad news,
warned Lamm, is the "enormous
animosity" that exists between
the religious groups and the resul-
tant fragmentation that has taken
place. "We can live with disunity,
we can't live with hatred ...
There's enough blame to go
around in every camp and every
agency."
... Halting 'Slippage' .. .
How does Orthodoxy contend
with the problem of "slippage
from full Jewish observance?" Is
there a plan to return Jews to the
movement?
Lamm replied that two bran-
ches of Orthodoxy provide
outreach programs in efforts to
reclaim such Jewry.
He said that the Lubavitchers
can appeal to personalities who
are affected more by the exotic
and the authority-centered con-
cepts of Lubavitch. Others, he
Rabbi Dr. Noi
said, are drawn to the "more
modernistic, more tolerant, more
rational kind of presentation" of-
fered by centrist Orthodoxy. He
described centrist Orthodoxy as
the religious direction emanating
primarily from Yeshiva Universi-
ty, the Rabbinical Council, Young
Israel and the Union of Orthodox
Jewish Congregations.
Among the centrist programs is
a system of youth seminars aimed
at high school levels. Lamm said
that the program has been so suc-
cessful that colleges for Ba'alei
T'shuvah (returnees), have been
established at Yeshiva University,
the James Striar School for men
and within the Stern College for
women.
A special program called
Shanah enables those stsudents
enrolled at other universities (as
well as graduate students and
adults beyond the age of 50) to
spend a semester or year in full-
time Jewish studies at Yeshiva
University. Many scholarships are
available for this program, he
added.
The university's Kiruv (getting
close) Program sends college
students, rabbinical students,
young rabbis and teens to cam-
puses across the country. The
young people get others in-
terested in their views and main-
tain contact with them, said
Lamm.
. Centrist Appeal for Boca
Raton .
Modern centrist Orthodoxy was
implemented in Boca Raton
through the Yeshiva University
Communities Program. Lamm ex-
plained that the approach was ap-
pealing to this community because
of several major principles:
First, he described the principle
of synthesis of Torah and secular
culture. Lamm said it was im-
perative that 20th Century Jews
be learned in their Judaism and be
full participants in it "... We
have to be engaged in it, in the
professions, in business and the
culture of the world, not despite
the fact that we are Torah Jews,
but because of it."
The second principle is commit-
ment with tolerance ... "A total
commitment, uncompromising to
Jewish tradition, but with a max-
imum amount of tolerance for
others." But, he cautioned, it has
to be honest tolerance accom-
panied by mutual respect. Too
often the relationship has been
dishonest for the sake of har-
mony, he said.
A commitment to Israel, as a
reality and as desirable, is the
final major principle of centrist
Orthodox. "In that sense it marks
us off from the rest of Orthodoxy
because we see Israel as a positive
development within our own faith
and commitment."
Rabbi Dratch Works With Orthodox Jews
To Build Congregation In Boca
By TINA ROSEN HERSH
This synagogue has not just
formed a congregation, but an ex-
tended family, says Rabbi Mark
Dratch of the two and one-half
year old Boca Raton Synagogue,
and adds that the 65 families
share the greater dream of
building an entire Jewish com-
munity dedicated to a "proper
Jewish life and Torah learning."
A five-acre tract on Montoya
Circle in west Boca Raton,
southwest of the Palmetto Park
Road/Powerline Road intersec-
tion, is the setting for a religious
complex which will include a sanc-
tuary, a mikvak, classrooms, a
social hall and offices. Rabbi
Dratch said the congregation is
ready to begin the first phase of
the complex immediately. They
are awaiting a building permit, he
said.
The Rabbi described the Mon-
toya Circle tract as "aesthetically
beautiful." He noted that there is
a variety of housing available in
the area rentals, town-houses
to "very substantial" single fami-
ly homes. "Anyone at any level of
professional growth could move
Rabbi Mark Dratch
into the community and feel com-
fortable there."
As more people move into the
area, a real sense of community
will be created Rabbi Dratch said,
"especially on Shabbos and the
holidays when people can open
their homes to others ...
The only requirement for
membership at the Boca Raton
Synagogue is that the potential
member be Jewish. All are
welcomed regardless of personal
observance, said the Rabbi. He
said that some of the congregants
cannot read Hebrew, but the
spirit and dedication of the
membership are attractive to
them. "We are tolerant... I may
not condone every behavior of
members of my congregation, but
I accept them because they are
Jews and I respect them because
of the commitments."
Rabbi Dratch admitted that
there are still problems for Or-
thodox Judaism in Boca Raton
education being foremost among
them. However, he was optimistic
that resolution will come "...
now that there is a presence of
authentic Judaism." Other pro-
blems he enumerated were in
terms of 'irking a physical
building, not having certain con-
veniences of kosher food
available, especially quality
kosher food, and not having a
mikvak. The problems are
primarily ones of a little inconve-
nience, he emphasized.
Asked about his own personal
impact on the Orthodox communi-
ty, Rabbi Dratch responded that
his presence can be described as
"Presenting opportunity in many
areas."
He alluded first to the practical
areas. In terms of kashrutk. Rabbi
Dratch said that as part of the
S.C. Va'ad Hakashruth he has
been working with two local
bakeries, a caterer and two hotels
which provide kosher catering.
Then in the realm of intellectual
pursuits and religious study, the
Rabbi has organised a number of
weekly classes for people of all
Jewish educational backgrounds.
Distant residents, from as far as
north of West Palm Beach and
south throughout Broward Coun-
ty, also frequently seek t .e
Rabbi's expertise concerning
religious questions. He explained
that "there is a ring of authentici-
ty here that they recognize and
are looking for. The membership
is building a SKul, providing a cen-
tral location with which they can
identify, in which they can ex-
press themselves Jewishly."


Pagefr__The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
Federation/UJA 1986 Campaign Update
GRAND BALL TO FEATURE
BIKEL, J'LEM SCENE
The Great Hall of one of the
most prestigious hotels in the
country, the Boca Raton Hotel
and Club, will be turned into a
replica of Jerusalem's Old City in
about three weeks, to accom-
modate the sixth annual Grand
Ball of the South County Jewish
Federation, which will be
celebrated with the theme "An
Evening in Jerusalem."
Noted stage, film and television
star Theodore Bikel will entertain
following the lavish dinner, with
the Marshall Grant Orchestra
playing music for dancing, accor-
ding to chairman Henry Yusem.
The Grand Ball, to take place on
Saturday evening, March 8, will
be the highlight of the Federa-
tion's annual campaign, and is ex-
pected to draw almost twice as
many participants as did last
year's Dinner Dance which had a
record attendance.
The evening's theme will come
alive through special decor
created by Bruce Sutka Produc-
tions of New York. It, and the
entertainment program, will help
in reflecting the Community
Theme "Into The 21st Century
One Dream, One People, One
Destiny."
Theodore Bikel
Bikel, one of the most versatile
entertaining "giants," is also a
senior vice president of the
American Jewish Congress, and
has served as a director of Amnes-
ty International.
Born in Vienna, Bikel im-
migrated to Israel at the age of
13. He joined the famed Habimah
Theater at age 19, and a year later
became co-founder of the Israel
Rabin, Arens Disagree on How
Israel Should Be Seeking Peace
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and his predecessor in
that office, Minister-
Without-Portfolio Moshe
Arens, disagree on how
Israel should proceed in the
peace process and about its
negotiating position.
The two Ministers, both former
Ambassadors to the United
States, expressed their views,
demonstrating the differences
between Labor and Likud in the
coalition government, before the
50th plenary assembly of the
World Jewish Congress at the
Jerusalem Hilton Hotel.
Rabin said that Israel should no
longer "wait for the telephone call
from the other side" but do what
it can to "facilitate" bringing
King Hussein of Jordan to the
negotiating table. But Arens said
Hussein had had an invitation
since 1967 and even before. He is
the "one man" who can decide
U.S. Vetoes
Anti-Israel
Resolution
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) -
The United States recently vetoed
in the Security Council a
Lebanese-sponsored resolution
"deploring" Israel for "violence"
in south Lebanon and demanding
that Israel withdraw it military
forces "to the internationally
recognised boundaries of
LftitMB."
whether there are to be direct
negotiations between Jordan and
Israel.
ARENS SUGGESTED that
Hussein is more concerned about
losing his throne than any benefits
he can receive from negotiations
with Israel. Rabin stressed that if
Jordan allows either Syria or the
Palestine Liberation Organization
to have a "veto" on negotiations
with Israel, "there will be no
beginning of negotiations."
Rabin said the Jordanian
delegation should include Palesti-
nians from the West Bank and
Gaza, but no declared PLO
members. He said without Palesti-
nians participating, any agree-
ment will be somewhat "invalid."
Both officials agreed that there
must be direct bilateral negotia-
tions, although Rabin said he
would accept the "umbrella" of an
international forum if this was not
used for negotiations.
RABIN ALSO rejected the call
by WJC president Edgar Bronf-
man that the Soviet Union be in-
cluded in the peace process. He
said if the USSR had been involv-
ed during the last 12 years there
would have been no Israeli-
Egyptian peace treaty. He said
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat
went to Jerusalem because Presi-
dent Carter wanted to bring the
Soviets into Mideast talks.
Arens and Rabin disagreed
most on Israel's negotiating posi-
tion. Rabin said it was much more
important to have a Jewish State
than to "have the borders we are
justified in demanding." He
declared that "I prefer the
Jewishness of the State rather
than the Jewishness of the
border."
Chamber Theater. He was
graduated from the Royal
Academy of Dramatic Arts in
London, and appeared in several
West End Theatre productions,
including some with Sir Lawrence
Olivier and with Peter Ustinov.
He has appeared in 35 films and
has starred in numerous television
roles, and is an accomplished con-
cert artist and raconteur. He also
has made many records, excelling
in particular with his singing of
Hebrew and Yiddish folk songs
and ballads.
Bikel has been active in the Ac-
tors' Equity Association, in which
he has served as vice president
and president. Currently, he is
vice president of the International
Federation of Actors. In 1977 he
was named by President Jimmy
Carter to serve on the National
Council for the Arts, for a five-
year term. Bikel has been a citizen
of the U.S. since 1961, and divides
his time between California and
Connecticut, where he lives with
his wife Rita and their two sons.
The Grand Ball will get under
way with a cocktail hour at 7 p.m.,
followed by introduction of the
special guests and dinner.
Maxine Kronick
Maxine Kronick
Guest Speaker At
Boca Lago Luncheon
Maxine Kronick, a former
Young Leadership Award winner,
will present her one-woman show
"From the Shtetl with Love," at
the Women's Division Boca Lago
luncheon on Monday, Feb.24, at
the Park Place Hotel.
Ms. Kronick, an actress by pro-
fession, is presently director of
Special Events for Flint,
Michigan, where she works direct-
ly for the Mayor.
"From the Shtetl with Love" is
an acclaimed documentary, which
has been presented in over 50
cities.
Shirley Green, chairwoman of
the Boca Lago Luncheon, said she
is very excited that Maxine
Kronick is visiting our communi-
ty, her first time in South Florida.
Please call Women's Division at
368-2737 for further information.
Dr. flyman and Mrs. Nettie Henkin
Century Village Gala
Set To Honor Henkins
Invitations have been sent out
long since, and most of the people
who intend to come have probably
made their reservations by now
but it should be a matter oLpublic
record, especially since we have
thousands of Jews living in Cen-
tury Village, that each and every
one of them is invited to this
event."
This is how Charles Seibel,
chairman of the Federation/UJA
Campaign for Century Village,
phrased his desire to extend an in-
vitation to all Century Village
residents to a gala event honoring
Dr. Hyman and Mrs. Nettie
Henkin. The gala will be held at
the Administration Building, se-
cond floor, on Sunday, Feb. 23, at
2 p.m. It will feature entertain-
ment by Israeli singer Ya'acov
Sassi, and will be followed by a
dessert reception.
This will be the major fund-
raising event in Century Village,
Seibel said, and minimum family
gifts of $100 are requested.
"Very few couples have given as
much to the community as have
the Henkins," Seibel said, "and
we look forward to a great tur-
nout on Sunday to do them honor.
It will be the best way to show it,
in the Jewish tradition, by making
a true tzedaka effort"
Hyman and Nettie Henkin have
been actively involved in com-
munity philanthropic and civic af-
fairs for years, both in the North
and locally. Nettie has been active
in Federation/UJA Campaigns, in
Israel Bonds drives, and is a life
member of Hadassah, B'nai B'rith
Women, ORT and Brandeis
Women.
Dr. Hyman Henkin was involv-
ed in the Federation/UJA Cam-
paign in Century Village since its
inception, and chaired the drive
for the past two years. During the
same period he also chaired the
Israel Bonds drive in the Village.
He is a past president of B'nai
B'rith Shomer Lodge in Century
Village, and of Suburban Lodge in
Illinois. He is a member of the
Men's arm of ORT, and of the
Hadassah Associates, the men's
support group for Hadassah. He
has also been president of the
Bayside Jewish Center in New
York, and is a board member of
Temple Beth Shalom currently.
Boca Lago Holds 1st
Annual Golf Outing
The Boca Lago Country Club
recently closed off one of their
golf courses and their main dining
room for breakfast and lunch, to
accommodate a large number of
members who indicated their in-
terest in participating in the first
annual Golf and Tennis Tourna-
ment to be held there on behalf of
the South County Jewish
Federation.
The event was a gala day for all,
and those who chose to play en-
joyed a great time with great
fellowship and camaraderie in ad-
dition to good golf and good food.
Sanford Milter was chairman of
the day, with Nat Marks, Mac
Siskind, Charlie Lefkowitz, Mar-
vin Nussbaum and Scotch Green
as co-chairmen.
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, executive
director of the Federation, spoke
at lunch and gave an inspiring, in-
formative talk on the growth of
the Jewish community, its
Sanford Milter
development and needs in the
South County area.
Saul White is Boca Lago chair-
man for the South County Jewish
Federation.
(Submitted by S. Milter)
MAKE THE COMMUNITY THEME YOUR THEME;
BE PART OF THE MOVE- INTO THE 21st CENTURY
J
M


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Join The Super Volunteers!
Do You Belong To Any Of These?
Amit
B'nai B'rith
B'nai B'rith Women
Brandeis
Hadassah/Hadassah Associates
Jewish War Veterans
Na'amat
Nat'l Council of Jewish Women
ORT
Workmen's Circle
Or Any of the Area's 11 Synagogues
IF YOU DO-
You should know that every one of them endorses SUPER
SUNDAY and encourages you, their members, to take part.
WHEN YOU volunteer two hours of your time on SUPER
SUNDAY to sit at the phones and make friendly, casual
calls to your friends and neighbors in the South County
community, you not only fulfill an important function for
your organization and the entire South County Mishpocha
you also actually enjoy yourself. Ask any of the hundreds of
volunteers from previous years.
IF YOU DON'T...
Here is an opportunity for you to take part in one of the
most important community-wide projects which will make
you feel like you do belong as indeed every Jew does!
For we see every member of the Jewish Community as one
of us, and on SUPER SUNDAY we all try to make that
come true...
So go ahead, try it. Come and be a SUPER SUNDAY
volunteer help us, yourself, and the Jewish People all
over it feels good!
Step forward and join the hundreds of volunteers who will join to
make SUPER SUNDA Y a greater event than ever before. Call
368-2737, ask for Joy London and tell her you want to register as a
volunteer for Super Sunday. Please, do it today.
INTO THE 2\CENTURY

*MQ*
ONE DREAM
ONE PEOPLE
ONE DESTINY
SV rSS
?
Wh#fl jokm Phono Uoe
IMCOrTiVS O LRfaif
a


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
*
Israel Bonds
Advisory
On February 16, 1986, at a breakfast at Temple Sinai, Israel Bonds uriU honor the past
Presidents, shown with the committee (left to right): Irving Cohen, Larry Sommers, Sam
Rothstein, Morris Jackler, Arnold Waldman, Charles Moss. Back row: Heinz Falickman,
Bernard Elish, Milton Lieberman and Jerome Gilbert.
Rabbi and Mrs. Feldman To Be Honored
On Sunday, March 2, Rabbi and
Mrs. Theodore Feldman will
receive the Israel Freedom Award
for their continued dedication to
Israel, "the Feldmans have been
pillars of our B'nai Torah Con-
greation and the community-at-
large," said Dr. Sidney Z. Leib,
chair of the event.
Dena Feldman, originally from
Philadelphia, has lived in Florida
for 15 years. She got her "sea
legs" in community work through
her involvement in Women's
American ORT, serving as a
President and then on the
Southeast Florida Regional
Board. Currently working for the
Jewish Family Service of South
Palm Beach County as a licensed
marriage and family therapist,
Dena is also a Licensed Clinical
Social Worker and coordinates
the Jewish Family Life Education
Program. She received her
graduate degree from Barry
University and is a trained
Divorce Mediator who works on
cases assigned by th<> court.
Rabbi Feldman is a graduate in
Psychology from Roosevelt
University in Chicago. He also
holds an MA in Rabbinics and is
ordained by the J i h
Theological Seminary. Ht i
dent of the South County H ib-
binical Association and preskfc i
Rabbi and Mrs. Theodore Feldman
of the Southeast Region of Rab-
binical Assembly of America. He
serves on the Board of the South
County Jewish Federation and on
the Cabinet of South County
Israel Bonds.
"The Rabbi has a delightful
sense of humor and the congrega
tion adores him as their spiritual
leader," said Marion Leib, chair.
"Rabbi and Mrs. Feldman are a
very important part of our com-
munity and we are thrilled to have
the opportunity to honor them at
this dinner-dance." Rabbi and
Mrs. Feldman have four children:
Jonathan. Melissa, A viva, and
Joshua.
Reservations may be made
through the Leibs or the Bond of-
fice, 368-9221.
Robert Mayer Evans Keynotes
Beth-El Bonds Event
Robert Mayer Evans, veteran
newsman and film-maker, will
speak at Boca Pointe on Feb. 23,
on behalf of the Temple Beth El
Israel Bonds campaign.
Evans has lived and worked in
several dozen countries spread
over five continents. He is a
former CBS News Foreign Cor-
respondent and CBS News
Bureau Chief in Moscow. He has
worked on both sides of the Iron
Curtain in Eastern and Western
Europe. H> has worked in Arab
and oil >ducing countries
around the I vrsian Gulf. He has
traveled in Israel, Egypt and
Lebanon, covering wars, as well
as peace negotiations.
In the Middle East, he met the
late Anwar Sadat of Egypt, King
Hussein of Jordan, the late Shah
of Iran, the Saudi Arabian
Foreign Minister and the Saudi
Minister of Petroleum, and PLO
lea at their former head-
m Beirut. In Israel he
bi Cabinet Ministers and
ev line Minister for
lecadi
iii, i ion into oil-
Robert M. Evans
producing areas of northern Ira j
Bob Evans crossed into Iran, stop-
ping at many of the holy centers
that became part of the Ayatollah
Khomeini's Islamic Revolution.
Evans' group entered
Afghanistan and then crossed the
central Hindu Rush mountains to
the capitol of Kabul. They under-
took field research for British
museums and camped nights with
Beduin tribes in the desert.
Bob Evans' education is broad:
a degree from the University of
North Carolina, a Masters in
Jurisprudence from Oxford
University in England, a J.D.
(Doctor of Jurisprudence) from
Yale Law School, and a Cer-
tificate in Chinese from Yale. He
entered broadcasting by working
for the late Edward R. Murrow at
CBS News.
The annual Beth El Bonds Din-
ner will honor Helene and Jay
Eichler. Because the new building
will not be completed the dinner
will be held at Boca Pointe Court
try Club. Couvert is $30 per per-
son. Reservation- <-an be made
through the Bo : Office at
368-9221.
Ed Bobick Speaks At
Boca Lago Bond Event
At the annual Boca Lago Israel
Bonds dinner, Edward Bobick ex-
plained how the Bonds has made
possible the building of highways,
scientific and medical ad-
vancements, the development or
irrigation systems for farmland
which produces for export some of
the most superior fruit in the
world, and how important it is to
continue to purchase Israel
Bonds.
Bobick is well known for his in-
volvement in local and world
Jewry. Israel Bonds presented
him with the Lion of Judah
Award. His expertise is shared by
various committees at Temple
Beth El and the South County
Jewish Federation.
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*
Friday, February 14,1986/Thc Jewish Ploridian of South County Page 9
Judith Resnik A Space Pioneer
"There was always a smile on
her face, this lovely young lady,
who had a dream ... a dream to
be a space pioneer." The words
that described Judith Resnik, one
of the seven who perished in the
25th shuttle launch great tragedy
last month.
According to her father, Mar-
vin, of Akron, Ohio, he had nur-
tured his daughter to reach her
greater expectations, giving her
the best start an American kid
could have for Judy was not only
one of the first women in the
space program, but was also the
first and only Jew to achieve that
distinguished honor.
She was a unique person, known
in school as "The Brain," her hob-
by playing classical music on the
piano.
She graduated from Pitt-
sburgh's Carnegie-Mellon Univer-
sity in 1970 with a degree in elec-
trical engineering, and she receiv-
ed a doctorate in the same field
from Maryland in 1977. While
working for Zerox in California,
she happened to spot a NASA
recruitment poster and this was
the beginning of her career in the
space program. Entering in 1978.
she was a member of the
Discovery Flight in August, 1984.
According to her father, "My
daughter was the first Jew in
space, and in Israel, her exploits
were followed with great
interest."
Noted author James A.
Michener in talking about Judith
put it best when he said, "The
mind of man is restless. No matter
how great the challenge, gallant
men and women will step forward
to tackle it. Judith Resnik could
serve as the symbol of why men
and women dare great things."
Astronaut Judy Resnik
Did Weizman Trip Succeed?
Continued from Page 1
political climate was there and to
explain to the Egyptians some of
Israel's views. He expressed con-
fidence that the arbitration pro-
cess would move forward. "I did
not expect one trip of mine to
change things by 180 degrees.
Those who expected this do not
understand life," he said. "Every
now and then it is worthwhile go-
ing down to Egypt and talk to the
Egyptians. I think this con-
tributes to understanding the
relations and also to improving
them," Weizman said.
HIS APPARENT inability to
achieve anything of substance by
going to Cairo minimized
domestic political fallout. Likud
hardliners who bitterly resent
Weizman's involvement in foreign
policy matters, especially with the
Egyptians, stopped protesting the
trip when the dove-ish minister
returned.
Earlier they had attacked
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
the Likud leader, for approving
the trip. Shamir confirmed that he
was informed of Weizman's inten-
tions beforehand and raised no
objections.
One of the issues contributiong
to the sour relations with Cairo is
Rabbi Takes Pulpit
WORCESTER, Mass. (JTA)
Rabbi Seth Levin Bernstein
assumes the pulpit of Temple
Sinai in March, succeeding Rabbi
Gary Glickstein. Bernstein has
served as associate rabbi at Con-
gregation Rodeph Shalom in New
York.
Egypt's refusal to give Israel the
report of the special commission
of inquiry set up to investigate the
murder of seven Israeli tourists by
an Egyptian soldier at Ras Burka
in eastern Sinai last Oct. 1. This
was one of the main conditions the
Inner Cabinet set for agreeing to
arbitrate over Taba.
THE EGYPTIANS said they
would give the Israelis only the
verdict of the Cairo court that
convicted the soldier, Sulieman
Khatar, and sentenced him to life
imprisonment. Khatar was found
hanged a week after the verdict,
an apparent suicide.
The Egyptian Charge d'Affaires
in Tel Aviv, Mohammad Basiouni,
said on a Voice of Israel Radio in-
terview that the "dangerous
deterioration" of relations bet-
ween Egypt and Israel was partly
the result of the "strong criticism
in Israel on the Ras Burka affair."
He said the court verdict which
Egypt is offering to Israel con-
tains in itself all the pertinent
details of the investigation.
Weizman said later he recom-
mended to the Foreign Ministry
that it at least consider accepting
the court verdict in lieu of the in-
quiry commission's report. He
agreed with Basiouni that the
25-page court document covered
all of the pertinent facts. He said
the Egyptians had told him that if
Israel felt the record of the Trial
proceedings and the court judge-
ment was inadequate, it could
renew its request for the inquiry
commission's findings.
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Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
Masada Dinner Climbs to Record High
Levines Get Am Chai' Award
Some 100 men and women were on hand last week to honor Abner and Mildred Levine at the annual Masada
Dinner, held at the home of Bud and Shirley Seretean in Boca Raton.
The mood was festive,
the environment was given
a Latin American motif in
line with the Community
Theme, which is currently
focusing on South American
Jewry. There was a
Mariachi band, pinatas, and
the menu was also in line
with the theme with Latin
American specialties.
The guest speaker for the
evening was Rabbi Marshall
Meyer, who spent 25 years
in Argentina as one of the
leading rabbis there, and ac-
complished much in the field
of Jewish higher education
and as a civil rights activist.
Rabbi Meyer, who feels
strongly that U.S. Jews
should work to promote
closer ties with the Jewish
communities of South
America, was an impressive
speaker and captured the
imagination of his audience
both with his revelations on
the situation of Jews in
Argentina under the rule of
the military juntas, and with
the prospects and problems
facing Jews there currently.
The Masada Dinner is one
of the major fund-raising
events of the Men's Division
of the South County Jewish
Federation; invited to this
event are those who pledge
gifts of $6,500 or more to
the Federation/UJA Cam-
paign. At last week's event
more than $900,000 was
raised setting a new
record for the Masada Din-
ner in South County'8
history. Of this, $350,000
was in new pledges.
Chairman of the event
was Shep Kaufman; his
associate chairmen were
Ken Endelson, Ben
Pressner and Seymour
Rappaport.
1
Left to right, Host Bud Seretean, Honorees Mildred and Abner Levine, Terry and Shep Kauf-
man (chairman).
Left, to right Federation President Marianne Bobick, Abner and
Mildred Levine, and Rabbi Marshall Meyer, the guest speaker.
Left to right, Abner and Mildred Levine, and their son and daughter-in law, Diane Hunt and
Larry Levine.
wmmmmmmm
Left to right, Morris and Chickee Yoffe, Marianne and Ed Bobick
Left to right, Henry and Anne Brenner, Lynn Persoff and Jim
Nobil.
Left to right, Jim and Marjorie Boer, Phyllis and Eugene
Squires.
Left to right, Frank and Ruth White,
Left to right, David and Eleanor Rukin, Rivian and Lewis
Johnson
Phyllis and Dr. Larry Charme, Judy and Henry Yusem. Arlettc
and Mike Baker. *
Left to right, Eric and Adrienne Dec
Weisman.
Left to right, Gary and Bernice Lebbin, Alvin and Shirley
Cohen, Dollsey and Seymour Rappaport.
The Mariachi band helped set the mood.. *


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
Left to right, Richard and Carole Siemens, Sherry and Kenneth ., ... ..
Endelson. ~f" to rt9kt> Norman and Betty Stone, Robert and Mimi Rieder, Edith and Dr. Melvin
Left to right, Gary and Rose Bernstein, Marjory and Maurice
Schiller.
\
Left to right, Ken Endelson, Jim Nobil, Shep Kaufman, Seymour Rappaport, Ben Pressner.
Left to right, Lawrence and Sylvia Mills, Albino, and Ernest Left to right, Wileen and Martin Coyne, Betty and Jordan
Mills. Ginsberg.
Gerald and Zella Witt *
Sol and Harriet Shanus
Left to right, Mark and Jo Ann Levy, Barbara Goldman, Arthur Left to right, Ben and Clarice Pressner, Frieda and Sam Golub.
Tzeses.
Left to right, Phyllis and Gerald Rothstein, Abby and Mildred
Levine.
h White, Edna and Sydney Jarlcow.
Left to right, Leonard and Eleanor Weisenberg, Shirley and Bet,
Scholson
Left to right. Ephraim and Beverly Young. Ruth and Saul
Weinberger.
Left to right, Frances and Albert Arent, Delia and Stanley
Nemer.
enne Dtckinger, Patricia and Peter
All above photos except
those marked (*) are by
Stan Sheets.
Left to right, Al and Hazel Krop, Miriam and Dr. Robert
Greenberg.


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
Edited by Marvin A. Kironer
ESTATE
"NON-PLANNING"
By MARVIN A. KIRSNER
And ROBERT E. GUNN
Surprisingly, many people go
on with life without ever planning
for death. One of the conse-
quences of such inaction is that
many people die without leaving a
valid wili.
A basic will provides for the
disposition of the assets of the
decedent, and takes care of ad-
ministrative details, such as the
appointment of the decedent's
personal representative. It is the
personal representative who has
the responsibility of administering
the estate of the decedent.
When a resident of Florida dies
without a will, Florida law
disposes of his assets and ad-
ministers his estate pursuant to
the laws of intestate succession.
More often than not, this can
result in assets going to parties
that the decedent did not intend
and also complicates the estate ad-
ministration process. The result of
such "estate non-planning" can
lead to many problems for the
heirs of the estate.
The intestate succession laws, in
effect, create a will for the dece-
dent. The following is the "will"
prepared by the State of Florida
for a husband or wife who dies
without a will and who is survived
by his or her spouse and minor
children.
LAST WILL
OF
JOHN Q. INTESTATE
I, JOHN Q. INTESTATE, do hereby publish and declare this to be
my last Will:
ARTICLE I
I give my wife, if she survives me, the following:
A. My personal effects (clothing, jewelry, etc.) but not to exceed
$1,000.00 in value.
B. All household furniture, furnishings and appliances located in my
residence at the time of my death up to a net value of $10,000.00 and all
automobiles used by me or members of my immediate family as our per-
sonal automobiles.
C. $20,000.00 in value of the remaining assets of my estate.
D. If my wife does not survive me, I give the items listed in A and B
above to my minor children who survive me.
ARTICLE II
The remainder of my estate shall be divided as follows:
50 percent to my wife;
50 percent to my lineal descendants.
If, at the time of my death, any descendant of mine is under the age
of 18 years, his share of my estate shall not be paid to him but shall, in-
stead, be paid to his court-appointed guardian.
ARTICLE III
I nominate my wife as guardian for any child of mine who is under
age 18 at the time of my death, but direct that before being authorized
to act, she post a bond with the court to guarantee that she will faithful-
ly and honestly invest and account for all of the child's property. The
amount of the bond shall be set by the court and the premium for the
bond paid from the guardianship assets.
I further direct that she not use any of the child's funds for the sup-
port of the child unless she can show to the court's satisfaction that she
is unable to support the child from her own sources and that she render
annual written accountings to the court explaining how, why and where
she spent any of the child's money.
When a child reaches age 18, he shall have the right to receive a full
and complete accounting from his mother and shall receive outright all
assets of the guardianship without any further restriction or control.
ARTICLE IV
If my wife should remarry, her new husband shall be entitled to 30
percent of everything my wife owns at the time of her death including
the property she receives from my estate.
ARTICLE V
I appoint my wife as personal representative of my estate, but re-
quire that she first post a bond in an amount to be set by the court to
guarantee the faithful and diligent performance of her duties. The bond
premium shall be paid from the assets of my estate. She shall not have
the power to sell any real estate owned by my estate without first ob-
taining approval from the court after notice to my children.
ARTICLE VI
Should my wife predecease me, I do not wish to exercise my right
to nominate the guardian of any minor children of mine. Instead, I
direct the court to make the selection after a hearing for that purpose
with due notice to all of my and my wife's nearest relatives.
ARTICLE VII
I recognize that the tax laws provide certain legitimate options to
me to minimize estate taxes. I prefer, however, to have my property us-
ed for government purposes rather than for the benefit of my wife and
children.
I have executed this instrument on the day of-------, 198--.
At the very best, dying without a will could be a headache to the
personal representative of the estate. At worst, it could create
monumental family problems as well as resulting in a federal estate tax
liability thai could otherwise be avoided through proper estate
planning.
Mr. Kirsner and Mr. Gunn are attorneys with the West Palm Beach
law office of Shutts and Bowen. "Taxing Matters" is edited by Mr.
Kirsner on behalf of the JCF Legal and Tax Committee.
Astronauts To Have Living Memorial With JNF Forest
NEW YORK The Challenger
space shuttle astronauts will be
memorialized by the establish-
ment of a forest at the American
Independence Park in Israel, in-
itiated by a spontaneous outpour-
ing of sympathy from across the
United States, the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of America
announces.
"These seven courageous men
and women have touched us all
more profoundly than we could
have imagined, and their tragic
death and sacrifice fills us with
the need to reach out," said Dr.
Joseph P. Sternstein, JNF
president.
"JNF has received a great many
phone calls from adults and
children alike, all of whom are ex-
pressing their sympathy by asking
that trees be planted as a living
memorial in the astronauts'
honor. The Challenger Forest is
JNF's way of commemorating
their indelible contributions to the
highest ideals of this nation and,
indeed, of the human spirit."
Children from schools which had
celebrated the festival of Tu
B'Shevat, the Jewish New Year
for Trees, have requested that
their recent Tu B'Shevat con-
tributions to JNF be donated
toward this forest.
"The presence of teacher
Christa McAuliffe on the ill-fated
shuttle has deeply affected the
children who had looked forward
to watching her 'class in space,'
Sternstein declared.
The American Independence
Park was established just outside
Jerusalem on the occasion of the
nation's Bicentennial celebration
in 1976. It was dedicated as a liv-
ing testimonial "to the friendship
and vision shared between the
United States and Israel."
New Transport System Will
Cut Cost of Sending Potash
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
new transportation system will
cut the cost of sending potash
from the Dead Sea to Ashdod port
by more than $5 million.
An 18-kilometer conveyor belt,
now under construction, will haul
the potash, Israel's principal raw
material export, from the Dead
Sea, the lowest point on earth, up
to a railway depot in the Negev
hills.
Most of the 1.7 million tons ex-
ported annually is now trucked
over mountainous roads to the
depot, where it is loaded onto the
railroad for the last leg of its
journey to Ashdod on the Mediter-
ranean coast. The Dead Sea
Works exports potash to Europe
and America, mainly for
agricultural use.
The new $20 million conveyor
belt, which will simplify the
journey to the railway terminal at
Mishor Rotem in the Negev hills,
is being financed through a con-
sortium of British banks via
Israel's Bank Hapoalim, with a
$13 million guarantee from the
British government's Export
Credits Guarantee Department.
The first stage of the automated
belt was completed at the beginn-
ing of January, and the company
estimates that the entire project
will be ready in a year's time.
VWWttft
Prime Timers Breakfast
Tuesday, February 25,1986
9:30 a.m.
Guest Speaker: ANNE KRAINEN
Members: $1.50 / Non-Members: $2.50
Please R.S.V.P.
395-5546














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In Israel Colleges ...
... And Local Friends
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 13
TEL AVIV U.
Multi/Loop Improved
Labvoratory Tool Developed
WEIZMANN INST.
Weizmann Institute, Sweden, Japan
Produce Clot-Dissolving Drug
into producing pharmaceuticals.
The Weizmann Institute's Yeda
Research and Development Com-
pany was founded in 1958 to in-
terest industry, both in Israel and
abroad, in Institute-developed
processes and to alert scientists to
projects for which industrial spon-
sors might be available.
Yeda was the first company of
expensively from bacteria, has
much more severe side effects.
Thus doctors are eager to obtain
improved and cheaper treatments
for embolisms.
Weizmann Institute technology
for producing tPA is based on
stimulation of normal human cells
grown in tissue culture. The
avoidance of genetically
2*5eered tumor ce"8 to obt^n
the drug is expected to accelerate lts kind >n Israel and played a key
approval of PA for detailed ro,e in ^e creation of the Kiryat
clinical studies. Drs. Bohak and Weizmann Industrial Park found-
Kadouri have also designed condi- ^ *n the vicinity of the Institute
tions for growing their cultured in 197- Kiryat Weizmann now
cells at high densities thus con- contains more than 20 companies
tributing to eventual large-scale
production of the enzyme.
"At this point," noted Dr.
Bohak, we cannot predict when
the tPA we are making wil be
sold. But our extremely close
cooperation with the Swedish and
Japanese groups has greatly
enhanced our research forces."
Working with the Weizmann
scientists are Prof. L.O.
Andersson and his group at the
Hematology Division of
KabiVitrum in Stockholm, and Dr.
K. Higashio and associates at the
Life Services Institute of Snow
Brand, a giant Japanese manufac-
turer that has recently diversified
In a major step toward com-
mercializing a promising clot-
dissolving medication to help vic-
tims of heart attacks and strokes,
Israel's Weizmann Institute of
Science and its Yeda Research
and Development Company have
signed agreements with phar-
maceutical companies in Sweden
and Japan to produce the drug.
i ne tripartite effort is aimed at
upscaling Weizmann-designed
bio-technology for producing the
clot-dissolving enzyme, human
tissues plasminogen activator
(tPA), and at investigating the
properties of the proposed drug.
A product with vast economic and
medical potential, tPA is expected
to improve emergency treatment
of victims of heart attacks.
According to Dr. Zvi Bohak,
who with fellow biophysicist Dr.
Avinoam Kadour heads the
research team at Weizmann, tPA
is a natural enzyme produced by
many body tissues, acts to
dissolve blood clots resulting from
injuries and various pathological
processes. However, the amount
of this material that exists nor
mallv in the blood stream is small
and cannot cope with emboli
(floating blood clots) that can
lodge in blood vessels supplying
vital organs, often the cause of
heart attacks, strokes and
dangerous blockages elsewhere in
the body.
that dot size'cln be quickly riuc Research Project On Hungarian Jews
ed and tissue damage lessened. In
manufacturing a wide range of
products which includes
chemicals, aircraft instrumenta-
tion, optical and scientific in-
struments, environmental control
apparatus, computer-associated
components, medical instrumen-
tation and audio-visual and scien-
tific games.
For additonal information
regarding scientific and research
activities at the Weizmann In-
stitute, write the Florida Region
office of the American Committee
for the Weizmann Institute of
Science, 1550 NE Miami Gardens
Drive, Suite 405, N. Miami Beach,
FL 33179.
One of the most basic tools in
microbiological research and
diagnosis is a small metal or
plastic rod with a tiny loop at the
end of it. Any technician prepar-
ing to test an environmental,
food, or clinical sample for the
presence of bacteria uses it to
transfer some of the sample onto a
sterile medium.
This procedure, known as "dilu-
tion streaking" is usually done
with a platinum or chromium
nickel loop, which has to be
sterilized in a flame, cooled, and
dipped into the matter being
tested, which is then transferred
to the growth medium, usually
agar. The loop has to be sterilized
several times, and streaked
through the agar again and again
in order to dilute the sample to en-
sure the growth of individual col-
onies of bacteria. This is essential
for proper diagnosis.
Dilution streaking with a metal
loop is time-consuming and risks
spraying the bacteria into the air,
where they can be inhaled and
cause infection. A disposable
plastic loop. Called the Multi-
Loop, it is a slender, four-sided
rod with a loop at one end and a
sphere at the other. By turning
the rod 90 degrees at a time, the
researcher or technician can use
the sphere to perform four streak-
ing operations. One Multi-Loop
thus replaces up to four conven-
tional loops. When a specific
amount of fluid is needed for the
sample, the loop at the other end,
which takes up 10 microliters at a
time, is used.
The Multi-Loop was developed
by Dr. Mel Rosenberg, who heads
the Oral Microbiology Laboratory
at the Sackler Faculty of
Medicine's School of Dental
Medicine; and Dr. Ervin Weiss of
the Operative Dentistry Section.
It will soon be produced by
Miniplat of Kibbutz Ein Shmer.
The cost per unit is about the
same as for the conventional
disposable loop. Patents are pen-
ding in Israel, the United States,
Japan and 10 European
Countries.
Reminder: Dr. Edward
plastic loop can also be used, but Teller will be speaking at a
since they cannot be sterilized, breakfast meeting of the
ZXtJS needed to prepare TAU Seminar Associates
" TT ? nc* *** *"* 21, 7:30
^**EZ$S2^ a.m. For more information
have now developed an improved
a.m.
call 392-9186.
HEBREW U.
preliminary studies on heart at-
tack victims that were treated
with tPa produced by U.S. resear-
chers in cultures of tumor-derived
cells, physicians have shown that
the drug is more effective in clear-
ing arteries than pharmaceuticals
now being prescribed and with
somewhat fewer side effects,
primarily undesirable bleeding.
Weizmann scientist Dr. Bohak,
however, warns that this is only
the first step, which shows that
the benefits predicted from
laboratory experiments can be
realized in medical practice.
Researchers must now work
toward minimizing production
costs of tPA and to gain further
understanding of its action on the
lK)dy.
Currently, several phar-
maceuticals are in use for reduc-
ing the effects of embolisms.
These are anticoagulants, medica-
tions that prevent growth of clots
but do not dissolve the existing
ones, and two varieties of
plasminogen activators which do
dissolve clots urokinase and
streptokinase.
Urokinase is in short supply and
extremely expensive, since it
must be extracted from huge
quantities of human urine. In con-
trast, streptokinase. obtained in-
he Andrew and Pearl
. ienfeld Research Project for
the Hungarian Jews, a research
project for the study of Hungarian
Jewish history, has been establish-
ed at the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem by Delray Beach
business and community leader
Andrew Rosenfeld and his wife,
Pearl.
Jewish communities flourished
in Hungary for over 1,000 years.
Jews participated in the economic,
literary, scientific and political life
of Hungary. They produced im-
portant works in Jewish scholar-
ship and enriched Hebrew and
Yiddish literature.
It was the third largest Jewish
community in the world and made
a tremendous contribution not on-
ly to Hungarian but to Jewish life.
All that came to an end with the
Holocaust when the 1000-year-old
Jewish communities with their
great institutions were destroyed.
The Andrew and Pearl Rosenfeld
Research Project at the Hebrew
University will save the glorious
past of that Jewry from oblivion
by research in all its aspects by
qualified scholars. The results of
their scientific work will be
published.
"The establishment of the An-
drew and Pearl Rosenfeld
Simcha Dinitz (right), former Israel Ambassador to the United
States, examines the technology employed in the computer-aided
design (CAD) courses that have been introduced in Boys Town
Jerusalem's College of Applied Engineering. Boys Town founder
Rabbi Alexander S. Linchner tells Dinitz that the College's elec-
tronics and mechanical engineering students are being taught
product design from airplane fuselages to artificial limbs by
creating three-dimensional pictures on a computer screen and
then testing and analyzing the design to varying sets of produc-
tion specifications.
Andrew and Pearl Rosenfeld
Research Project dedicated to the
history and culture of Hungarian
Jewry is a historic event in the life
of Hungarian-speaking Jews all
over the world," said Dr. Moshe
Carmilly-Weinberger, Professor
Emeritus of Jewish Studies at
Yeshiva University and Acting
President of the Central Office of
the World Federation of
Hungarian Jews in the U.S. and
Canada.
PASSOVER 1986
lONGHTfl
STAYS
AVAIUIU
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This Passover enjoy a traditional atmosphere
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Yom Tov observing hotel. That hotel is the luxurious
Kosher Travel Plan Passover P,k kagH at the
VERSAILLES/SANS SOUCI
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Lovely accommodations featuring color
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Olympic sue swimming pool Tea room
2 fully conducled Seder services by well-
known Cantor* 1 Glatt Kosher meals daily
Services in our own Synagogue
GLATT KOSHER
( I. ...iniMH" .11 I.' ]| Mi*nn B.-.H h II
800-325-1697/305-531-4213
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Passover
at the Concord
Wed April 23-Thurs. May 1
The observance of tra-
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of rhe Sedarim. the beauty
of rhe Services, rhe bril-
liance of the Holiday Pro-
gramming.
Cantor Herman
Molamood. assisted by
rhe Concord 45-voice
Symphoic Chorale, di-
rected by Morhew Lazor
and Dan Vogel. fo officiate
or the Services and
Sedarim.
Outstanding leaders
from Government. Press,
the Arts ond Literature.
Great films. Music day ond
night on weekdays.
Special programs for rots,
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ftabbi Simon Cohen
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ii



Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986

\*~ f^A^3^****^^
ml Life Education
o
y*mmmmmmmmmmmt
Jewish Family and Children's
Service is continuing to provide
an important service in addition to
counseling which is known as
Jewish Family Life Education
(JFLE). The Jewish Family Life
Education program provides a
framework through which to look
at some of the aspects of in-
dividual and family life within a
specifically Jewish context.
Dedicated to promoting
strength in the Jewish family,
JFLE offers workshops and
seminars which are designed to
help people explore shared con-
cerns, through participation in a
series of group discussions, led by
trained counselors. Thoughts are
exchanged and new ideas sur-
faces. Group members discover
unexplored inner resources, bet-
ter ways to cope, and alternative
choices.
"We are eager to work with
organizations and groups in the
community to design JFLE pro-
grams to meet the needs of their
members," said Dena R. Feldman
LCSW, coordinator of JFLE. Ac-
cording to Feldman, the response
to JFLE programs has been a
positive one, and the demand for
Jewish Family Service to provide
them has increased.
In the past few months, staff
professionals have facilitated
groups dealing with a wide range
of topics. A support group for
parents of 7th graders was of-
fered at Temple Beth-El. There
were several workshops with the
JCC Singles groups. Workshops
on The Modern Jewish Family at
B'nai Torah Congregation, Asser-
tiveness for Aviva Chapter of
Hadassah, Stress Management at
a JCC group, Jewish Identity at
Hillel at Florida Atlantic Universi-
ty, and the Dilemma of the
Modern Woman for the National
Council of Jewish women are
some JFLE programs offered in
the community. In addition, the
agency has Widowed Persons'
Support Groups running
throughout the year. An upcom-
ing series "When Parents
Divorce" will provide a support
group for parents and one for
children of divorced couples.
According to Feldman, "With
our committment to a personal
and direct approach to our Jewish
sense of community, lifelong
education, and centrality of the
family, we can make JFLE pro-
grams available to religious, com-
munity, educational and profes-
sional and self-help groups."
Anyone interested in more infor-
mation in reference to Jewish
Family Life Education may con-
tact Dena Feldman at 395-3640.
Balancing Children's
Needs and Your Own
By NANCY A. FELDMAN,
LCSW
Adapted from Retpontive
Parenting
By Saf Lerman
Vol. 1. Helping Children At
They Grow
As parents, you need to respect
your own limits, feelings and
moods, as well as those of your
children. You need to create a
good balance.
To help balance these needs, it is
helpful to decide whose need is
greater, in other words, who has
the dominant need at the moment.
For example, a child wants to go
to the beach, but the parent is ex-
hausted. All parents make
sacrifices for their children at
times, but, there are certain times
a parent needs to listen to their
own needs. Here it is best for the
parent to respect their feelings of
exhaustion and plan on taking the
child to the beach another day.
A parent would love to sit down
and read a book, but sees that
their child has been on her own for
a while and really needs attention
now. Here, it is best for the parent
to address the child's need and sit
down and read that book later.
The child's need is more pressing.
Another way to help balance
needs is to set aside some time for
yourself. All parents need time
and space for themselves. With in-
fants and toddlers, who need cons-
tant supervision, this will take
some planning. You can expect
older children to be more accep-
ting of your time to read, think or
listen to a record. You can explain
that you are not to be disturbed
for that interval and help your
child find something to do on their
own during this time. Sometimes
you can make an agreement to
have special time together after
the parent has had some quiet
time alone. This also helps the
child to learn to enjoy themselves
independently.
After all, parents not only need
to fulfill themselves in their paren-
ting roles, but also in their roles as
individuals with interests outside
the family. They need to go places
on their own and to do some
things for themselves. This space
helps parents return to their
children refreshed.
When you are angry or disap-
pointed about something,
separate from the child, it is very
important to let your child know
they are not the cause of your feel-
ings. You can tell your children
when you are upset, mad or sad
about something and reassure
them that they did not make you
feel this way. By doing this, you
keep the children from feeling
responsible for problems they did
not cause.
Letting your child know you are
human and are capable of making
mistakes is also important. When
you are sorry for something
you've said or done, apologize in a
manner that is sincere and
straightforward.
As parents, each of you have dif-
ferent preferences and strengths,
and combine these aspects in
varying degrees. No parent
should strive to be like another;
just like your children, each of you
is unique. Just as you love your
child for being a special person,
your children learn to love each of
you for being a distinct parent and
person!
Lavie Jet May Never Make It Into Flight
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Israel's second generation
jet fighter plane, the Lavie,
may never fly. Although
Israel Aircraft Industries
(IAI), its manufacturer, pro-
mises a prototype will be
ready for test flights by the
end of the year, the multi-
billion dollar project could
be grounded for budgetary
reasons.
Hirsch Goodman, the Jewish
Post's defense correspondent,
says opposition to the Lavie is
growing as politicians and plan-
ners examine the Israel Defense
Force's proposed development
program for the period 1985-1990.
WHILE THE Air Force must
keep pace with the rapidly grow-
ing air forces of the Arab confron-
tation states, it could be better
served by purchasing
sophisticated aircraft abroad at
less cost than the home-built
Lavie. This is the opinion of many
senior Air Force officers.
IAI must sell at least 300 Lavies
to the Air Force in order to break
even. But cuts in the defense
budget have reduced prospects for
orders anywhere near that
number. Over $1 billion has
already been spent by IAI on
research and development.
Most of the money has been pro-
vided in the form of special grants
from the U.S. But U.S. military
aid to all recipient countries in-
cluding Israel must be cut this
year to stay within the limits of
the new Gramm-Rudman law.
THE LAVIE still has powerful
supporters, notably Defense
Minister Yitzhak Kabin, Chief of
Staff Gen. Moshe Levy, and Likud
Minister Moshe Arens. The latter,
an aeronautical engineer by train-
ing, was one of the originators of
the Lavie project.
(p THE RESORT WITH A PERSONALITY
INSPIRING SERVICES AND SEDARIM April 23-May 1
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SMALL CLASSES AFTER SCHOOL CARE (till 5:30)
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ART PHYS. ED. COMPUTER SCIENCE HEBREW LANGUAGE STUDIES
QUALIFIED AND CERTIFIED TEACHERS
BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
For Prospective Parents of Day School Students
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Wednesday, February 19, 1986 at 8:00 P.M.
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For More Information
Please Call:
ROBIN BRALOW at:
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392-4779
* Registration will begin on this
evening.
"A Quality Education for the Total Child"


Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 15
Chai-Lights
of the
Jewish Community Day School
By ROBIN BRALOW
Annual Book Fair
The Day School kicked off their
annual Book Fair on Tuesday,
Jan. 28 with guest speaker Syd
Hoff. Murna Gross, a mother at
the Day School and chairperson
of the Book Fair, arranged for
this children's author and il-
lustrator to speak to
Kindergarten through Eighth
Grades.
In preparation for this special
event, students of the First Grade
read many of his books and drew
posters highlighting their favorite
scenes. The students from all
grades were very enthusiastic
about meeting the author of such
books as Albert the Albatross,
Danny and the Dinosaur, Oliver
and many, many more.
The author used his gift of i\-
lustration to relate to his large au-
dience. He told them of his
background, growing up in New
York, as he filed blank sheet after
blank sheet with sketches of the
characters he spoke of. He also
drew his popular characters and
explained their origin.
Syd Hoff is wnat might be con-
sidered a comedy writer for
children. His books and illustra-
tions are humorous, on a child's
level. "The best humor," he main-
tains, has to do with events that
"people can identify as having
happened to them, or something
that has been in their sub-
conscious. Humor for some reason
is basically sad. There's some sort
of affinity between the sad and
the funny that makes humor all
the funnier." His books and il-
lustration reflect his sentimenta.
Author Syd Hoff, at the board, about to tell children his story as
he illustrates on the large pad, at the Book Fair.
The Day School students were
bursting with questions such as
"When did you become a writer?"
"Why?" and "What steps should I
take if I would like that career?"
The question of why he chose to
write specifically for children was
most obvious as his warm rapport
with the students made the after-
noon especially memorable. Syd
Hoff spoke and illustrated for
nearly two hours after which he
mingled with the students and
autographed their books.
Turning students on to reading
has become increasingly difficult
as television provides strong com-
petition for children's time, such
as MTV. The Book Fair was in-
stituted to cultivate children's in-
terest in books and how they can
enrich their lives. First Grade
teacher Marcia Kamstock ex-
plains: "Actually meeting the
author whose books they had so
enjoyed provided an extra
motivator and really encouraged
the students to express their ideas
and feelings about his books."
Judaic and secular books were
available at both campuses during
the Book Fair which lasts a full
week. Students choose own books
and fill out request forms that
their parents must sign prior to
them receiving their selections.
The act of independently choosing
their own books serves as a
motivating factor in itself.
Children seem more concerned
about their reading material when
they share in the responsibility of
selecting what they shall read.
Day School Visits Masada
By ELISSA GRYNSPAN
During the month of January,
various classes from Preschool
through Fifth Grade visited
Masada. Their journey, however,
did not take them to the top of
that mountain in Israel, nor did
they ride in the cable car. Instead,
they rode in the yellow school bus
to Masada Israeli Imports in Boca,
where they broadened their
horizons.
Moshe Stern, the store owner,
"kvelUd" as the children arrived,
for it brought back sweet
memories of his former teaching
days. As each class entered they
were led to the back of the store
and seated around a table that
displayed ritual objects for Shab-
bat. Included among these were
candlesticks, a kiddush cup, a
wine holder, a challah plate, knife,
and cover, a havdalah candle and
a spice box.
With the older grades, Moshe
discussed the symbolism behind
each ritual object and elaborated
on such customs as why Jews eat
fish on Shabbat. With each ex-
planation the children sat wide-
eyed as one beautiful story after
another unfolded.
See-More
The Clown
In conjunction with the topic
"the Circus," the Preschool had
oee-More the clown perform for
Jem at the Satellite Campus.
Prior to his arrival the children
Practiced being a clown
themselves by juggling bean bags,
reating their own clown tricks,
and pantomiming selling colored
balloons. When the clown arrived
Je students were anxious to see a
real" clown. Their laughter and
sounds of glee filled the Satellite
building.
Moshe Stern helps 1st Graders through the Shabbat Kiddush
ceremony at Masada Israel Imports.
The younger children had the
opportunity to touch the ritual ob-.
jects. Moshe taught them the
Hebrew word for each object such
as pamutim for candlesticks and
bakuk for the wine bottle.
There was also music in the air.
The children sang Shabbat songs
and Moshe delighted them by
playing the chalil and harmonica.
One particular Shabbat song,
"Yom L'Israel," sung by the
Kindergarten, struck a familiar
chord for Moshe. He then taught
them to dance to that song, which
he learned as a Kindergartener in
Israel.
When you turn children loose in
a store there is a certain frenzy
and excitement that takes place
and this was no exception. The
older students scurried about
searching for that special
souvenir. The intent of the field-
trip however was not a shopping
spree, but rather to expose the
children to the beautiful world of
their Jewish heritage. In Masada
that world truly came to life.
President Ronald Reagan
The White House
Washington, D.C.
Dear Mr. President,
We, the first grade class of the South County Jewish Communi-
ty Day School, in Boca Raton, Florida wish to express our sorrow
and pain to the families of our seven brave astronauts who gave
their lives in space exploration.
We hope we can pay them the greatest respect by growing and
developing into young Americans proud of our country with pur-
pose in our lives and goals in our hearts.
With love and sympathy,
Marcia Kamstock (Grade 1 secular teacher), Sarah Lasarovic,
Adam Jaffee, Erin Sevell, Jon Greenfield, Aliza Bregman, Andy
Foss, Debra Brodsky, Brooke Forster, Georgy Cohen, Jonah
Yolman, Jennifer Brawn, Emily Tisdial, Joey Arcabascia,
Danielle Kotaska, Lauren Brodsky, Amanda Mossovits, Sheridan
Rafer, Anthony Taines, Beth Kaufman, liana Saposnik, Josh
Zins, Ariel Grossman, Jeannette Watkin, Michael Jedwab, Shon-
na Grynspan, Melanie Barsher, Rebecca Harwick, Adina Zeev
REMEMBERING THE CHALLENGER CREW
The Day School held a memorial service for the seven Shuttle
astronauts beginning with a brief discussion during a Flag-
Raising Ceremony. Principal Burt Lowlicht explained how the
loss of the Shuttle crew was a national tragedy as he lowered the
flag to half-mast. While raising the Israeli flag, he discussed how
Israel represents both the national and spiritual essence of
Judaism and how the loss of Judith Resnik, the Jewish astronaut,
was a loss for Jews all over the world.
The morning minyan was dedicated to the astronauts. Principal
Lowlicht expressed to the children the pride and hope that school
children all over the United States, and throughout the world, felt
for Christine McAuliffe, the'first teacher to make an attempt to
reach the stars. The disappointment and loss was apparent in the
faces of the students.
Principal Lowlicht made reference to the fact that the
astronauts were a heterogenous group consisting of several
minorities. The fact that Judith Reanik's religion was not a focal
point and not even mentioned on certain newscasts demonstrated
how free our country is and how every person has an equal oppor-
tunity to reach the pinnacle of his or her career, regardless of
race, sex, religion, or creed. It was emphasized that in the United
States they (the students) can be anything they want to if they
concentrate, work hard, and dedicate themselves.
The solemn service concluded with Kaddish in memory of the
seven.

* *vmifiJiljt;
rxxxixxxixxxxixixxixxxifl
South County Jewish Federation
1986 GRAND BALL
at the
Boca Raton Hotel & Club
Saturday, March 8,7 p.m.
$1250 minimum gift
Call 368-2737 for information.
LTxxxxxxxxx
$100 couvert .
per person
2ND ANNUAL
GOLF and TENNIS TOURNAMENT
BOCA GROVE/OCEAN
BOCA GROVE COUNTRY CLUB
UNDER THE AUSPICES OF
South County Jewish Federation
MONDAY, MARCH 10th 19M
GOLF: SHOTGUN TEAM BEST BALL 9:00 a.m.
TENNIS: DOUBLES ROUND ROBIN 10:00 a.m.
iNTmF OOLF................................. -00 P*n PERSON
TfNNIS..............................JM.0S W PflBBBN
BREAKFAST AND LUNCH INCLUDED
Includes
QOLF 1 HOLM mm, CANT TfNNIS PMC BALLS
BRIAKFAST (M .. LUNCMSON 1:B Rm
SPBAKBR AWARDS DRAWING VALUABLE PRIZES
Open To All Of Boca Grove And The Ocean
GOLF TENNIS SOCIAL
for furthar Information Contact
OCA OMOVt/OCtAN OOLF 4 TfNNIS TOUMNAMfNT CO
STDNCT MTMAN
OEKSON ERNSTIIN
Mi-iru
NOKMAN I 1TOM
MI-WI
$500 Minimum Contribution lo IWo Men"- Campaign
more clowns
\


Page 16 TheJewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
*
?
THE ADOLPH and ROSE LEVIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
HAPPENINGS
An Agency of the South County Jewish Federation
J.C.C. Activities Program
Session II Update
J.C.C. Holiday Closings:
Passover.........April 24,25, 30, May 1
Memorial Day..................May 26
ACTIVITY STARTIDATE
YOUTH/AFTER SCHOOL SESSION II
Shavuol....................June 13,14
Independence Day..............July 14
COST
MEM/NON MEM
Schools Out-Center's In (3-12 yrs) Mon., Feb. 17 Fn Mar 28 Fri., Apr. 18 9:30 a.m.4 p.m. T.B.A. Watch for More Details!!
Spring Fling (3-12 yrs.) Mon., Mar. 31-Fri., Apr. 4 Watch for Details'! 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m T.B.A.
Bus Service Mon. Thru Thurs. (from Addison, Mizner & Verde.) (Boca Academy has added J.C.C. to its route) Call Bari for Details!!
Pre/Post Program Care Mon. thru Thurs. 2:30-6 p.m. Call Bari for Details!!
Clay Crafts (6 classes) (5-10 yrs.) Mon., March 3 or Thurs., March 6 2:45-3:30 p.m. 3:45-4:30 p.m. S40/I66 S40YS65
Art Explosion (6 classes) (54 yrs.) Wed., March 5 3:464:30 p.m. $25*35
Sketch a Story (6 classes) (68 yrs.) Tues., March 4 2:45-3:30 p.m. or 3:46-4:30 p.m. $5*7.50
Stitches (sewing) (6 classes) (7-12 yrs.) Thurs., March 6 3:464:30 p.m. $26*40
Kotchs Kitchen II (5-12 yrs.) Thurs., March 6 (6 classes) 4:45-5:30 p.m. $17.50*25
Rocketry I (7-10 yrs.) Wed., March 19 (8 classes) 4:45-5:30 $30*45
Rocketry II (9-12 yrs.) Wed., March 19 (8 classes) 3:464:30 p.m. $35*50
Kiddle Komputer (7-10 yrs.) Tues., March 4 (at S.C.J.C.D.S.) 3:464:45 p.m. $17.50*25
Ceramics (Myre.)..................... (5-10 yrs).................... Mon., March 3 or Thurs., March 6 Mon., March 3 4:465:30 p.m. 4:465:30 p.m. 3:464:30 p.m. $40*55
Ceramic Birthday Parties (ages 5-12 years) CallBerlfor Details!!
Drama (5-10 yrs.) Mon., March 3 4:465:30 p.m. $12*24
TEENS/TWEENS
"Tween Club" (grades 6-8) Call for Details. $10*20
Tween Travel (grades 6-3) March 30-Aprll 4 (Points North) Call for Info.
B.B.Y.O. High School Teen Youth Group Call Bar! for Info.
TeenDenee Set., Feb. 15 8:30p.m.-MW. $4CaMtarDMaatl
S.A.T. Preparation For May Test: Sundays, March 16 11a.m.-2:30p.m. $130*155
HEALTH PHYS ED-TODDLERS/YOUTH
"Waterproofing Your Toddler' Begins in March Call for Details!!
Toddler Swim Team (3 yrs. & u p) Begins in March Call for Details!!
Beg. Combo Dance (68yrs.) Wed., March 5 (6 classes) 3:464:45 p.m. $36*42
Beg. Jazz & Tap (9-12 yrs.) Wed., March 5 (6 classes) 4:465:45 p.m. $36*42
Soccer (68 yrs.) Thurs.. March 6 (6 classes) 2:463.30 p.m. or 3:45-4:30 p.m. $18*25
Floor Hockey (912 yrs.) Thurs.. March 6 (6 classes) 4:465:45 p.m. $18*25
Basketball (68 yrs.) Wed., Mar. 5 (6 classes) 4:465:30 p.m. $18*25
Basketball (7-12 yrs.) Tues., March 4 (6 classes) 3:464:30 p.m. $18*25
Karate (7-12 yrs) Mon., March 3 (6 classes) 4:465:45 p.m. $18*25
College Volleyball Nights Sundays: Mar. 16 & Apr. 20 7-10 p.m. Free mem. (JCC or Hillel) $2 non-mem.
Tennis (68vrs.) (7-liyrs.) Mon., March 3 or Thurs., March 6 Tues., March 4 or Wed., March 5 3:464:30 p.m. 2:463:30 p.m. 4:465:30 p.m. 3:464:30 p.m. $18*25
Ping Pong (8-12 yrs.) Mon., March 3 (12 week session) 3:464:30 p.m. $10*20
Sports Potpourri (7-10 yrs.) Wed., March 5 3:464:30 p.m. or 4:465:30 p.m. $18*25
HEALTH PHYS-ED. /ADULT
Tennis Adv. Beg. (6 classes) Wed., March 5 10-11 a.m. $18*25
Tennis int. (6 classes) Thurs., March 6 10-11 a.m. $18*25
Sunday Tennis-Adult Doubles Strategies (6 classes) Sun., March 2 88:45 a.m. $18*25
Sunday Beg. Tennis (6 classes Sun., March 2 9-945 a.m. $18*25
Sun Int. Tennis (6 classes) Sun., March 2 1010:45 a.m. $18*25
Stroke of the Week Sun., March 2 11-11:45 a.m. $4*6 per dees
Private Lessons Sundays Vi hr. classes between noon-2 p.m.$lO*l 5
Tennis Ball Machine Cell In Advance to reserve $2*8 (coet per hr.)
Men's Softball League Sun., April 13 (18 weeks) 9a.rn.noon $35*45
Co-Ed Volleyball Mondays thru April 7 7-9 p.m. Free*20
6KRece T.B.A. Cell David for Details
ACTIVITY
SPECIAL SERIES
START/DATE
TIME
COST
MEM NONMEM
When Parents Divorce: Wed., Feb. 19-March 12 For Parents and Children (7-10 yrs.) 67:30 p.m. Call for Details!
Children of Aging Parents (Katty Cohen) Fridays (ongoing support group) 1-2 p.m. Free
ADULT CLASSES/LECTURES
Drug Dependency Wed., Feb. 19 7:30-9 p.m. Free*2
Jewish Art Tues., Feb. 18 7:30 p.m. Free*2
Living In a Remarried Family Wed., March 19 7:30 p.m. Free*2
Drop-In Israeli Dancing Thursdays, Feb. 6/20, Mar. 6/20 7:30-9:30 p.m. $2*3
BRIDGE SECOND SERIES
Beginners II (Adv. Beg.) Mon., Feb. 24 (6 classes) 610 p.m. $40*55
Adv. Bridge Workshop Mon., Feb. 24 (6 classes) 10 a m.-noon $55*65
Int. Bridge Mon., Feb. 24 (6 classes) 1:363:30 p.m. $40*65
Besic Bridge Review Tues., Feb. 25 (6 classes) 10a.m.-noon $40*55
Supervised Bridge Play (All Levels) Wednesdays thru May 28 (No play April 2) 14 p.m. $2*2.50 per session
PRIME TIMERS
All Classes at Levis JCC unless otherwise noted.
(HCC^HIIIhaven Convalescent Center
5430 Linton Blvd.. Delray
PRIME TIMERS SPECIAL EVENTS
Vacation with Elderhostel
Thurs., March 27
7:30 p.m.
Dance Young At Heart
Sat., Feb. 22
P.T. Breakfast
Tues., Feb. 25
P.T. Annual
Passover Seders
Wed., April 23
4 Thurs., April 24
8:00 p.m. Watch "Floridian" tor
Det a/fa and Costs of
Spectof Events//
930 a.m.
6:30 p.m.
TRIPS
Norton Gallery: Design in America Thurs., March 6 8:45 a.m.4 p.m. $10*15
"Wills" Herbert Goldfeld Thurs., Feb. 20 7:30 p.m. Free*2
"Automotive Maintenance" Rick Bogani Thurs., Feb. 27 7:30 p.m. Free*2
"The Aging Phenomenon" -Katty Cohen Thurs., March 13 7:30 p.m. Free*2
"Investing..." Joseph Rey (H.C.C) Fridays. Mar. 7-28 1:30-3 p.m. $10*15
CARDS! 1 GAMES! 1
Beg. Canasta (HCC) Fridays. March 7-28 930-11:30 a.m. $20*30
Duplicate Bridge Thursdays 12:30 p.m. *1.75*2 ***>
PRIME TIMERS CLASSES
Joys ot Living (Al Green. PhD) Wed., Feb. 19March 26 10a.m.-noon $15*25
Reincarnation (Pat Comngton. MSW) Tues., Feb. 18March 25 7-9 p.m. $15*25
Communications (Al Green, PhD) Wed.. Feb. 19March 26 1:363:30 p.m. $15*25
Joy in Motion (9 classes) Mon.. March 3 1611 a.m. $18*25
HOW TO REGISTER:
1. Review the program list with your family and decide in which activities you and your
family would like to participate.
2. Since registration begins immediately, complete and mail the form, or bring it to the
Center Registration Office, with the specified fees.
3. Registration must be accompanied by the FULL FEE and NO telephone registration will
be accepted for activities.
4. Registration closes ONE WEEK PRIOR to starting date, or when the maximum number
of participants for each class is reached.
5. A $2.00 Late Fee will be charged tor registering after deadline.
* Members have first priority for claas sign up.
CANCELLATIONS AND REFUNDS:
All activities are scheduled on a predetermined minimum number of participants. We
regret that should a class not register sufficient numbers, It will be cancelled and all fees will
be refunded.
Your cancelled check will be your receipt for courses you register for. You will be notified
by phone only if the course is cancelled. There will be no other correspondence regarding your
registration.
Because classes are based on a limited enrollment, activity fees are not refundable upon
cancellation by a participant unless the place can be filled.
YOUR SUGGESTIONS ARE ENCOURAGED
The Center's activities are based upon the interests and concerns of our members. We
hope to be flexible enough to change, delete, and expand services where physically and
financially possible. Therefore, your suggestions and ideas are appreciated.
Furthermore, you are cordially invited to serve on any of the numerous program or
administrative committees of the Center, and to thereby assist In Its growth and development.
Call The Center For More Information.
395-5546



Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 17
^9
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
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ACTIVITY REGISTRATION FORM
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: I
Im not afraxd to pick it up," claims Lori Enselberg, with
friends Meredith Gould and Dawn Foti, all part of the JCC
Tweens. Also xn attendance at the overnight were: Jonathan
Gould Urx Man, Alex Vladimir. Michael Shaffer, Daniele Rafer,
Jennifer Herbst and Sam Gross.
\
CAMP MACCABEE
OPEN HOUSE
On Tuesday evening, Feb.
25, at 7:30 p.m., Camp Mac-
cabee will be hosting an
Open House at the Satellite
Campus of the South Coun-
ty Jewish Community Day
School located on Fifth
Avenue. The Open House is
for parents only who have
enrolled or are considering
enrolling their 2- and 3-year-
old toddlers in our Vr-day
program. At the Open
House you will have a
chance to meet key staff,
tour the facility, and ask any
questions that might con-
cern you. Call 395-5546 for
more information.
SINGLES PROGRAMS
FOR SINGLES 20-60 .
Wednesday, Feb. 19, 7:30
p.m.
Come "experience" a pro-
vocative videotape of adults
who confront their
stereotypes and uncertain-
ties about their Jewishness.
After viewing the film,
Ethnotherapy with Jews,
we'll discuss how we feel
when we say, "I am a Jew."
Children over 12 years
welcome. At the JCC.
Members: No cost/non-
members: $3.
FOR SINGLES 20-40 ...
Saturday, Feb. 22, 8:30 p.m.
Our very first Wine and
Cheese party of 1986! Rick
Back has graciously opened
his home to us .. 6860
Palmetto Circle So. No.
1004, Boca Raton. Please
call Rick, 393-6834, or the
JCC, 395-5546, for reserva-
J'ons and directions.
Members: $2/non-rnembers:
?4.
"REINCARNATION"
The Levis JCC will spon-
sor a class on "Reincarna-
tion" starting Tuesdays,
Feb. 18 through March 25,
7-9 p.m. Cost for members
is $15, non-members, $25.
"COMMUNICATIONS"
The Levis JCC will spon-
sor a class entitled "Com-
munications," starting
Wednesdays, Feb. 19-Marcn
26, from 1:30-3:30 p.m. The
instructor, Al Green, PhD,
will focus this class on rela-
tionships, friends and fami-
ly, and now to enhance them
through communication.
The cost for members is
$15, non-members, $25.
"JOYS OF LIVING"
The Levis JCC will spon-
sor a class entitled "Joys of
Living." The class will be
held starting Feb. 19, 10
a.m.-noon. The instructor is
Al Green, PhD. Cost for
members is $15, non-
members, $25.
"WHAT EVERY
FLORIDA RESIDENT
SHOULD KNOW
ABOUT WILLS"
The Levis JCC will hold a
lecture titled "What Every
Florida Resident Should
Know About Wills," on
Thursday, Feb. 20, 7:30
p.m. Herb Goldfeld, At-
torney, will be the guest
speaker. Members come
free, non-members pay $2.
DRUG DEPENDENCY
LECTURE
On Wednesday, Feb. 19
at 7:30 the Health Lecture
Series will resume at the
Levis JCC with a lecture on
Drug Dependency by
Meredith Malin. This lec-
ture will deal with today's
problems and give
guidelines for dealing with
drug dependency. Whether

Saturday, February 22
4.00 PM
$5.00 per person
Adolpti Rom Levis
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
'*,
*.
n Awwt Cmm*' *** *'""
336 Spanish River Boulevard, N.W.
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(305) 395-5546
*
t*
I
After their overnight with six other S. Florida JCC's (the first of
its kind), the Tweens stopped at the Beach for some early morning
Jun and sun. The Tweens presently meet once a month for a fun-
filled activity. For more information, contact Bari at S95-55U6.
it be a personal problem, a
family problem or potential
problem, you won't want to
miss this important lecture.
There is no charge for
Center members. Non-
members wil be charged $2.
Refreshments will be
served.
WEDNESDAY BRIDGE
JCC Sponsors Supervised
Bridge Play for all levels of
players every Wednesday
afternoon from 1-3 p.m.
Temi Linzner, Certified
Bridge Instructor will be on
hand to help with bidding,
defense, and play of the
hand.
Bring a partner, a full
table of players, or come
alone. All players are
welcome to enjoy and play
at The Levis JCC, 336 NW
Spanish River Blvd. in Boca
Rato. Cost is $2 (members)
or $2.50 (non-members).
For more information
on all JCC Programs call
395-5546.
^
Adolph & Rosa Levis
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
a* *amr e %mm> cmmi* jmM riimiii
Annual
MEMBERSHIP MEETING &
ELECTIONS
^^MBWBe^BBBBBBJMBBejBBJBBBBJBBBBJJJJJJBJBBlJBJJJBBajBJJJ
Wednesday, March 19
7:30p.m.
Levis J.C.C. Auditorium
Awards Presentation
Election of Officers and
Board Members
336 Spanish River Boulevard, N.W.
Boca Ralon, Florida 33431
(305) 3B5 5546

(
I


Page 18 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
I

Local Club &
Organization News
Na'amat U.S.A. Zipporah
Chapter will hold their next
meeting, Tuesday, Feb. 25, noon
at the American Savings Bank,
W. Atlantic Ave., Delray. Lunch
will be served at noon. Members
and guests are welcome. A book
review will be presented.
ORT
Women's American ORT
Boca-Delray evening Chapter
will hold their annual "Brunch On
Wheels," Sunday, Feb. 23. The
brunch includes two bagels, lU lb.
Nova Scotia salmon, V* lb. cream
cheese and miniature Danish.
Each brunch is $8.50 and delivery
is assured by 10 a.m. to Boca,
Delray areas. Pamper yourself by
letting ORT deliver your
breakfast, by calling 391-4137 by
Feb. 17.
Women's American ORT
North Pines Chapter will hold
their annual Art Auction, Sunday,
Feb. 16 at Temple Anshei Shalom,
Oriole Jewish Center. Preview,
12:30 p.m., auction 1:30 p.m. Ad-
mission is free. Champagne punch
and door prizes. All are welcome
to attend.
Women's American ORT All-
Points Chapter will hold their
next meeting Tuesday, Feb. 18,
noon at the American Savings
Bank. Kings Point. A book report
will be given. Bagels and coffee.
Make your reservations for a trip
to Epcot Center March 5-7. In-
cluded, 3 dinners, breakfasts,
hotel, gratuities, dinner theatre,
medieval castle and more. Call for
reservations and information
Mona 499-9267.
LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
Mitzvah Chapter Women's
League for Israel will hold their
next meeting Monday, Feb. 17 at
10 a.m. in the administration
building, Century Village West.
Their program will be on "Cults
and the Jewish Family." The
boutique will be open and
refreshments served.
HADASSAH
Hadassah Shira Delray will
hold their next meeting Wednes-
day, Feb. 19, noon at Temple
Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic Ave.,
Delray. Elise Waintrup will pre-
sent a book review on "My
Father, My Daughter" by Yael
Dayan and "Holy Days" by Lis
Hart man. Guests are welcome
and refreshments will be served.
For further information call
499-1105.
Hadassah Shalom Delray will
hold a luncheon/card party, Tues-
day, Feb. 18, noon at Temple An-
shei Shalom, W. Atlantic Ave.,
Delray. For reservations and
tickets, please call 498-9424.
Hadassah Menachem Begin
will hold their next meeting
B'nai Mitzvah

Erie Wolf
ERIC WOLF
On Saturday, Feb. 15, Eric
Wolf, son of Linda and Steven
Wolf, will be called to the Torah at
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton as
a Bar Mitzvah.
Eric is a 7th Grade student at
Boca Raton Academy and attends
the Temple Beth El Religious
School. Family members sharing
in the rimha are his sister, Amy
and his grandmother, Sih/a Feld
of New York City. Mr. and Mrs.
Wolf will host a Kiddush in Erie's
honor following Havdalah
Services.
STACIBECK
On Saturday, Feb. 15. Staci
Staci Beck
Michelle Beck, daughter of Patty
and Louis Beck, will be called to
the Torah at Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton as a Bat Mitzvah. As
an ongoing Temple project she
will be "Twinning" with Mila
Smirnov of the Soviet Union.
Staci is a 7th Grade student at
Boca Raton Academy and attends
the Temple Beth El Religious
School. Family members sharing
in the rimha are her brothers,
Steven and Ryan; and grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Sterneck of St. Louis Missouri,
and Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Taft of
Cincinnati, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs.
Taft will host a Kiddush in their
granddaughter's honor following
Shabbat Morning Services.
CANTOR
For parallel service for High Holidays in
Conservative Synagogue in suburb New York
(Five Towns). Experienced and highly
competent candidates only.
Initial screening in Florida. Salary negotiable.
Send reply to:
Box BE c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101 ___________________
Wednesday, Feb. 19, noon at
Temple Emeth, 5780 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray. A fashion show will
be presented by "Anita's of Kings
Point."
Hadassah Ben-Gnrion will hold
their next meeting Thursday,
Feb. 20, 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Emeth. Life members will be
honored and a film shown featur-
ing Zubin Meths, conductor of
New York Philharmonic. Make
your reservations for a bus trip to
Tampa, Feb. 23-25. $255 includes
bus, all meals, gratuities, cruise
on Seaescape, dinner theatre and
more. For reservations call
499-9955, 499-4874 or 499-0675.
Hadassah Boca Maariv will
hold their next meeting Wednes-
day, Feb. 19, 1 p.m. in the ad-
ministration building, Century
Village West. In observance of
Jewish Music Month, Cantor Irv-
ing Obatbaum will present a
musical program entitled "From
Haftorah to Hatikvah." Cantor
Obatbaum has written and
directed numerous cantatas, plays
and operettas. Refreshments will
be served and boutique items
discounted.
NCJW
National Council of Jewish
Women SoathPoint Section will
hold their next meeting, Friday,
Feb. 21,10 a.m. in the Community
Room of Town Center, Boca
Raton. Their guest speaker will be
author and Anthropologist, Dr.
Ezekiel Barber who is an expert
on the Jews of India. He will
discuss their history, customs and
current status in India. Guests are
welcome.
National Council of Jewish
Women Boca-Delray Section will
hold a brunch at Park Place Suite
Hotel, Friday, Feb. 14, 10:30 a.m.
The money raised will go for ANS,
Annual National Support. These
funds are used to support the pro-
jects of the National organization
in our country and in Israel. The
brunch will begin with a special
champagne reception and end
with a fashion show of active wear
by All That Jazz. Minimum dona-
tion to ANS, $18. For further in-
formation call 994-2688.
On Thursday, Feb. 20, between
11 a.m. and 1 p.m. NCJW in
cooperation with National Society
for the Prevention of Blindness
will conduct free vision screening
of children aged 4, 5 and 6 at Boca
Raton Community Center, 150
N.W. Crawford Blvd. This time is
designated for children not enroll-
ed in a preschool program. Train-
ed volunteers will test the children
for Amblyopia (lazy eye syn-
drome). For further information
call 487-4625.
B'NAI B'RITH
Olympic XI Lodge No. 2947
will hold a breakfast meeting at
Boca Del Mar Country Crab, Sun-
day, Feb. 16. Their guest speaker
will be senior vice president of
B'nai B'rith International Mr.
Murray H. Shusterman. Shuster-
man is a lawyer from Philadelphia
who is active in Jewish affairs
here and abroad. He will address
many issues of the day of interest
to all. Questions and answers will
follow. All are welcome to attend
by reservations. For information
call Ralph Baum 391-7595.
NA'AMAT
Na'amat U.S.A. Palm Beach
Council have reserved seat
tickets available for "Shalom 86"
matinee and evening perfor-
mances at West Palm Beach
Auditorium, Tuesday, Feb. 25.
Call Tess Teller 471-1146.
ORT GROUP FEATURES
PSYCHOLOGIST SHATIN
Dr. Leon Shatin, PhD, FAPA, a prominent Clinical Psychologist,
will be the guest speaker at the next general meeting of the Boca-
Glades Chapter of Women's American ORT, Monday, Feb. 17, at noon,
at Temple Beth El in Boca Raton.
Dr. Shatin will speak on "Loneliness and Friendship," exploring
the varieties of human friendship, the impersonality of our times, and
the implications for personal fulfillment. There will be questions-and-
answers and audience participation, sharing feelings about problems of
friendship, psychological closeness and shared intimacies in the modern
world.
Dr. Shatin, in addition to practicing clinical psychology, also
teaches the subject in college, and serves as a consultant to the South
County Jewish Family and Children's Service. He is also possessed of a
remarkable literary background and an outstanding sense of humor.
Members and their guests are cordially invited to attend.
Refreshments will be served. For more information call 483-6878.
Shabbat, 6 Adar 1,5746
Weekly Sldrah Terumah
Candlelighting 5:53 p.m.
Sabbath Ends 7:02 p.m.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30
a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101, Boca Raton, Florida
33433. Orthodox services held at Verde Elementary School
Cafeteria, 6590 Verde Trail, Boca, Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
For information regarding Friday, Sundown services Mincha-
Maariv, call Rabbi Mark Dratch. Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd., Delray
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Daily
Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:46 a.m. and 5 p.m. Sab-
bath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class 5 p.m.
Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION BETH AMI
2134 N.W. 19th Way, Boca Raton, Florida 33431. Conservative.
Phone (305) 994-8693 or 276-8804. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer; Cantor
Mark Levi; President, Joseph Boumans. Services held at the
Levis JCC, 336 N.W. Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton; Friday
evening at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio Road,
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler. Sab-
bath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10:15 a.m. Mailing ad-
dress: 8177 W. Glades Road, Suite 214, Boca Raton, FL 33434.
Phone 483-9982. Baby sitting available during services.
CONGREGATION TORAH OHR
Located in Century Village of Boca Raton. Orthodox. Rabbi
David Weissenberg. Cantor Jacob Resnick. President Edward
Sharzer. For information on services and educational classes and
programs, call 482-0206 or 482-7156.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
7099 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33446. Conser-
vative. Phone 495-0466 and 495-1300. Cantor Louis Hershman.
Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:30 a.m. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 38432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at
8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month, Saturday morning services 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 840015, Boca Raton, FL 33434. Con-
servative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday 8:30 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 488-5557. Joseph
M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Conser-
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd. Zvi Adler,
Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:45 a.m.
Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p-m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Barwick
Road), Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Reform. Sabbath Eve. ser-
vices, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver,
phone 276-6161.
si


In The Synagogues !
And Temples ...
Torah Ohr, New Shul
Makes Innovations
Friday, February 14, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 19
Torah Ohr, the fledgeling Or-
thodox congregation in Century
Village of Boca, is rapidly making
name for itself in Orthodox
circles (and in general) through in-
volvement in innovations and
issues of observance.
Its latest is a contribution, a
HIDUSH associated with space
flight. (A hidush is an innovational
concept or credence with regards
to teachings contained in the
Torah.) The week in which the
U.S. experienced the tragic
disaster of the Challenger was
also the week of reading the
Torah portion (sidrah) of Yitro or
Jethro, in Exodus.
A verse in Yitro, Chap. XIX:4,
s interpreted as alluding to space
flight, in saying "Ye have seen
what I did to the Egyptians, and
how I bore you on the wings of
eagles and brought you to me."
(The eagle is the highest flying
bird.)
The hidush presented in
discussion at Sabbath services on
Feb. 1 equates the Hebrew letters
ocating the verse and using
gematriya with the year 5734
the year man stepped on the
moon. (Gematriya is a numerical
system which uses the number
value of the letters in the Hebrew
alphabet; it is used in the Talmud
and even more so in Icabala to ar-
rive at various deductions. For ex-
ample, the first patriarch was at
irst called Abram later named
by G-d Abraham because he had
full command over the 243 bones
in his body. The Hebrew letters of
ABRAM are equal, numerically,
to 243.)
The hidush was discovered and
belated by Joseph Pfeffer, a scien-
tist whose articles on calendaric
subjects have appeared in the
EWISH FLORIDIAN OF
ISOITH COUNTY, and who is a
neml>er of Torah Ohr. Readers
vho would like more information
in the hidush and on gematriya
alculations can obtain them by
|*riting to Joseph Pfeffer, c/o The
ewish Floridian of South County.
TEMPLE SINAI
Temole Sinai Concert Seriea
will feature Violinist Benny Kim,
' n a
Beethoven/Brahms/Bach/Chopin,
Obituaries
ANTMAN
Murry, 75. of Kings Point. Ddry Beach,
was onKinally from New York City. He is
wrvived by his wife Hilda; ton Paul;
daughter Rosiyn Heiater and four grand
fhildren (Beth Israel-Rubin Memorial
Chapel).
EHRUCH
Fannie. 100, of Leiaurevflle, Delray Beach
was originally from Russia. She is survived
ty her sons Al and Martin; daughters
Uorothy Kane. Laura Sherman; brother
victor Daitch; nine grandchildren and 16
Seat grandchildren. (Beth Israel-Rubin
emonal Chapel).
PEINBERG
S*ra. 53, of Kinp Point, Delray Beach, was
nginally from South Africa. She is turviv-
f? >>y her husband Irwin; brothers Ben
JUrkus and Raymond Marcus; sister Batys
Khn. (Beth Israel-Rubin Memorial Chapel).
"RR1S HARA
h. 69 of Pines of Delray Villas, was
onpnaUy from Oregon. He is survived by
TOr Frances; brother Ralph; sisters
dSE y' Ue "^ thMne and *ven "-
Chapel" ,Guttorm*nW.rhit MemonaJ
SHAPIRO
J0- \ of King. Point. Delray Beach.
was originally from Illinois. He is survived
g. "if' Rebecca; stepson Martin
'*nan. daughter Nancy Hendnckson;
laughter Blame Holland; brother. Irv
2" w*^1 JeT "*" Joan Ross. Ger
" Simth, Hetty Prochep and Sara Miller;
rrZ?, tf?r,dch'Wren and one great
85S| ^ I,r-IRubin MeSiortal
program, Saturday, Feb. 15, 8
p.m. at the Temple, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray. Tickets $8.
Also includes "meet the artist"
session, Sunday, Feb. 16, 1 p.m.
For ticket information call
276-6161 or Bass 428-0917.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood will
hold their next meeting Monday,
Feb. 24 at the Temple. A cor-
related book review on "Leah's
Children" by Gloria Goldreich and
"Brithright" by Joseph Amiel will
be given by Irene S. Levine,
Reference Librarian from Valley
Stream, New York. Ms. Levin is a
columnist for the Jewish
Librarian Newletter. Public is
welcome and refreshments will be
served. For additional informa-
tion call Adele Agin 499-6338.
ANSHEI SHALOM
Temple Anshei Shalom Men's
Club will sponsor a breakfast
meeting, Sunday, Feb. 16, 9:30
a.m. at the Temple, 7099 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray. Their guest
speaker will be Dr. Ian Goldbaum.
For information call 495-0466.
BETH SHALOM
Temple Beth Shalom
Sisterhood will hold their next
meeting Monday, Feb. 24, 10:30
a.m. in the administration
building. An interesting program
is planned. Boutiques and
refreshments. A message will be
given by Rabbi Crain.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth Brotherhood
will sponsor a paid up brotherhood
breakfast, Sunday, Feb. 23, 9:30
a.m. at the Temple. Donation $1
and tickets must be picked up
before Feb. 18. The program will
consist of "A Roast" moderated
by Jack Bunis. Ladies invited.
SINGLES' SHABBAT
Friday, February 14, 10 p.m. at Temple Beth El,
333 SW 4th Avenue., Boca, 391-8900. Oneg Shabbat
will follow. 1-95 to Palmetto Park Rd., East to SW
4th Avenue. Turn right on 4th Avenue. The Temple
is 3 blocks south of Palmetto Park Rd., on the right
hand side of the street.
German Official Suggests
Killing Rich Jews
To Balance Budget
ADL Official Supports Mormon
Study Center In Jerusalem
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Nathan Perlmutter, director of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, has indicated his sup-
port for the controversial
Brigham Young University study
center of the Mormon Church
under construction on Mount
Scopus in Jerusalem.
The ADL official noted that in
medieval times, custom would not
permit Jews to build synagogues
taller than churches. "What really
counts," Perlmutter said, "is that
made-by-Christians medievalisms
.. not be adopted by Jews, not in
this already excessively punished
century, and surely not in the city
that should be a light unto all
cities, Yerusalayem."
Perlmutter's comments are con-
tained in his monthly column in
the ADL Bulletin, the agency's
national publication. He also
pointed out that "No matter com-
pliance with Jerusalem's deman-
ding building requirements; no
matter the approbation for the
project of Mayor Teddy
Kollek .; no matter the absence
of evidence that Israeli Jews have
converted to Mormonism, a small
minority of zealots would bar the
Mormons from building on Mount
Scopus."
Meanwhile, a rally was held
here by a group of supporters of
Rabbi Meir Kahane, the Israeli
Knesset member, outside the Mor-
mons visitors bureau in Mahattan.
The protestors carried placards
and changed slogans urging that
the Mormons stay out of Israel
and cease construction of the $15
million Center.
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A West
German official's public sug-
gestion that rich Jews ought
to be killed to help balance
the budget has triggered
outrage here for the second
time this month over anti-
Semitic remarks by politi-
cians linked to Chancellor
Helmut Kohl's ruling Chris-
tian Democratic Union
(CDU) coalition.
Wilderich Freiherr Von Mier-
bach Graf Von Spee, Mayor of
Korschenbroich, in the federal
state of North Rhine-Westphalia,
admitted that he told the town
councils budget committee that a
few rich Jews should be slain in
order to get the budget balanced.
Korschenbroich has a population
of about 27,000. It was not im-
mediately known if any Jews live
there.
VON MIERBACH apologized
for his remark but added that talk
about killing rich Jews was widely
used in the past when discussing
financial matters, an explanation
that stunned observers. He did
not say whether he was referring
to the Nazi era or the more recent
past.
The opposition Social
Democratic Party (SPD) im-
mediately called on the Mayor to
resign. The Jewish community in
Trial Date Set For Alleged War Criminal
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
The deportation hearing of
alleged Nazi war criminal
Karl Bruno Blach, a
Czechoslovakian native ac-
cused of serving as a guard
and dog handler at both
Dachau and Wiener-
Neudorf concentration
camps, will take place this
September, it was announc-
ed here by United States
Immigration Judge James
Patrick Vandello.
The Justice Department's Of-
fice of Special Investigations
(OSI) has charged that Blach, 65,
of La Habra, Calif., voluntarily
joined the Nazi Party in 1939 and
in June 1940 became a member of
the Waffen SS, Hitler's corps of
storm troopers. In addition, the
OSI charges that Blach par-
ticipated in the spring 1945
evacuation march from Wiener-
Neudorf to Mauthausen, in which
numerous persons died, in an ef-
fort to flee advancing forces.
AT A HEARING last week,
Blach's attorney, Ronald Parker
of Fullerton, Calif., stated that
there were 30 charges made
against his client and that of the
30, Blach admits to only three:
that he is not a U.S. citizen, that
he was born in Czechoslovakia,
and that he is presently stateless.
Judge Vandello explained to
Blach that the alleged crimes of
which he is being accused are of a
deportable nature, and that if he
doesn't choose a country, the
court will have to decide. Blach
was given until July to file any
papers which might block his
deportation order.
Official of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center here attended last week's
hearing and continue to moniter
the case.
ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY
SAVE THE DATE!!
Sunday, May 18
11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
at the Baer Jewish Campus
Fun/Food/Music/Dance
For All Ages!!
... and much, much more!
VOLUNTEERS Please call
NEEDED! Marianne 395-5546
Remember! m
Dusseldorf announced it has filed
suit against him for racial incite-
ment. Von Mierbach, a member of
the CDU, made the remark at a
meeting on Jan. 16. But the local
newspaper, owned by a CDU ac-
tivist, still has not published it.
Outrage was expressed last
month when Hermann Felner, a
ranking member of the Christian
Social Union, the CDU's Bavarian
sister party, stated publicly that
Jews who seek reparations from
German firms that used them as
slave laborers during World War
II created the impression thatt
"Jews are quick to show up when
money jingles in German
cashboxes."
FELNER, too, apologized both
in the Bundestag and in a formal
statement to the Jewish communi-
ty. But the matter resurfaced
when the weekly Der Spiegel
quoted Chancellor Kohl as saying
that Felner's remark was not anti-
Semitic and that it reflected the
attitude of most Germans. A
government spokesman has
denied the Der Spiegel story. The
weekly stood by its account.
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres,
on his visit to West Germany, has
refused to comment. Aides said he
did not read Der Spiegel, and had
no intention of raiting the matter
during his talks in Bonn.
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Page 20 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 14, 1986
Press
By MARTY ERANN
It is most unfortuante, and cer-
tainly not pleasant to report; but
last year was the worst in Israel's
history so far as aliya was con-
cerned. The Soviets, despite hints
leaked via France and the U.S. on
the possibility of opening their
gates have not done so, and the
number of Jews permitted to
leave the USSR in 1986 was only
marginally higher than in 1984
which was the lowest year on
record. Immigration to Israel
from the West was by far lower
than ever, and the total number
arriving in Israel, including the
thousands of Ethiopian Jews sav-
ed, was the lowest in the state's
37-year history.
This is made even worse by the
unofficial estimates of yerida, the
emigration of Israelis from the
country, exacerbated by the grow-
ing unemployment there. Israel's
unemployment rate is around 8
percent which does not sound
terrible compared, for example,
with Great Britain's 13-14 per-
cent. But unemployment in the
U.K. or in the U.S. does not bring
dramatic increases in emigration,
while in Israel it can and does ..
There are no official statistics
on yerida Israelis do not
declare their intention to move
permanently. Often, they leave on
a tourist's visa, or a student's
visa, but settle down permanently
in the country to which they
travelled. The Israeli government
estimates the number based on
total departures, less total ar-
rivals; at best, this is a gross, inac-
curate estimate. Since the actual
statistics cannot be anything but
demoralizing, there is a tendency,
to say the least, to keep them as
low-key as possible.
Unofficial (but educated)
estimates have put the 1985
yerida figures at over 90,000.
One of the forms of an old Jewish
joke says that two Jews need
three synagogues: one for the two
of them, and one each for when
they cannot get along .
In one sense, at least this joke
does not apply to the Jewish
Agency and four of the major
Jewish organizations which work
closest with it the Council of
Jewish Federations, the United
Jewish Appeal, the United Israel
Appeal and the World Zionist
Organization American
Section.
These four organizations
recently issued a statement endor-
sing "Jewish Agency Week" to be
held Feb. 20-27. This "week"
comes on the heels of the meeting
Holocaust Denial Book
To Remain
TORONTO-(JTA) A book
that claims the Holocaust is a
hoax, as well as controversial
publications will not be banned
from the library at Ryerson
Polytechnical Institute in
Toronto.
After a three-month investiga-
tion, a special committee has ruled
out adopting a policy that would
remove books such as "The Hoax
of the Twentieth Century" from
Library shelves. The book denies
the well-documented fact that six-
million Jews died at the hands of
the Nazis.
The new policy of the Institute,
however, approved by its govern-
ing council, could result in a book
being placed in a "limited scot
area if it is the subject of an
"adverse judgment" by a Cana-
dian court
New Chairman
of the Jewish Agency Board of
Governors in New York which
has raised some controversy, but
which both the Jewish Agency
leadership, as well as American-
Jewish leadership see as an oppor-
tunity for greater participation by
American Jewry.
The four major organizations in-
volved are the bodies, in effect,
responsible for designating the
delegates serving as members of 5?e ae,e8e to the Board of
the Jewish Agency Assembly, its **venjors meeting, who will be
Board of Governors, and so on. So
that, in effect, they are responsi-
ble (together with similar bodies
elsewhere throughout world
to get to know the Jewish Agency
better, to learn more about how
the money they raise for social
services in Israel is spent, and to
strengthen their ties through both
Zionist and non-Zionist channels
with Israel.
There is a "but." But the United
Israel Appeal is basically
designees of the Federations and
the major Zionist bodies. But the
organizations endorsing the
"week" are not capitalizing on the
arrival of scores of major Jewish
leaders from Israel and the rest of
the Jewish world to reach the
grassroots of American Jewry; at
best they will get a few of them to
address some of the Campaign
events and enhance the fund-
raising efforts.
Someone ought to get ALL of
the delegates to the Board of
NEW YORK (JTA) Josh
Weston of Montclair, N.J., presi-
dent of Automatic Data Process-
ing, has been elected chairman of
the board of the Boys Town
Jerusalem Foundation of
America. The election was an-
m
nounced by Joe Nakash,
organization's president.
Rabbi Named
1
the
MADISON, Wis. (JTA) -
Rabbi Jan Murray Brahms of
Nashville has been named the
spiritual leader of Temple Beth El
in Madison.
ID
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101.
Jewry) for both the Zionist and
Jewish community leadership
(usually referred to as the "fund-
raisers") segments of the Jewish
Agency leadership, as well as for
its funding and operations.
The "Jewish Agency Week"
gives some 100 or more of the
Jewish comunities througout the
U.S. and Canada an opportunity
going out to the various com-
munities, to champion our Com-
munity Theme throughout the
country, to promote a vision of
One Destiny by the 21st Century
- which goes far beyond enhanc-
ed fund-raising.
Perhaps the next time such an
opportunity arises, a "week" of
this sort will get endorsement
from every major Jewish
organization, including the
religious groupings, B'nai B'rith,
ORT, and so on .
Are You Single?
Do You Play Golf?
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where shopping is a pleasure 7 days o week
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