<%BANNER%>

The Jewish Floridian of South County ( February 7, 1986 )

Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 7, 1986
Aq Agency of the South County Jewish Federation
Our brand-new Turning Twos'' program is for Mommy-and-Me
graduates Pictured above are Tatiana Weisman and Elizabeth
' ML mad ***transition (without Mommy) most
The Adoiph and Rose
Levis Jewish Community
Center is proud to present
its Early Childhood Pro-
gram for our Spring Ses-
sion. All of our programs of-
fer a warm atmosphere of
acceptance, support and
professional guidance to
enhance your child's growth
and Jewish identity.
THRIVING THREES Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday, 9:30
a.m. 12:30 p.m. Please pack your
child a Kosher lunch. (All lunches
are refrigerated). Child must be
three (3) by September 1, 1985.
Program Dates: March 17-June
9
Cost: Members: $180, Non-
members: $240.
Instructor: Diane Brown.
TERRIFIC TWO'S I (older
twos) Tuesday and Thursday,
9:30 a.m.-noon. Please pack your
child a Kosher lunch. (All lunches
are refrigerated). Child must be
30-36 months by Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 18-June
10.
Cost: Members: $120, Non-
members: $160.
Instructor: Diane Brown.
TERRIFIC TWO'S II (younger
twos) Monday and Wednesday,
9:30 a.m.-noon. Please pack your
child a Kosher lunch. (All lunches
are refrigerated). Child must be
24-30 months by Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 17-June
9.
Cost: Members: $120, Non-
members: $160.
Instructor: Karen Albert.
TERRIFIC TWO'S III Mon-
day and Wednesday, 9:30
a.m.-noon. Please pack your child
a Kosher lunch. (All lunches are
refrigerated). Child must be 24-36
months by Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 17-June
9.
Cost: Members: $120, Non-
members: $160.
Instructor: Kotch Drucker.
TURNING TWO'S Tuesday
and Thursday, 9:30-11 a.m.
Parent does not accompany child.
Children will be served a snack.
Child must be two or recently two.
Program Dates: March 18-June
10.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Kotch Drucker.
SHABBAT FUNSHOP I
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Please
pack your child a Kosher lunch.
(All lunches are refrigerated).
Child must be 24-36 months by
Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 21-June 6.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Karen Albert.
SHABBAT FUNSHOP n -
Firday, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Please
pack your child a Kosher lunch.
(All lunches are refrigerated).
Child must be 24-36 months by
Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 21-June
6, 1986.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Kotch Drucker
TOT LOT Tuesday, 9:30
a.m.-l 1 a.m. Parents must accom-
pany child. Parents will be served
refreshments. Children will be
served a snack. Child must be
18-23 months by March 1.
Program Dates: March 18-June
10.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Karen Albert
ONES ARE FUN Thursday,
9:30-10:30 a.m. Parents must ac-
company child. Parents will be
served refreshments. Children
will be served a snack. Child must
be 12-17 months by March 1.
Program Dates: March 20 June
5.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Karen Albert
PLAYGROUND
PLAYGROUP Wednesday,
9:30-10:30 a.m. Parent must ac-
company child. Children will be
served a snack. Child must be
12-23 months by March 1.
Program Dates: March 19-June
4.
Cost: Members, no charge, Non-
members $15.
Instructor: Martha Sands
The following dates there will be
no classes:
Wednesday, April 23 through
Friday, May 2 Spring Recess.
(Classes will resume on May 5.)
Monday, May 26 Memorial
Day
June 10 Last day of all classes
LEVIS JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
Duplicate Bridge
Every Thursday!
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will be offering ACBL
sanctioned Duplicate Bridge for
experienced players every Thurs-
day at 12:30 p.m. Cost for
Members is $1.75, Non-members
$2. Free plays to winners.
Refreshments will be served.
Automotive Maintenance
Consumer Tip
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will hold an Automotive
Maintenance Presentation, Thurs-
day, Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m. Norton
Tire Co. will help educate the con-
sumer through this exciting and
entertaining presentation. Prizes
will be awarded and refreshments
served. No charge for members,
non-members pay $2.
What Every Florida Resident
Should Know About Wills
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will hold a lecture titled
"What Every Florida Resident
Should Know About Wills," on
Thursday, Feb. 20, 7:30 p.m. Herb
Goldfeld, Attorney, will be the
guest speaker. Members come
free, non-members pay $2. For
more information call 395-5546.
Joys of Living
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will sponsor a class entitl-
ed "Joys of Living." The class will
be held Wednesdays, starting
Feb. 19-March 26, 10-noon. The
instructor is Al Green, PhD. Cost
for members is $15, non-
members, $25. Deadline for
registration is Feb. 12
Communications
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will sponsor a class entitl-
ed "Communications," starting
Wednesdays, Feb. 19-March 26,
from 1:30-3:30 p.m. The instruc-
tor, Al Green, PhD, will focus this
class on relationships, friends and
family and how to enhance them
through communication. The cost
for members is $16, non-
members, $25. Deadline for class
registration: Feb. 12.
For information on ALL JCC programs please
call 395-5546. (unless otherwise specified)
Reincarnation
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will sponsor a class on
"Reincarnation," starting
Tuesdays, Feb. 18 through March
26, 7-9 p.m. Cost for members is
$15, non-members, $25. Deadline
for registration is Feb. 11
Sex After 56: Enjoy!
The Prime Timers Committee
of the Levis Jewish Community
Center will sponsor a lecture en-
titled "Sex After 56: Enjoy!",
Tueday, Feb. 11, 7:80 p.m. The
guest speaker is Al Green, PhD.
Cost for non-members is $2.
members come free.
JCC PROGRAM BROCHURE
WINS NATIONAL AWARD
The Association of Jewish Com-
munity Centers and YM-YWHA's
the JWB has announced that
the Levis Jewish Community
Center's Fall-1985 Program
Brochure is a winner in the 1986
JWB Communications Awards
Competition.
There were over 334 entries
from more than 100 centers the
largest and most enthusiastic
competition since JWB began it in
1978.
The booklet won 2nd Place in
the "Center Brochures" division
for its design and "We Belong
Together" theme.
The award will be presented at
the JWB Biennial Meeting taking
place April 9-13 in Toronto,
Canada. The programmatic con-
tribution of all center program
committees and staff helped to
make this award possible. The
Brochure was designed by JCC
Membership/PR Director Les
Scheinfeld.
The Adolph and Rose Levis Jewish Community
Center wishes to acknowledge their Contributory
Members and welcome all New Members who have
recently joined:
BENEFACTORS 1986 ,
(As of 1-27-86)
'Marian and Sydney A. Altman
Marjorie and James Baer
'Rita and Elbert Bagus
Florence and Ted Baumritter
'Rose and Gary Bernstein
'Marianne and Ed Bobick
'Anne and Henry Brenner
* Jenna and Robert Byrnes
'Edith and Mel dayman
Libby and Milton Davis
Adrianne and Eric Deckinger
'Yetta Dogan
'Shirley and Karl Enselberg
'Sally and Lester M. Entin
'Bonnie and Robert Fishman
'Leslie and Martin Freedman
'Florence Fuller
' Barbara and Herb Gimelstob
Ernest Goldblum
'Shelly and Barry Halperin
Dalia and Ury Kalai, M.D.'s
'Bobbie and Pete Kamins
'Terry and Shep Kaufman
'Elaine and David Kend
'Laura and Steve Litinsky
'Mildred and Abby Levine
'Bea and Richard Levy
'Dinah and Daniel Man
'Marcia and Stanley Moser
'Nina and Robert Mufson
Lillian and Louis Newman
Jim Nobil
'Edith and Donald E. Peiser
Anita Penzer
'Clarice and Ben Pressner
'Miriam and Donald Rich
* Jeanette and Harold j. Rosen
'Berenice B. Schankerman
'Carole and Richard Siemens
'Anita and Sanford M. Simon
Janice and Saul A. Slossberg
Barbara and David Stein
Betty and Norman Stone
Ruthie Fay and Marvin
Waldman
Ruth and Saul Wienberger
Ruth and Frank W. White
Janet and Andrew Whitehill
Beth and Henry Whitehill
Betty and Phillip Zinman
Renewing Founding Members.
RECENT NEW
JCC MEMBERS
Mi. Jill Lanning
Mi. Ruth Goldberg
Mi Georgia Bledaoe
Mi. Elaine Keliky
Mi. Lillian Straiabet*
Dr. and Mrs. Gary Eisenberg
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Kosloff
Mr. Rick Back
Mr. and Mrs. Joah Rabin
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Maletx
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Raum
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Deutch
Dr. and Mrs. Steven L. Pollack
Ms. Tamar Ben Ami
Mr. and Mrs. Effrem Arenstein
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Katz
Mr. and Mrs. Burleigh Greenberg
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Segall
Mrs. Ray Nelson
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Meyers
Ms. Guitelle Baltimore
Ms. Mary Ballon
Mr. Edward Ross
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Shelling
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Lukoff
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Goldkland
Ms. Nancy Tisdial
Mr. Oilman Hanish
Mrs. Isabel Binder
Mrs. James Kahn
Ms. Esther Frieder
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Isler
Dr. and Mrs. Abraham Portman
Mr and Mrs. Mel Hackel
Mr Bruce T Honekman
Mr. and Mrs. William Pollack
Ms. Andrea Grant
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Starkoff
Mr. Alex Bauer
l>r and Mrs. Stan Guberman
Ms. Celia Hirsch
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Krumholz
Mr. Louis Brazen
Ms. Lisa Ohrt
Mr. and Mrs. Ron Jedwab
Mr. and Mrs. Manny Isenman
Dr. and Mrs. Stewart Gorenberg
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Marcus
Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Lissauer
Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Weisleder
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Kaufman
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Temor
Ms. Helen Regenstreif
Ms. Paula Forbes
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Wasserman
Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Steinberg
Mr. and Mrs Mark Roaenfield
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hanson
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Hurwitx
Mr. Irving Stern
Mi. Jean Abramoff
Mr. and Mri. Kami Argov
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Baine
Dr. and Mrs. Eric Gechter
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Brown
Mr. and Mn. David Gart
Mi. Lucille Graham
Mr. and Mra Morrii Phillips
Dr. and Mrs. Mark Libow
Mr. and Mrs. James Tisdale
Ms. Ellen Brooks
Ms. Linda S. Levine
Mi Marion Levi
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hermann
Mr. and Mra. David Daffner
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Shapiro
Mr. and Mra. Eduardo Roth
Dr. and Mra. Edward Pollock
Mr and Mra. Allen Iarow
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Weine
Mr. and Mra. Mark Milask
Dr. and Mra. Ricahrd Greenwald
Mr. and Mra. Gerald Tamber
Mr. and Mra. Michael Weintr
Mi Karen M>ckett


Volumes of Major Interest
Friday, February 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 13
SPECIALLY FOR
By MORTON I. TEICHER
bbat: A Rite of Passage in
Jerusalem. By Peter Stephan
Jungk. New York: Times
Books, 1985. 151 pp. $12.95.
The author of this little book is a
sung American Jew who lives in
Henna where he is writing a
liography of Franz Werfel. In the
rorse of seeking his identity, he
ent a year in Jerusalem, study -
; in a yeshiva. The experience of
year is recorded in this
aunt.
Apparently, Jungk learned a
eat deal about the Jewish
eligion, making up for the defi-
iencies in his early education at
sis assimilated home in California,
lowever, he ended the year with
number of questions still
knresolved. He seems to be a
riser person for his year in
|erusalem and he certainly
smonstrates his love for and
ibwledge about that beautiful
Ity.
Those who share his love and
inowledge will have fond
lemories evoked of familiar
streets and sites which mean so
luch to Jews who have been for-
tunate enough to spend some time
Iin Jerusalem.
I Living With Koestler. Edited by
Celia Goodman. New York: St.
Martin's Press, 1985. 204 pp.
$12.95.
In 1950, after living with him
for five years, Mamaine Paget
became Arthur Koestler's second
wife. They separated after only
one year of marriage, and three
years later, in 1954, Mamaine died
at the age of 37. During her sue
years with Koestler, she wrote
frequent letters to her twin sister,
Celia, and it is these letters which
have been brought together to
make up this book.
Interspersed among discussions
of the weather, bird-watching and
food, there are vignettes of con-
tacts with such luminaries as Sar-
tre, Camus, Malraux, Simone de
Beauvoir, Simone Weil, James T.
Farrell, Teddy Kollek, Cyrus
Sulzberger and Bertrand Russell,
among others. Occasionally, these
slight episodes tell us a bit about
the person being mentioned.
Shortly after Israel declared its
independence in May, 1948,
Koestler secured assignments as a
reporter for several newspapers
and went to Israel along with Ma-
maine. They remained there for
about four months, and her letters
for this period have special in-
terest, but they do not add very
much to our understanding of the
trials and tribulations of Israel
during the first few months after
it was reborn.
Mamaine, who was not Jewish,
makes a few references to
Koestler being a Jew, but her let-
ters suggest that his Jewishness
was not an important factor in his
life nor to their lives together. In
fact, not much light is thrown on
other aspects of Koestler in this
six-year period beyond the sug-
gestions that he was a mixed-up
person who struggled with being
an ex-communist. Koestler's
ultimate suicide pact with his
third wife is presaged to some ex-
tent in these letters which picture
him as an extreme neurotic who
was subject to fits of depression
and who beat his wife on several
occasions.
Koestler's writing brought him
some fame and money. His story,
"Darkness at Noon," was adapted
into a play by Sidney Kingsley and
ran successfully on Broadway for
eighteen months. His book on
Israel, "Promise and Fulfill-
ment," was not well received, nor
was one of his last books in which
he concocted a bizarre theory of
the origin of the Jews.
In some ways, Koestler was a
tragic figure. He was certainly
one of the leading intellectuals of
his time, and he hobnobbed with
many interesting personalities.
However, these letters make him
out to be somewhat of an un-
savory character. The editor pro-
vides a brief biographical in-
troduction which, when combined
with what we can glean about him
from the letters, suggests that a
full biography might be worth
reading.
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101.
Professional is interested in meeting a life partner to
59. Traditional, noble character and fine ethical features,
tall. Driver a plus. I am located in Florida. State tele-
phone. Write to:
CH c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
OPEN HEART SURGERY
HOLLYWOOD HEART SURGERY
Bypass Surgery, Valve Surgery, Pacemakers
INSURANCE HOSPITAL
Medicare Participating Memorial
Insurance Assignment Accepted
Health Plan Participatioa
ALLAN WOLPOWITZ. M.I).
3427 Johnson Street
Hollywood. Florida 3:1021
By Appointment Only
Tel. (305) 962-5400
Empire!
Number
One
Kosher
Turkeyl
Pure, Clean
&Lean!
FOR THE BEST. SELECT A BIG.
EMPIRE KOSHER TURKEY...
CONVENIENT READY-TO-COOK
OR PRE-COOKED TURKEY
DRUMSTICKS, TURKEY
BREASTS. PAN-ROASTS.
ROLLS & SLICES I
(800) EMPIRE 4
Distributed By:
FLORIDA
Miami Baach, FL Mvndaison, Inc.
(305)672-5800
Hialaah, FL Tropic lea Company
005)824-5750
N. Miami, FL All Amarican
Food Dial. (305) 863-4496
Th Mini Innlrd NMHr In Kmhrt P*ry
't)lM IKtlll KOHNI rtiuilll ttai
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakariat opan at 8:00 A.M.
\
Available at Publix Stores with
Fraah Danish Bakeries Only.
Delicious Served with
Your Favorite Pasta
French Bread
toaff %J
Available at PubHx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Decorated
Mini
Heart Cake
$129
each
(With Fresh Strawberries,
if Available.................$1.99)
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Large Heart Shaped
Chocolate
Chip Cookie
SAW
each ^B
Available at AN Publx Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Decorated for Valentines Day
Holiday Cup Cakes... 6 $ 1"
Made with the Freshest Fruit and Raisins
Hot Cross Buns............ $179
Cherry Cheese
Coffee Cake.................* $189
Banana Nut Loaf.............ch$149
BUS
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Perfect with Any Meal
Chicago Hard Rolls ...2 ** 25*
Serve with Publix Premium Ice Cream
Cherry Crumb Pie.........*** $249
Prices Effective
February 6 thru 12,1986.
.
Publix

MM


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
February 7, 1986

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00235

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
February 7, 1986

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00235

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
ONE DREAM.. .ONE PEOPLE.. .ONE DESTINY
w-^ The Jewish -^ y
FloridiaN
of South County
Volume 8 Number 6
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach, and Highland Beach, Florida Friday, February 7,1966
Fr*$ftocA*f
Price 35 Cents
Inside
Temple Mount Tensions
... page 3
More on Righteous
Gentiles... pegs 4
Money Seminsr for
Women... page 5
'Mom Can't Do It All"
..page 16
New
Campus Funding Starts
Abner Levine Chairs Drive
Abner Levine, one ot the most active men "it is truly a thrill and a
behind many major philanthropic endeavors in source of pride for me that
this community, has consented to chair the ap *J
campaign to bring to reality the plans for the Marianne Bobick, president
new Richard and Carole Siemens Jewish Cam- f ?c ^^ County Jewish
_.,. no -1,41 Federation, as she announc-
pus on U.S. 441. ^ Levine'.g appointment
last week. "The challenge is
Day School 'Open House' Is A Major Event ^StXS&^n
is Abner Levine."
Jewish parents of children from
Preschool through Eighth Grade
owe it to themselves to be inform-
ed on what the Jewish Community
Day School has to offer now, and
the developments planned for the
coming years, according to Prin-
cipal Burt Lowlicht.
The Day School plans an Open
House program for parents of
such children an annual event it
considers of major importance
on Wednesday, Feb. 19, at 8 p.m.
The program will take place at the
Satellite Campus, 2450 NW 5th
Avenue, Boca Raton.
The Open House program will
guide the parents through both
campus facilities, showing off the
classrooms, science lab, computer
room and library/media center,
parents will meet the staff and experiences
learn about the school programs
and basic goals and educational
philosophy.
Ma. Mossovitz with her preschool pupils.
area excels also, as parents find
their tots enjoying their learning
The Beit Yeladim program, for
pre-schoolers, will be described by
Andrea Mossovitz, preschool
director, who will describe the
children's day in school with the
aid of a slide show.
"Many parents are surprised to
learn that the preschool is a struc-
tured program with readiness
skills as well as creative oppor-
tunities, rather than a play
group," according to Burt
Lowlicht, "Judaic study is in-
troduced through the celebration
of holidays with the learning of
traditions and songs. The secular
Says Maria Kits, whose
daughter is in her second year at
the Beit Yeladim: "I find my
daughter is learning so much .. .
It is the most wonderful, creative
environment where eager minds
like my daughter's have the op-
portunity to develop and reach
their potential in many areas."
Space in the preschool is
limited, and the Open House pro-
gram serves as the registration
"kick-off' for the coming year.
Parents are urged, therefore, to
make this date a priority on their
calendar.
Parents of Kindergarten
through Eighth Grade will also
find the Open House helpful.
Students in the school the only
Jewish school in the South County
area come from Boca, Delray,
Highland Beach and Deerfield
Beach.
"There has been an enormous
growth and development in the
school, which has grown to more
than 200 students this year," said
Lowlicht, "and this growth will
continue. Parents should be ex-
posed to the Jewish School op-
tion." Lowlicht will make a
presentation of plans for the
school to be built at the new
Richard and Carole Siemens
Jewish Campus in West Boca a
modern facility which will be able
to accommodate more than 600
students. The project, says
Lowlicht, is one of the most am-
Continued on Page S-
The task is to implement
the decision of the Federa-
tion's Board to raise $12
million in capital funds, to
build the complex at the
Siemens Campus to in-
clude an expanded Jewish
Community Day School, the
Adolph and Rose Levis
Jewish Community Center,
the Jewish family and
Children's Service, and ade-
quate Federation and com-
munity offices to cater to
the needs of a rapidly grow-
ing Jewish community.
Levine, a resident of the Del-
Aire Country Club in Delray, has
served as vice president of the
Federation and continues to serve
as a Board member; he has been
associate chairman of the Federa-
tion/UJA Campaign, in 1982, and
Inquiry Extended
TORONTO (JTA) The
Cabinet has extended by six mon-
ths the official inquiry into Nazi
war criminals living in Canada,
conducted by former Quebec
Superior Court Judge Jules
Deschenes who was named a one-
man commission by the govern-
ment a year ago.
Abner Levine
was chairman of the campaign in
1983. In 1984 he chaired the
Masada Dinner (for men whose
gifts are $6,500 or more), and last
year he chaired the Men's Division
Major Events.
This year, Abner Levine and his
wife Mildred were named as
honorees of the Masada Dinner.
Levine's philanthropic activity
and community service have not
been limited to his extensive work
in behalf of the Federation both
here and in his part year residence
in Lawrence, New York. He has
been one of the pillars of the Israel
Bonds work in South County,
establishing the Prime Ministers'
Club for those whose bond pur-
chases are $25,000 or more. He
has been active in support of
AIPAC, the American-Israel
Public Affairs Committee, on
whose national advisory board he
serves. He has been active in the
B'nai B'rith Anti-Defamation
League. He has served as an ac-
tive board member of B'nai Torah
Congregation. And, in line with
his firm belief that Jews in
America must be involved in the
country's political life, he was ac-
tive in several political campaigns,
Continued on Page 8-
Edward Teller to Lecture At Local TAU Seminar Group
Even before the event has
taken place, the American
Friends of Tel Aviv University
consider it a major feather in their
cap: the guest speaker for their
Seminar Associates meeting in
February will be Dr. Edward
Teller, one of the most prominent
scientists in the world.
Dr. Teller will address a
breakfast meeting of the Seminar
Associates on Friday, Feb. 21, at
7:30 am.
Teller's name is probably most
familiar to people as one of the
scientists who developed the atom
bomb during World War II. He is
also known as a staunch propo-
nent of what he insists be properly
called the Strategic Defense In-
itiative, though the press and the
public have come to use the
euphemism "Star Wars."'
Bom in Budapest in 1908, Dr.
Teller was educated in Germany
and received his PhD from the
University of Leipzig in 1930. In
the early thirties he taught and
did research work in Germany and
Denmark, but with the rise of the
Nazis to power he left Germany,
going first to London, then to the
U.S., where he became a citizen in
1941.
After World War II Dr. Teller
became professor of physics at the
University of Chicago but the
threat of Soviet technological
developments prompted him to
return as assistant director to the
Los Alamos Scientific
Laboratory. In 1952, after in-
itiating substantial progress
toward thermonuclear explosives,
he became consultant at the
Lawrence Livermore National
Laboratory in California, which he
also directed in 1958-60. From
1960 to 1975 he continued as
associate director there, while
also serving as professor of
physics at the University of
California. He has been a senior
research fellow at the Hoover In-
stitution in Stanford, California
ever since.
Dr. Teller has served the coun-
try in many ways, including as a
member of the advisory commit-
tee of the Atomic Energy Com-
mission, as chairman of the first
Nuclear Reactor Safety Commit-
tee, as a member of the USAF
Scientific Advisory Board, on the
President's Foreign Intelligence
Advisory Board, and a board
member of the Defense In-
telligence School. In 1982 he was
appointed to the White House
Science Council.
His awards and medals were
numerous, and include such
prestigious ones, among others,
as the Enrico Fermi Medal, the
Albert Einstein Award, The
Harvey Prize, the Joseph Priestly
Award and the National Medal of
Science. He has written several
books and numerous articles both
scientific and of general concern,
and is currently working on a
book dealing with the influence of
Continued on Page 10
Dr. Edward Teller


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 7, 1986
CAMPUS
1. Aquatic Center Named &
I >eduated
2. Tt-nnis Complex Named &
Dedicated
3. Main Boulevard Named &
Dedicated Street
4. Holocaust Memorial Garden -
Named & Dedicated (with
Sculpture and Eternal Light)
5. West Boulevard Named &
Dedicated Street
6. Central Atrium Named &
Dedicated
Athletic Playing Field & Jogging
Course Named & Dedicated
Entrance Reflecting Spray Pool
Day School Entrance Plaza
Main Portico
West Concourse
North Concourse
East Concourse
South Concourse
Parking Lot #2
Parking Lot #1
Parking Lot #4
Preschool Playground (JCC and
Day School)
Day School Playground
Parking Lot #3
Plaque Dedication (Federation
Lobby)
North Cypress Preserve
South Cypress Preserve
Elevated Walkway to Sports Area
Basketball Court #1
Basketball court #2
Volleyball Court
Senior Walking Course
Heritage Village Walkway
Entranceway Flag Poles
Water Fountain
Pool Kiosk

"V^^ "Vl
7.
a
9.
10.
n.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.


JOOO .Q Q Q:'@ oooeo oooo^

GNEHMEJONE^Mni
Kim Marsh Named
Capital Dev't Director
A Jewish people. At hone with one
another. A family to share joy and sadness.
To embrace me another with Jewish
tradition. To laugh tetter. Cry together.
_____ To be together.
Sharing a home. Our own
Jewish Community Center, where young
and dd enjoy the world together. Our
Family Service, dedicated to extending
hearts and hands to Jews in need.
Our Day School, inuring our children in
Jewish heritage. Our Federation, the
core of our Jewish community.
Kimball Marsh, formerly ex-
ecutive director of the United
Jewish Fund and Council (Federa-
tion) of St. Paul, Minnesota, has
joined the South County Jewish
Federation as director of the
Capital Development drive.
Kim's main task, according to
Federation president Marianne
Bobick who announced his ap-
pointment, will be to work with
the campaign to raise $12 million
for the construction of the com-
plex at the new Richard and
Carole Siemens Jewish Campus.
A native of Los Angeles, Kim
grew up in an Orthodox environ
ment, and studied psychology at
UCLA before beginning his
career in Jewish communal work.
By age 25 he had been camp direc-
tor of the JCCs, a planning
specialist for the Jewish
Federation-Council, and a
religious school teacher in several
synagogues.
He was awarded a scholarship
by the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions to study in Hebrew Union
College's School of Jewish Com-
munal Service and at University
of Southern California School of
Social Work, graduating with MA
degrees from both in 1976.
Since then, he served in St.
Paul, first as assistant director,
and then, in 1979. was promoted
to the executive director position,
at age 30. During his tenure there
he started many innovative pro-
grams and projects, bringing the
UJFC to greater heights than it
toof ever attained bof nrn.
Kim Marsh
grammatic and fund-raising
levels.
Kim's wife, Sue, and their
daughter Jenny, four-and-a-half,
will be joining him at their new
home in Boca Raton this spring.
They are expecting their second
child in May.
The high regard in which Kim
and his family were held by the
community in St. Paul is sum-
marized in the words with which
they (regretfully) said "good bye"
to the Marshes: "We will treasure
the idealism, determination, sen-
sitivity and sense of fun which you
have shared with us fo deflftde."
"The Jewish community of
South County welcomes the Mar-
shes and wishes them the best as
they grw with.uv'.'.iMd Mrs..
Bobick.
r
i
03
OB
I


A Rabbi
Comments
The following is brought to our
readers by the South County
Rabbinical Association. If there
are topics you would like our
Rabbis to discuss, please submit
them to The Floridian.
HOW MANY
COMMANDMENTS?
By RABBI
JOSEPH S. NOBLE
Defray Beach
With the reading of the 10 Com-
mandments in our Synagogues
last Shabbat begins a series of
"mitzvot." Actually, the first
mitzvah was given in the first
chapter of Genesis.
Although there are several
synonyms for mitzvot such as
torot, hukkim, mishpatim, and
edot, in Talmudic terminology,
mitzvot is the general term for the
divine commandments, computed
to be 613 known as "taryag"
mitzvot since tannaitic times.
Mitzvot are classified as affir-
mative and negative: 365 negative
precepts, corresponding to the
365 days in the solar year; and 248
negative precepts, corresponding
in number to the parts of the
human body (Makkot 23b).
611 mitzvot, numerically equal-
ing TORAH, are said to have been
given through Moses, while the
first two commandments of the
Decalogue were given directly by
G-d on Mount Sinai.
In addition to the mitzvot
designed for the people of Israel
alone, the Torah contains seven
precepts which are incumbent on
all human beings, dependents of
Noah. The seven Noachian
precepts are: 1) the establishment
of courts of justice, the prohibition
2) of blasphemy, 3) of idolatry, 4)
<>f incest. 5) of bloodshed, 6) of
robbery, 7) of eating flesh cut
from a living animal (Sanhedrin
56a, b). "These constitute what
we might call "Natural Religion,"
as they are vital to the existence
of human society" (Hertz, Genesis
9:7).
"Rabbi Simlai taught (Makkot
24a): 613 mitzvot were given to
Moses. Along came David and
condensed them to 11, as it is
written: A Psalm of David: Lord,
who shall dwell in Your taber-
nacle? Who shall abide upon Your
holy mountain? 1) He who lives
with integrity, 2) does what is
right, 3) and speaks the truth in
his heart; 4) who has no slander
upon his tongue, 5) who does no
evil to his fellow man, 6) who does
Friday, February 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Rabbi Joseph Noble
not reproach his neighbor. 7) In
his eyes a vile person is despised,,
8) but he honors those who revere
the Lord. 9) He takes an oath even
to his own harm and does not
change. 10) He does not lend
money at usurious interest
11) he does not take a bribe
against the innocent. Whoever
does these things shall stand firm
forever (Psalms 15:1-5).
"Isaiah condensed them to 6, as
it is written: l)He who walks
righteously and 2) speaks upright-
ly, 3) who despises the gain of op-
pression, 4) waves away a bribe,
instead of grasping it, 5) stops his
ears against listening to infamy,
and 6) shuts his eyes against look-
ing at evil he shall dwell on high
... (Isaiah 33:15, 16).
"Micah condensed them to 3, as
it is written: the Lord told you
what is good and what He re-
quires of you: l)to do justly,
2) love mercy, and 3) walk humbly
with Your G-d. (Micah 6:8).
"Isaiah further condensed them
to 2, as it is written: Thus said the
Lord: 1) Observe what is right and
2) do what is just; for soon My
salvation shall come, and My
deliverance be revealed (Isaiah
56:1).
"Finally, Amos condensed them
to 1: Thus said the Lord to the
house of Israel: Seek Me and you
shall live (Amos 5:4)."
Readers Questions
My Dear Rabbis,
Not too long ago, I came into
possession of a copy of a "Kosher
Ordinance." The first sentence
read: "At the urging of the Rabbis
of Palm Beach County, the Coun-
ty Commissioners passed an Or-
dinance deeming Misrepresenta-
tion of Koshruth a misdemeanor
and liable to punishment."
The body of the ordinance, if en-
forced, would stay the fears of a
great many people who question
the kashruth of some butcher
shops and restaurants located in
Passover
of the Concord
Wed. April 23-Thurs. May 1
The observance of tro- Outstanding leaders
dirion, the magnificence from Government, Press,
of the Sedorim. the beauty the Arts and Literature,
of the Services, the bril- Great films. Music day and
liance of the Holiday Pro- night on weekdays.
Special programs for tots.
rweeners and teens.
gromming.
Cantor Hermon
Molamood, assisted by
the Concord 45-voice
Symphoic Chorale, di-
rected by Morhew Lozor
Rabbi Simon Cohen
and resident Rabbi Eli
Mazur oversee constant
Koshruth supervision and
Sedarim.
and Dan Vogel, to officiate Dietary Low observance,
at the Services and
OONOORD
RESORT HOTELS
*A_, Klomesho Lake NY 12751 \&J
a*
MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
Hotel (914) 794-4000
ToNFim 600-431OAS0
TWX 510-240-6006. Telex 320607
See Your Travel Agent
Reservation Phones Are Open 7 Doys o week.
Palm Beach County.
How long must the public wait
until they have confidence that
the "Kosher Ordinance" is being
enforced?
Sincerely yours,
ARTHUR ROSENTHAL,
Delray Beach
The South County Rabbinic
Association replies:
The Rabbinic Association of
South County and the Palm Beach
Board of Rabbis are keenly aware
Temple Mount
of the difficulty in enforcing the
County Ordinance making
misrepresentation of Kashruth a
misdemeanor.
It is because of their deep con-
cern that they have agreed to
coordinate action and planning for
the enactment of State and/or
County legislation providing for
Kashruth supervision and
enforcement.
In the meantime, the Va'ad
Hakashruth of the Rabbinical
Association is pursuing
agreements for the supervision of
all butcher shops, bakeries and
restaurants in the area which
claim to be kosher. Until such a
time as that can be achieved, the
buying public can help by repor-
ting any observed improper prac-
tices to the Rabbinical Association
for further investigation.
RABBI JOSEPH
M. POLLACK,
Secretary,
Rabbinical Association
of South County
Stirs New Tensions Over Prayer
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Tension between Jews and
Arabs stemming from re-
cent confrontations on the
Temple Mount continue to
escalate over the issue of
Jewish prayer at the site of
two of the holiest shrines of
the Islamic faith.
The matter was discussed
before the Knesset's Interior
Committee last week where there
seemed to be some uncertainty as
to what the law permits. Arabs
were further angered when
Sephardic Chief Rabbi Mordechai
Eliahu proposed that a synagogue
be erected on the Temple Mount.
The Mufti, Sheikh Sa'ad A-Din Al-
Alami, chief of the Moslem Coun-
cil, responded in effect that it
would be over his dead body.
MEANWHILE, a delegation of
six Israeli Arab mayors visited the
Mufti on the Temple Mount to ex-
press solidarity with the Moslem
religious authorities' refusal to
allow Jews to worship there. It
was the first visit to the site by
Israeli Arabs in any official
capacity. Mayor Tarek Abdul Hai
of Tira states that Jewish
demands to worship in the Temple
Mount were motivated by political
not religious reasons.
Sheikh Al-Alami, who is the top
Moslem religious functionary in
Israel, declared, "Just as I will not
pray in your synagogues, I don't
want Jews to come and pray
here."
The latest religious strife was
precipitated when several
members of the Interior Commit-
tee, headed by its chairman, Dov
Shilansky (Likud-Herut), visited
the Temple Mount two weeks ago
to investigate allegations of illegal
construction there. They were
confronted by angry crowds and
had to be extricated by the police.
THE COMMITTEE members
repeated their visit a week later,
and while it passed without inci-
dent, Arab youths stoned police
just outside the Temple Mount
area, and 17 were arrested. On
both visits, the Knesseters were
accompanied by ultra-nationalist
Jewish activists who are not
members of the Interior
Committee.
Their presence, and the fact
that on the first visit the news
media was invited with cameras,
constituted what the Moslem
authorities contended was
deliberate provocation. Police
have maintained tight
surveillance over the area since
then. Last Sunday, they
prevented several Jews from
entering the western gate of the
Temple Mount when it appeared
they intended to stage a
demonstration. Two members of
Rabbi Meir Kahane's extremist
Kach Party were detained.
The Temple Mount is open to all
visitors and is, in fact, a tourist at-
traction. But Israeli law forbids
Jewish prayers at the site of the
Al Aksa Mosque and the Dome of
the Rock (Mosque of Omar) which,
after Mecca and Medina (in Saudi
Arabia) are the holiest Moslem
shrines. Deputy Attorney General
Yoram Bar-Sella told the Interior
Committee, however, that Jewish
prayer on the Temple Mount was
not a criminal offense.
DAVID KRAUS, Inspector
General of Police, explained to the
committee that organized Jewish
prayer was banned by a ruling of
the Supreme Court but an in-
dividual was entitled to pray there
as long as he did not do so
demonstratively.
Aharon Sarig, director general
of the Jerusalem Municipality, in-
formed the committee that con-
trary to allegations, no illegal con-
struction was taking place on the
Temple Mount. He said there was
some reconstruction work which
did not require licenses, but he
knew of no prayer platforms being
erected.
I
Manischewitz
1986 PASSOVER RECIPE GUIDE.
""^'JL. ^1 i -.V-n<"~ r_--~- I j ZZVSS.*

1 iszm,~~*- ^~-
And Receive 400 in Coupons
Our new 1986 Passover Recipe Guide is more beautiful than ever' And we at
Manischewitz hope it will make your holiday celebration more beautiful than ever,
too Our Guide features two menu suggestions plus special recipes for dishes like
Stuffed Cornish Hens. Apple Fritters, and Cheese Cake
You'll also find a 15 coupon for delicious Manischewitz Some Stuff and a 25c
coupon for any Manischewitz Cake Mix. Send for yours now and have a very
happy and Kosher Passover!
COUPONS EXPIRE APRIL 29 1986
Mail coupon to: RECIPE GUIDE. P.O. BOX 484A, JERSEY CITY, N. J. 07303
Please send the Manischewitz Passover Recipe Guide to:
Nam*_________________________________________________________________
Address______________________________________________________________
Crty
C*y____________________________________Stale______________Zip_____________
Ooe Raop. GukJ. Per Rtquast Request will not be processed witnoul zip code PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY
OffcK good ** supply !_-
-------
-.-.-.-------------------I


Page 4 The Jewish Flcndian of South County/Friday, February 7, 1986
Israel, Spain Establish
DATELINE: ISRAEL Formal Diplomatic Relations
More On Righteous Gentiles
By FERN ALLEN
Special to the South County
Jewish Federation
For months German army of-
ficer Major Ruegemer was
unaware that 12 Jews were hiding
in his villa in occupied Poland until
he came home unexpectedly one
afternoon in 1943 and discovered
four of them in his kitchen with
his housekeeper, Irene Gut-
OpDyke.
Gut-OpDyke knew that she and
the Jews she was hiding could be
marked for death, since that same
day she had witnessed a public
hanging of a Polish family who
had harbored Jews. Shaken by
what she saw, the Polish-born
housekeeper returned home, but
forgot to lock the door to the villa
from the inside. Before she knew
it, her employer walked in on
them.
Confronting her in his study,
the elderly German officer who
luckily was not a Nazi reminded
her of the danger she had put
them in. But he allowed the Jews
to stay, and he even took precau-
tions, such as darkening the win-
dows at night to ensure that they
would not be discovered.
Gut-OpDyke, now a U.S. citizen
living in California, was honored
by Yad Vashem in Jerusalem,
where she planted a tree on the
Avenue of Righteous Gentiles and
received the Yad Vashem
medallion.
In addition to the Jews she hid,
Gut-OpDyke also brought food
and clothing to 300 Jews hiding in
a forest near the town of Tarnopol
where she lived.
She recalled those tense
moments when she admitted to
the German officer that she had
been hiding Jews in his house. "1
told him, 'If you have to tell the
authorities, then I have to give up
my life.' He looked at me with a
tear in his eye and said, 'I could
never do that to you.'
"He never wanted to know who
else was hiding in the villa. But
the four women would serve him
tea and even started to call him
'grandpa," said the petite,
blond-haired woman, who was
then in her early twenties.
After the war the major return-
ed to Munich where he learned
that his family practically disown-
ed him because he had befriended
Jews. But the Haller family, who
were among those he hid in his
home, also settled in the city and
looked after him. Soon their
young son was also calling the
German major "grandpa."
Gut-OpDyke, who was also the
foreman of a laundry which
employed hundreds of Jews, had
encouraged them to flee when she
learned that they were to be
rounded up by the Nazis in July
1943. However, 12 were unable to
escape, so Gut-OpDyke hid them
in an airduct in the laundry until
she could bring them to the villa.
"I had to steal the key from the
major when he was drunk, and
then I brought them one by one to
the villa," said the 63-year-old
woman. "The major was just mov-
ing into the villa, and wanted to
paint the house. The painters
were all Nazis, so I had to keep
moving the Jews from one room
to another.
"Many times I would serve din-
ner to Gestapo men, knowing that
underneath them there were Jews
hiding. Today, when I think about
it, I can't believe it myself. I didn't
really do it; the Lord did. He put
me in the right place at the right
moment," she said.
The Jews hid for nine months in
a servants' quarter which had a
connecting hiding place. The ma-
jor was unaware of their presence
for their first four months. It was
during that time that the Nazis,
responding to a rumor that there
were Jews hiding in the house,
came to search the villa.
"I looked through the hole in the
door and when I saw their helmets
I got very scared. I ran to wet my
head so I would have an excuse
when they asked me why I took so
long to answer the door. I was
able to alert the Jews through a
secret alarm system we had devis-
ed, so they weren't detected when
the Nazis searched the house. But
the major was so mad when he
found out they suspected him,"
she said.
When the Russians finally ad-
vanced into the town, Gut-
OpDyke fled with the 12 Jews into
the forest, where she joined the
partisans.
She arrived in New York City in
1949 with the aid of HIAS. Not
knowing any English, she worked
in a garment factorv at a low-
paying job. Today she is a suc-
cessful interior decorator in
southern California where she
lives with her husband William K.
OpDyke.
Gut-OpDyke has lost all contact
with the people she saved until
1981, when she found the Haller
family in Munich. The discovery
culminated seven years of sear-
ching, initiated by Haim Asa, a
rabbi in her neighborhood who
had heard her story and submitted
her file to Yad Vashem. The
Haller family's testimony was
essential in order to substantiate
her story and enable her to
receive proper recognition from
the institution.
Gut-OpDyke is now writing her
memoirs and telling her story to
community groups. "It's my way
of fighting anti-Semitism in
America," she said.
Labor Minister Satisfied
With Talks With U.S. Officials
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israeli Minister for Labor
and Social Affairs, Moshe
Katzav, has expressed
satisfaction with his just-
concluded discussions with
top Administration officials
in Washington regarding
the extension of cooperation
in the fields of labor and
social welfare between
Israel and the United
States.
Katzav, addressing a press con-
ference at the Israeli Consulate
here, said that he met in
Washington with Labor Secretary
William Brock and that the two of
them agreed to sign shortly a
Memorandum of Understanding
on future cooperation between the
two countries in areas of labor and
social affairs.
"We decided to continue the
ongoing joint programs and to
identify and define mutually
The Jewish
RID]
of Sooth County
"^J The Jewish ^^ y
FloridiaN
FREDSMOCHET SUZANNE SMOCME I
Edrtn- me PliMMMW E.ecut.ve Editor
MARTY ERANN
Director otCommuniranon Souin County Jewish federation
Published Weekly Mid September through Mid May Bi Weekly Balance ot year (43 muni
Second Class Po.laqe Paid at Boca Nalon Fla USPS 5S0 ?S0 ISSN 0274 8134
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Fla. 33I0I
BOCA RATON OFFICE 336 Spanish Riv.r Blvd N W Boca Raton. Fla 33431 Phone 36*2737
Mam Office Plant 120 N E 6th St Miami. Fla 33132 Phone 373 4606
Advertiaing Dirertor. Start Leaser. Phone JSft-lt2
Combined Je J: Appeal South County Jewish Federation mc Officer* President
Marianne B>r ek. Vice Presidents Mariorie Bam. Eric W Deck.noer. Larry Charme
Secretary Arr ,id Rosenthal Treasurer Sheldon Jontitt. Executive Director Rabbi Bruce S
Warshal
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7) by membership South
County Jewish Federal- 136 Spanish River Blvd N W Boca Raton Fla 33431 Phone
368-2737
Out of Town Upon Ffctqut,.
Friday. February 7.1986 28 SHE VAT 5746
Volume 8 Number 6
~i jp*
beneficial areas for exchanges of
information and experiences."
Katzav said. He said that Brock
agreed to visit Jerusalem next
June and that the Memorandum
of Understanding between the
two Ministers will probably be
signed then.
KATZAV SAID that the major
topic of discussion with his
American counterpart were
women's affairs, unemployment,
vocational training and problems
of the handicapped, and employ-
ment. He said that they also
discussed a joint seminar on
women's affairs which is schedul-
ed to be held in Israel this spring,
and a joint project between Tem-
ple University in Philadelphia and
Haifa University on the vocational
evaluation of the handicapped.
Katzav also met with Secretary
of Health and Human Services
Otis Bowen and discussed with
him forms of mutual cooperation
in the area of human development
and mutual services.
Noting that two years ago the
two Ministers signed a Memoran-
dum of Understanding, Katzav
said that he and Bowen expressed
mutual satisfaction with the pro-
gress mutual satisfaction with the
progress of a Binational Children
at Risk Task Force, the coordina-
tion of programs for special
visitors to Israel and the U.S., in
volvement of non-governmental
organizations such as the Council
of Jewish Federations in the
facilitation of activities, and the
progress to date in many other
cooperative areas.
IN ANOTHER meeting, with
Assistant Secretary of Health and
Human Services Dorcas Hardy,
Katzav said he discussed the
possible creation of a Joint Task
Force on Aging and the explora-
tion in activities conducted under
the Memorandum of
Understanding.
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres of
Israel and Prime Minister
Felipe Gonzalez of Spain
met for four hours at The
Hague Jan. 19 to seal the
new relationship between
their countries.
Spain and Israel formally an-
nounced the establishment of full
diplomatic ties. Officials of the
two countries signed the
documents of mutual recognition
in The Netherlands capital.
Peres and Gonzalez were invited
here by the Dutch government for
bilateral discussion and other
meetings related to the Middle
East peace process and the Euro-
pean Economic Community.
Holland currently holds the
rotating chairmanship of the
EEC, which Spain joined on Jan.
1. One of the conditions of its ad-
mission to the Common Market
was recognition of Israel.
THIS WAS an historic event
for both Mediterranean nations,
as Peres noted in remarks at Ben
Gurion Airport before his depar-
ture. "This morning wil begin
with the meeting with the Prime
Minister of Spain, Felipe Gon-
zalez," Peres said.
"This really is a very special oc-
casion in the annals of diplomacy
and the history of our people,
since the Golden Age (of Jews in
Spain) which goes back 500 years
when the Jewish people par-
ticipated so much in the culture of
Spain, contributed to it and car-
ried with them the essence of a a
very unique culture," Peres said.
He recalled the expulsion of
Jews from Spain in 1492. "Now,
meeting again as peoples, coun-
tries and leaders is, I believe, for
all of us, a moving experience,"
Peres added.
FOLLOWING HIS talk with
Gonzalez here, the Israeli leader
observed that Spain is in a unique
position to help the Middle East
peace process. "With the benefit
of balanced and friendly ties with
all parties in the conflict, it can
serve as a bridge between us, thus
contributing to the peace process
in the Middle East, he said.
Gonzalez noted that Spain's
recognition of the Jewish State
38 years after its founding was
part of the process of ending his
country's isolation from world af-
fairs that characterized the
regime of the late Gen. Francisco
Franco. "I hope we can contribute
now to the peaceful solution of
Middle East problems," he said.
Peres met in The Hague with
Richard Murphy, U.S. Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
who flew to Europe over the
weekend in what Reagan Ad-
ministration sources described as
a renewed effort to break the im-
passe in the Middle East peace
process. Murphy met with King
Hussein of Jordan in London.
WHEN HE left Israel, Pe
described his trip as "a mission to
reinforce our friendship with
Europe," although his meeting
with Gonzalez was clearly the
highlight. The U.S. Ambassador
to Israel, Thomas Pickering, ac-
companied the Premier on his
flights to Holland.
Peres spent five days in Britain
where he had a 90-minute private
talk scheduled with Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher and a
luncheon with the Prince and
Princess of Wales. In West Ger-
many, he met with Chancellor
Helmut Kohl, President Richard
Von Weizsaecker, Foreign
Minister Hans-Dietrich Genscher,
and Bavarian Prime Minister
Franz-Joseph Strauss.
Peres also visited West Berlin,
the first Israeli Premier ever to do
so, and was expected to pay a
private visit to the site of the
Bergen-Belsen concentration
camp. In each of the three coun-
tries on his itinerary, Peres also
met with leading businessmen in
an effort to boost trade with
Israel.
Spain Signs Despite Worries
About Arab Economic Threats
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The
Spanish government, by
establishing formal
diplomatic ties with Israel,
took what it and apparent-
ly most of the Spanish peo-
ple consider a long overdue
and honorable step at the
risk of Arab economic
sanctions and possible ter-
rorist attacks against
Spanish installations and
citizens abroad and at ho-
me.
Spain sought to forestall
diplomatic and economic reper-
cussions in the Arab world by in-
forming Arab leaders of its inten-
tion to recognize Israel well in ad-
vance. Spanish diplomats stressed
that this will not alter Spain's
traditional backing of the Palesti-
nian cause.
AT THEIR meeting with Israeli
diplomats at The Hague to sign
the documents of mutual recogni-
tion, the Spaniards presented the
Israelis with a paper calling for in-
ternational recognition of Palesti-
nian rights.
Meanwhile, stringent security
precautions have been in place
since early last week at all
Spanish Embassies and
diplomatic missions abroad. These
were especially evident at Spanish
l<-rations in Western Europe and
the Middle East. On the eve of
recognition, hundreds of members
of Spain's anti-terrorist squad, the
crack GEO, were dispatched to
European and Middle East
capitals.
Despite these precautions, three
Spanish officials, one a security
guard, were kidnapped in Beirut.
They are being held by a Shiite
Moslem militia, reportedly as
hostages for release of several
Lebanese gunmen sentenced to
prison terms in Spain last year. It
was not clear whether the kidnap-
pings were connected with
Spain's recognition of Israel or
merely coincidental.
DESPITE THREATS of ter-
rorist attack and economic retalia-
tion. Spanish public opinion seems
nearly unanimously in favor of
Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez's
initiative to recognize Israel. Vir-
tually all of the major dailies have
congratulated him for taking the
step, expressing regret only that
it was not taken much sooner.
Democratic government was
restored in Spain in 1974 for the
first time in 35 years, following
the death of Gen. Francisco Fran-
co. The Spanish people have since
been searching for their cultural
and historic roots. In the course of
that search, they have welcomed
the very notion of Sephardism,
the concept of a Spanish Jewry,
removed by the expulsion 500
years ago.
Dozens of books on the role
Continued on Page 5-


The Paul Greenberg Column
Friday, Febniary 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
A Visit From the Bishop
If Homer nodded, surely
Desmond Tutu can blunder.
The Anglican bishop of
Johannesburg has been
visiting the United States,
where he is most welcome.
Bishop Tutu may be South
African's best hope for a
peaceful resolution of its im-
mense problems. Yet the
other day, he made some
comments that were insen-
sitive, bullying, and one
would like to think
atypical. At the time, he was
holding a news conference
at the UN. That might ex-
plain his lapse. The UN's at-
mosphere may be
infectious .
What Bishop Tutu said was that
the Reagan Administration has
been 'very coy about taking action
against South Africa,' but impos-
ed sanctins on Libya 'at the drop
of a hat.' That was a particularly
unfortunate location, since those
were bodies, not hats, that drop-
ped on the floor of the Rome and
Vienna airports when terrorists
struck in an action that Libya at
first hailed. The double-massacre
proved the final straw for this Ad-
ministration, which long has
known of Libya's support for such
deeds.
Accusing the Administration of
following a double standard, the
bishop complained: 'When a few
white people are killled the world
talks about so-called terrorism.'.
There is a callousness in those
words that might be all the clearer
if one simply substituted the word
'black' for 'white' in that
sentence, as in: 'When a few black
people are killed, the world talks
about so-called terrorism.'
What would Desmond Tutu
think of anyone who could commit
such a sentence at a press con-
ference? Even if a total of 19 dead
is only a few by the bishop's
reckoning, there were those who
loved them. And there are some
who would argue with John Donne
that even the death of one
diminishes all. He who destroys
one life, an ancient sage warned,
destroys a whole world.
Butsurely it is not necessary to
lecture Desmond Tutu on the
sanctity of life; he has pleasded
for more than one life, and even
now pleads for a life of dignity on
behalf of a whole people. If the
bishop were not so fluent in
English it would be tempting to
attribute his words to a language
problem. But he isnot only fluent
in the language but eloquent.
What then is oone to make of his
demoting this act of terrorism to
"so-called" terrorism? That
doesn't sound like the Bishop Tutu
who won, and earned, a Nobel
Peace Prize.
Perhaps if the bishop's words
were put incontext, his meaning
might be clearer. Unfortunately,
it is: "When a few white people
are killed, the world talks about
so-called terrorism. But it doesn't
talk! about thousands dead for the
most part during peaceful
demonstrations (in South Africa).
Why is it not terrorism when four-
year-old children are killed by rub-
ber bullets? Why is it not ter-
rorism when people are detained
and have their brains bashed out
in jail?" But of course it is. Just as
it is in the Soviet Union when
peaceful dissenters are dispatched
to labor camps, closed cities, or
"psychiatric" hospitals. It is a dif-
ferent kind of terrorism state
terrorism, or what Alexander
Solthenitsyn called Internal
Violence. But would Bishop Tutu
recommend that the world stop
trading the Soviets?
There are different kinds of ter-
Liquidation Organization after
some murderous outrage against
innocent civilians, an armed strike
may be appropriate. Where ter-
rorist bases cannot be clearly
identified, as in Libya after the
outrages at Rome and Vienna,
retaliation may harm mainly the
innocent just as a trade em-
bargo against South Africa might
hurt most those it is designed to
help.
paring oppressions, the object be-
ing to prove that My Suffering Is
Greater Than Yours. As in "a few
white people" killed at Rome and
Vienna versus "thousands dead"
in South Africa's demonstrations.
Whatever the object of such
rhetoric, the usual result is to
divide the victims against each
other and spare the terrorists, of-
ficial and unofficial.
Bishop Tutu reduces all the
reasons for this country's boycot-
ting Libya but not South Africa to
one: Racism. Of the reason for
such policy, he says only: "I think
it is racist." That is probably the
simplest explanation, and also the
most incorrect and most destruc-
tive; it transforms a difference of
opinion and judgement into one
more name-calling contest. In
short, it is about as fair as if a
detractor of Desmond Tutu's were
to explain that the reason the
bishop hasn't called for a boycott
of the Soviet Union is simple, too:
He is a Communist.
The only thing necessary for the
triumph of evil in the world, Ed-
mund Burke once warned, is that
good men do nothing. If he had
been less eloquent, that great
statesman might have put it this
way: All that is necessary for the
triumph of evil is that men of good
will be too occupied doubting one
another's motives to pursue what
should be a common struggle,,
Copyright, 1986,
Freelance Syndicate
Paul Greenberg
ronsm
strike
and different ways to
back, some more ap-
propriate than others. An
American boycott of the Soviet
Union (which has been tried
before) might prove no more ef-
fective than one against South
Africa. When terrorist head-
quarters can be clearly identified,
as in the case of the Palestinian
State Dep't.
Says It Has Issued No Report
Not To Travel to Israel
A boycott of South Africa might
even relieve the pressure on those
most responsible for racial oppres-
sion there. For what would be the
result if all those American com-
panies and their executives in
South Africa folded their opera-
tions and stole away, instead of
demanding more just policies? An
American boycott might even
solidify white opinioni in that
country behind apartheid's WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department said
interference ^^ "outside that it is not warning Americans not to travel to Israel.
p. __. "No travel advisory for Israel has been issued as a result of
mUH^SSL; the recent mcidente and no such travel advisory is being
stead of weighting them, he plays contemplated, Department spokesman Bernard Kalb said,
the old and pointless game of corn-
FBI director William Webster recently urged
Americans to be careful about travelling in the Middle East
because of a recent rash of terrorist incidents. Kalb said
that Webster was probably urging that everybody keep in
mind the possibilities of danger in the area.
dMu'M
IMITY
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION
Seminar On 'Women
and Money' Planned
By Foundation
Spain Signs Despite Worries
The first annual seminar for
women, "Women and Money,"
will be held in the Key Largo
Room of the Deerfteld Beach
Hilton Hotel on Monday, Feb. 24,
from 9 to 11:30 a.m.
The seminar, co-sponsored by
the Jewish Community Founda-
tion and the Women's Division of
the South County Jewish Federa-
tion, is chaired by Edith A.
Clayman.
Announcing the seminar,
Phyllis Squires, Chairwoman of
the Federation Women's Division
said: "The role of women in finan-
cial management is rapidly in-
creasing. Focusing on this grow-
ing role, the Women's Division is
pleased to co-sponsor our first an-
nual financial management
seminar for women."
Mary Lehman, vice president,
Department Manager for Finan-
cial Counseling, United States
Trust Company of New York, will
lead the seminar. The subject is
"What Every Woman Wants to
Know About Money."
Mrs. Lehman is a graduate of
the University of Pennsylvania
and received her law degree from
Columbia University School of
Law. Mrs. Lehman practiced law,
specializing in estate planning and
trust administration, with two
Wall Street law firms, before join-
ing U.S. Trust. She is a director of
the Estate Planning Council of
New York City, member of the
Bar Associations of the City of
New York, the State of New
Jersey, State of New York and the
American Bar Association. Mrs.
Lehman serves on the Legal and
Tax Panel of the Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies of New
York.
The seminar will cover ques-
tions such as:
What are the advantages and
disadvantages of jointly held
property?
Continued from Page 4
played by Sephardic Jews in
Spanish history are published
every month. A regular monthly
television program on the State-
owned network is devoted to the
Jewish contribution to Spain.
Popular singers are performing
songs based on Sephardic themes.
THE RECOGNITION of Israel
is viewed by many Spanish
historians as closing the breach
between Spain and Jews that
opened in 1942. A special service
celebrating the new relationship
between Spain and Israel was held
at Madrid's modern synagogue.
Jewish congregants, most of them
relative newcomers from North
Africa, greeted each other with
cheerful Mazel Tovs.
Members of Jewish youth
organizations filled Madrid's com-
munity center. They sang the
Israeli national anthem, Hatikva.
There are believed to be about
15,000 Jews in Spain. The largest
communities are in Madrid and
Barcelona. At the time of the ex-
pulsion, an estimated quarter-
million Jews lived in Spain, among
them writers, jurists, rabbis, doc-
tors and philosophers.
Mary Lehman
If I remarry, shall I enter into
an antenuptial agreement; if so,
what provisions shall it contain?
What are the latest
developments relative to the
Social Security Act?
Is it beneficial to create a trust
during my life?
Can I give money to charity
and still retain an income during
my lifetime?
The Seminar Committee
members are:
Marjorie Baer, Anne Brenner,
Jeanne' Clayman, Zel Horelick,
Mildred Levine, Anne Paskin,
Erline Rabin, Rose Rifkin,
Eleanore Rukin, Jeanne Sankin,
Berenice Schankerman, Onalee
Schwartz, Gladys Weinshank.
Breakfast at 9 a.m. will precede
the session, which will close with a
question-and-answer period.
There is a $5 charge for the
seminar, which includes
breakfast.
Reservations are limited on a
first-come basis, and can be made
by sending a check for $5 to the
South County Jewish Federation,
336 N.W. Spanish River Blvd.
(Attn: Women and Money.)
Please call Mr. Kirshner or Mr.
Jaffe at 368-2737 for additional
information.
_SHIP_
YOUR CAR
HOME
U\tf\J-
r
i
i
L.
AUTOLOG, the leading transporter of privately-
owned automobiles is the easiest way to ship your
car home to most Northeastern or Midwestern cit-
ies. Drop off your car at any Florida Autolog termi-
nal and our Free Shuttle Service will bring you to
your plane. Substantial discounts off your air fares
when you use Autotog. lb get ail the facts, call our
toll-free number, or send coupon for our Fare
Schedule and Brochure
Call toll free 1 (800) 526-6078
AUTOLOG CORP. 56 Maritime St.. Port Newark, NJ 07114
Phase send me an Autolog Fare Schedule A Brochure
Name
Address
City___
Phone(.
Origin_
State
2p
Destination.
I
I
I



Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 7, 1986
ChaiJjghts
Jewish Community Day School
Living The Theme
The Fifth and Sixth Grade
classes of Charles Augustus and
Earl Everett celebrated this
year's Community Theme, "One
Dream, One People, One
Destiny," by creating an Interna-
tional Food Fest of ethnic, kosher
delights.
Each student dressed in tradi-
tional garb and prepared a
popular dish from a selected na-
tion. Students were encouraged to
look to their own ancestry when
choosing a country. Tal Valenzula
chose his family's birth-place (as
did many others) Mexico.
Dressed as an ethnic Mexican, he
shared his dish of tortillas with
melted cheese, which he cooked
himself. "Jalapeno peppers usual-
ly cover the top." He told me,
"but the class voted against
them." Meridith Gould dressed
her Cabbage Patch kid to match
her own Russian custom and
brought in blintzes. Natalie
Sedaghati, from Persian ancestry,
made a tray of baklava. Jeanne
Taines, whose mother is Israeli,
shared fcUafel with the class.
Japan, Italy, Hungary, France,
China, and Spain were also
represented.
The International Food Fest
gave the students more than just
an opportunity to savor foods
from foreign lands. It encouraged
discussion about Jews around the
world and how they are able to
participate in their nations'
culture still retaining their
Jewish heritage and identity. The
students communicated about
where their families had come
from and how they arrived in the
United States. The Fifth and
Sixth Grade, through this learning
experience, found new enlighten-
ment in this year's Community
theme.
Tu Bi'Shvat
The Day School celebrated Tu
Bi'Shvat through the study of the
origin of the holiday and the ac-
tual planting of trees.
Preschoolers participated with
their teachers in planting
beautiful flowers.
Principal Burt Lowlicht planted
a tree at each campus, as the
students sang Hebrew songs
related to the holiday. Parties
were planned to celebrate the holi-
day. Mrs. Leah Temor's First
Grade class brought in the seven
traditional Israeli species: figs,
olives, dates, grapes,
pomegranates, barley and wheat.
Jewel Scheller's Kindergarten
class created a paper Tu Bi'Shvat
"forest."
The Second, Third and Fourth
grades made a Tu Bi'Shvat 'seder'
with the traditional prayers and
songs.
Tu Bi'Shvat has become one of
the children's favorite holidays.
Air Bus
Intercepted
TEL AVTV (JTA) A
Kuwaiti Airbus 310 passenger air-
craft carrying about 110
pa '.gers and crew was in-
ters pted and escorted out of
Israeli airspace by military jets
after it strayed nearly two miles
into Israeli airspace over the
Golan Heights, a military official
reported here.
The Kuwaiti aircraft was on a
flight from Damascus to Kuwait.
By ROBIN BRALOW
Day School Event
Continued from Page 1
bitious to be undertaken by any
Jewish community in the country,
and the school will play a major
role in it.
"Just the fact that a school of
that size is in the planning is an
exciting feature. The details of the
plans and explanation of the
facilities to be built will be even
more interesting parents owe it
to themselves and their children
to learn more about it," said Prin-
cipal Lowlicht.
St
r
mtnvm -
S*
Sc
-This Simmer,
UtADElhE HFxr For Oi ir Warmth
Before the Honda heal wilts you this summer,
make plans to head North roc the Kalbn ten There, you II
find tool surroundings and warm receptions everywhere
you turn.
And if you plan to make your summer reterva-
lions now you can plan 10 lake advantage of our special
Extended Sta; Kates Ai thai rate, you'll enjoy the
Fallsview activities even more
There's indoor and outdoor tennis and s miming, a Kolxri Trent
Jones golfcourse, racquethall. hoating and so much more. There seven
^ a two meals a clay plan to let you pack in more excitement than cur
So this summer, come to where the atmosphere is as in\ icing as che
weather The Fallsview
Through costumes and ethnic food, students "live" the Communi-
ty Theme at the Day School.
CALL lOll FREE SIM). > 1-0152

Not since the matzo ball has
something so tiny made it to big.
Tu BiShvat at the Beit Yeladim.
Its Tetley s tiny little tea leaves. They've been making it bw in
Jewish homes for years. Tetley knows that just as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the mosl flavorful, the same thing is
true for tea leaves So for rich, refreshing flavor, take time out
for Tetley tea Because tiny is tastier!
K Certified Kosher
iw mm fr TETLEY. TEA
"Tiny is rn.rirr -
*


-----
Friday, February 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Federation/UJA 1986 Campaign Update
v '
Z)r. Nathan Hoffeld (2nd from right) awards first place to the
team (left to right) Howard Allen. Sidney Lipsch and Dr. Stuart
Sylvan.
Dr. Nathan Hoffeld gives award to Bernard Goldman for closest
to the pin. (Photo: Dave Siegel).
Boca West Golf Event
Better Than a Hole In One
The men of Boca West 72 of
them recently took part in a
Golf Tournament held on behalf of
the South County Jewish
Federation.
Dr. Nathan Hoffeld, chairman
of the event, said he was happy
with the results: "This was a good
beginning for what I hope will
become a major annual event in
Boca West."
Prizes were awarded to the first
four teams in the shotgun tourna-
ment with the best ball of four.
The winning team consisted of
Howard Allen (Peppertree
Village), Sidney Lipsch
(Lakewood), and Dr. Stuart
Sylvan (Bridgewood). In addition,
a $100 gift certificate from Nancy
Kaye Interiors of Boca Raton was
won by Bernard Goldman (Laurel
Oaks) for "closest to the pin."
Dr. Hoffeld was full of praise for
his co-chairman, Daniel Freed
(Cedarwood), and to the commit-
tee members: Nathan Schneider,
Henry Rothschild, Harold Horns-
tein. David Flagel, Bob Schumer,
Harold Lichtenberg, Arthur Roth,
Max Gold and Herb London.
A buffet luncheon followed the
tournament, at which Daniel
Freed spoke of the need for
volunteers to work on the 1986
Federation/UJA Campaign, and
signed up 15 volunteers. Herb
London discussed local needs and
plans for a Local Mission to be ar-
ranged for residents of Boca
West. The Grand Ball was also
discussed, and as a result of the
tournament Boca West has filled
four pre-registered tables for the
Grand Ball.
YLD Kicks-Off Drive
At At Racy Program
Over 50 members of the Young
Leadership Division took part last
month in the first "fund-raiser"
for that group for the 1986
Federation/UJA Campaign, at the
Pompano Race Track.
During the dinner, Rabbi Bruce
Warahal. the Federation's ex-
ecutive director, gave an in-
teresting talk on Judaism and its
attitude toward the "new sexual
morality." He pointed out that
unlike many other belief systems,
Judaism has always promoted and
condoned a healthy attitude
toward sex; that it does not look
upon sex merely as a means of
procreation, but also as a part of a
healthy relationship between
mature adults.
' The dinner and discussion was
followed by the evening's racing
program. During the dinner, some
$11,000 was pledged to the Cam-
paign a very good beginning for
the newly formed division, accor-
ding to its chairman, Stanley
Fishbein.
Boca Greens Is Headed
For Great Campaign Year
Sometimes a casual, impromptu
'interview' provides a greater in-
sight than a formal, planned one.
This was the case when William
Obletz, who assumed the chair-
manship of Boca Greens, stopped
by the Federation office recently.
Obletz, who relocated to Florida
with his wife Diana from Long
Island, has also lived in Buffalo,
New York. In both areas he had
been moderately active in com-
munity life UJA. HIAS, the Na-
tional Council of Christians and
Jews, the Jewish Community
('enter. However, he points out,
when they retired to Florida and
went into the "activity-role" so
usual for most retirees, his life did
not have the zest it had when he
was in business.
It took getting involved in the
Federation and the campaign to
fill this void, and to give him a
sense of fulfilling a tremendous
responsibility to the Jewish Peo-
ple locally and in Israel accor-
ding to Obletz. And he enjoys
working with the dedicated people
in Boca Greens. "Once made
aware of the needs and the pro-
gress being made, they have been
most helpful in working to make
the campaign a great success,"
says Obletz.
With pleasure, Obletz describes
William Obletz
the progress of the campaign in
his area. At the first planning
meeting, several weeks ago, 32
people took part, and formed
several committees: Cecil
Henschel became co-chairman;
Syd Dankman and Phyllis Roths-
tein took charge of the Dinner-
Dance committee; Al Myers and
Stan Siegel head the Special
Events committee; Gabe Samd-
peril the Super Sunday efforts;
Peter and Evelyn Savino
Solicitation; and Jerry Rothstein,
Major Gifts.
Dora Roth a very special
Israeli woman who survived the
Holocaust under incredible condi-
tions as a young girl and became
an outstanding personality in
Israel was the guest speaker at
the meeting. Providing her au-
dience with an update report on
the Middle East situation and the
effects on Israel from the recent
terrorist activities, Mrs. Roth in-
spired everyone to redouble their
efforts over last year.
Several members of the Boca
Greens Men's Division took part
in a Mini-Mission that same week,
and were impressed by what they
saw being developed in this com-
munity; they also gained a far bet-
ter understanding of what is
meant by "local needs."
Boca Greens is planning, as in
previous years, to hold a dinner-
dance as a climax to the campaign
activities. In addition, this year,
they will hold an invitational Golf
Tournament at the Boca Greens
Country Club on Thursday, March
20 (March 21 is the rain date). The
tournament will take place after a
luncheon is served, and will be
followed by cocktails and hors
d'oeuvres.
Shirley Green Stays On
To Chair Boca Lago Women
Both within the Federation's
Women's Division, and among the
Federation/UJA Campaign
workers and staff in general, Boca
Lago occupies a special place of
honor for the dedication and con-
sistent growth of its volunteers
and campaign efforts.
It, therefore, is a mark of
distinction when a capable person
such as Shirley Green returns to
chair the Women's Division cam-
paign in Boca Lago. It is both a
sign of commitment on her part,
as well as a vote of confidence by
her committee in this active area.
Shirley Green came to Florida
from Cleveland, Ohio less than
three years ago but as one who
was active in that respected
Jewish community, she plunged
Shirley Green
into active community life in
South County right away.
She served as chairwoman of
Israel Bonds Women Division in
Cleveland, was a member of the
Federation's board, co-chaired a
suburban residential section for
United Way, chaired the Women's
Division for UJA and Hadassah's
Big Gifts and Tourism commit-
tees. She was awarded the
Women of Valor Award from
Israel Bonds and a medallion
from the Federation in Cleveland.
The women's campaign in Boca
Lago, according to Mrs. Green,
will climax with a gala luncheon to
be held at the Park Plaza Hotel in
Boca, on Monday, Feb. 24. More
details will follow.
Gush Thrilled As Apt's. Open for Jews of Hebron
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Gush Emunim chalked
up a victory with serious
political implications when
13 apartments, renovated
for Jewish occupancy, were
consecrated at a religious
ceremony in the heart of
Hebron.
Deputy Premier and Housing
Minister David Levy (Likud-
Herut) said at the ceremonies that
additional construction for Jews
will begin immediately in a nearby
courtyard. The Housing Ministry
invested about $1 million this year
for construction of Jewish flats in
Hebron.
DEFENSE MINISTER Yit-
zhak Rabin (Labor) told the
Knesset Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee that he is
firmly opposed to Jewish settle-
ment in Hebron but is forced to
abide by the terms of the coalition
agreement under which the Labor
Party and Likud formed their uni-
ty government last year.
The coalition agreement does
not extend to Tel Rumeida and
other parts of Hebron where the
Gush Emunim have repeatedly
tried to put up Jewish
settlements.
The flats on which Sephardic
Chief Rabbi Mordechai Eliahu af-
fixed mezuzahs are in 19th Cen-
tury buildings known as the Bet
Hadassah and Bet Hasson com-
plexes. They remained Jewish
property afer the Jewish popula-
tion fled Hebron during the 1929
Arab uprising. The Gush Emunim
have long claimed the right of
Jews to resettle there.
IN 1979, a group of women and
children, headed by Miriam Lev-
inger, wife of Gush Emunim
leader Rabbi Moshe Levinger,
moved into the Bet Hadassah bu-
ilding.
FEDERATION SHABBAT Change of date: Please
note that the Federation Sabbath at the BOCA RATON
SYNAGOGUE has been changed from February 15 to
Shabbat, March 1, at 9:30 am.
ALSO, note that the same program at Congregation AN-
SHEI EMUNAH will take place on Sunday February 9
(this Sunday) at 9:30 a.m.
MAKE THE COMMUNITY THEME YOUR THEME;
BE PART OF THE MOVE- INTO THE 21st CENTURY
(I


Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday,^February 7, 1986
From Dedication of the New Richard and Carole Siemens
Continued from Page 1
including that of George
McGovern, and the late Howard
Samuels of New York.
As he accepted the chairman-
ship of the capital fund campaign,
Levine said he was flattered that
Honoring Senator
Hawkins. ..
such a great task was entrusted to
him. "I have accepted this
challenge because I feel it will be a
rewarding one, considering the
many dedicated people we have in
this community with whom it
will be a pleasure to work. I feel
there are many who understand
the great opportunity we have, to
energize the community with this
project, to bring together the
various elements and divisions in-
to one complex, allowing to work
and program in dimensions we
have not known before."
The campaign, and the realiza-
tion of the dream of one great
home for the community, will
strengthen it, make it more
dynamic, help create a more
vibrant and meaningful Jewish
community life for those now liv-
ing here, for those who will be ar-
riving, and for the coming genera-
tion, Levine said.
Mrs. Bobick added: "This is, in
great part, what we mean by
reaching boldly into the 21st Cen-
Jewish Campus'One Home'
tury. It is also what is meant by
the word Chalutzim pioneers.
Our community will be joining
hands with one another, and with
future generations, in this
pioneering effort, in the process
which will help bring out the best
of talent and potential, experience
and resources which members of
this community and friends who
spend a portion of their year with
us have.
By the time the plans for the
new campus are realized, she said,
this community will have jumped
into place as the sixth largest of
all Jewish communities in the
country. "We would be remiss if
we did not exercise foresight, if
we did not do the most to bring
the dream into reality."
All of the festive day's honorees: (left, to right)
Richard and Carole Siemens, Congressman
Dan Mica, Senator Paula Hawkins, Naomi
and Roy Flack.

>

Standing left to right: Rabbi Bruce S. War-
shal, executive director. South County Jewish
Federation; Naomi Flack; Roy Flack; Con-
gressman Dan Mica; Senator Paula Hawkins
Richard Siemens; Carole Siemens; and Can-
tor Martin Rosen singing the Hatikvah.
. .. and Congressman Mica.
?, *
I**
(Left to right/. Buddy Imber, vice-president of the Levis JCC;
Gladys Weinshank, chairwoman of the Jewish Family and
Children's Service; and Arnold Rosenthal, chairman of the
Jewish Community Day School the three leaders of the three
major divisions which will enjoy new facilities at the Richard
and Carole Siemens Jeunsh Campus. (Mrs. Betty Stone, president
of the Levis JCC, was out of town on the day of the dedication.)
The children of the Day School, calling on the
audience to join in the refrain, sang a
reminder of the plight of Soviet Jews, of whom
they (as did Congressman Mica) adopted a
family. r
Uatjorie Boer Jim was the founding president of
th, South .inty Jewish Federation, a mere seven years ago .
laZIi,^krnh',Ui frrm Wagogues joined
together in harmony (m more than one sense)
to blow the shfnr in honor ofth* occasion.


Friday, February 7, 1986/The JewiBh Floridian of South County Page 9
Chef For All Seasons
By ANITA SHALLEY
Aroma plays an important part
in the success of a meal. A certain
sauce used on delicacies in French
cooking is particularly appealing
on mushroom dishes .
The following appetizer is
kosher and is marvelous with
french bread for dunking.
MUSHROOMS WITH
GARLIC BUTTER SAUCE
1 8 dozen medium mushrooms,
cleaned, stems removed.
Vi cup (one and half sticks)
butter, melted
One cup chopped parsley
One medium head of garlic (9 or
10
cloves) separated and peeled
V medium onion, cut into pieces
4 Tsps. white wine
2 Tsps. fresh lemon juice
1 Tsp. nutmeg
Salt and pepper to taste
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Set mushroom caps in a shallow
baking dish.
Place remaining ingredients in
blender or food processor and
blend at high speed 10 seconds.
Spoon sauce into mushroom caps.
Bake until butter sauce begins to
bubble, about 7 minutes. Place
under broiler one minute, until
sauce turns golden brown.
-voices
V *J tf-

THE BEST WAT TO SEE ISRAEL
IS NOT AVAILABLE
TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC.
It is only available to members of the American Jewish Congress.
Since we inaugurated our International Travel Program in 1958, some
350,000 members have participated in our tours to Israel, as well as to
40 countries on six continents. Tours which have earned the reputation
of being, quite simply, the best there are.
What is the American Jewish Congress?
We are a Jewish human rights and legal action organization, founded
nearly 70 years ago. Our original aims were CO strive for the creation of a
Jewish homeland in Palestine; to fight all forms of inequality, discrimina-
tion and anti-Semitism; to strengthen ties between Jews of America and
Jews throughout the rest of the world.
That was 70 years ago. What about now?
Our goals are the same,"but the issues have changed. Our support
of Israel is unqualified and fundamental. We have been, and remain, an
integral pan of the Mid-East peace process. At home, we are not afraid
to denounce the bigotry of a Louis Farrakhan or strive to eliminate, in
the courts and out, all forms of racism, bigotry, discrimination and anti-
Semitism.
What does this have to do with travel?
In our 40th anniversary year we determined that a concrete demon-
stration of our concern for, and interest in, world Jewry would be to give
our membership the opportunity of traveling to Israel and many other
countries with Jewish communities. Since then, we have become the
world's largest Jewish travel program.
What is so special about traveling with AJCongress?
Our tours are renowned for excellence, sophistication, innovation,
style and unrivaled value. Our members travel together, never with com-
mercial tour groups. Everywhere we go, we arrange unusual and special
events, briefings on local Jewish life, meetings with Jewish communities
plus visits to each country's most popular sites and attractions.
1
Come to a TVavel Presentation!
(Movie, refreshments, travel information)
Boca Raton... February 5 @ 3 PM, Holiday Inn (Glades Ave.
Call 305-763-8177 to R.S.V.P.
Can anyone book a tour?
No. Only American Jewish Congress members may participate in
our International Travel Program. If you are not already a member, you
should remit membership dues along with your tour deposit. By joining
the American Jewish Congress you are playing a major role in the causes
we pursue. You will also receive a subscription to our absorbing 'Congress
Monthly' magazine.
Call us for details, or complete the attached
coupon. We look forward to your joining the
world of the American Jewish Congress.
A World of Difference.
For details, mail the attached coupon
or call us:
Nationwide Toll-free 1-800-221-4694,
New York 212-879-4588,
Long Island S16-7 52-1186,
Westchestej/Rockland 914-328-0018.
Come to Israel. Come stay with friends.
AJCongreiWH^rnlnoiuil 1 ravel Program
15 East 84th Street, New York, N.Y. 10028
? I'd like to join the American Jewish Congress.
I enclose membership dues:
D $35 Individual D $50 Husbands Wife ? $100 Century Club
JJ Please send me vour free 144-pae Travel Guide and membership tafarawdUB
---------r-|---------------------'------------------------------------
AJJr.
u
.!*af.
Dp.
. Telrphont-


PagelO The Jewish Floridian of South Coupty/Friday, February 7. 1986
Israel Bonds
Advisory
Local TAU Seminar
Anshei Emuna Honors Morris Landau
At a recent Israel Bond
breakfast, Cong. Anshei Emuna
honored Morris Landau for his
dedication to Israel and for being
a founder of the synagogue.
Landau spoke of the recent trip
taken with his family, of the pro-
gress that has occured in com-
merce, highways, and medical
technology, compared to his visit
in 1973. Friends wept as Landau
spoke of his love for Israel and for
his wife, Goldie, who passed away
last year.
Harry Cope chaired the suc-
cessful event with support from
ttabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks: Eugene
.ichtman, president of the con-
legation; Commander Murray
lymowitz of the Jewish War
Veterans; Helen Lasky, Breakfast
'ommittee Chair; Lucille Cohen,
'ack Feilich, Irving Fersko, Earle
Frimere, Bernie Herskowitz,
Nora Kalish, Sam Kurr, Ann
Lakoff, Ernest Levy, Abe Lipp-
nan, and Harry Silver.
Margit Rubnitz spoke of her im-
migration to the United States
from Czechoslovakia. She com-
mented on what might have been
possible if Israel had been born
before World War II "maybe
the Holocaust would never have
happened ..."
In response to this poignant
message, the audience reacted
with much praise for Morris Lan-
dau and tremendous financial sup-
port for Israel.
Continued from Page 1
technology on warfare.
While some people in the peace
movement tend to think of Dr.
Teller strictly in terms of his con-
tribution to nuclear warfare, his
broad expertise, in fact, has con-
tributed a great deal in the areas
of quantum mechanics and energy
research, and he has strong
arguments to make on the
Strategic Defense Initiative and
the relationship between defense,
technology, and foreign policy.
His talk should be of particular in-
terest at the Seminar Associates,
since he will undoubtedly relate
these issues to the Middle East
and Israel in particular, including,
perhaps, discussion of the role
Israel might play in future U.S.
defense developments.
For further information on the
Seminar Associates and the lec-
ture by Dr. Teller, please call
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University at 392-9186.
Technicians Show Drone Action
Left to right: Jewish War Veterans' Commander Murray
Hymowit, Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks, Morris Landau, Harry
' 'ope, of Congregation Anshei Emuna.
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
technicians spent two weeks in an
isolated desert area
demonstrating to American ex-
perts the capabilities of the Israel-
made drone pilotless light air-
craft used for reconnaissance pur-
poses. Those demonstrations
resulted in a major contract from
the U.S. Navy, according to an ar-
ticle in Bamahane, the Israel
Defense Force monthly magazine.
The Israel-made drone fulfilled
the American requirements with
respect to maximum cruising
range and altitude, ability to spot
hidden targets, take-off and lan-
ding on short (70-meter) runways,
and maintenance needs.
99
Rochelk Levy presents The Congregational Award, Prayer of
Peace to Anshei Emuna's President, Eugene Lichtman, in
gratitude for the congregation's support of the Israel Bond
program.
AUDITIONS
for "Diary of Anne Frank
to be presented May 5,1984
Cast Needed:
3 Teens One Male, 2 Female
5 Adults 3 Male, 2 Female
Auditions to be held at the Levis J.C.C. on:
Thursday, Feb. 20 7:00 p.m.
Monday, Feb. 24 7:00 p.m.
Boca Teeca Plans 2nd
Annual Golf Outing
With great enthusiasm, Sidney
Antman and Bernard Schachman
have begun to coordinate the Se-
cond Annual Boca Teeca Golf
Outing, on behalf of Israel Bonds.
"Last year, deciding to"tAke
advantage of the golf course com-
munity in which we live, a very
successful tournament proved a
celebration of efforts on behalf of
Israel," said Schachman.
This year, March 6 (rain date
March 13) will be the date of
another exciting program. "This
event needs the efforts of both
men and women." said Antman.
'Because so much planning is in-
volved, many people are called
lpon to serve on the committee
.. golfers or not!"
Besides the fun had last year,
Boca Teeca residents also raised
over $100,000 in capital to invest
in Israel. The committee will ac-
tively pursue the entire communi-
ty to participate in "golf-and-
gelt."
"Bonds are becoming more
competitive and part of our job is
to educate the people," said
Schachman.
The cost of golf and lunch will be
$40 and covers cart, fees, prizes
and relaxation. For those enjoying
just lunch, $20 couvert will be
charged.
Invitations will be in the mail
soon, but reservations for the
limited 140 spaces will be taken
anytime at the Bond Office.
368-9221. Watch for details.
Are You Single?
Do You Play Golf?
456-2828
ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE DAY
SAVE THE DATE!!
Sunday, May 18
11:00 a.m. -3:00 p.m.
at the Baer Jewish Campus
Fun/Food/Music/Dance
For All Ages!!
... and much, much more!
VOLUNTEERS PI.... call
NEEDED! Marianne 395-5546
The South County Jewish Youth Council
presents a
COMMUNITY-WIDE TEEN DANCE

Remember!,
Date} Saturday February 15, 1986
Time! 8:30pm to mldrjight
Cost : $4.00
Qradesl 9th thru 121
SPONSORED BY
B.B.Y.O..B.I.F.T.Y..B.O.F.T.Y..J.C.C..U.S.Y.



In Israel Colleges ...
... And Local Friends
Friday, February 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
..-.:- TEL AVIV U.
New Kit Warns Of Tooth Cavities
ECHNION
Computer Model of Heart To Aid In Diagnosis
A team of medical researchers
. the Technion-Israel Institute of
technology is developing a three-
limensional computerized model
If the human heart which will aid
|octors in the diagnosis and treat-
nent of heart disease. The com-
puter model can be programmed
lo reproduce different heart
bathologies in an accelerated time
frame, giving doctors better in-
bight into the dynamics of the
healthy and unhealthy heart.
For years, engineers have used
computers to build electronic fac-
similes of bridges and skyscrapes
before committing their design to
[concrete and steel. Once
translated into a computer image,
the proposed structure could then
be exposed to a variety of com-
puterized test conditions such as
I windstorms, earthquakes, and ex-
treme variations of temperature.
Similarly, the Technion
research group of physicians
engineers, architects and com-
puter specialists are constructing
a computerized model of the
human heart based on the
lechanical, electrical and
chemical characteristics of the
heal thing. The research headed
py Professor Samuel Sideman of
he Department of Biomedical
engineering and Director of the
pardiac Research Center will-
[EBREW U.
Professor Shmuel Sideman (left) confers with an associate at the
rechnums Department for Biomedical Engineering. Building
models of the body s cardiovascular system promise new insight*
into heart disease and its treatment.
enable researchers to introduce
such variables as cholesterol level
and blood pressure, and observe
as the computerized heart por-
trays the ten-year development of
a heart attack in a matter of
minutes.
The research is being carried
out in cooperation with experts at
several leading medical hospitals
including the Mayo Clinic, the
Cleveland Clinic, and Chicago's
Michael Reese Hospital and
Medical School.
According to Professor
Sideman, this research will not on-
ly aid in the diagnosis of heart
disease, but will also help describe
and classify previously undefined
functions of the heart.
Noted Lecturer From H.U. At Temple Sinai
Dr. Bernard Cherrick, vice
president of Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, a noted international
cturer and author, will speak at
lecture sponsored by the
Lmerican Friends of Hebrew
Jniversity and Temple Sinai at
he temple on Tuesday, Feb. 18, at
|:30 p.m.
His topic will be "Israel the
Reality of the Dream."
Born in Dublin, Ireland, Dr.
-herrick earned numerous
legrees in Semitic Languages,
[hilosophy, Economics, Political
cience, and a Doctorate in Divini-
/. He served as the Rabbi of the
Jew Synagogue in London, was
lirector of the Jewish National
fund and the United Palestine
Lppeal in Great Britain, and later
Jecame world director of
frganization for the Hebrew
Jniversity.
Dr. Cherrick is considered an
Excellent orator, and has lectured
Intensively throughout the world,
mere is no admission charge to
lie lecture, the public is cordially
ivited.
A biographical dictionary of
Palestinian political figures the
irst comprehensive study of
Palestinian political history to be
ampiled anywhere is now be-
: prepared for publication at the
larry S. Truman Research In-
titute for the Advancement of
Peace at the Hebrew University
If Jerusalem. Publication is an-
pcipated in two years.
The purpose of the compilers of
dictionary, headed by Prof,
loshe Ma'oz and by Dr. Alex-
er Bligh, is to create a
ference work including all im-
portant Palestinian political
figures from the 1880's to date.
The dictionary will cover about
|50 biographies from the total of
)me 500 now contained within
he Truman Institute data base on
Palestinians. Source material for
the entries comes from archives in
Israel and Britain, journalistic and
academic sources in Arabic,
Hebrew, English and French, as
well as interviews with prominent
figures. The Hebrew University's
extensive collection of Arabic
publications has served as an im-
portant source of material.
The study of Palestine and
Palestinian Arabs has, over the
past two decades, come to con-
stitute a major sub-Field within
Middle Eastern studies; while
scholars in the past have written
on various aspects and periods in
Palestinian history, no one as yet
has tied all of these elements
together in a comprehensive work
giving an overview of Palestinian
political history.
No clear picture of the current
state of Palestinian politics can be
understood, say the dictionary
editors without a detailed ex-
amination of such principal
figures as Yasir Arafat, George
Habash, Abu Musa, Isam Sartawi
and the spectrum of ideologies
which they represent. The
biographical dictionary will thus
provide an important new tool for
scholars and government decision
makers.
The dictionary will contain vital
information pertaining to each
person listed, such as family
background, education, profes-
sional and political ac-
complishments. The text inlcudes
treatments of major events and
trends in Palestinian political
history insofar as they relate to
the subject's life.
The biographical dictionary, be-
ing compiled by Jewish and Arab
researchers at the Truman In-
stitute, reflects the goal of the in-
stitute to promote peace through
knowledge.
A vaccine against the AIDS
virus could be developed within
five years, the man who
discovered the AIDS virus in the
U.S. said at a lecture at the
Hebrew University-Hadassah
Medical School.
Dr. Robert C. Gallo, chief of the
laboratory of human tumor cell
biology at the National Cancer In-
stitute of the U.S. National In-
stitute of Health, also said that
within one year he expected small
advances to be made in treatment
of the disease, advances in which
he hopes to have a part.
Gallo, 48, of Bethesda, Md., was
in Jerusalem to receive the 1985
Rabbi Shai Shacknai Memorial
Prize and to deliver the Shacknai
Memorial Lectures, both of which
are administered by the
Lautenberg Center for General
and Tumor Immunology of the
Hebrew University-Hadassah
Medical School. He was selected
for the honor for his contributions
to the field of immunology, which
include the discovery of the first
known human cancer virus (a
leukemia virus) and the AIDS
virus.
The Shacknai Prize is con-
sidered one of the top awards in
its field and has been given in the
past to three men who later won
the Nobel Prize.
In other comments on AIDS,
Dr. Gallo expressed surprise that
an AIDS test was not mandatory
in Israel for blood donors, in order
to check the spread of the disease,
which can be transmitted through
blood, serum or semen. He said he
believes it also can be transmitted
through saliva, but only with
great difficulty, and that Kissing,
therefore, is not particularly
dangerous, unless it is very heavy
and conducted over a long period
of time.
The medical reserchers was
highly critical of those in the
medical profession who do not
want to become involved with
AIDS victims because of a fear of
infection. He compared them to
soldiers who will not go into battle
or firemen who refuse to fight a
raging blaze.
It may soon be possible to
discover cavities before they get
big enough to need drilling.
Tel Avi University's School of
Dental Medicine is testing an
easy-to-use kit that may make it
possible to check for cavities
also called caries even those
which are still invisible to the den-
tist's eye. And you won't even
need to be a dentist to use it.
In the test, the patient bites
down onto a non-toxic malleable
solid surface, which provides an
imprint of the teeth. With the
biting action, bacteria associated
with the development of caries are
deposited into the imprint
material. The imprint is then in-
cubated in a medium which en-
courages growth of the bacteria
making them clearly visible on the
impression.
In addition to indicting the loca-
tion of already-developed caries,
initial results suggest that the test
may also predict sites of future
caries. Current methods of testing
for caries focus on looking for
bacteria in sample of saliva. These
can tell you whether you have a
cavity, but not where.
Developed by Dr. Mel
Rosenberg, who heads the
Laboratory of Oral Microbiology,
and Drs. liana Eli and Ervin
Weiss of the Operative Dentistry
Section in the School of Dental
Medicine, the procedure has been
tested on volunteers.
Another year or two of ex-
perimentation will be needed to
determine the test's reliability.
The initial research was supported
by Ramot, the University Authori-
ty for Research and Development
through its joint foundation with
the office of the chief scientist of
Kit for diagnosing cavities be-
ing tested at Tel Aviv Universi-
ty: black spots on imprint show
location of caries.
the Ministry of Industry. Negotia-
tions are underway with a number
of private firms to obtain funding
for future research.
TEL AVIV (JTA) El Al
ticket counters at two British air-
ports in Manchester and in Lon-
don have been relocated, ap-
parently because other airlines
are nervous about possible ter-
rorist attacks. In the Dec. 17
assault on El AJ ticket counters at
the Rome and Vienna airports,
most of the 19 who died were
passengers on line at adjacent
counters.
SEATS NOW AVAILABLE AT BOX OFFICE
DIRECT FROM BROADWAY!
* YIDDISH MUSICAL COMEOY NOW WITH ENGLISH SUBTITLES
"Exciting and tunny."
New York Times
'Strongly recommended"
Newsday
Zeety and delightful
a hit!*
A Mate
Made In
Heaven
(OUR REBBENYU)
with an ALL STAR CAST
and KLEZMER BAND
FT. LAeMRBAU bailey concert hall
3NI SOUTH WEST 0AVIE U.
. FH tt IN Ptt
mm.,run miiii
SAT.. Ftlll MM
tm.run tmmtm
TCUTS. EVES: SIS MATS: S14
INFORMATION a AESV: 471
THEATRE OF THE PERFORMING ARTS
17R0 WASHINGTON AVENUE
poua >eno.....
Wa.FfB.2* 1MB
TNBL.Ftt.t7 Mai-
ms: RUTS S15. 13, 11, EVES: SIT. IS, 12
INFORMATION MTB BBBB
Tickets on sale it BO Setoct-A Seat
IouIkxis. including JORDAN MARSH STORES
CHAAIT 1(R>|)4a-3S4l/t>0UrS I73-3S13
THE SHOW THAT SOLD OUT IN NEW YORK
PASSOVER198(5
UNIVERSAL KOSHER TOURS INC.
PRESENTS
A TRADITIONAL AND KOSHER
PASSOVER HOLIDAY
AT THE "NEW
DIPLOMAT, FLORIDA
1 _. RESORT AND ^ 1
1 ^COUNTRY^^P 1
FROM ^ THRU
APRIL 23RD X MAY 1ST
Complete Giatt Kosher Holiday Program
From $899 to $1199 per person double occupancy
Plus 18% tor tax and gratuities
For Additional Information Contact:
Universal Kosher Tours Inc.
5 Penn Plaza
New York, New York 10001
212-594-0836 800-221-2791
Exclusive Operator for 1)1 PI OMAT, FLORIDA


Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 7, 1986
^
THE ADOLPH and ROSE LEVIS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
HAPPENINGS
&
An. Agency of the South County Jewish Federation
Ourbrand-new Turning Twos'' program is for Mommy-and-Me
graduates Pictured above are Tatiana Weisman and Elizabeth
bands, who have both made the transition (without Mommy) most
successfully!
The Adolph and Rose
Levis Jewish Community
Center is proud to present
its Early Childhood Pro-
gram for our Spring Ses-
sion. All of our programs of-
fer a warm atmosphere of
acceptance, support and
professional guidance to
enhance your child's growth
and Jewish identity.
THRIVING THREES Mon-
day, Wednesday and Friday, 9:30
a.m.-12:30 p.m. Please pack your
child a Kosher lunch. (All lunches
are refrigerated). Child must be
three (3) by September 1, 1985.
Program Dates: March 17-June
9
Cost: Members: $180, Non-
members: $240.
Instructor: Diane Brown.
TERRIFIC TWO'S I (older
twos) Tuesday and Thursday,
9:30 a.m.-noon. Please pack your
child a Kosher lunch. (All lunches
are refrigerated). Child must be
30-36 months by Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 18-June
10.
Cost: Members: $120, Non-
members: $160.
Instructor: Diane Brown.
TERRIFIC TWOS II (younger
twos) Monday and Wednesday,
9:30 a.m.-noon. Please pack your
child a Kosher lunch. (All lunches
are refrigerated). ChUd must be
24-30 months by Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 17-June
9.
Cost: Members: $120, Non-
members: $160.
Instructor: Karen Albert.
TERRIFIC TWO'S III Mon-
day and Wednesday, 9:30
a.m.-noon. Please pack your child
a Kosher lunch. (All lunches are
refrigerated). Child must be 24-36
months by Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 17-June
9.
Coat: Members: $120, Non-
members: $160.
Instructor: Kotch Drucker.
TURNING TWO'S Tuesday
and Thursday, 9:30-11 a.m.
Parent does not accompany child.
Children will be served a snack.
Child must be two or recently two.
Program Dates: March 18-June
10.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Kotch Drucker.
SHABBAT FUNSHOP I
Friday, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Please
pack your child a Kosher lunch.
(All lunches are refrigerated).
Child must be 24-36 months by
Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 21-June 6.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Karen Albert.
SHABBAT FUNSHOP II
Firday, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Please
pack your child a Kosher lunch.
(All lunches are refrigerated).
Child must be 24-36 months by
Sept. 1.
Program Dates: March 21-June
6, 1986.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Kotch Drucker
TOT LOT Tuesday, 9:30
a.m.-l 1 a.m. Parents must accom-
pany child. Parents will be served
refreshments. Children will be
served a snack. Child must be
18-23 months by March 1.
Program Dates: March 18-June
10.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Karen Albert
ONES ARE FUN Thursday,
9:30-10:30 a.m. Parents must ac-
company child. Parents will be
served refreshments. Children
will be served a snack. Child must
be 12-17 months by March 1.
Program Dates: March 20-June
5.
Cost: Members: $70, Non-
members: $95.
Instructor: Karen Albert
PLAYGROUND
PLAYGROUP Wednesday,
9:30-10:30 a.m. Parent must ac-
company child. Children will be
served a snack. Child must be
12-23 months by March 1.
Program Dates: March 19-June
4.
Cost: Members, no charge, Non-
members $15.
Instructor: Martha Sands
The following dates there will be
no classes:
Wednesday, April 23 through
Friday, May 2 Spring Recess.
(Classes will resume on May 5.)
Monday, May 26 Memorial
Day
June 10 Last day of all classes
LEVIS JEWISH
COMMUNITY CENTER
Duplicate Bridge
Every Thursday!
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will be offering ACBL
sanctioned Duplicate Bridge for
experienced players every Thurs-
day at 12:30 p.m. Cost for
Members is $1.75, Non-members
$2. Free plays to winners.
Refreshments will be served.
Automotive Maintenance
Consumer Tip*
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will hold an Automotive
Maintenance Presentation, Thurs-
day, Feb. 27, 7:30 p.m. Norton
Tire Co. will help educate the con-
sumer through this exciting and
entertaining presentation. Prizes
will be awarded and refreshments
served. No charge for members,
non-members pay $2.
What Every Florida Resident
Should Know About Wills
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will hold a lecture titled
"What Every Florida Resident
Should Know About Wills," on
Thursday, Feb. 20, 7:30 p.m. Herb
Goldfeld, Attorney, will be the
guest speaker. Members come
free, non-members pay $2. For
more information call 395-5546.
Joys of Living
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will sponsor a class entitl-
ed "Joys of Living." The class will
be held Wednesdays, starting
Feb. 19-March 26, 10-noon. The
instructor is Al Green, PhD. Cost
for members is $15, non-
members, $25. Deadline for
registration is Feb. 12
Communications
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will sponsor a class entitl-
ed "Communications," starting
Wednesdays, Feb. 19-March 26,
from 1:30-3:30 p.m. The instruc-
tor, Al Green, PhD, will focus this
class on relationships, friends and
family and how to enhance them
through communication. The cost
for members is $15, non-
members, $25. Deadline for class
registration: Feb. 12.
For information on ALL JCC programs please
call 395-5546. (unless otherwise specified)
Reincarnation
The Levis Jewish Community
Center will sponsor a class on
"Reincarnation," starting
Tuesdays, Feb. 18 through March
26, 7-9 p.m. Cost for members is
$15, non-members, $25. Deadline
for registration is Feb. 11
Sex After 55: Enjoy!
The Prime Tuners Committee
of the Levis Jewish Community
Center will sponsor a lecture en-
titled "Sex After 55: Enjoy!",
Tueday, Feb. 11, 7:30 p.m. The
guest speaker is Al Green, PhD.
Cost for non-members is $2.
members come free.
JCC PROGRAM BROCHURE
WINS NATIONAL AWARD
The Association of Jewish Com-
munity Centers and YM-YWHA's
the JWB has announced that
the Levis Jewish Community
Center's Fall-1985 Program
Brochure is a winner in the 1986
JWB Communications Awards
Competition.
There were over 334 entries
from more than 100 centers the
largest and most enthusiastic
competition since JWB began it in
1978.
The booklet won 2nd Place in
the "Center Brochures" division
for its design and "We Belong
Together" theme.
The award will be presented at
the JWB Biennial Meeting taking
place April 9-13 in Toronto,
Canada. The programmatic con-
tribution of all center program
committees and staff helped to
make this award possible. The
Brochure was designed by JCC
Membership/PR Director Les
Scheinfeld.
The Adolph and Rose Levis Jewish Community
Center wishes to acknowledge their Contributory
Members and welcome all New Members who have
recently joined:
BENEFACTORS 1986 ,
(As of 1-27-86)
'Marian and Sydney A. Altman
Marjorie and James Baer
Rita and Elbert Bagus
Florence and Ted Baumritter
Rose and Gary Bernstein
* Marianne and Ed Bobick
Anne and Henry Brenner
* Jenna and Robert Byrnes
Edith and Mel Clayman
Libby and Milton Davis
Adrianne and Eric Deckinger
Yetta Dogan
Shirley and Karl Enselberg
Sally and Lester M. Entin
Bonnie and Robert Fishman
'Leslie and Martin Freedman
'Florence Fuller
'Barbara and Herb Gimelstob
Ernest Goldblum
'Shelly and Barry Halperin
Dalia and Ury Kalai, M.D.'s
'Bobbie and Pete Kamins
'Terry and Shep Kaufman
'Elaine and David Kend
* Laura and Steve Litinsky
Mildred and Abby Levine
'Bea and Richard Levy
'Dinah and Daniel Man
'Marcia and Stanley Moser
'Nina and Robert Mufson
Lillian and Louis Newman
Jim Nobil
Edith and Donald E. Peiser
Anita Penzer
Clarice and Ben Pressner
'Miriam and Donald Rich
* Jeanette and Harold j. Rosen
Berenice B. Schankerman
Carole and Richard Siemens
'Anita and Sanford M. Simon
Janice and Saul A. Slossberg
Barbara and David Stein
Betty and Norman Stone
Ruthie Fay and Marvin
Waldman
Ruth and Saul Wienberger
Ruth and Frank W. White
Janet and Andrew Whitehill
Beth and Henry Whitehill
Betty and Phillip Zinman
Renewing Founding Members.
RECENT NEW
JCC MEMBERS
Ms. Jill Lanning
Ma. Ruth Goldberg
Mi Georgia Bladaoe
Mi. Elaine Ktlsky
Ma. Lillian Straaaberc
Dr. and Mrs. Gary Eisenberg
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Koaloff
Mr. Rick Back
Mr. and Mrs. Josh Rabin
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Maletx
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Raum
Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Deuteh
Dr. and Mrs. Steven L. Pollack
Ms. Tamar Ben Ami
Mr. and Mrs. Effrem Arenatein
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Katz
Mr. and Mrs. Burleigh Greenberg
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Segall
Mrs. Ray Nelson
Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Meyers
Ms. Guitelle Baltimore
Ms. Mary Balkin
Mr. Edward Robs
Mr. and Mrs. Roger Shelling
Mr and Mrs. Leslie Lukoff
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Goldkland
Ms. Nancy Tisdial
Mr. Colman Hanish
Mrs. Isabel Binder
Mrs. James Kahn
Ms. Esther Frieder
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Isler
Dr. and Mrs. Abraham Portman
Mr. and Mrs Mel Hackel
Mr Bruce T Honekman
Mr. and Mrs. William Pollack
Ms. Andrea Grant
Mr and Mrs. Earl Starkoff
Mr. Alex Bauer
Dr. and Mrs. Stan Guberman
Ms. Celia Hirsch
Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Krumholx
Mr. Louis Brazen
Ms. Lisa Ohrt
Mr. and Mrs. Ron Jedwab
Mr. and Mrs. Manny Isenman
Dr. and Mrs. Stewart Gorenberg
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Marcus
Dr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Lissauer
Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Weisleder
Mr. and Mrs. Lee Kaufman
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Temor
Ms. Helen Regenstreif
Ms. Paula Forbes
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Wasserman
Mr. and Mrs. Mortimer Steinberg
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Roaenfield
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hanson
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Hurwitx
Mr. Irving Stern
Ms. Jean Abramoff
Mr. and Mrs. Rami Argov
Dr. and Mrs. Stuart Baine
Dr. and Mrs. Eric Gechter
Mr. and Mrs. Steven Brown
Mr. and Mrs. David Gart
Ms. Lucille Graham
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Phillips
Dr. and Mrs. Mark Libow
Mr. and Mrs. James Tisdale
Ms Ellen Brooks
Ms. Linda S. Levine
Ms. Marion Levi
Mr and Mrs. Room! Hermann
Mr. and Mrs David Daffner
Mr and Mrs. Michael Shapiro
Mr. and Mrs. Eduardo Roth
Dr. and Mrs. Edward Pollock
Mr. and Mrs Allen Iarow
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Wains
Mr. and Mrs. Mark MQaak
Dr. and Mrs. Ricahrd Greenwald
Mr. and Mrs Gerald Tamber
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Werner
Ms Karen Mickett


Volumes of Major Interest
Friday, February 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 13
SPECIALLY FOR
By MORTON I. TEICHER
habbat: A Rite of Passage in
Jerusalem. By Peter Stephan
Jungk. New York: Times
Books, 1985. 151 pp. $12.95.
The author of this little book is a
oung American Jew who lives in
l/ienna where he is writing a
>iography of Franz Werfel. In the
ourse of seeking his identity, he
pent a year in Jerusalem, study-
ng in a yeshiva. The experience of
hat year is recorded in this
account.
Apparently, Jungk learned a
treat deal about the Jewish
eligion, making up for the defi-
iencies in his early education at
Iris assimilated home in California,
lowever, he ended the year with
number of questions still
linresolved. He seems to be a
riser person for his year in
erusalem and he certainly
emonstrates his love for and
Knowledge about that beautiful
Those who share his love and
knowledge will have fond
memories evoked of familiar
streets and sites which mean so
much to Jews who have been for-
tunate enough to spend some time
in Jerusalem.
Living With Koeatler. Edited by
Celia Goodman. New York: St.
Martin's Press, 1985. 204 pp.
$12.95.
In 1950, after living with him
for five years, Mamaine Paget
became Arthur Koestler's second
wife. They separated after only
one year of marriage, and three
years later, in 1954, Mamaine died
at the age of 37. During her sue
years with Koestler, she wrote
frequent letters to her twin sister,
Celia, and it is these letters which
have been brought together to
make up this book.
Interspersed among discussions
of the weather, bird-watching and
food, there are vignettes of con-
tacts with such luminaries as Sar-
tre, Camus, Malraux, Simone de
Beauvoir, Simon'* Weil, James T.
Farrell, Teddy Kollek, Cyrus
Sulzberger and Bertrand Russell,
among others. Occasionally, these
slight episodes tell us a bit about
the person being mentioned.
Shortly after Israel declared its
independence in May, 1948,
Koestler secured assignments as a
reporter for several newspapers
and went to Israel along with Ma-
maine. They remained there for
about four months, and her letters
for this period have special in-
terest, but they do not add very
much to our understanding of the
trials and tribulations of Israel
during the first few months after
it was reborn.
Mamaine, who was not Jewish,
makes a few references to
Koestler being a Jew, but her let-
ters suggest that his Jewishness
was not an important factor in his
life nor to their lives together. In
fact, not much light is thrown on
other aspects of Koestler in this
six-year period beyond the sug-
gestions that he was a mixed-up
person who struggled with being
an ex-communist. Koestler's
ultimate suicide pact with his
third wife is presaged to some ex-
tent in these letters which picture
him as an extreme neurotic who
was subject to fits of depression
and who beat his wife on several
occasions.
Koestler's writing brought him
some fame and money. His story,
"Darkness at Noon," was adapted
into a play by Sidney Kingsley and
ran successfully on Broadway for
eighteen months. His book on
Israel, "Promise and Fulfill-
ment," was not well received, nor
was one of his last books in which
he concocted a bizarre theory of
the origin of the Jews.
In some ways, Koestler was a
tragic figure. He was certainly
one of the leading intellectuals of
his time, and he hobnobbed with
many interesting personalities.
However, these letters make him
out to be somewhat of an un-
savory character. The editor pro-
vides a brief biographical in-
troduction which, when combined
with what we can glean about him
from the letters, suggests that a
full biography might be worth
reading.
SINGLES
Are you Single? Personal Ads get response! Cost is
$10.00 for up to 30 words. To place your special singles
ad send $10.00 and copy of ad to: The Jewish Floridian,
Singles Column, P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Florida 33101.
Professional is interested in meeting a life partner to
59. Traditional, noble character and fine ethical features,
tall. Driver a plus. I am located in Florida. State tele-
phone. Write to:
CH c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
OPEN HEART SURGERY
HOLLYWOOD HEART SURGERY
Bypass Surgery, Valve Surgery, Pacemakers
INSURANCE
Medicare Participating
Insurance Assignment Accepted
Health Plan Participatioa
ALLAN WOLPOWITZ, M.l).
3427 Johnson Street
Hollywood. Florida 33021
HOSPITAL
Memorial
By Appointment Only
Tel. (305) 962-5400
Empire!
Number
One
Kosher
Turkeyl
Pure, Clean
&Lean!
FOR THE BEST. SELECT A BIG.
EMPIRE KOSHER TURKEY...
CONVENIENT READY-TO-COOK
OR PRE COOKED TURKEY
DRUMSTICKS. TURKEY
BREASTS PAN-ROASTS
ROLLS & SLICES!
(800) EMPIRE 4
Distributed By:
FLORIDA
Miami Beach, FL Mandalson, Inc.
(305)672 5800
HlalMh, FL Tropic Ice Company
005)624-5750
N. Miami, FL All American
Food Dial. (305)653-4496
ISe Mot !ruted Nwe m KohM faM'1
'*um IM.IM to
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Delicious Served with
Your Favorite Pasta
French Bread
loaff %|
Available at PubHx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Decorated
Mini
Heart Cake
$]29
each
(Wilh Fresh Strawberries,
if Available .................$1.99)
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Large Heart Shaped
Chocolate
Cookie
Chip
$4
each
99
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Decorated for Valentines Day
Holiday Cup Cakes... 6 *. $ 1"
Made with the Freshest Fruit and Raisins
Hot Cross Buns............ $179
Cherry Cheese
Coffee Cake..................** $189
Banana Nut Loaf...........ch$149
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Perfect with Any Meal
Chicago Hard Rolls ...2 25*
Serve with Publix Premium Ice Cream
Cherry Crumb Pie........e^h$249
Prices Effective
-^ February 6 thru 12.1986.
fe^^SP u*ntlty
/ j^SSST^ Right* Reaerved.
wemm
_


Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 7, 1986
In The Synagogues
And Temples ...
Weizman in Talks With Mubarak
BETHEL
Temple Beth El Singles Shab-
bat will take place Friday, Feb.
14,10 p.m. at the Temple, 333 SW
4th Ave., Boca. Oneg Shabbat will
follow. For further information
call 391-8900.
TEMPLE SINAI
Temple Siaai'i next Young Ar-
tist Concert Series will be held
Saturday, Feb. 15, 8 p.m. at the
Temple, 2475 W. Atlantic Ave.,
Delray. Featured will be concert
violinist Benny Kim. For ticket in-
formation call 276-6161.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth Sisterhood will
hold their Torah Fund Luncheon
in support of the Jewish
Theological Seminary, Thursday,
Feb. 13, noon at the Temple, 5780
W. Atlantic Ave., Delray. The
entertainment will be headed by
Cantor Zvi Adler. Benefactors'
pins will be presented by Rabbi
Elliot J. Winograd. Donation,
$7.11.
Temple Emeth Brotherhood
and Sisterhood will sponsor an
evening of song and humor, Sun-
day, Feb. 16, 8 p.m. Featured will
be Paul Zim, international "Voice
of Jewish Soul" music and Sy
Klein man. humorist. For ticket in-
formation call 498-7422.
Temple Emeth Diamond Club
meets every Monday morning, 9
a.m. at the Temple. This club is
for people 75 years of age and
over. There is entertainment,
lunch and much attention from
Temple volunteers.
Temple Emeth Singles Club
will hold their next meeting, Mon-
day, Feb. 10, noon. This is a social
meeting of cards and games and is
limited to members only.
Refreshments will be served. Br-
ing your own cards and games.
ANSHEI EMUNA
Congregation Anshei Emuna
Sisterhood and Men's Club will
hold their annual dinner dance,
Sunday, Feb. 23, 6:30 p.m. Lucille
Cohen and Willie Tannenbaum
will be honored for their years of
devoted service. Donation $18 per
person. For tickets call Nora
Kalish 499-9229 or 499-2644.
ANSHEI SHALOM
Anshei Shalom Oriole Jewish
Center Sisterhood will hold a
Rummage Sale, Sunday, Feb. 16
in the parking lot of Carteret Sav-
ings and Loan, 4999 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray, 9 a.m. For further
information call 499-0296.
The Sisterhood's next meeting
will be held, Monday, Feb. 17,
9:30 a.m. in the Temple, 7099 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray. The Kings
Point Steppers will entertain.
Refreshments will be served. For
further information call 499-3282.
RABBI SINGER
TO VISIT CATHOLIC
HIGH SCHOOL
Rabbi Merle Singer at Temple
Beth El visited Pope John Paul II
High School in Boca Raton this
week under the auspices of the
Jewish Chautauqua Society (JCS),
to give students there an overview
of Judaism.
Singer is a board member of the
Association of Florida United
Way, United Way of South Palm
Beach County, the South County
Jewish Community Day School,
the Education Foundation of
Palm Beach County, the South
County Jewish Federation, and
Planned Parenthood.
He is a member of the Central
Conference of American Rabbis
(CCAR), the CCAR Relief and
Subvention and Solicitation Com-
mittee, the Clergy Association of
Boca Raton, the Association of
Reform Zionists of America, and
the UAHC Commission for Winn-
ing the Unaffiliated.
JCS, educational arm of the Na-
tional Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods (NFTB), endows
Judaism courses at universities
throughout the United States and
Canada, assigns rabbinic lecturers
to campuses, donates books of
Judaica to libraries, distributes a
large film collection, and sponsors
Institutes for Christian Clergy in
its goal of improved interfaith
relations.
-ISRAELI=
4fi
*V Your source for everything Jewish YV
The Largest Selection of Bat/Bar Mltzvah Sets
Open Sundays
FREEMEZUZAHToOur
Customers With A Purchase
Offer Expire* 2-2846
Listen to the Jewish Variety
Show 10*0 on your AM Dial
11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Sundays
Qrdn ShoppM at Boca
7080 W. Palmetto Park Rd
(Pewrllna 4 Palmetto)
Boca Raton
368-9495
Jacaranda Plaza
277 W. SunrtM Bhrd.
Plantation
472-4736
NEW JERSEY YMHA-YWHA CAMPS
AT MILFORD, PA
1200 Acres 3 Lakes e Athletics Terms *
Gymnastics Swimming Saving Canoeing *
Arts & Crafts e Dramatics Pioneering e Nature
e Photography e Horseback Riding e Ham
Radio A Broadcasting Professional Staff e Jewish
Culture e Dietary Laws Group Living & Individual
Development Olympic Pool Computers Jet
Skis e Scuba Diving Astronomy
INCLUSIVE FEES: 8 weeks $2055
July 81078. Aug. 8*80.
(Reductions for sibUnga)
"Y" membership is not required.
825.00 surcharge for non-members
CALL BARBARA ZALCBERG at (305) 488-1766
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ezer Weizman met with
President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt in Cairo Sunday. He
flew there secretly on a
special mission, the purpose
of which was not disclosed
but is believed to be an
urgent attempt to arrange a
summit meetings between
Mubarak ana Premier
Shimon Peres.
Weizman, a Minister-Without
Portfolio attached to the Prime
Minister's Office, waa accom-
panied by Gen. (Res.) Avraham
Tamir, director general of the
Prime Minister's Office, who has
been closely involved in recent
negotiations with Egypt. This trip
was approved by Peres who
waa in West Germany Sunday
by Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir and Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin.
WEIZMAN and Tamir were
reportedly joined by Israel's Am-
bassador to Egypt, Moshe Season,
at their session with Mubarak,
Weizman, who has had close con-
tacts with Egyptian officials since
his participation in the Camp
David talks seven years ago, is
said to fear that unless a Peres-
Mubarak summit takes place
soon, the entire peace process
could be in jeopardy. Peres is
believed to share this view.
Israel's cool relations with
Egypt were further strained last
week by the unenthusiastic recep-
tion given in Cairo to Israel's offer
of a package deal to settle the
Taba border dispute by interna-
tional arbitration as Egypt has
demanded and move at the
same time to revive the stalled
process of normalization between
the two countries. The Egyptians
insist that a summit date can be
Airports Tighten
Security
PARIS (JTA) Airports in at
least a half dozen European coun-
tries have tightened security
measures in the aftermath of the
Dec. 27 simultaneous attacks on
Israeli airline counters at the
Rome and Vienna airports.
The airports in Athens, Madrid,
Barcelona, Rome, Milan, Paris
and Lisbon are under "red alert."
They are considered especially
"sensitive" and are taking
precautions against possible at-
tack by Palestinian terrorists.
Heavily armed police have been
posted at all check-in counters.
Armored police vehicles patrol the
tarmac outside the terminal
buildings and escort planes taxi-
ing for landing or take-off.
Obituaries
BERG
Paul, 67, of Kings Point, Delray Beach, was
originally from Illinois. He is survived by his
wife Eleanore; sons Bruce and Arnold; and
1 grandchild (Beth Israel Rubin Memorial
Chapel).
BOCK
Alexander, 74, of Kings Point, Delray
Beach, was originally from New York. He is
survived by his son Charles, daughter Susan
Trachtenbert; brothers William and Morris;
and three grandchildren. (Beth-Israel Rabin
Memorial Chapel).
CHEBKA8KY
Ethel. 96, of Kings Point. Delray Beach,
waa originally from New York. She ia sur-
vived by her son Milton; daughter Muriel
Farley, seven grandchildren, and 10 great-
grandchildren. (Gutterman Warheit
Memorial Chapel).
HOL8TEIN
BSalSan, 67, of Boca Raton, was originally
from Maryland. He ia survived by hia
daughter Ruthie Holstein. (Beth-Israel
Rubin Memorial Chapel)
LBNOWTR
Jacob M., 62. of Kings Point. Delray Beach,
was originally from New York. He ia surviv-
ed by hia niece Barbara Sbedler; sisters
Judith Wolff and Frances Shedler (Beth-
Israel Rubin Memorial Chapel).
MITTLEMAN
Charles. 89, of Century Village, Boca Raton,
waa originally from New York. He is surviv-
ed by his wife Sylvia (GutUrman- Warheit
Memorial Chapel).
set only after a date is set tor ar-
bitration to begin.
They infuriated many Israelis
by flatly refusing to give Israel
the report of the special commis-
sion set up to investigate the
murder of seven Israeli tourists by
an Egyptian soldier at Raa Burka
in eastern Sinai last Oct. 1.
WEIZMAN reportedly
telephoned Mubarak over the
worsening situation and was told
by the Egyptian leader that he
had an open invitation to visit
Cairo. Weizman is also said to
have informed Mubarak he would
keep his visit secret lest if be
jeopardized by elements of Likud.
Likud circles in fact openly
criticized their party leader
Shamir, Monday, for approving
Weizman's trip.
The urgency of his visit was
underlined by the fact that Tamir,
in effect a personal emissary of
Peres, flew in from Europe where
he had been escorting the Premier
and immediately boarded Weiz-
man's plane to Cairo.
No details of the meeting with
Mubarak were reported here.
Weizman is believed to have ex-
plained to him the importance of
the decision by the Inner Cabinet
on Jan. 13 to offer Egypt a
package deal including arbitration
over Taba.
Observers here said that unless
Weizman returns from Cairo with
an agreement for an early sum-
mit, Peres' prestige, no less than
his own, would suffer a severe
blow and the peace process will be
in danger.
Shabbat, 29 Sh'vat, 5746
Weekly Sidreh Mishpatlm
Candlelighting 5:49 p.m.
Sabbath Ends 6:57 p.m.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30
a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101. Boca Raton, Florida
33433. Orthodox services held at Verde Elementary School
Cafeteria, 6590 Verde Trail, Boca, Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
For information regarding Friday, Sundown services Mincha-
Maariv, call Rabbi Mark Dratch. Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd., Delray
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Daily
Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m. Sab-
bath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class 5 p.m.
Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION BETH AMI
2134 N.W. 19th Way, Boca Raton, Florida 33431. Conservative.
Phone (305) 994-8693 or 276-8804. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer; Cantor
Mark Levi; President, Joseph Boumans. Services held at the
Levis JCC, 336 N.W. Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton; Friday
evening at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio Road,
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler. Sab-
bath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10:15 a.m. Mailing ad-
dress: 8177 W. Glades Road, Suite 214, Boca Raton, FL 33434.
Phone 483-9982. Baby sitting available during services.
CONGREGATION TORAH OHR
Located in Century Village of Boca Raton. Orthodox. Rabbi
David Weissenberg. Cantor Jacob Resnick. President Edward
Sharzer. For information on services and educational classes and
programs, call 482-0206 or 482-7156.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
7099 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33446. Conser-
vative. Phone 495-0466 and 495-1300. Cantor Louis Hershman.
Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:30 a.m. Daily
services 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at
8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month, Saturday morning services 10:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FL 33484. Con-
servative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday 8:80 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 483-5557. Joseph
M. Pollack. Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Conser-
vative. Phone: 498-3586. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd. Zvi Adler,
Cantor. Sabbath Servicea: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:45 a.m.
Daily Minyana at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Berwick
Road), Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Reform. Sabbath Eve. ser-
vices, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver
phone 276-6161.


^
Local
Organization
Peter andDmyra PoUock of Boca Raton, who will hmt the 3rd
ORT's Third Annual
'Gala For Giving'
A champagne brunch at the
Boca Raton home of Devyra and
Peter Pollock will provide the set-
ting for the third annual "Gala for
Giving" of District VI of Women's
American ORT at noon, Sunday,
Feb. 9.
Representatives will be in atten-
dance from the seven South
Florida Regions of District VI of
ORT including members and ma-
jor benefactors of $5,000 and up
from North Palm Beach through
South Dade. Representatives and
committee members from the
local South County area include:
Norma Heit, district chairman of
Golden Circle, Betty Jacket,
District VI donor chairman and,'
from South Palm Beach Region:
Anita Kessler, region president;
Elayne Fischer, executive com-
mittee chairman; Pepi Donshik,
chairman of Capitol Funds; Violet
Feldstein, chairman of Golden
Circle; Evelyn Savino, chairman
of Legacy and Endowment.
The afternoon agenda will feature
the noted raconteur, Emil Cohen
and Pepi Dunay, of Boca Raton,
President of District VI, as guest
speaker.
ORT the vocational, technical
and scientific education program
of the Jewish people has been in
operation since 1880. Originally
founded in Czarist Russia to train
Jews for professions from which
they had traditionally been ex-
cluded, ORT is now a global net-
work comprising 800 schools with
an annual enrollment of 130,000.
AMW
American Mizrachi Women
"Amit" Beersheva Chapter will
hold "A White Elephant Sale,"
Wednesday, Feb. 12, 12:30 p.m.,
at the American Savings Bank,
Kings Point. Delray. Enjoy an
afternoon of browsing and
bargain hunting. All are welcome
to attend.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women Boca will
see "Steve and Edie" at The
Sunrise Theatre, Wednesday,
Feb. 12, 8 p.m. For information
call Esther 482-8860. Plan to at-
tend their mini auction, Monday,
Feb. 17. 12:30 p.m. in Temple
Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic Ave.,
Delray. Lunch will be available at
noon. This auction is open to the
public.
B'nai B'rith Safed Unit will
hold a breakfast meeting, Sunday,
Feb. 9, 10 a.m.. in Pines of Boca
Barwood Recreation. Center,
23380 Barwood Lane So. Their
guest speaker will be Leo Brink,
Chairman of the Florida State
Association and Palm Beach
Council Adult Jewish Education.
Mr. Brink will also conduct in-
stallation ceremonies for incom-
ing officers. All members and
friends are urged to attend. For
further information call 483-1737
or 487-7215.
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi
Chapter will hold their next
meeting, Monday, Feb. 17, at
Temple Emeth, 5780 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray. Their guest speaker
will be Dr. Stewart Bauman on
the topic "Sexuality in the Mature
Years." The public is invited and
refreshments will be served.
B'nai B'rith Delray Lodge No.
2965 will present a Brotherhood
Award to Andre Fladell, Head of
the South County Political
Cooperative, in recognition of his
service to the community. Com-
missioner Dorothy Wilken will
present the award. This event will
take place Tuesday, Feb. 11, 7
p.m. at Temple Emeth, 5780 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray. All are in-
vited to attend and admission is
free. For additional information
call Bob Morrison 498-8748.
ORT
Women's American ORT Boca
Century Chapter will hold their
next meeting, Wednesday, Feb.
10, noon in the Administration
building. Refreshments will be
served. ORT Century Village will
be taking a bus trip to Sheraton
Bal Harbour for dinner/luncheon
and show Pizzaz, Sunday, Feb. 16.
Donation is $35. Call Helen
482-6678, Ann 483-1833 or Tillie
483-0779.
HADASSAH
Hadaaaah Menachem Begin
Chapter will hold their HMO lun-
cheon, Tuesday, Feb. 11, noon at
St. Andrews Country Club, Boca.
The cost is $25. Their speaker will
be Elaine Elish. For reservations
call Ruth Kanort 499-5333.
Hadassah immediate past presi-
dent Mrs. Ruth L. Kantor of
Menachem Begin Chapter will
chair Hadassah Florida Atlantic
Region Award ceremony in West
Palm Beach, Sunday, Feb. 9, 1:30
p.m. All life members and
associates are invited to attend.
The honorees are Helen Popovich,
Educator, FAU: Alex W.
Dreyfoos, Jr. Philanthropist;
Stella Monchick, Registered
Nurse.
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel, Delray
Lodge No. 224 will hold their next
meeting, Monday, Feb. 10, 1 p.m.
at the American Savings Bank,
Kings Point. Their guest speaker
will be Denis S. Shore of
Prudential-Bache. Refreshments
will follow.
NA'AMAT
Na'amat Beeraheeba Club will
hold their next meeting Tuesday,
Feb. 11, 1 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank, Kings Point Plaza,
Delray. Refreshments will be
served at noon. A book review will
be given by Blanche Herzlich.
Guests are welcome.
Na'amat Kinneret Chapter will
spend an evening at Jai Alai in
West Palm Beach, Wednesday,
Feb. 12. The cost of $4 per person
includes a program. For further
information call 498-1969.
LEAGUE FOR ISRAEL
Women's League for Israel
will hold their next meeting, Mon-
day, Feb. 17, 10 a.m. in the ad-
ministration building, Century
Village West. Their boutique will
be open, refreshments will be
served and a special guest will be
their speaker. If interested in see-
ing "Getting My Act Together"
with Nancy Dessault, please call
483-3645 or 483-4371 for
information.
BRANDEIS
Brandeis Women Boca Cen-
tury Village Chapter will be tak-
ing a Valentines Day bus trip to
Stuart, Friday, Feb. 14 for a boat
ride to Frances Langford Outrig-
ger Restaurant for lunch, enter-
tainment and bus back to Boca.
For reservations call Rose
483-5838 or Eleanore 482-9704. If
you have books to donate for their
Book Fair, March 14-15, please
call Dora 482-5120 or Dorothy
483-0138 for pick-up.
Brandeis Women Trails
Chapter will hold their next
meeting, Friday, Feb. 14, 9:30
a.m. at Temple Sinai, 2475 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray. Guests are
welcome.
Brandeis Women Delray
Chapter are planning a two day
trip to the West Coast of Florida,
Feb. 11-13. For information and
reservations, contact Ida Light
499-8495 or Shirley Lossef
499-0568.
JWV
Jewish War Veterans Post 266
has elected their new slate of of-
ficers for the new year, Com-
mander, Murray Hymowitz; Sr.
Vice Commander, Jack Gehr-
inger; 1st Jr. Vice Commander
Harry Klein and 2nd Jr. Vice
Commander Mark Black.
Friday, February 7, 1986/The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 15
Ministerial Committee To Study
Mormon Center on Mt. Scopus
Retirees Can Explore
Israel As Alternative
Retired persons may find they
.are better off settling in Israel
financially and otherwise than
relocating in the U.S. or
elsewhere, according to the North
American Aliyah Movement
(NA'AM).
An exploratory trip to examine
such a possibility, and to en-
courage retired people to learn
the facts, is being sponsored by
NA'AM from May 17 through
June 2.
Areas to be investigated in-
clude: Housing, medical care and
health insurance, ulpan language
study, mortgages, legal matters,
absorption in a new environment
and financial counseling.
A fee of $1260 includes round-
trip via El Al, hotel accommoda-
tions, two meals daily (three on
Shabbat), and all land ar-
rangements and tours.
For more information, write the
North American Aliya Movement,
515 Park Avenue, New York,
N.Y. 10022 (Tel.: 212-752-0600,
ext. 230).
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
special ministerial committee
established to study the Mormon
Center presently under construc-
tion on Mt. Scopus is not likely to
halt the controversial project,
sources close to the committee
said this week.
But the panel, headed by
Religious Affairs Minister Yosef
Burg, is expected to propose
measures that it hopes will end
the fierce protests and demonstra-
tions by Orthodox Jews here and
abroad who claim the Mormon in-
stitution will become a center for
missionary activity in Israel.
The project is sponsored by
Brigham Young University of
Provo, Utah, the educational
branch of the Mormon Church,
headquartered in Salt Lake City.
Mormon leaders have pledged
there will be no proselytizing in
Israel and agreed to accept an
Israeli advisory board of secular
and lay religious leaders to
monitor the Center's activities.
The committee headed by Burg,
veteran leader of the National
Religious Party, may propose that
the Mormon Center be classified
officially as a theological seminary
as well as a university. That wouid
put it under the joint jurisdiction
of the Education Ministry and the
Religious Affairs Ministry.
The Burg committee was set up
by the Cabinet two weeks ago
after the Labor-Likud unity coali-
tion government came under in-
tense pressure from the religious
parties in the coalition to kill the
project. It was initiated during a
Likud administration, is strongly
backed by Likud and Labor
ministers, and has received the re-
quisite building licenses from all
the relevant authorities.
Its supporters argue that the
Mormon Center will not only
make an economic contribution to
Jerusalem but will stand out as
the first major American institu-
tion built under Israel govern-
ment auspices on land conquered
by Israel in the 1967 war.
DO YOU BELONG TO ANY OF THESE?
AMIT
B'NAI B'RITH OR
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
BRANDEIS
HADASSAH/HADASSAH
ASSOCIATES
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
IF YOU DO -
should know that every one of
them endorses SUPER
SUNDAY and encourages you,
their members, to take part.
WHEN YOU volunteer two
hours of your time on SUPER
SUNDAY to sit at the phones
and make friendly, casual calls to
your friends and neighbors in the
South County community, you
not only fulfill an important
function for your organization
and the entire South County
Mishpocha you also actually
enjoy yourself. Ask any of the
hundreds of volunteers from
previous years.
NA'AMAT
NAT'L COUNCIL OF
JEWISH WOMEN
ORT
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
OR ANY OF THE AREA'S
11 SYNAGOGUES
IF YOU DON'T ...
Here is an opportunity for you
to take part in one of the most
important community-wide
projects which will make you feel
like you do belong as indeed
every Jew does!
For we see every member of
the Jewish Community as one of
us, and on SUPER SUNDAY we
all try to make that come
true...
So go ahead, try it. Come and
be a SUPER SUNDAY volunteer
help us, yourself, and the
Jewish People all over it feels
good!
Step forward and join the hundreds of volunteers who will join to
make SUPER SUNDAY a greater event than ever before. Call
368-2737, ask for Joy London and tell her you want to register as a
volunteer for Super Sunday. Please, do it today.
JOIN THE WINNING TEAM!
1M


Page 16 The Jewish Floridian of South County/Friday, February 7, 1986
'Silent no mote'
Soviet Jewry update
v8)i4* 'mmmmmmwmmmmm
Mathematician VLADIMIR
LIFSCHITZ, 45, the staunchest
friend and supporter of ROALD
ZELICHONOK, who was recently
sentenced to three years on
charges of "... defaming the
Soviet state .," was himself ar-
rested on Jan. 8 on a similar
charge.
o
UJI MOM CANT DO IT ALL
O
Some weeks ago ROSA
FINKELBERG, a Moscow
geologist, was one of the
signatories to a letter from
women refuseniks to the Com-
munist Party Congress asking for
an opportunity to discuss their
refusals.
*irs *
OawMiijJUiiMuuuMuuuiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiitiflii'in^riiiiiiifl
A four-hour search of his apart-
ment, in the presence of his wife
ANNA, resulted in the confisca-
tion of private letters and
documents concerned with
LIFSCHITZ'S four-and-a-half-
year-old application for emigra-
tion to Israel.
Enraged, ANNA sent identical
telegrams to Secretary General
Gorbachev and USSR Procurator
General Rekunkov, which in part
read: "My husband never engaged
in slanderous fabrications and he
never referred in his private cor-
respodence to any questions con-
cerning the political regime of the
country which he has been plann-
ing to leave. The letters only con-
tained a truthful presentation of
facts concerning the life of our
family. The real reason for
persecuting my husband is his
desire to repatriate to Israel
together with his family. The con-
fiscation during a search in our
apartment of the affidavits (in-
vitations) from Israel, needed to
apply for emigration, can serve as
confirmation of this claim.
"I demand your intervention
and immediate closure of this case
based on illegally intercepted
private letters, a fact which 1
found out from my conversation
with Investigator Pristantskov ol
the State Procurator's Office. II
such a step is not taken, this case
will serve as one more proof of
state persecution of Jewish
refuseniks in the USSR."
BORIS BEGUN, son of long-
term Prisoner of Conscience
IOSIF BEGUN, and Begun's wife
INNA, recently staged hunger
strikes to protest the severe ver-
dict against Iosif. Iosif officially
was accused of using his cultural
activity for illegal purposes, he is
held in severe conditions contrary
to the courts's decision.
Inna asks that appeals on
Iosif s behalf be sent to
General Secretary Mikhail
Gorbachev and to Boris
Vasilyevich Kravtsov,
Minister of Justice, ulitsa
Obuka 4, Moscow 129028,
(Tel. 206-05-54).
SIMON SHNIRMAN returned
to Kishinev from Labor Camp.
Since he has served two terms of
imprisonment, the routine would
be for him to serve a period of
twelve months "probation." This
means that he will not be allowed
to leave the city without police ap-
proval; he will not be allowed to
leave his home after dark; and he
will have to report to the police
dairy.
Twenty-eight-year-old SIMON,
a metallurgical technician, was
imprisoned from 1978-81 and
1983-86 for "draft evasion." He
refused to comply with the call up
on the grounds that serving two
years in the Armed Froces
automatically labelled him "a
security risk" for at least a fur-
ther five years. SHNIRMAN is
married to ELIZAVETA. They
ave a daughter, YANA, who will
be 3 in March.
The women didn't get a reply,
but at the end of December ROSA
got a summons from the KGB.
She and her husband EVGENY
were interviewed separately, and
ROSA was told that it was inad-
visable to send collective letters
and that she should not put her
signature to any such letters in
the future.
ROSA's encounter with the
KGB was similar to an earlier one
last July. She was a signatory to a
letter from a number of women to
Valentina Tereshkova, President
of the Soviet Women's Commit-
tee, asking her for support in
gaining official recognition for
their Jewish study cricle. On that
occasion, too, ROSA was told not
to sign collective letters.
The women's circle was not
given official recognition, but it
does meet occasionally to ex-
change ideas on such things as
Jewish cookery and traditions.
Bomb Explodes
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
woman was slightly injured and
taken to a hospital for treatment
for shock when a bomb exploded
in Afula Tuesday. It was the
eighth terrorist blast in the
Jezreel valley town in recent mon-
ths. The explosive charge was hid-
den under bushes near the Afula
bus station.
TV Blackout Ends
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
four-day television blackout last
week ended after a labor court
ordered striking employees to
return to work and instructed the
Broadcast Authority to re-instate
union leader Hezi Koka, whose
dismissal triggered the walkout.
"If we could only have parties
the way we used to!" explained
Rona.
"They needn't be fancy," added
her sister happily, "just chicken
and french fries and then, Mom,
some of your famous brownies.
Umh!!"
"Darlings," said Jill, spreading
out her hands in a hopeless
gesture and glancing at the JFCS
counselor, as if pleading for sup-
port. "I wish I could bake, but I
don't have the time or energy.
Now that Dad and I ire divorced
and I work, I'm too tired to plan
parties. Over weekends there's so
much to do, errands, phone calls,
cleaning ..."
Jill appealed again to the
counselor with a despairing
gesture. "All of us are going
through such a terrible adjust-
ment," she explained. That's why
I came here for counseling with
the girls. "I'm overwhelmed and
they're upset because everything
is different for them."
Nodding, the counselor turned
to the younger of the two girls.
"How has life changed for you
since the divorce?" she asked.
Ten-year-old Rona answered
readily with a touch of resentment
in her voice. "We had to leave our
old school and now we don't see
any of our friends. Mom says she's
too busy to have them over for
dinner."
"We used to do a lot of fun
things like ride horses and take
dance lessons," broke in Cindy,
"but Mom says we can't afford
that any more and anyway I guess
she wouldn't be willing to drive us
there. Next summer we won't be
able to go back to camp."
"I had a dance solo in the class
play," Rona continued, "and
neither of our parents came." She
then murmured, almost to herself,
"Well, I really didn't ask Dad."
"The children are right," Jill
observed. "Their whole pattern of
life has been disrupted."
As the hour ended, the
counselor smiled at Jill and com-
mented quietly, "you mentioned
before that you and the girls came
here because you feel overwhelm-
ed by the substantive problems
you're facing. You were wise to do
that. We can give you support and
advice in working things out. At
the same time," she pointed out,"
there's very real extra emotional
stress that comes from making a
major family change and becom-
ing a one-parent household. My
hunch," she observed, "is that as
healthy people you and the girls
can handle this situation
yourselves. But you could pro-
bably resolve your problems
faster and more easily if our agen-
cy helped a little."
Conferring quickly, Jill and the
girls agreed to visit Jewish Family
and Children's Service again for
several sessions as a family. At
the counselor's suggestion Jill ar-
ranged to meet with her alone the
following week. At that time the
two women talked about Jill's per-
sonal difficulties. Since she was
receiving very little child-support
money from her husband she had
returned to work, using skills
learned before marriage. Her low
job status in a department store
added to her feelings of poor self-
worth that the divorce had arous-
ed. The social worker asked the
Jewish Vocational Service to give
Jill guidance in building a more
promising career.
In the family sessions the
therapist encouraged the children
to talk about their real losses.
They complained that before the
divorce they never had to be con-
cerned about the work of the
house. "Now you have to share
some of that burden," the
counselor told them firmly. "If
you help, your mother will have
the time and energy to do the
special kinds of things you miss.
In a family that functions well,
"she remarked, "members sup-
port one another. That's the pat-
tern you should establish in your
household."
The girls were quiet for a few
minutes and then Cindy slowly
asked her mother, "Mom, if we
vacuum and dust this weekend,
could we ask some kids over for
Sunday supper?" Her eyes bright
with pleasure, Jill nodded assent.
Questioning Rona further about
her class play, the therapist learn-
ed that the girls generally exclud-
ed their father from their school
lives to avoid offending their
mother. "He's still your Dad," the
counselor objected, shaking her
head, "and if he wants to be more
involved in your life, fine. That's
not being disloyal to your Mom."
With the therapist's guidance
Jill and her daughters now work
as a team. Together, they give fre-
quent small parties. Thanks to
scholarships, arranged by Jill and
the counselor, the girls will be able
to go to camp next summer. Jill is
studying accounting, with the en-
couragement of her daughters,
who understand the importance of
helping mother achieve her career
goals. The girls visit their dad
often, on nights when Jill has
classes.
Besides Jill and the girls, more
than 50 single-parent families
turned to Jewish Family and
Children's Service for guidance
during the past year. Through
your contribution to the South
County Jewish Federation you
gave them the advice and emo-
tional support they needed to
develop a sound family life.
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service, in con-
junction with the Levis
Jewish Community Center,
will be running a support
group for divorced parents,
and a separate group for the
children, beginning Feb. 19
for four consecutive
Wednesdays.
For more information contact:
DENA FELDMAN, at the
Jewish Family and Children's Ser-
vice (395-3640) or MARIANNE
LESSER, at the Levis Jewish
Community Center (395-5546).
-----------ROTBl-----------
Ordained, advanced college and
university degrees verted In
very section of congregational,
educational and community
areas Is Interested In chal-
lenging lulltlmt pulpit. Minimum
salary $15,000.
Writ* to:
HO c/o The Jewish Ftortdlan,
P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Fla. 33101
WHAT DO YOU GET FOR $109,900 IN BOCA DEL MAR?
RYTHING!
Canatuffalm Club
A select community of just 56
Fee simple villas and townhomes ^
adjoining Boca Fointe, *%r
Community Features: heated
pool, recreation building, sauna,
tennis courts.
Homes Feature: 1,913-3,144 sq. ft
total living space Garage,
Extravagant array of luxury
extras all included in one low price
DIRECTIONS: Canary Palm Drive runs
east offPowerline Rd between
Camino Real and SW18 St
10-5.
FINAL PHASE. ACT NOW! B*
Canary Palm Club, 6676 Canary Palm Circle, Boca Raton, Florida33433 305/368-5133.