The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00194

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be
Jewish Floridian
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
. 7 Number 7
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, February 15,1985
MMMnatM
Price 35 Cents
xles Deferred
But U.S. To Sell Saudis More Arms
)AVID FRIEDMAN
.SHINGTON -
) Secretary of State
re Shultz stressed that
the Reagan
^lustration has decided
jfer the sale of any new
to the Middle East,
ling K-15s and other
[ment to Saudi Arabia,
ioes not mean it does
flan to sell weapons to
states in the near
I think our interests are
\\y served by (the) strength
ntries in the Middle East in
bn to Israel." he said in
be to questions in the
\g session of the Senate
Relations Committee's
jnths of hearings on
can foreign policy.
JLTZ CONFIRMED the
revealed by Richard
|i\, assistant secretary of
Dr Near Eastern and South
I affairs, while testifyii.g to
lllouse Foreign Affairs
Committee's subcommittee on
Europe and the Middle East.
Murphy said the ad-
ministration wants to review
"how our various programs in the
security field will complement
our efforts in the peace process"
and "how it can help achieve a
general stability" in the Mideast.
The review presumably in-
cludes Israel, but Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin told a
press conference here that Israel
has no plans to ask the U.S. for
new weapons systems.
SHULTZ'S COMMENTS
came after Sen. Rudy Bosch wit z
(R., Minn.) noted that every four
years the administration presents
Congress with a weapons
package for Saudi Arabia despite
the strong opposition to it in
Congress. Boschwitz pointed out
that Sen. Richard Lugar (H..
Ind.), the committee's chairman,
said he has scheduled the series
of hearings in an attempt to
achieve a consensus on foreign
policy. Bosch witz said that
proposing to sell arms to Saudi
Arabia would not lead to that
consensus.
But Shultz said, "As we study
this question, I don't have much
doubt in my mind that we will
find" that continued arms sales
to Saudi Arabia and other Arab
countries are needed "I can't say
at this time specifically what," he
added. "But I certainly wouldn't
sit here and say that you should
expect no proposals introduced."
Shultz said that an "example"
of the beneficial effects of past
Continued on Page 11
Sen. Rudy Boschwitz
Senator Alan Cranston
Basic Agreement
But Israel Hopes To Up '85 Aid
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Israeli Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin
asserted last Wednesday
that while Israel and the
Reagan Administration
"basically reached an
agreement" that U.S.
Despite The Problems
Lebanon War Helped Israel, U.S.
take years to evaluate
By the war in Lebanon
two things there is little
Israel has to withdraw
deploy its forces; and the
destroying the PLO's
ucture, was an absolute
|ty-
I evaluation was made last
by Yehuda Halevi,
nt and chief executive of
t>f Israel Bonds since the
gng of 1983, who was in
aton to attend a Bonds
ng to honor Rabbi and
Merle Singer of Temple
Pvi. who is a brigadier-
in the reserves, served in
Armored Corps, and
the Manpower depart-
frior t0 retirement from the
and taking on the Israel
[post. Born in Shanghai, he
military aid in 1986 will be
increased to $1.8 billion,
Israel would seek more if
the U.S. decides to provide
arms to the Arab states.
Rabin's remarks cane at a
press conference after the White
House officially announced the
figure for the 1986 appropriation,
all of it a grant, which is $400
million more than Israel is
receiving this year, but $300
million less than Israel requested.
THE DEFENSE Minister,
who met with President Reagan
at the White House last Wed-
nesday morning, said that the
Yehuda Halevi
came to Israel in 1950, aged 12,
and served in the IDF from 1955
to 1982.
The PLO, he pointed out, had
amassed incredible power, both
in the military and political
senses. Apart from posing a
serious military threat on Israel's
border, they had many countries
in awe; even former President
Jimmy Carter had admitted, in a
seminar, that the PLO exercised
more power in the UN than did
the United States.
Worse, the residents of Israel's
northern frontier areas were
thoroughly disgusted, and were
convinced that those in central
Israel just did not care about
their fate (namely, children
having to live and go to school in
Continued on Page 15
Administration had not men-
tioned to him any plan for
providing arms to such countries
as Saudi Arabia and Jordan. He
said he did not discuss this issue
specifically except to repeat the
position of every government of
Israel that Israel opposes any
sale of arms to Arab countries
that consider themselves in a
state of war with Israel.
Rabin said Israel "ap-
preciates" the U.S. increase and
indicated that it would not seek
to have the amount raised by
Congress unless new weapons are
Continued on Page 6
Cabinet Approves $23 Billion
Budget To Help Solve Crisis
School's Cantorial Concert
Promises To Be Great Hit
^uth County Jewish
wty Day School will hold
PJW concert on Wed-
| March 13, 7:30 pm.. at
I J-meth in Delray Beach.
p he the third annual
I and is one of the year's
fundraising pro ects for
t school, which is an
iZ the Sov^ County
federation.
Icncert this year will
'dynamic duo cantors
Cm Albrecht and
P Zfira.
Albrecht was the
1 soloist in the
Pus Israel Army Choir
'Pient of the American-
Avraham Albrecht
Avshalom Zfira
and
Israel Cultural Foundation
Award. He has toured in Yiddish
concerts with the internationally
renowned Molly Picon, and has
appeared in operas in Israel with
the Jerusalem Symphony. He is
currently cantor of the Dot Hills
Jewish Center in New York.
Cantor Zfira is from Jerusalem,
and of Yemenite ancestry. His
singing career began after ser-
ving his army stint and studying
at the Rubin Academy in
Jerusalem. He serves as cantor of
the Marathon Jewish Center in
New York.
The two cantors have been
singing together since 1982, and
have had numerous appearances
on television, radio and in
Continued on Page 5
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Tne Cabinet has
unanimously approved a
$23 billion budget for fiscal
year 1985, presented by
Finance Minister Yitzhak
Modai. According to Modai
it is a step toward solving
the economic crisis.
Although only marginally
smaller than the budget for fiscal
1984, it represents a reduction of
nearly $2 billion from last year's
actual spending. The effects of
the new budget will be to reduce
living standards by about five
percent. There will be a similar
drop in real wages and higher
taxes. Increased unemployment
is considered inevitable.
MODAI, the target of criticism
from his colleagues when he first
presented his draft budget last
month because he did not cut
enough, emerged satisfied from
the Cabinet session. He
cautioned, however, that what
was approved was a budget
"framework." The budgets of
each ministry have yet to be
made final and changes are
possible.
Modai hinted that he expects
disputes over the proposed cuts
in the defense and education
budgets. The defense budget
stands at $4 billion, of which $2.6
billion comes from local resources
and the balance from U.S.
military grants-in-aid, mainly in
the form of military equipment.
Modai said one question mark
hovering over the defense budget
is the cost of withdrawing the
Israel Defense Force from south
Lebanon, an operation begun last
month. He said it is too early to
foretell the exact cost but it is
estimated in the neighborhood of
$140 million.


nragez TM Jewisfi FIoriSTan of South County / Friday, February 15,1986
>
Press Digest
(Compiled from Israeli dailies
and the English-language Jewish
Press, by Marty Erann, Director
of Communications, South
County Jewish Federation)
The Jewish Week reports that
thousands of additional Jews,
from the same roots as the
"Falasha" Jews may be 'hidden'
in Ethiopia. According to
Kphraim Isaac, an Ethiopian Jew
who is a visiting scholar in Near
East studies at Princeton
University, and who has been
back to Ethiopia several times
since coming to the U.S. in 1961,
these Jews may number as many
as 50,000. These Jews live in
isolated villages in the moun-
tains, and are likely to remain
isolated there for the foreseeable
future. Other authorities
acknowledge the existence of
groups who follow Jewish
practices, but are reluctant to
assert that they are actually
Jews.
The Jewish Week also reports
on mezuzahs which are destined
to go into space later this month
with astronaut Jeffrey Hoffman,
the first Jewish man scheduled to
go into space aboard a shuttle on
Feb. 23. A Jewish woman
Judy Resnick has already been
in space aboard a previous
shuttle. Hoffman and his wife are
active in their synagogue and are
committed Jews. He was in Israel
as a teenager with the National
Federation of Temple Youth.
Noted Harvard University
Professor Alan Dershowitz has
defined a "new form of anti-
Jewishness," reports the
National Jewish Post and
Opinion. The professor, speaking
in lieu of Abba Eban as keynoter
at Lehigh University, cited
numerous examples of this "more
dangerous than anti-Zionism and
more modern than anti-
Semitism" form of racism.
Among these examples was a
quote from Jesse Jackson, who
told Dershowitz he (Jackson) had
met Jews who supported Israel
but did not fight for social
justice, and Jews who fought for
social justice, but did not support
Israel. But he had never met
Jews who supported both,
Jackson said.
In another item, the P and O
tells of a letter sent to Jesse
Jackson by Rabbi Michael
Menitoff of Bnai Jacob
Congregation in Woodbridge,
Conn., asking him to intervene to
help save Ethiopian Jewry.
Rabbi Menitoff sent the letter on
the eve of Martin Luther King
Jr.'s birthday, noting that the
rabbi's mentor, the late Abraham
J. Heschel, was a close confidant
of the late Dr. King.
The P and O also featured a
major article on a report from a
two-man committee appointed to
study the need for com-
munications between the Jewish
Agency and world Jewry. The
two men were Alfred Fleischman,
former president of the St. Louis
Jewish Federation, and Howard
Weisband, a staffer of the
Agency. The report was
published by the Intermountain
Jewish News out of Denver,
which is edited by Hillel Gold-
berg, an Israeli resident.
(Goldberg has often published
articles critical of Jewish
establishment leaders and
policies, which has gained him a
reputation varying from
"courageous" to "maverick"in
the Jewish press M.E.)
The paper published a four-
page reproduction of confidential
reports under the heading
"Jewish Agency in Crisis." In
the report Fleischman and
Weisband say, "Hofberger
(chairman of the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors) needs to
speak more directly to the board,
tell them what's going on the
good, the bad, and the problems.
His first target should be the
board people then his
Assembly then to the 2,000
to 3,000 important Jewish
leaders. He needs to extend his
personal contact through
newsletter, etc., to local
Federation leaders in the larger
communities, at least There
should be strong Jewish Agency
committees in every major
federation. ."
Editorially, the P and O says
the Jewish Agency has long been
an anachronism, and needs more
overhauling than merely better
communications not only with
the Jewish world, but also in-
ternally. If there is a fear in the
Agency that Israel's share of
fund-raising proceeds will
decrease, that would be minimal.
And there are already many fund-
raising groups outside the
federations from Brandeis
through the Anti-Defamation
League and recently even the
Weisenthal Institute. This is
"not far short of chaos," says the
P and O, and what is needed is
not just a study of the Jewish
Agency, but of fund-raising as a
whole.
Predictably, almost every
publication had some editorial
comment on whether Ariel
Sharon won or lost his fight
against Time magazine, with the
evaluation also predictable,
according to each publication's
customary position on Sharon
the man. Thus, The Jerusalem
Post, calling Sharon "the chief
architect of the ill-advised
Lebanon escapade," says it
would be "preposterous to apply
the term moral victory to a man
like Sharon, who bears moral
responsibility for Israel's mo3t
senseless war, as well as for the
events surrounding the massacre
at the Palestinian camps in
Beirut, even had he won his libel
suit against Time." As for Time's
share in the whole affair, says
The Jerusalem Post, it merely
proved that Time "performed a
disservice to the journalistic
community (Time) com-
mitted a serious error to which
journalists are often prone."
A story which started with
rumored difficulties experienced
by an Israeli stock-market giant
with a low profile, 39-year-old
David Bias, has led Yediot
Aharonot to write a side-bar
story exposing the kibbutz
movement as a financial giant
which is deeply involved in the
financial markets. It started with
a "mini-crash" in the stock
market in Tel Aviv, attributed to
the rumors of Bias' difficulties. It
turns out that one of the debts
supposedly jeopardized was one
of $50 million to a company called
Eshet Funds, which is owned by
the kibbutzim and is used to
make loans in what is known as
the "grey market."
Says Yediot: Every time one of
the financial giants collapsed, in
the past, the kibbutzim proved to
be involved and lost large sums.
This was true in January 1983,
when the Rieger-Fishman group
collapsed, it was true late that
year when the bank stocks
crashed, and later when Yoram
Gil (owner of a large high-tech
company) had difficulties and the
kibbutzim joined demands to put
him into receivership.
The kibbutzim have surpluses
amounting to as much as $300
million, which they use for short
term investments in loans and in
the stock market, says Yediot.
Usually this is done quietly, and
often through "straw men."
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LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
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Germany, Poland, Hungary and
Rumania have independently
agreed to share their heretofore
confidential archives of the
Holocaust period with scholars
from Israel's Yad Vashem
Martyrs and Heroes Remem-
brance Authority, it was an-
nounced by Abraham Spiegel,
chairperson of the Los Angeles
Martyrs Memorial and Museum
of the Holocaust, its West Coast
affiliate.
"We are very anxious to have
access to this material," Spiegel
noted, "for it will enable us to
make significant advances in
repairing the patchwork of the
history of the period. We will be
able to trace the fates of in-
dividuals, of communities, of the
development of a genocide which
should never again happen to any
people on earth."
The German state j
archive in LudwigsbJ
contains essential infon'
available for research* J
whatever is considered?1
^.^YadVashea*
facility. While the pZj
have been accessible to i
for about three years
those of the other i
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It is estimated that ho
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which include those of thtj.
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A Rabbi Comments
\lbwing is brought to our
by the South County
[at Association. If there
cs vou would like our
jto discuss, please submit
Vfhe Floridian.
\Y. Kabbi Merle Singer of
Beth El Is currently
involved in the
[ereihl issue of the use of
Ibooks in public schools of
each County. He chose to
|ce in this column the text
position statement he
the Palm Beach School
Recently. Please see "On
nd That," P. 4, for a
lit by another Reform
[who has a different
r
Itendent Mills, Members
chool Board:
se before you as a con-
parent of four children in
Beach County public
system, covering
middle and high
I also speak as a
ntativc of the religious
nity, representing not
yself as rabbi of Temple
I of Boca Raton, but I also
Ifor the Anti-Defamation
jofB'nai B'rith.
Iviews I am about to ex-
re those shared by clergy
faiths, including Msgr.
IcMahon of St. Joan of
Patholic Church, whose
will be expressed tonight
eparate letter; Rev. Dr.
Stephenson of The First
terian Church of Boca
and Rev. Conrad Braaten
Affirmation Lutheran
Bt to com end the members
school board who for
years have worked to
quality of education in
blic schools. I am deeply
Jed that issues such as
efore us this evening will
deter the school board
pursuit of excellence in
n.
question of book cen-
is not new; and a recent
of educators indicated
fcore than 200 books were
|ted to censorship
res. ranging from the
tan Heritage Dictionary to
fwain's Huckleberry Finn,
|I> Salinger's Catcher In
ye. Even The Diary of
did not escape the
Is i j i because it "per-
ls the hoax'' that the
jst actually occurred.
recent display on book
at West Virginia State
it was noted that the
had been banned
bout history more than
krbook.
i we look for reasons as to
*ge of censorship in the
U answers are not hard to
|>th so much of our lives
our control: inflation,
oyment, even bread lines,
l have been established up
[threats of terrorism, and
ring family structure all
I us.
a" age of instant
Won, it makes sense,
not, to seek instant cures.
psh Agency Deal
AVIV (JTA) -The
I *gency and the Ministry
F>rption last week reaf-
I* previous understanding
Agency would deal with
"'grants during their first
Israel and that the
would take over after
Pe period had concluded.
You pick up a book with critical
social ideas and you believe that
you have discovered the cause of
the problem: corruption of the
mind; corruption of the body;
corruption of society. Don't read
about the problem. Don't read
about drinking, teenage
pregnancy, child abuse, for if you
avoid these social issues you will
not be infected by them.
Therefore, when the free flow of
ideas, many of which we object
to, become too frightening to
handle and live with, the
response is that the ideas must be
removed, expunged and cen-
sored.
I would like to raise several
questions with you this evening.
Is the purpose of community
pressure to inform, to include
information previously
unavailable, to broaden the base
of knowledge? Or is the purpose
to exclude information, to hide
knowledge?
Knowledge is power. William
A. Chappel, a member of the
Warsaw. Indiana, School Board,
where the Values Clarification
texts were burned, stated, "The
bottom line is, who will control
the minds of the students?" He
Friday, February 15,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Rabbi Merle Singer
understood that those who
control information control not
only minds but also action. The
purpose of education in a free
society is the expansion of
knowledge so that students will
be able to make responsible,
informed choices in a democratic
society.
In commenting on the cen-
sorship of Values Clarification in
Warsaw, Indiana, the president
of the American Society of
Journalists and Authors wrote,
"And this is what those
frightened people in Warsaw,
Indiana, objected to: to high
school students' thinking about
these issues for themselves,
taking the best advice their
parents and teachers (and may I
add, the advice of their churches
and synagogues) had to offer,
and then making up their minds
for themselves. The saddest
thing about the actions against
this book is the lack of confidence
the adults who banned it and
burned it show in the ability of
young people to think hard about
the important issues in their lives
and to come up with their own
answers not the answers we
give them because as much
as we might like to think so, we
don't have all the answers."
We in the religious community
know from our own bitter ex-
periences the dangers of living in
repressive societies, where only
the opinions of those in power
may be expressed. When Religion
and State are joined, censorship
is sure to follow.
At issue is the basic question.
Even if a local community were
to arrive at some consensus,
should the majority be allowed to
suppress minority views, no
matter how unpopular, or censor
texts in order to rewrite history,
or limit critical thinking?
A recent editorial in The
Christian Century observed that
"fundamental to any free people
is the right to access to printed
matter. The First Amendment
was added to our Constitution in
part to protect words and ideas
which the majority might find
objectionable. These are
protected under the Amendment
because freedom is a precious
commodity that flourishes best in
an atmosphere of openness.'
I conclude by reminding the
members of the school board of
the United States District Court
judge who ordered the Chelsea,
Mass., School Board to restore an
anthology of writings by
adolescents to the high school
library. (The board's decision to
remove it had been made on the
complaint of parents to the
language in one of the selections.!
In the decision. Judge Joseph
Tauro wrote, "What is at stake
here is the right to read and be
exposed to controversial
thoughts. A valuable right
subject to first amendment
protection. The most effective
antidote to the poison of mindless
orthodoxy is ready access to a
broad sweep of ideas. There is no
danger in such exposure: The
danger is in mind control."
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/. lm
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, February 15,1986
On This and That
By RABBI
BRUCE S. WARSHAL
Executive Director,
South County Jewish F
Elsewhere in this issue Rabbi
Merle Singer of Temple Beth El
published his recent speech
before the Palm Beach County
School Board. In this column I
would like to present an alter-
native view of the same issue.
It is important to remember
that I speak as an individual
rabbi and not for the Federation,
just as I am sure Rabbi Singer
would make no claim for
representing the views of the
almost 1300 members of his
congregation. I also believe that
it is healthy for the Jewish
community to see an open
disagreement and dialogue
between two rabbis who are
basically seeking the same ends.
The present imbroglio involves
the use of a book entitled Let's
Talk About Health in the middle
schools of Palm Beach County. A
coalition of Christian con-
servatives has banded together
and asked the school board to
cease using this text. Now a
liberal group calling itself the
Coalition for Quality Education
has been formed in support of the
use of this book. I personally sit
somewhere between these polar
positions.
I count myself as one of the few
Rabbi Bruce Warshal
people who have actually read the
text. Having done so, I believe
that we are not dealing with an
issue of book burning or far-right
extremism. Not every text is
perfect, and not every complaint
from the Fundamentalist
Christian community is spurious.
I would have no problems with
my child using this particular
text, but precisely because I am a
liberal I understand the
protestations from the Right.
The book covers controversial
areas such as drugs, sex and
alcohol. It clearly talks about the
dangers of alcoholism but
ultimately gives the student the
right to choose whether he or she
should drink. I have no problems
with this, but I understand the
reservations of a committed
Methodist who believes that
liquor is a tool of Satan.
The text also describes the use
of contraceptives and indicates to
the student his or her right to
choose whether to use them and
whether to have an abortion in
case of pregnancy. I do not wish
to shield my 12-year-old daughter
from this information and would
have no problem with her reading
this text; however, if I were a
committed Catholic or Fun-
damentalist Christian who
believed that abortion is akin to
murder, I would have every right
to protest the public schools
offering the option of murder
through abortion to my child.
We complain bitterly when the
Christian Fundamentalists
attempt to introduce prayer and
bible study into our public
schools. Is not the Coalition for
Quality Education doing likewise
in the guise of values clarification
Black-Jewish Coalition
Examined On Firing Line
Affirmative action is one of the
issues that has caused some
dissension between people in the
black community and people in
the Jewish community, says Dr.
Mary Frances Berry of the U.S.
Commission on Civil Rights.
Dr. Berry Joins Firing Line
host William F. Buckley Jr. and
guests Rabbi Balfour Brickner of
New York and Professor Nathan
Glazer of Harvard to examine the
"Black-Jewish Coalition." The
program airs Sunday, Feb. 17, at
5 p.m. on WXEL-TV 42.
Rabbi Brickner also sees af-
firmative action as "one of the
major issues that create
exacerbated tensions between the
black and the Jewish com-
munity."
But Prof. Glazer disagrees that
it is a principal point of issue
now, stating that women have
been helped much more than
blacks by affirmative action.
What is more important, ac-
cording to Glazer, are foreign
policy views, our relationship to
the Third World, South Africa,
the whole issue of prejudice in
general.
Whether blacks and Jews can
have a successful alliance, ac-
cording to Dr. Berry, depends on
why they formed a coalition in
the first place. If it was done for
self-interest, then they msut see
it as continuing to serve their
self-interest. If it was done for
humanitarian or religious
reasons, "then they might not
feel today that they ought to try
to abandon such an alliance."
Buckley and his guests discuss
black and Jewish viewpoints as
they pertain to South Africa,
public education, the Republican
and Democratic parties, and
Jesse Jackson.
Dr. Berry is a professor of
history and law at Howard
University. She received her
bachelor's and master's degrees
at Howard, her doctorate in
history and law degree from the
University of Michigan.
Brickner is rabbi of the
Stephen Wise Free Synagogue in
New'York. A former national
director of the department of
Interreligious Affairs of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, Rabbi Brickner
was co-founder of New York
City's black-Jewish dialogue
group. He is a graduate of the
Unviersity of Cincinnati and the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion.
Glazer is professor of sociology
at Harvard and a widely
published writer. He attended
City College of New York, the
University of Pennsylvania and
took his doctorate at Columbia.
Austrian Minister
Apologizes to 'Public'
VIENNA (JTA) -
Defense Minister
Friedhelm Frischen-
schlager has apologized to
Chancellor Fred Sinowatz
"and to the public" for
what he called "this
miscalculation," his
characterization of the
personal greeting he ex-
tended last month to Nazi
war criminal Walter Reder
on his return .to his native
Austria after nearly 40
years in prison in Italy.
Frischenschlager's reception of
Reder touched off the worst
political storm in Austria's recent
historv. It threatened the sur-
Thc
Jewish Floridian
of South County f(II)Sloe(lll
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Editor and Pubnifier Executive Editor NeCr 9Mkti^Hr!S1 "*?-S-P"> through ">*.,. U-WMfcly fune. rll"=",l,"
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Jewish Federation. 336Spanish RwrBlvd N W Boca Raton Fla 33431 Phone36827V
Out ol Town Upon Reouest. J
Friday, February 15,1985
Volume 7
24SHEVAT5746
Number 7
vival of Sinowatz s Socialist-led
coalition government of which
the defense minister's small,
right-leaning Freedom Party
(FPOE) is a partner. Sinowatz
had ordered the defense minister
to cut short a three-day official
visit to Egypt and to return home
to explain his action.
HIS JOURNEY to Graz to
meet Reder, a 69-year-old former
SS Major convicted of the mass
murder of civilians in Italy in
1944, triggered demands for his
resignation across the entire
political spectrum.
In particular, it infuriated
leaders of world Jewry,
assembled in Vienna for the first
tune since World War II to at-
tend a meeting of the governing
board of the World Jewish
Congress.
Sinowatz's initial reaction to
the affair was to call it a "grave
J^^ .Uter' m a message to
WJC President Edgar Bronfman,
the chancellor said, "I am
profoundly sorry" about the
Keder incident.
In the course of his prepared
address to the WJC gathering,
Smowate told the delegates,
I he fact that this transfer (of
Reder to Austria) made for
personal contact between the
defense minister and Reder was a
grave political error.''
through the utilization of this
text? Liberal behavior is in-
cumbent on the Left as it is on
the Right.
In a meeting with the
leadership of the Coalition for
Quality Education in Rabbi
Singer's office, I heard a
spokesman for the school board
protest that there is no coercion
of the children of the parents who
disagree with the use of this text,
since a child can opt out of the
course. A spokeswoman even
protested that since this option is
available, the course is basically
an elective. I remember the
stigma of the small Jewish boy
opting out of religious education
in the public schools of a coal
town in Pennsylvania. I carry the
scars of being singled out, and
thus somehow different, to this
very day.
If it were a true elective, one of
many courses being offered at the
same time, we would have a
different dialogue today. This is a
possible compromise for the
School Board to investigate. But
with coalitions of the far right
and far left forming, with the
battle lines and cannon already in
place, with the liberals insulting
the conservatives and vice versa,
I doubt that this middle road will
be utilized.
I believe that what is bothering
the leadership of the Coalition for
Quality Education is not the
attack on Let's Talk About
Health, but the fear that if the
Fundamentalist Christian
movement wins this issue before
the school board it would be the
catapult to political power and to
the merging of church and state.
My answer to this fear is not to
fight them on a false issue. Even
the far right may be correct on
any one given issue. If they have
a legitimate complaint about this
text, let us admit it or find a
compromise by making it a true
elective. If and when the Fun-
damentalist Christians attempt
to invade the public school
system, I will gladly join the
Coalition for Quality Education
and take my stand on legitimate
issues.
Another crucial distinction
must be made: We are not
talking about book burning in the
present instance. We are
MMfclng about a particulatalext
that presents particular moral
values to a student who is
required to be in the class. When
lers A
the loonies attack tk.
^ n demand *
or. Catcher in ^ *S
Bible, it is at that time tJ'
also take my stand
Coalition for Quality i
has been quoted as ..
the leadership of the
Opting to ban fil
About Health is antXLj
regret this false indusianE
Semitism. We are 5*
with basically an intri!
struggle. The liberal (a
rxuunstream churches a^
at the rise of power and i
of the Fundamentalist
movement. They take .
opportunity to chaJW*
on issues such as thToneWj
before us. "
,.Af Jews, let us reman J
the far left Christian eS
is pro-Palestinian, pro-PLOa
I would argue, anti-Semi* y
tar right Christian moveaJ.
with the lunatic neo-Nia.
maintains that the Holoo
never occurred. We 3
enemies on both sides oil
political and religious sp
But we also have our L,
both sides. A large portioo3]
Fundamentalist ChriJ
movement, Jerry FaWl
eluded, is staunchlyproli
major portion of the
Christian movement has bead
co-partner in ecumeil
dialogue. This is not. per 1
Jewish issue and we shoukiT
careful not to make it so.
The crux of the issue it L
Values clarfication is a verji
idea, but I do not give ml
year-old the right to 44
whether she should kill or i
kill, fornicate or not fo
steal or not steal. As parauj
do dictate our moral impenti
to our children. If we don't.
name of liberality and
thinking, we are derelict a I
obligation to mold our pro)
into caring and moral hi
beings.
Some people include it
within these moral imper*
that I do not, issues suekj
abortion and liquor. If I dot
respect their list of moral l
peratives and thrust thisr
down the throats of their chi
in the public shool setting.1
I am less liberal than they. 1
should give us some camel
reflection.
Readers Write
(Note: The Jewish Floridian
welcomes letters from readers
about any issue relating to the
Jewish community here or to the
Jewish people in general.
Readers' letters do not
necessarily have to relate to
subjects which were referred to in
our paper. In fact, we encourage
readers to write and express their
opinions on current controversial
issues.)
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The Jewish Floridian, in "A
Rabbi Comments" (Feb. 1, 1985)
featured Rabbi Samuel Silver, on
the topic of "Extremism." After
a few witticisms. Silver got
serious and stated: "Patriotism
is admirable; Jingoism can be
disastrous. Resistance to
xenophobia is salutary; but if it
means glorifying violence a la the
JDL, the means nullify the
ends." The esteemed rabbi had to
get his anti-JDL (meaning anti-
Kabbi Kahane) comments in
print .. .
Practically all of (Rabbi
Silvers) public discussions with
Christian clergymen speak of
only the good values of
Christianity; always highlighting
the position of Christian "love of
the Jews." (I must remind Rabbi
51*S the ultimate aim of
the Christian leaders is the
conversion of the Jewish People
to Christianity is not that the
roost extreme goal?)
Ecumenism is one of Silvers -
favorite topics.
"Understand your Chriati
neighbor." the rabbi sermoaf
I agree with him. but doe"
Christian neighbor under*
the Jewish People? I suggests
Rabbi Silver go and walk at
the average non-Jet
grassroots community *'
soon realize that his beliefI
ecumenism is not shared by r
overwhelming number of
Jewish citizens.
Anti-Semitism is as stroof
ever; at least the JDL doap
try to lull the Jewish Peep"
a false sense of secunty.
truth being that if the U>'
an economic depression
1929), the Jews would be I
(as in Germany) and *
against the Jews would M
"acceptable" **iv*y
Aryan Christian neighbors
If defending the bv
survival of the J^*^ J
any "means or rnetw<:
eluding counter-violence
tremism, so be it j
comes to that, then UO r
JDL and Rabbi Kahane.
The credo of the Jewish
is "Never Again/' n\
exactly that. So 1 say *.
Silver- the Talmud *JJ
onea>mestokillyou,y^
lull him first." That J^*
tremism; that's common
Iseychel in Yiddish I
.. SAMUEL BOtflJ


Friday, February 15,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 6
Ancient Torah Scroll Brought Here From Morocco
[y MARTY ERANN
distance between
nce and coincidence,
mtly, is not nearly as great
gap betwen those who
and those who do not.
* Stein believes it was the
that led her and her
ri David to a dusty attic in
Ico, where they purchased
ient Torah scroll from a
. antique dealer.
Steins, who like to travel
Jifferent locale each year,
Morocco this year for no
special reason. When their guide
in Marrakesh found out they
were Jewish, he eagerly pointed
out various shops or residences,
saying: "This shop owner is a
Jew," or "Jews live here, and
here, and there." But there are
not very many Jews left in
Morocco; the bulk of the Jewish
community there left some 30
years ago, with most going to
Israel and a few to France or
other countries, following a series
of pogroms in various Moroccan
cities.
Day School Chai-lites
Upcoming Day School Activities
puary 19 Open House
pportunity for parents of
(Ctive students to tour the
Itellite campus, learn about
jaic and secular programs,
philosophy and future
^pmenls. Meet principal
Lowlicht and pre-school
or Andrea Mossovitz. A
show will be presented. 8
2450 N.W. 5th Avenue,
laton.
truary 25 Book Fair
author Robert Kimmel
author of such children's
as Jelly Belly and
\late Fever. A book sale will
Co-sponsored with the
|h and Rose I^evis Jewish
ninity Center, at the JCC,
i.m.
March 8 Schpielathon In
conjunction with our Purim
celebration. South County
Jewish Community Day School
will sponsor a "Schpielathon" to
raise funds for the school. The
students participate through
dressing in costumes and
competing in a walk-run
jogathon. Credit is earned by
number of laps completed and the
amount of money collected.
Prizes will be awarded to in-
dividuals as well as classes who
achieve set goals. Children are
encouraged to obtain sponsors by
contacting friends, relatives, and
local business and professional
people in the community. If you
would like to sponsor a student
contact Robin Bralow 395-3521.
pool's Cantorial Concert
omises To Be Great Hit
Continued from Page 1
Ft. They will perform in five
ages, and will include
every facet of Jewish
in their program. In ad-
i to cantorial selections, the
rs will sing Yiddish
Ites. Israeli and Ladino
f-ngs, Hassidic tunes, a
from Jewish Broadway
| and even a touch of Italian
kets are priced at $5 for
al admission and $18 for
patron seats (reserved front
center section), which include a
wine and cheese reception to meet
with the cantors after the con-
cert. Special group rates are
available for 25 or more tickets.
Tickets are available at: South
County Jewish Community Day
School (395-3212); Levis Jewish
Community Center (395-5546);
B'nai Torah Congregation (392-
8566); Temple Beth Shalom at
Century Village (483-5557); and
Temple Emeth (498-3536).
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The guide also led the Steins to
a Moslem religious leader who
deals in antiques, saying he
happened to know the dealer had
an old "Jewish scroll" in his
possession. "The antique dealer
happened to be an honorable
man," says Barbara. "I happen
to know this because when his
assistant exaggerated the age of
a certain artifact, he scolded the
man saying he was sorry he had
to embarrass him, but he would
not stand for an attempt to
mislead a stranger." (This was in
their native tongue, but was
translated by the guide.)
The dealer showed the Steins
an ancient Torah scroll, in the
back of a dark, dusty attic he
had not placed it on display, and
that helped convince the Steins
he had not intended to sell it. He
said a Berber friend of his, a Jew,
had placed the scroll with him for
safekeeping some 30 years ago.
and promised to return to claim
it. The man, said the dealer, was
quite old at that time, and was
probably no longer alive. Still, he
was reluctant to part with an
object that was entrusted to him
by a friend.
It was only when the Steins
appealed to him as a religious
figure, saying he could un-
derstand the need to return a
holy Jewish object to Jewish
hands, that the dealer agreed to
let them have it without
bargaining, for the price they
said they were prepared to pay.
Bringing the Torah back to
their home was quite an ex-
perience for the Steins, who are
now searching for experts to
determine its exact age and
origin. It has also served as a
source of pride and inspiration for
their children, who look at it with
love and reverence every day.
The scroll is written on
goatskin parchment, backed with
a layer of muslin-like fabric for
protection. The parchment is
darkened with age, and there
appear to be some places where
the seams have been crudely
resewn. It came with a pair of
crown bells of brass, which
appear quite old and crudely
formed, believed typical of the
work of Berber Jews.
The Steins have not decided, as
yet. what they will ultimately do
with the Torah scroll. First they
want to finish all the research and
learn all they can about it who
wrote it, when it was written and
where. But wherever they decide
to place it, finally, the feeling of
pride will always stay with them
it was a "once in a lifetime"
experience.
(Barbara Stein chairs the
Federation's Community
Relations Council.)
Barbara Stein holds the Sefer
Torah she brought back from
Morocco.
The white seen on the scroll is a
fabric. The scroll itself, as can be
seen on the inscribed surface, is
darkened with age.
TO YOUR
HEALTH
iiM^r
Km?
7?5F
=F
is.. ?.
ffite
Choosing a residential retirement
community is more than a matter of
selecting an attractive setting. It is a
decision that will effect your physical
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your retirement years.
For this reason, there is a crucial
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neighboring communities for people
62 and over. A difference that can
have a direct result on your health for
the rest of your life.
There are other differences at The
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%cQwrt'
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To learn more about the differences
that make The Court at Palm-Aire
Florida's most unique residential
retirement community, please call
(305) 975-8900, or fill out and return
the attached coupon.
To your health. From The Court at
Palm-Aire.
You're invited to Preview '85!
Palm-Aire Spa Hotel
2501 Palm-Aire Drive North
Pompano Beach, FL
Wednesday, February 27
10:00 AM or 2:00 PM
Another community by Life Care
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care community in the country.
Resort environment
Spacious apartments
Elegant dining .
Minibus transportation
Maid and linen service
24 hour security
Health care
Pool, spa and exercise rooms
Library, card room, art studio,
music room and auditorium
Commissary and drug store
Beauty and barber shop
Please make your reservations early, as seating is limited.
To R.S.V.P., please call Janet at (305) 975-8900 or fill out
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| The Court at Palm-Aire 2701 North Course Drive
j Pompano Beach, FL 33069 (305) 975-8900
' Please reserve____seats at Preview 1985 on:
Wed. Feb. 27____10:00 AM ___2:00 PM
! Name_____________________________________________
Address
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I My Guests are:
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State
Zip
Corptiratton
SCF 2/15*5
'


lUUy.UHCBIBUW I.IW4
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, February 15,1986
Sephardim in U.S.
They Must Revive Their Traditions
By JEAN WEISS
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
Just as it is important for the
Ashkenazic Jewish community in
the United States to better
understand Sephardic Jews as
they rise to positions of influence
in Israel, so too is it important for
Sephardim in the U.S. to revive
their traditions before they assi-
milate into the larger, dominant
U.S. Ashkenazic community,
said the recently appointed
executive director of the Amer-
ican Sephardi Federation, Rabbi
Joshua Toledano.
"There is more than one aspect
to Judaism than the norm ac-
cepted by the Ashkenazic com-
munity," he said. Since more
than 60 percent of the Jews in
Israel are Sephardic, Toledano
said he predicts there will be a
Sephardic prime minister in the
not too distant future.
BECAUSE OF the population
trend, Israel will become a
"Middle Eastern" country in-
stead of a "European" county in
the Middle East, the rabbi said.
Consequently, U.S. Ashkenazic
Jews should be acquainted with
the customs, traditions and her-
itage of their Sephardic brethren
so they can interact better with
them, said Toledano. the spiritual
leader of Congregation Mikveh
Israel in Philadelphia, the city's
oldest synagogue (17401 and only
Sephardic one.
Originally "Sephardim" were
of Spanish and Portuguese
descent. The term now includes
Jews from Arab countries in the
middle East, he said.
Ashkenazim came from Central
and Eastern Europe.
The 44-year-old Moroccan-born
rabbi said. "Negotiations with
the Arabs would have had a dif-
ferent tone" if Sephardim, accus-
tomed to the Arab mind, had
played a larger role. "A mistake
was made by the Israeli leader-
ship by not involving more
Sephardim and getting their
input in decisions regarding the
peace treaty with Egypt,"
Toledano said.
"SEPHARDIM could have
advised the leadership as to the
best way to negotiate with the
Arabs. Arabs don't sign con-
tracts. Contracts are basically a
European mode. That is why the
Egyptians are carrying out the
minimum requirements of the
treaty rather than its spirit." The
treaty with Lebanon was broken
because of Arab disregard for
contracts, he added.
From the late 1940s to the
early 1960's, Sephardic im-
migrants arriving in Israel were
poor and uneducated. They were
considered the underclass.
Toledano said. Only within the
last decade has a better educated,
younger generation started
taking its place in Israel's econ-
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omic, social and political spheres.
An example is David Levy, a
deputy prime minister. Toledano
pointed out.
The U.S. Ashkenazic com-
munity already is showing
greater interest in Sephardim as
a result of Israel's demographic
shift and because a growing
number of Sephardic Israelis now
are living in the U.S., he said.
TOLEDANO, who comes from
an unbroken line of 45 genera-
tions of rabbis dating back to pre-
Inquisition Spain, recalled the
dominance that Sephardic
scholars had in teaching, philo-
sophy and writing, including bi-
blical commentaries and poetry,
through the 15th century. It was
not until the 16th century that
Ashkenazic scholars started
coming to the forefront.
The rabbi urged the 250,000 to
300,000 Sephardim in the U.S. to
remember their past and to keep
alive their customs and tradi-
tions. Sephardim were the first
Jewish settlers in the U.S., but
were soon outnumbered by
Ashkenazim. The largest im-
migration of Sephardim began at
the end of the 1800s and conti-
nued until 1924. About 50.000
people arrived from the Balkans.
Turkey. Yugoslavia and Greece
They settled in New York and
Philadelphia.
"To some extent they were un-
wanted by local Jewish welfare
boards because they were less
intellectual and less fortunate
than other new arrivals,"
Toledano said. Their Ashkenazic
co-religionists could not identify
with them because they did not
speak Yiddish, he added. Some
Sephardim, therefore, headed
West and settled in Seattle.
Today, Seattle has the second
largest Sephardic community in
the U.S. after New York.
"FOR IMMIGRANTS in the
United States less than 100
years, spread around the country
and busy trying to make a living,
they could never get organized,"
he said.
Discussing the role of the ASF,
Toledano described it as a cul-
tural and communal organization
designed "to inform Sephardic
Jews about their Sephardic her-
itage. Its goals are to preserve
Sephardic culture, to promote
programs, activities and insti-
tutions of Sephardic interest and
work hand in hand with local
Federations in support of the
Jewish community in general and
Israel in particular." He said the
ASF is non-political and does not
support any Israeli political
party.
The ASF sponsors seminars
and conferences and has
established a speakers bureau,
said Toledano, who is a visiting
professor of Sephardic studies at
Yeshiva University. Besides
publishing books, the ASF
provides needy Sephardic writers
with scholarships for work relat-
ing to the Sephardic community.
A young leadership program has
been established.
Toledano stressed that the
ASF "is not in competition with
other Jewish Federations and is
not trying to take away from
other fundraising efforts nor
fragment the Jewish com
munity."
"MANY SEPHARDIC Jews
are now unknown to local
Federations." he said. In an
effort to reach Sephardim alien-
ated from the Jewish community
at large, a "Sephardic desk" has
been established at local Jewish
Federations where there is a size-
able Sephardic community.
Toledano said. "This will provide
support for fund-raising acti-
vities and bring to attention the
needs of the Sephardic com-
munity in that city."
The 15-year-old ASF "has had
its ups and downs in terms of
organization and is trying to get
cohesive," Toledano said. "As
the (Sephardic) community be-
came more organized nationwide,
the need for a headquarters be-
came more apparent." Toledano
commutes from Philadelphia
weekly to the ASF's New York
headquarters.
To help the ASF become esta-
blished, Toledano said he is
forfeiting his salary and is vol-
unteering his time. A strong ASF
will help those who have "lost"
their roots re-establish their
identity, he said.
ADL Denounces Anti-Semitic
Occurrences in Tunisia
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has denounced the
emergence of anti-Semitism in
Tunisia. In a cable to President
Habib Bourguiba. Abraham
Foxman, ADL's associate
national director and the head of
its international affairs depar-
tment, cited two recent instances
of anti-Semitic materials being
disseminated in that country.
A weekly publication,
Annonces, in its December 28
edition, published an article
saying that "the Jews are willing
to tread on the most holy of
values for favors, even small ones
. and they are monkeys and
donkeys, even though they seem
to have something human about
them ..." Foxman noted in his
cable.
"Secondly, we have learned
that a new edition of the
'Protocols of the Elders of Zion,'
the famous anti-Semitic forgery
used by the Nazis and others, has
been published in Tunis and now
occupies a prominent place in
display windows of many large
Tunis book stores." Noting that
incitement of racial hatred is
against Tunisian law, Foxman
urged Bourguiba to take steps
against the spread of bigotry.
One of the most beautiful
resorts anywhere salutes
the glorious celebration of
the Holiday of Liberation.
Passover
Fri April 5 Sat April 13
Cantor
Lawrence Tuchinsky
and the Nevele Symphony Choir
conducted by
Marlena
Services Sedarim
Dr.Chaim
Israel Etrog
will offer a program of
lectures and conduct
seminars during the holiday
WVItt
EOenvtfle. New York 12428
Hotel 914-647-6000
See Your Travel Agent
POT CALLING KET06 BLACK
y<*ZjonistLater/
Basic Agreement
Continued from Page 1
sold to the Arabs. He stressed
that most of the money is spent
in the U.S. for the purchase of
arms and only $200 million will
be used in Israel for the
development of the Lavie fighter
olane.
Rabin said that he found in his
three days in Washington
"understanding and readiness to
support Israel in this crucial
period of our life" both in the
administration and in Congress.
On Israel's request for increased
economic aid, Rabin said there
were no "threats" nor "pressure"
from the U.S.. and that the U.S.
wanted only to be sure that the
Israeli government and people
were "serious" about solving its
economic problems.
ASKED ABOUT the overall
peace process, Rabin said that a
"timetable" cannot be set for
achieving peace because it is
necessary to "create op-
CttM
oaf
portunities for achieving
expansion of the peace p
He stressed that peace ci
imposed either by Israel
Arabs or by th. Arabs on
nor by outside powers on
region, but requires a deriswl
the countries concerned to
from war and agree to negotul
While stressing that Joi
the only neighboring
country where negotiations
Israel seem likely, Rabin
doubted that King Hussein
afford the isolation in the
world that followed
President Anwar
willingness to reach a
agreement with Israel.
At the same time, he saw
hope in Iraq resuming dip!
relations with the U.S. afar
years, and Jordan "daring"
renew relations with Egypt
saw this as a small step
could lead to progress is
coming year.
sail
Sadil
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it
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CMSTfWUTEO BY
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(813)323-1205
Miami Beach, FL Mendeleon, Inc.
(305) 672-5800
Hialeah, FL Tropic Ice Company
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1
Friday, February 15,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
Federation/UJA Campaign f85 Update
iarold Markowitz
PLEASE NOTE:
In our issue of Feb. 1, the
names under two
photographs were tran-
sposed in error. One was the
picture of Leonard
Westerman, who is chairing
the Federation-U J A
Campaign in Coco Wood
Lakes: the other was Harold
Markowitz, who is co-
chairing the joint
Federation-UJA breakfast
for temples Emeth and Sinai,
on Wednesday. Feb. 20. We
reprint. the photographs
here, with the correct cap-
tions and our apologies to
the two gentlemen and
anyone else who was misled
by the error.
Leonard Westerman
Del-Aire Charity
Golf Plans
In Full Swing
Emeth and Sinai Do Honor
To The Silvers and Tears.
vo distinguished couples are
be honored by two
nguished temples at a joint
dast next week, to be held in
If of the South County
Ssh Federation and the UJA.
emple Sinai and Temple
th. of Delray, will honor
ji Dr. Samuel M. Silver and
Elaine Silver, and Dr.
ris Tear and Mrs. Edna Tear.
breakfast will take place at
| newly-dedicated building of
kple Sinai on Wednesday,
.20. at 9:30 a.m.
abbi Silver is the spiritual
er of Temple Sinai. He is a
:>nally known figure, who
)tes much effort to
nenical dialogue. He served
infantry chaplain in World
II. and as a national
plain of the Jewish War
Brans. He is a widely
lished writer, columnist and
urer, and can be heard
ilarly on two local radio
trams. He is listed in "Who's
laine Silver, an accomplished
lician, has appeared in
fcerts, has performed on TV
radio, and served as vocal
to several opera singers.
She currently directs Temple
Sinai's choir and serves as
organist.
Dr. Morris Tear made history
in Westbury, Long Island, where
he was the founding president of
the Westbury Hebrew
Congregation. At age 24, when
the Jewish community there was
miniscule, he agreed to serve as
chairman of the UJA campaign,
and continued to do so for the
next 10 years. He then became
chairman of the Israel Bonds
drive there for the next two
years. Dr. Tear has also been
active in the United Synagogue
of America, serving as New York
Metropolitan area vice president.
All this was before the Tears
came to South Florida. Dr. Tear
is now active in the Federation-
UJA campaign of Palm Greens,
and serves as a board member of
Temple Emeth.
Edna Tear was president of the
Sisterhood of Westbury Hebrew
Congregation, is a life member of
Hadassah and active in the
Pioneer Women (Na'amat), and
is active in Temple Emeth
Sisterhood. She also serves on
the Palm Greens entertainment
committee.
(Boca Lago Men's Campaign
Is 'Thrilling,' Says White
ul White, chairman of Boca
men's campaign, is thrilled
the way this year's Boca
's men's campaign is
Ming. According to Saul,
I year's campaign will far
ss last year's, giving Boca
its rightful place as a major
touting community in the
County area."
ie worker's breakfast held on
II attracted 80 attendees
voiced their growing ex-
it about the campaign.
re all looking forward to the
Lago Dinner Dance that
|be held at the Boca Lago
try Club on Tuesday
. March 12.
new chairman of Boca
Saul White introduced
major innovations in the
structure of the campaign
organization by creating three co-
chairmanship positions in charge
of solicitations, special events
and publicity. Working side by
side in these capacities are Dr.
Vic Perlow, Ezra Mermelstein
and Sandy Milter, respectively.
In addition, Boca Lago has
maintained its pod chair-
manships with several additions.
Saul hopes that innovations such
as these will continue to be
developed in future campaigns.
This will be the key to continued
success in the Boca Lago men's
campaign for the South County
Jewish Federation and the
United Jewish Appeal.
Barnett Trio, Siegel Will
en Up Oriole Villages Luncheon
Barnett, chairman of the
villages Luncheon, has
anted that his grup. the Bob
f" I no. will provide the
^amment for the luncheon.
Went will take place on
y. March 11. 12 noon, at
"''day InnonCiladesand I-
j"mng the trio will be Izzy
I as the guest vocalist.
responses indicate the
f on will be a great success
pne beginning of a new
l10n for the Villages of
Oriole.
Bob has made a point of
clarifying that the $ 100 minimum
gift for attending the event refers
to the contribution or pledge for
the 1985 campaign and does
not refer to any additional
pledges or gifts. In other words,
anyone who has pledged a $100
family gift for this year's cam-
paign is eligible to attend the
luncheon and no additional
pledges will be required at the
luncheon itself.

Attendance at the breakfast is
open to all who have pledged a
minimum family gift of $50 or
more to the '85 Federation-UJA
campaign.
A kickoff meeting for the
forthcoming Del-Aire Charity
Golf Tournament, scheduled for
Saturday. March 23, took place
recently at the home of the co-
chairmen. Ruth and Frank
White.
Great enthusiasm was
generated by the committee's
plans for an outstanding event
which will commence with an
advance cocktail party. At that
time teams and their marshals
will be drawn and posted.
Tournament day will start with
a sumptuous brunch, followed by
a cocktail party when the players
return to the clubhouse and
culminating in the evening with
an elegant dinner-dance. Wives
are invited to both cocktail
parties and the dinner.
Many surprises are being
prepared. A spectacular prize will
be won by one of the players,
with one of the two raffle tickets
included in the entrance fee.
Among those present were
Harriett and Sol Shanus, the
"angels" of the entire event,
along with the following
chairmen and their committees:
Shep Kaufman, publicity; Hy
Glanz, golf; Alfred Saffer,
financial; Bob Madan, food and
beverage. Unable to attend were
cnairpeople Adele Godofsky,
decor and Rita Strochak, gifts.
Other members of the com-
mittee will include Stanley
Strocker, Milton Cutler, Ben
Pressner, Aaron Rubin, Joan
Rubin, Howard Pittman and
Linda Demambro.
To ensure a flawless day, the
field is being limited to 30
foursomes, and the committee,
therefore, suggests early signups.

Share
The
Vision
wmm>

Answer
The
Call


Your Community Needs Your Help Now!
Reserve Your SUPER SUNDAY phone
SUNDAY, MARCH 17
You Will Be Helping Jews In Need At Home,
In Israel, and Throughout the World.
CALL AND VOLUNTEER.
368-2737 (Marcia Nathans)
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION
BOCA RATON
DELRAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
326 N.W. Spanish River Blvd.
Boca Raton, FL 33428
We Need You And You Will ENJOY Helping CALL TODAY!


afcc o x ire jewisn i- londian ot South County / Friday, February 15,1985
Federation/UJA Cam
n '85 Update!
Advanced Gifts Luncheon Highly Successful
More than 80 women attended the Advance Gifts Luncheon held on January 25 on
oehalf of the Women's Division 1985 Federation-UJA Campaign.
The highly successful event was held at the lovely home of Lee and Mickey
Weinstein. The guest speaker was Zelig Chinitz, director-general of the United Israel
Appeal (UIA) in Israel, who greatly inspired the women with his briefing on current
Jewish events in the world and in Israel.
(Photos by Stan Sheets)

(Left to right) Marilyn Zinns, co-chairman Advance Gifts; Muriel Harris, t_.
Advance Gifts; Gladys Weinshank, chairman Advance Gifts; luncheon hosttu]
Weinstein; Clarice Pressner, co-chairman Advance Gifts; Marilyn SonabtnL, i
chairman Advance Gifts.
(Left to right) Phyllis Squires (chairman, Women's Division), Gladys Weinshank, Lee
Weinstein (hostess for the event), Marianne Bobick (president, SCJF), Zelig Chinitz
(guest speaker).

(f
I

(Left to right) Shirley Levin, Berenice Schankerman, Lillian Hildebrani
Kaufman, Helene Eichler (assistant executive director. South County Ji
Federation), Joyce Heisel (Women's Division director).
(Left to right) Gloria Massry, Dorothy Lipson, Ann Katz, Harriet Shanus, Dollsey
Rappaport, Phyllis Wragge.
V
f
(Left to right) Eleanor Rukin, Eleanor Rosenthal, Lee Cravitz, Jane Leventhal, Jane
Gortz, Pat Brown.
(Left to right) Sara Blum, Polly Kaltenbacher, Lillian Kent, Shirley Marcus
Ellish, Lauren Sax.

mm
f *\
r
* E
t
L 1

*.
(Left to right) Minna Creiger, Ruth Frank, Margaret Kottler, Rita Bagus, Roz P
Marian Altman.
(Left to right) Barbara Schuman, Gloria Rosenthal, Phyllis Cohen. Hose Le>*n
Shirlee Cohen, Ann Handler.

A
^.
(Left to right) Helen Lidsky, Fern Rose, Alice Seidman, Edith Rosenbaum, Belle Cohen.
Esther Cohanv.
'Left to right) Esther Blank, Muriel Harris. Sylvia Zuckerman,
Jeanne Sankin. Marilvn Sonabend
Madaly
BrV*


Friday, February 15,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
M
ft to right! Evelyn Woolman, Caryl Rothman, Beverly Drost, Elaine Friedman,
oldie Halpen, Helen Cohan.
"%
A
i?.i
left to right) Jesse Jacobs, Ruth Yesley, Kelly Freeman, Florence Riesberg, Lillian
Usher, Ruth Fox.
(Left to right) Muriel White, Selma Axelrod.
(Left to right) Elayne Brenner, Miriam Olsten.
> <^' ^- .-.
i
FAMILY DIVISION HONORS SIEGELS
Super Teens
At Super Sunday
By BAR I STEWART
year for the first time in
pUI n County-s history teens will
Ived as volunteers at
?' Sunday, to be held March
1 Ins is exciting in two
Hiects: it will enlarge the
pmher of community members
Irticipating in Super Sunday
>d it will introduce the teens of
>uth County to an over-
helming experience in Jewish
Immunal life.
[The majority of teens par-
ppating in Super Sunday were
^tacted through the Jewish
Nmunity Center's Youth
puncil, staffed by Sarah Landa,
""ector of Youth Services, and
Tid Sheriff. Health and
p.vsical Education director. The
pincil's purpose is to serve as
earing house for South
Purity's youth groups. It
fovides a facility as well as
^'rams designed to bring the
wish youth groups together.
present, there are three
PuPs on the Youth Council,
m-Bofty.and USY. but it is
< all interested youth
groups.
B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYOl is the only
one of these groups not affiliated
with a synagogue. Its program is
five-fold: religious, social,
athletic, cultural. and
educational.
Boca Raton Federated Temple
Youth (Bofty) is South County's
arm of Nifty, the Reform
movement's youth organization.
United Synagogue Youth
(USY). an organization of the
Conservative movement, bases
its programs on social, religious,
educational, and cultural aspects
of Judaism.
A fourth group participating in
Super Sunday is led by Rabbi
Mark Dratch of the Boca Raton
Synagogue. Although this group
is supported by the Orthodox
temple, its social and communal
activities are open to all teens in
the community.
The teens will be involved in a
number of activities at Super
Sunday including childcare.
backroom, and reception. I bey
will be in charge of sports, games,
and a Super Sunday let' Cream
Party for the children of adult
volunteers. Working in the
backroom will entail sorting
pledge cards and running them
into the telephone room, as well
as other tasks. In addition, the
teens will be checking volunteers
in and out of the reception area
and directing them into the
correct rooms.
It is hoped that by involving
the teens in Super Sunday now,
while they are just beginning
their involvement in Jewish
communal life, their commitment
to the Jewish community will
grow as they do.
If you are not a member of one
of the aforementioned youth
groups and would like to par-
ticipate in Super Sunday, please
contact Marcia Nathans at the
South County Jewish Federation
368-2737. by specifying that you
are a teenager.

i >
Betty and Israel (Iz) Siegel are being honored at the
Family Division Luncheon on Monday, March 4, at the
Sheraton Hotel in Boca Raton. Call 368-2737 for reserva-
tion or additional information.
TAKE THE LEAD
1985 YOUNG LEADERSHIP RETREAT
UJA YOUNG LEADERSHIP CABINET
UJA YOUNG WOMEN'S LEADERSHIP CABINET
GIF NA TIONAL LEADERSHIP
DE VELOPMENT COMMITTEE
1985
MAY
HMDAT CATUKAV SUNDAY
X X X
FLORIDA REGION
Mark your calendars for these dates
Details will follow!!
Bring the kids!! All welcome!!
Grenelefe Resort
Near Orlando, FL
Announcing
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION
WOMEN'S DIVISION
2nd Annual Golf Tournament
Monday, March 11,1985
Bocaire Country Club
17170 Military Trail
Boca Raton
8:00 a.m. Continental Breakfast
8:45 a.m. 2 Best-Ball Foursome Tournament
1:30 p.m. Lunch Entertainment Prizes
Entry Fee: $1375 USGA
Tax deductible Attested Handicap
Limited Participation
Please call South County Jewish Federation
Women's Division, 368-2737 For More Information.


Page 10 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, February 15, 1985
South County Jewish Federation Speakers BureaJ
The SCJF Speaker's Bureau is
a service to local Jewish and civic
organizations at no charge. It is
comprised of professional
volunteers who specialize in
diversified topics of Jewish in-
terest. For further information,
or to request a speaker, call the
Federation office, 368-2737. (No
solicitation of funds.)
retirement. Was president of a
congregation in Maryland and
served on synagogue board for
many years. Has been a stamp
collector for 50 years, specializing
in all aspects of U.S. and Israel
philately. Lectures on history
and development of Israel
through stamps, and similar
topics.

PHIL WARSHAFSKY. A
consumer advocate and
columnist, particularly on
matters concerning the aged.
Writes letters and articles ex-
tensively for seven New England
publications, as well as the
Miami Herald and Fort
Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel.
Founder of West Delray "Save a
Life" committee. Volunteer
worker at Delray Community
Hospital. Board member of
Temple Emeth Brotherhood.
Active in various civic affairs at
Kings Point. Jewish humor is his
topic.
NANCY HORWITZ TOBIN.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Extension
director for Broward and Palm
Beach areas. Has worked with
Hillel ever since graduating from
Brandeis University with an MA
degree in Contemporary Jewish
Studies and social work 10 years
ago. Directed Hillel at University
of Pennsylvania. Speaks on
Jewish education.
A. PHILIP TOWSNER.
Attorney and financial con-
sultant who worked for the
Federal government for many
years, specializing in federal
assistance programs, then in
private practice in Washington.
Is also a trained cantor, who has
performed with Cantor Green-
berg, and on occasions with
Yossele Rosenblatt, and in
Yiddish theatre, with such
notables as Menashe Skolnick,
Molly Picon and Aaron Lebedoff.
Served as cantor for synagogues
in formation in Washington, and
did the same in Boca Raton for
B'nai Torah Congregation when
it first started. Most recently,
served as cantor for the overflow
services for Temple Sinai of
Hollywood. Florida, for High
Holiday services during the past
two years. Can sing Yiddish
songs and speak on remem-
brances of the Yiddish theatre.
BETTY STONE. One of the
organizers of the Federation-UJA
Women's Division locally, even
before South County became an
independent federation;
currently serves as chairman of
the newly established Adolph
and Rose Lev is Jewish Com-
munity Center. Holds degree in
speech and dramatic arts from
Syracuse U., and has directed
and recorded plays and stories.
Was active in National Council of
Jewish Women in Great Neck,
NY., as well as in UJA. Has
served as board member of South
County Jewish Federation since
its inception, holding various
offices. Has been active in
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton,
as board member, secretary, and
one of the organizers of its
Distinguished Artists Series.
Volunteer at Boca Raton
Community Hospital, American
Cancer Society, Friends of
Caldwell Playhouse and
Women's Golf League of Broken
Sound Golf Club. Recipient of
1980 Community Service Award
from the Boca Raton News. Was
chairman of the Speakers
Bureau. Will speak about Adolph
and Rose Levis JCC.
Kern of Boca Raton, is a native
Floridian. Holds master's
degrees in estate planning and in
taxation. Frequent lecturer for
Florida Bar and Florida Institute
of Certified Public Accountants.
Speaks on wills and trusts,
financial and investment
planning, and charitable con-
tributions and trusts.
B'rith Women chapters. Member,
National Women's Board of
Israel Bonds. Has been on
Federation's executive board and
on Speakers Bureau of South
County for several years, and in
1984 awarded "Outstanding
Speaker" by South County
Federation. On executive board
of American Friends of Hebrew
University; recipient of Israel
Freedom Medal and, with
husband, Irving, of Golda Meir
Century Club Award. Lectures
on Israel and the Middle East.
Chairman FRANCES SACKS.
Married to a prominent rabbi, she
has been involved deeply in every
aspect of congregational and
sisterhood activity since her
marriage. For 12 years, in
Philadelphia, served as president
of Friends of Dropsie College and
on its board of governors; was
board member of the Women's
Council of the Federation there,
and vice president of the CRC,
Northwest Division, life member
of Hadassah, Mizrachi, and
Technion Society, as well as
Sisterhood of Congregation
Anshei Emuna in Delray.
Currently heads the Speakers
Bureau. Speaks on Soviet Jewry,
Jewish festivals and holidays and
Syrian or Ethiopian Jewry.
ALBERT OSTRICK.
Attorney, businessman and U.S.
Navy veteran. Active in Knights
of Pythias Deputy Grand
Chancellor. Chaired UJA and
Federation drives and one of
founders of Bell Park Jewish
Center in Queens. N.Y. Elected in
1981 as "silver-haired legislator"
for Delray, and served in
Tallahassee helping prepare bills
for the aged and infirm. Active on
executive board of Atlantic
Democratic Club, and writes a
monthly column for Atlantic
Observer and a weekly column
for Condo News. Speaks on Israel
and the Middle East.
RABBI DR. SAMUEL
SILVER. Spiritual leader of
Temple Sinai in Delray Beach.
Known for his promotion of
ecumenism, he hosts two radio
shows and conducts extensive
dialogues with clergymen of
various Christian denominations.
Also known for performing in-
terfaith marriages. Has written
numerous books and
monographs, and writes a weekly
column on Yiddish in the Anglo-
Jewish press. Speaks on in-
terfaith relations.
SHIRLEY MOSKOWITZ.
Graduate of Juilliard School of
Music, teaches Jewish music and
is a cantorial soloist. Expert in all
facets of Jewish and Hebrew
music, she teaches children in the
Hebrew Day School system and
adults, and can lecture on history
of Jewish music.
"CHAIM." Was in personnel
and labor relations before
CRAIG DONOFF. Tax
torney, partner in Donoff


at- ROSE RIFKIN.
and President of Hadassah and B'nai
Past
MATILDA (TEDDY)
BLENDES. Former teacher~and
librarian in N.Y. Has traveled
extensively all over the world,
including 15 trips to Israel. After
the SixDay War in 1967. went to
Israel on sabbatical, to teach
English as volunteer
stayed for a year as teache^S
American International W'
Kfar Shmaryahu f\
president in Boca of Branfi
Women, and of B'nai
Women Genesis Chapter A I
in Mizrachi, Had,, ?
Siferh00d -but p^uH
activity iniFederation-ljJA \
in Israel Bonds. Has been?
chairman at Century VjlU
since coming to Boca. SoeakTf
Israel and the Middle EVi"
also gives book reviews.
JOHN M. LOWE, FUlI
Professor and former Dean 1
City College, N.Y. Hasdegreesa
classical languages and literatim
as well as comparative literatim
of religion. Recipient of numerom
academic and community honon
from City College and Yeshivi
University. National via
president of ZOA and editor of in
award-winning publication "Kol
Hagalil." Represented ZOA it
the UN. Member of the Boards
Overseers of Bar-1 Ian University,
and of board of local chapter of |
American Friends of Tel Avn
University. Phi Beta Kappa aid
Mensa Society. Speaks on Israel-
U.S. relations.
FRIEDA JAFFE. Holocau*
survivor from Poland, who was in
Bergen-Belsen one of 1
children to survive of 5,000 seB
there. Active in Beth-El. Chain
Federation's "Shalom. Souti
County," which welcomes ne
residents in the area. Speaks on
the Holocaust.
HARVEY GROSSMAN^
Participated in first Overseas
Program at Tel Aviv Universit .
where he studied chmcj
psychology, and stayed in isn*
eight vears. Worked >n co
seiing and with youth in
derprivileged areas ot l*r .
Worked with Israel nfls
field representative m tn**"L
County area, and became direc
of the Federation-UJA campttP
in 1982. Speaks on Israel antrJ
Middle East, SCJF
Ethiopian Jewry.
^^^i


--*mif
Friday, February 15,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
ference on Soviet Jewry.
Hadassah representative to the
board of governors of the Hebrew
University. Served on the
executive committee of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
organizations. Recently elected
vice president of the American
Zionist Youth Foundation.
MARIANNE BOBICK.
resident of South County
lewish Federation. Vienna born,
jrvived as a child from the
lolocaust. Has been active in
jadassah, ORT, temples in New
fork. Served as chairman of
Russian resettlement committee
w Federation. Was president of
Day School and chairman of
ie Community Relations
indl. Recipient of the
ic rat ion's Community Service
d in 1980. Recipient of State
If Israel Lion of Judah Award in
Speaks on Israel and the
liddle East. SCJF and Jewish
lucation.
LEO E. BRINK. President of
newly-formed B'nai B'rith lodge
in Oriole Villages. An ac-
countant, with heavy Yeshiva
educational background and
expertise in Judaism and rab-
binic lore. Formerly active in
temples and community
organizations in New Jersey, now
active in Temple Emeth in
Delray, serving on various
committees and having served on
board and executive committee.
Has written and lectured ex-
tensively. Senior mentor for
creative students for Palm Beach
County School Board, and guest
lecturer and chairman for adult
Jewish education for B'nai B'rith
District Five in South County.
Speaks on Jewish festivals and
U.S.-Israeli relations.
Honorary Life Member of the
board of governors of the Hebrew
University. Was made Woman of
the Year by the Israel Bond
Organization. Speaks on any
subject related to Israel, Zionism
and Israel-Diaspora relations.
ANN GENELES. Graduate of
Hebrew Theological College as a
teacher; organized and serves as
president of Hebrew Club of
Kings Point. Vice nresident of
Yiddish Culture Club at Kings
Point. Life member of Hadassah
held various executive
positions in her group
secretary, education chairman,
Youth Aliyah chairman and
president. Does book reviews and
speaks on Jewish music.
EDWARD BOBICK.
prominent trial attorney from
l.Y. Active in both South
bounty Federation and Temple
3eth El of Boca Raton, as well as
Israel Bonds. Recipient of Lion of
Judah Award from Israel in 1981.
Vice president of Temple Beth El
(for membership). At Federation,
chaired allocations committee,
Israel missions, and Speakers
bureau. Florida representative to
CJF Government Affairs
-""ommittee. Speaks on Israel and
the Middle East, and the SCJF.
ROSE ELLIS MATZKIN.
Was the 15th national president
of Hadassah. Previous national
chairs were: National Service
Committee, Hadassah Con-
stitution, Hadassah Medical
Organization, Youth Aliyah,
Zionist Affairs, Ameican Affairs,
Tourism and Wills and Bequests.
Was a member of President
Ford's Task Force on Women.
Was a Hadassah delegate to the
World Zionist Congress in
Jerusalem for many sessions and
is on the executive board of the
World Confederation of United
Zionists. Is a member of the
board of the Institute of Jewish
Affairs in London and of the
American Zionist Federation.
She is on executive committees of
AIPAC and the National Con-
SHIRLEY ENSELBERG.
Was vice president of the South
County Jewish Federation and
co-chaired the Women's Division
for two years. President and one
of the founders of the Jewish
Community Day School. On UJA
National Young Leadership
Cabinet. Has master's degree in
social work from Boston U. and
has worked in counseling and
with the aged. Also active in
B'nai Torah Congregation.
Speaks on Jewish education.
ATTENTION
Medicare Beneficiaries:
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Sales Deferred
Continued from Page 1
sales to the Saudis and other
Arab states is that the "tanker
war" in the Persian Gulf was
"kept under control in part
because some of our friends had
the equipment and the capability
to use it in a manner that was a
challenge" to Iran. "That was a
contribution not only to their
stability and their security but
also to our stability and our
security," the secretary asserted.
SEN. ALAN CRANSTON
(I)., Cal.) said he believes
weapons sales should be deferred
as long as the Saudis act in ways
that are damaging to both U.S.
interests and Israel. He said
Saudi "oil blackmail" has been
used to enforce an Arab-led
boycott against Israel which he
said has contributed to Israel's
economic difficulties.
But Shultz replied that he did
not believe the boycott was
responsible for Israel's economic
problems. "They are, I believe,
largely self-induced," because of
poor economic management, he
said. "It is perfectly possible to
have a thriving properous
economy in Israel given the
quality of the people there and
their capabilities."
Shultz said the U.S. is ready to
help Israel and will "do what is
necessary." But he said Israel
has to take steps to improve its
economy which he said it is now
trying to do. "We are working
very closely with the government
of Israel and sympathetically."
he said.
WHEN SEN. Frank
Murkowski (R., Alaska) asked
whether if a new Arab-Israel war
broke out the U.S. would have to
get together with the Soviet
Union to keep it from spreading,
Shultz replied, "No sir." When
Murkowski asked for a fuller
explanation. Shultz said that "if
a war broke out today I think
Israel would give a very good
account of itself."
He added that if such a conflict
arose, the U.S. might discuss
with the Soviet Union, as it has
in the past, "damage control."
But he said he does not
"foresee any development that
will lead us to want to come
together with the Soviet Union
for some type of condominium in
the Middle East. The way to get
at the problem in the Middle East
is for, particularly, the Arab
states around Israel, to sit down
with Israel and negotiate out a
peace agreement."
IN HIS prepared statement,
Shultz said the U.S. remains
"committed" to President
Reagan's September 1, 1982
Middle East peace initiative "as
the most promising route to a
solution of the Palestinian
problem. We will be intensively
engaed this year in consultations
with our Arab and Israeli friends
to explore opportunities for
progress."
But he also noted that "recent
events have reminded us that the
Arab-Israel conflict is far from
the only source of tension in that
pa rt of the world.''
Responding to questions,
Shultz said he would press for
Senate ratification of the UN
convention against genocide.
Reagan announced support for
ratification last September in a
speech to B'nai B'rith Inter-
national. But the Senate failed to
adopt it in its rush to adjourn for
the elections. However, the
Foreign Relations Committee
promised that it will be re in-
troduced this year.
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Mft--X*.
-luEvcniau r hjimum oi cx>utn county / tnday, February 15,1985
V.
" l^"V /(dolph and Rose Levis JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTttl
ey
an agency of the South County Jewish Federation
The JCCs Video Game Room is
open Monday through Thursday
2:30-5 p.m. and 7-9:30 p.m., and
Sundays 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
PRIME TIMERS SPONSOR
FIRST ANNUAL SEDER
The JCC Prime Timers
Committee, with Esther
Omansky as chair, announces the
Center's first annual Seder. This
Seder will take place at the Levis
Jewish Community Center on the
first night of Passover, Friday,
April 5. The Seder will begin at
6:30. The cost is $24 per person;
seating will be limited to 100
people. JCC members will receive
first priority. The Seder will be
professionally conducted by
Phillip Towsner, a retired cantor.
The Prime Timers are excited
about the Center's first Seder and
look forward to your attendance!
Save the date and reserve your
seat now!!! Call 395-5546.
PARENT-CHILD
COMMUNICATION
Beginning Wednesday, Feb.
27, the Levis Jewish Community
Center will be starting a program
dealing with Parent-Child
Communication.
This program is designed to
help parents raise happier, more
responsible children through
honest communication. The
results will be genuine friendship
and respect between you and
your child.
Lila Lang will be instructing
this course. Lila has recently
come to Boca Raton from New
@GLATT
Directly on the Ocean
40th to 41st Sts.
Miami Beach
Cftoum
HOTEL
IjPURIMspecialN;
aa
^$10
4 Days & 3 Nights
Mar. 7 to Mar. 10
par person
doubtoocc.
tax ft gratulttM uc: A C
itra mmmrnm
INCLUDING
(MOOT HATCS AVAILABLE
GALA
PURIM
PARTY
2 Complete Kosher Meals Dally
3 on the Sabbath-Full Hotel
Facilities ft Activities
Tour Host*
Khchart LaOowm 4 Af Smapw
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner Si Smith Inc.
6100 Glades Road
Town Executive Center
Suite 101
Boca Raton, FL 33434
305/487-7010
National Watts 800/327-3352
FL Watts800/4320447
*C
*^& Merrill Lynch
Richard E. Fishman, CFP
Vice President
Boston
University
-

.
BenGurion
University
of the Negev'
Master of Science In Management
Full time degree studies in Israel
One Year Program Taught in English
Joint Degree Full Campus Facilities
Mail Inquiry to:
Director, MSM Program in Israel
Boston University Metropolitan College
755 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
Tel (617) 353-29*7
Please send aaaaataM
about the MSM program
in Israel
Njmr
A Israel
I tost on I 'mvcrsjry in an Kqiul Opportunity Institution
York where she spent 22 years in
the Lynbrook school system. For
11 years she led weekly groups
dealing with parent-child
communication.
For more information, please
contact the JCC at 395-5546.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE
Thursdays at 1 p.m.
Support your duplicate bridge
game. Take your choice of novice
games, open games, handicap
games, Swiss team games.
Plan to participate and enjoy
our game. Thursdays at 1 p.m.
Location: Levis Jewish
Community Center. 336 Spanish
River Blvd., NW. Cost: Members
$1.50. Non-Members $2.
FILM SERIES
The Levis Jewish Community
Center's Film Series continues in
February with the 1974 French
comedy, "The Mad Adventures
of Rabbi Jacob." The film is
presented in French with English
sub-titles and stars Louis De
DeFunes and Suzy Delair.
Showtimes are 3 and 7 p.m. on
Sunday, Feb. 17. Admission is
$3. Refreshments will be served.
The film series will continue
with "The Dybbuk" on March
24: and "Lies My Father Told
Me." starring Yossi Yadin,
scheduled to be shown on April
14. Save these dates for the JCC
Film Series.
Call 395-5546 for more in-
formation.
HEALTH LECTURE SERIES
"Stress Reduction" Claudio
Belfort. PhD, psychologist and
David Cold, attorney.
Date: Wednesday, Feb. 13.
Cost: Members: No Cost, Non-
Members $2. Location: 336 NW
Spanish River Blvd., Boca.
Refreshments will be served
Contact: David Sheriff J
JCC, 399-5546. at
HOLISTIC HEALTH
SERIES
"Loving Relationship," .
Mikela Green, MSW. Date F..
20, 7:30 p.m. Cost: MernK
Cost, Non-Members $2 w
sored by Levis Jewish fW
munity Center.
Contact David Sheriff at J
JCC, 395-5546.
CANOE TRIP FUN
This Sunday. Feb. 17. join us
for a canoe trip at Jonathw
Dickinson State Park in Jupiter
lone hour drive from Bocal. We j
will be meeting at the center to
carpool to the park. Family
invited!
Time: 9 a.m. promptly. Cost
$10 per canoe (2-3 people ps
canoe)
Call David Sheriff for direc
tions or more details (395-5546).
nrr
Conquistador
TUCSON, ARIZONA
Holiday Rates
3 Night Mm. Stay
Reservations Subject
to Availability
Arrive: Fri.. April 5
Depart: Mon April 8
(4 days/3 nights)
$400 per person
plus tax & tip
Arrive: Fri., April 5
Depart: Sun., April 14
(10 days/9 nights)
$1100 per person
plus lax & tip
1100 deposit o*i parson
holtts your rt*rvllion
All rataa ara Doubia Occupancy
tChildrtnt rttti nulmbf)
PESACH '85
MAD* N TftAVf l SVICES
1MSW TlwflAMXua
0~* FL 13004
Pnorw: (306) 92S4077
Passover
at the Concord
Fn April 5 Sor April 13
The observance of rradi
non. rhe magnificence of
rhe Sedanm. rhe beaury
of rhe Services, rhe bril-
liance of rhe Holiday
Programming
Cantor Herman
Malomood, assisred by
rhe Concord 45-voice Sym
phonic Chorale, direcred
by AAorhew Lazar and
Don Vogel. ro
off iciore ar rhe
Services and
Sedanm
Oursrandmg leaders
from Governmenr, Press,
rhe Arts and Lirerarure
Grear films Music day and
nighr weekdays Special
program for rors, rweeners
anareens
Pobbis Cohen and
Mazur oversee consranr
Kashrurh supervision ond
Dierary Law observance
CjONCORD
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Friday, February 15.1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 13
Tl'ESDAY. FEBRUARY 5. 1985
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PTV4
TAX ADVISORY ALERT
TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEASON ... IS IT NOW FOR YOU?
This is the time for hard logic. Simply put here it is.
Since July 24, 1984. when the Dow-Jones industrials average stood at 1078.95, to the time
of this writing, it has increased to 1290.08.
Many people have been blessed with substantial percentage increases in their stock
values. Perhaps you didn't have one of the top performers, but again you may have some
real appreciated gains in the equities you hold.
No one really knows whether the market is at the top of the gain," but let's suppose there
is a correction due. Why not think about the following suggestion think seriously.
SET UP A PHILANTHROPIC FUND:
The Jewish Community Foundation of South County (the endowment program) will
establish a Personalized Philanthropic Fund in your name or the name of anyone else you
wish to designate. You can activate the Fund by contributing your appreciated stock or
other property to the Foundation and by completing a simple form. You retain the right to
act as a fund advisor. Thus, the fund can function as a valuable planning vehicle for the
management of all your future charitable giving.
YOUR TAX ADVANTAGES:
-An income tax deduction may be taken this year, since contributions to the Fund are
treated as gifts to a public charity.
The fair market value of your appreciated long-term securities is 100"/odeductible (up to
30%of your contributing tax base).
There is no tax on the income within the Fund.
No tax return or reports need to be filed on the Fund.
You may continue to contribute to the Fund enabling you to make larger contributions
during high income years and especially after a windfall.
There is no cost to establish the Fund.
WHAT THE FUND CAN DO:
-At any timeryou, a*** fund advisor, may make recommendations tor distributions of in-
come or principal from the Fund to recognized charities, both Jewish and non-sectarian.
All grants are subject to the approval of the Jewish Community Foundation of South
County, which reserves the right to determine that the recommended beneficiaries are
consistent with the Federation's charitable purposes.
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS:
For further information please call Arthur Jaffe at the Foundation office, 681-8000, for
details on how to effect the transfer of those appreciated securities, and of course, con-
sult your own tax advisor.
THE JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION
OF SOUTH COUNTY
(THE SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION ENDOWMENT PROGRAM)
336 NW Spanish River Blvd.
Boca Raton, FL 33431
368-2737
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Page 14 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, February 15,1985
In The SYNAGOGUES
and TEMPLES
TEMPLE SINAI
LECTURE SERIES
In cooperation with the South
County Federation. Temple
Sinai's Adult Education Com-
mittee is sponsoring a series of
lectures by area rabbis at the
temple. 2475 W. Atlantic Ave..
Delray, every Tuesday. 10 a.m.
Rabbi Theodore Feldman
initiated the series, and will be
followed in subsequent weeks by
Rabbi Mark Dratch. Rabbi
Samuel Silver, Rabbi Nathan
Zelizer and Rabbi Louis Sacks.
The public is welcome to attend.
For further information call 276-
6161.
The Knights of Pythias will
sponsor a post-prayer collation at
the temple, Friday. Feb. 15 at
8:15 p.m. In his sermon. Rabbi
Samuel Silver will stress the
theme of friendship, one of the
slogans of the Pythians.
Observance of the Sabbath will
continue Saturday. Feb. 16, 10
a.m. when the service will involve
reading from Scripture followed
by a study session. The public is
welcome.
Rabbi Silver will profile an
important Jewish personality at
a gathering, Thursday, Feb. 21 at
10 a.m. in the temple, under the
auspices of the Adult Education
Committee chaired by Philip
Kaye. The public is invited to
attend. For further information
call 2766161.
BOCA RATON
SYNAGOGUE
LECTURE SERIES
Probe the pesach. meditate on
Matzah and savor the Seder to
make your Passover an enriching
one. Beginning March 5 for four
consecutive Tuesdays, 8 p.m. at
the home of Leonard and Trudy
Spender, attend this series
sponsored by the Boca Raton
Synagogue. For further in-
formation, please call 368-9047.
BETHEL
DISTINGUISHED
ARTIST SERIES
Wednesday. Feb. 20 at 8:15
p.m., the Chamber Group Tashi
will present their program
featuring Richard Stoluman,
Theodore Arm, Fred Sherry. Ida
Kavafian and Steven Tenenborn.
This ensemble has given per-
formances throughout North and
South America. Europe and the
Far East. For information and
tickets, call tne concert office at
391-8600 or purchase them at th*
temple. 336 SW 4th Ave., Boca.
Maxim Arno of the Beth-El
Contemporaries group prepare*
for the "Trivia Party."
BETHEL
CONTEMPORARIES
HOLD "TRIVIA PARTY"
The Contemporaries of Temple
Beth El will hold a "Trivia
Night" on Saturday, March 9, in
the temple social hall.
The party will include dinner
and music at 8 p.m. followed by
the game played with some in-
novations. Teams will compete
by answering the same questions
(in writing) simultaneously.
In Israel's Colleges.. And Local Friends
Lavie Guest At Local Fete for Bar-Ilan
Prizes donated by local mer-
chants will be awarded.
The cost for the evening is $30
for members and S35 for guests.
RSVP bv calling Iris Kantrowitz.
483-1702'. or Alyse Schoenfeldt.
368-9685. Or mail your check,
payable to Contemporaries-Beth
El. to: Judith Glatt, 8967 SW 7th
St.. Boca Raton 33433.
The Contemporaries is a group
of young married couples lone
spouse must be under 50i Its
aims are social, cultural, service
to the temple and the eoez-
munity, and fund-raasixg
Formed last FalL it zms breucj
held several successful eveccs
and projects.
B'NAI TORAH
B'nai Torah Sister hod will hoid
a dessert-card party on Thur-
sday, Feb. 21 at the synagogue.
1401 NW 4th Ave.. Boca. The
cost is $2.50 per person and
husbands and friends are invited
to attend. Please respond before
Feb. 18 to Muriel Israel or Estee
Goldstein, 392-8566.
BETH SHALOM
Temple Beth Shalom
Sisterhood, Century Village
West, will hold their next
meeting on Monday, Feb. 25, 10
a.m. in the Administration
Building, Boca. An interesting
program is planned. Boutiques
and refreshments as usual.
ANSHEISHALOM
Anshei Shalom Oriole Jewish
Center Brotherhood will sponsor
a breakfast meeting on Sunday.
Feb. 17 at 9:30 a.m at the Abbey
Club House. 6294 Abbey Lane in
Oriole Village. Delray. Their
guest speaker will be Rabbi
Jordan Shepard. For in-
formation, call 495-0466.
In celebration of its 30th
anniversary, Bar-Ilan University
will hold a reception in honor of
Ambassador Naphtali Lavie at
the home of Ann and Joseph
Katz. 3889 Live Oak Boulevard
in Delray Beach, on Tuesday.
March 5 at 5 p.m.
New residents of Delaire in
Delray Beach. Ann and Joseph
Katz have recently moved from
Detroit. Michigan, where they
were prominently identified with
a wide variety of civic.
educational and philanthropic
causes-
Dr. Emanuel Rackman.
president of Bar-Ilan University.
Ramat-Gan, Israel, will come to
Delray Beach for this occasion.
Ambassador Lavie, who is the
Consul-General of Israel in New
York, has been a journalist, news
editor and senior correspondent
in Israel. He joined the Israel
Government in 1970 and served
as a spokesman for the Defense
and Foreign ministries as well as
an advisor to Defense ministers
TAU Publishes Books In Arabic AmbassadorNaphtauu^
Exploring Israeli Literature, Culture
The first two books of a new
series in .Arabic dealing with
Jewish culture and contemporary
society have been published by
Tel Aviv University's School of
Language and Literature.
Prof. Sasson Somekh. head of
the school and project editor, said
the project was designed to
afford a balanced view of Israel
and the Jewish people in the
Arabic language, as well as to fill
an important need for the ap-
proximately 1.000 students
majoring in Hebrew language
and literature at Egyptian
universities.
"Until now very little Hebrew
Randy Eisner
Bar Mitzvah
RANDY EISNER
On Saturday. Feb. 16. Randy
Louis Eisner, son of Laurie
Eisner and Bruce Eisner, will be
called to the Torah at Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bar
Mitzvah. Randy is a seventh
grade student at Loggers Run
Middle School and attends the
Temple Beth El Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
simcha are brother. Brian:
grandparents. Mr and Mrs.
David Ahrams of Boca Raton
and Arthur Eisner of Trenton.
N.J.; and great-grandmother.
Fay Cohen of Boca Raton. Also
present will be Mr. and Mrs. Leo
Eisner of Fayetteville. NY. and
Alan Abrams of Orlando.
Randy's mother will host a
reception in his honor following
Havdalah services.
Community Calendar
February 17
Temple Beth El Solos meeting, 10 a.m.; Temple Emeth Singles
Board meeting, 9:30 am.
February 18 <
B'nai B'rith Naomi meeting, 12 noon; Women's League for
Israel meeting, 10 a.m.; Women's American ORT Pines North
meeting, 12:30 pm.; Anshei Shalom Oriole Jewish Center
Sisterhood meeting, 9:30 am.; Women's American ORT
Sandalfoot meeting, 1 pm.; Women's American ORT Boca
Glades meeting, 12:30 p.m.
February 19
Women's American ORT Boca Delray Evening Board meeting
8 p.m.; B'nai B'rith Delray Lodge No. 2965 meeting, 7:30 p m.-'
B'nai Brith Boca Teeca Lodge Board meeting, 9:30 am :
Women's American ORT All Points meeting, 12:30 p.m South
County Jewish Community Day School Open House-
Prospective Parents, 8 p.m.
February 20
Women's American ORT Region Board .
Hadassah Menachem Begin meeting, 12 pm.; Ha
Maariv meeting, 12:30 p.m.
10 am.;
Boca
February 21
Pioneer Women Kinneret Board meeting, 10:30 am.; Temple
Beth El Sisterhood meeting, 12:30 p.m.; Hadassah Ben Gurion
meeting, 12:30 p.m.
literature has been available in
Arabic and almost nothing
scholarly exists on Jewish or
Israeli culture," Prof. Somekh
said. "Almost everything
available in Arabic is un-
sympathetic if not hostile. This
series will contribute to a new
and different view of Israel and
the Jews."
The project, titled "The
Modern Hebrew Culture Series,"
will feature translations of
contemporary Israeli authors and
studies of various aspects of
Jewish culture. The two books
published so far are The Lover, a
novel by Israeli author A.B.
Yeboshua, and The Roe Hunt, a
collection of modern Hebrew
short stories.
Moshe Dayan and Shimon Peres
A longtime friend of Bar-Ilu
University. Ambassador Lav
received the degree of Doctor of
Humane Letters Honoris Cauai
from the University.
Bar-Ilan. founded in 1966, is
Israel's only institution of higher
learning that combines excellence
in secular studies with a rich
program of Judaic courses.
Enrollment at Bar-Ilan is now
past the 12,000 mark and in-
cludes over 2,000 foreign
students. The University has
gained an international
reputation for its outstanding
faculties in Law, Natural
Sciences, Social Studies and an
American School of Economics
and Business.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.. Boca Raton. Florida 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566. Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m.. Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101, Boca Raton, Florida
33433. Orthodox services held at Verde Elementary School
Cafeteria. 6590 Verde Trail. Boca. Saturday morning 9:30 a.m.
For information regarding Friday. Sundown services Mincha-
Maariv. call Rabbi Mark Dratch. Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd.. Delray
Beach. Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L Sacks.
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class 5
p.m. Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling. 22445 Boca Rio Road,
Boca Raton. Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler.
Sabbath Services Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday at 10:15 a.m.
Mailing address: 950 Glades Road. Suite 1C. Boca Raton. FL
33432. Phone 392-9982.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan
Association Office, West Atlantic Ave., corner Carter Road,
Delray Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat. Saturdays. 9
a.m. and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 4982141
Office: 14600 CunAxHand Drive, Delray Beach, Florida 33446.
Phone 495-0466.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 SW. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton. Florida 33432. Reform
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Gregory S. Marx. Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services
at 8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FL 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 pm., Sunday
8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 483-
5557. Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Conser
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd Naftaly A.
Lmkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Serivces: Friday at 8 pm-.
Saturday at 8:45 a.m. Daily Minyana at 8:45 a.m. and 5 pm
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Berwick
Road). Delray Beach, Florida 33446. Reform. Sabbat fai Eva-
services, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat., 10 am. Rabbi Samuel Silver,
President Samuel Rothstein, phone 276-6161.


Friday, February 15,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 15
NEWS From Local I
Clubs & Org.'s
Profile
B'nai B'rith
B'nai B'rith Boca Teeca Lodge
I No. 3119 is the oldest and largest
Jewish service organization in
the world. Founded in 1843, it
has lodges and chapters in over
40 countries and a membership of
over half a million. The many
tacets of the "Sons of the
Covenant" are unique and not
duplicated, in many phases, by
| any other Jewish service group.
B'nai B'rith's basic purpose is
I to help assure the creative
[continuity of the Jewish people.
It does this with official
I representation on the United
I Nations; with action of the Anti-
Defamation League, which
| guarantees that there will never
[be another Holocaust: with the
Hillel Foundations on over 300
college campuses; with dedicated
service to veterans at over 175
veterans hospitals in the United
States; with support for the
State of Israel; with our
International Council,
headquartered in Geneva,
! Switzerland, where the welfare of
| Jews in over 40 countries is
surveyed on a daily basis. All
' this, in addition to our civic and
community service to our local
communities, make B'nai B'rith
somewhat of an insurance policy
for the future protection of
Judaism.
Boca Teeca Lodge, now in its
fifth year in Boca Raton, with
Seymour Launer as president.
has becomne an outstanding
component of B'nai B'rith. It has
received commendation from
Palm Beach Council and from the
district for fund-raising efforts
and for outstanding involvement
in civic and community affairs.
President Launer is a prac-
ticing attorney in Boca Raton,
and has taught business law at
Palm Beach Junior College. His
talents will help keep up the
continued success of Boca Teeca
Lodge. Our first president was
Morris Kadish, who served nobly
for two years, with the help of a
dedicated group of founders: Dr.
Philip Popick, Sol Grabelle,
Myron Maurer, Charles
Greenberg, Ben Solomon, Irving
J. Brown, Harvey Zamelsky and
Philip Hinerfeld, whose efforts
enlisted many members and Boca
| Teeca Lodge was chartered.
As the Lodge grew in size, it
became involved in many
community affairs and through
the efforts of brother William
Schnur. the Hillel Foundation at
FAU was financially supported
and a seminar was conducted by
him on Job Search and Career
Development. Brother Jack Paull
served as chaplain during the
first two years and then became
president for two terms. During
his administration three awards
were presented to our Lodge,
Outstanding Lodge in Palm
Heach Council" for a Lodge of
this size, "Outstanding President
Award" by Palm Beach Council
and by District Five of B'nai
B'rith.
. Presently there are 125 Lodges
ln the State of Florida with a
membership of 25,000.
kFor any further information on
the lodge or B'nai B'rith contact
"f- Allen Brotman 994-1314,
MOO NW 2nd Ave., Boca Raton,
FL 33431.
ZOA
Zionist Organization of
America Boca Century Village
Chapter will hold their next
meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 19 at
'* p.m. in the Administration
"uilding. Their guest speaker
Time Immemorial," a book
review. Refreshments will be
served and guests are welcome.
There will be door prizes and
Israeli songs. For further in-
formation, please call 483-3076.
HADASSAH
Hadassah Boca Maariv
Chapter of Century Village West
vill hold their next meeting on
Aednesday. Feb. 20, 12:30 p.m.
n the Administration Building.
\ book review will be given by
Dr. Louis Bader on "The
Abandonment of the Jews."
Refreshments will be served.
Make your reservations for tables
and players now for their March 5
luncheon and card party to be
held at Lakeside Holiday Inn.
Donation is $9 for buffet, in-
cluding desserts and cofffee. Call
Sue Mandelberg 482-6947, Rose
Schun 487-0633, Sylvia Vilensky
487-1410 or Stella 482-3632.
Hadassah Ben Gurion Chapter
will take a bus trip to Historical
Museum of South Florida, plus
tour of Coconut Grove on
Thursday, Feb. 28. The cost is
$12 with lunch on your own. For
reservations, call 499-4874 or 499-
5972.
ORT
Women's American ORT
Delpointe Chapter will hold their
next meeting on Tuesday. Feb.
26. 12:30 p.m. at Temple Sinai,
2475 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray.
Mrs. Marie Horenberg will speak
on the subject of American
Women in Politics. Refreshments
will be served and guests are
welcome. For information, call
498-9869. Reservations are now
being taken for their luncheon
and card party, Monday, March
11 at 12 noon to be held at
Temple Sinai. Please call 499-
0194.
Women's American ORT Boca
Century Village Chapter will take
a trip to Lido Spa from Sunday to
Wednesday, March 17-20 for the
cost of $149. For further in-
formation call Bea Isaacs 483-
1710 or Eve Kurland 483-1658.
Women's American ORT All
Points Chapter will take a trip to
the Historical Museum and
Planet Ocean in Miami on
Tuesday. Feb. 26. The cost is $24
which includes bus, lunch and
admission.
Women's American ORT
Delray Chapter is sponsoring a
bus trip to Vizcaya and Coconut
Grove on Monday, March 4, 9
a.m. For reservations, please call
Ann Swilling 498-5958 or
Florence Wallent 498-7794.
Pioneer Women-Na'amat
Kinneret Chapter will hold their
next meeting on Monday. Feb.
25, 12:30 p.m. at the Palm
Greens Clubhouse. Via Delray in
Delray Beach. Rose Sher Weiss,
who served as president of the
Florida section of Retired
Teachers will talk on "Myths
About Jews from Biblical Times
to the Present." Refreshments
will be served.
BRANDEIS
Brandeis Women Boca
Chapter will hold a champagne
luncheon at the home of Shirley
and Larry Brickman on Monday,
March 11 at 12:30 p.m. to benefit
Library Trust. The contribution
is $35 minimum unit. Their
guests will be Rose Rifkin on
"Jewish Humorous Patter" and
Jay Coral, National Board
Member. By reservation only,
please call Edith Harrison 276-
4918 or Molly Weiss 994-8723.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi
Chapter will hold their next
meeting on Monday, Feb. 18,
12:30 p.m. at Temple Emeth,
5780 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray.
This two part program on
brotherhood will feature essay
contest winners from Carver
Middle School to read their
essays and receive their prizes
and Mr. Charles Seibel, vice
chairman of the New York Board
of ADL, will be guest speaker.
Refreshments will be served and
all are welcome to attend.
B'nai B'rith Women Genesis
Chapter will hold their
"Brotherhood" program meeting
on Thursday, Feb. 28, 12:30 p.m.
in the Administration Building,
Century Village, Boca. Their
guest speaker will be Rabbi
Samuel Silver of Temple Sinai
who will speak on Interfaith
Relations, for harmony among
ethnic groups. Members and
guests are invited to attend and
refreshments will be served.
"You Made Our Loss
More Bearable/'
^w **V ^

if \M
Warmth and Comfort Sensitivity and Understanding
Compassion in your time of neetl We understand.
HUHIX
A Family Protection Plan Chapel
i2L
-'-* >*
wr honor all prr-nc-d programs.
t8(>8 vv. Atlantic AviiHM' DHrey Hra< h. PL .13445
.105-4tM>-HOO<)
--
Despite The Problems
Lebanon War Helped
Both Israel, U.S.
Continued from Page 1
bomb shelters, and so on).
Given Israel's "delicate
composition," this could not be
tolerated, said Halevi. It took
years and great efforts to absorb
immigrants from differing
backgrounds and establish a
feeling of unity, and this was one
of the things which could easily
be destroyed.
So the PLO infrastructure had
to be destroyed, instead, and the
Lebanon action was justified.
However, the cost was great, not
only in economic terms which
Israel could ill afford but
especially in loss of Israeli lives.
Israel, therefore, has had to
accept a calculated risk in with-
drawing. If it means attacks will
again come from the Lebanese
side, Israel would still retain the
right to retaliate, and would do
so.
One of the benefits of the
elimination of the PLO's power
base has become apparent in
recent Middle East develop-
ments, Halevi said. Jordan would
never have dared to permit the
PLO to hold its conference in
Amman, nor would it have made
its rapprochment with Egypt, if
it had to fear the PLO as before.
Also, the United States was
never in as strong a position in its
Middle East relations with
Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia and
even Iraq as it is today, even
though it has demonstrated a
stronger than ever support of
Israel.
The cost of the Lebanon in-
vasion added to an already heavy
burden which has caused Israel's
economic problems to ac-
cumulate, to the tune of billions,
since the Yom Kippur War in
1973. While other countries,
including the U.S., would deal
with such problems by economic
measures leading to increased
unemployment, Israel cannot
afford to do so. "We had a
recession in the 60's," Halevi
explained, "which might have
been even worse than today's."
At that time unemployment was
permitted to grow, and as a result
some 100,000 Israelis migrated to
greener pastures.
"When there is unemployment
in this country, people do not
seek to go to Japan, or Paris or
London to solve their problem.
But there is hardly an Israeli who
does not have an uncle or aunt or
some friend in America, and in
his mind immediately arises the
thought 'maybe I'll go abroad to
find a better way of making a
living and later I'll come back.'
. We did not build the State of
Israel so that Israelis will want to
leave to go to the U.S. we built
it so that Jews from all over the
world will come to live in Israel
whenever they feel like it."
However, Halevi said, it is his
personal philosophy that the time
is past for Israelis to present
their Jewish brothers abroad
with the image of a needy poor
relation. The problems are being,
and will be overcome, and the
achievements of Israel's 36 years
speak for themselves they are
unequalled anywhere in the
world. Her Western allies have
come to recognize Israel's value
as a strategic ally, and Jews
should recognize the growth and
technological achievements
which have already made Israel
one of the world's top 10 high-
tech countries: which have
helped her jump from exporting
$70 million about 30 years ago to
$12 billion this year, with more
than 90 percent in citrus then to
more than 40 percent in high-tech
products at present.
It is for this that Israel Bonds
is looking to mobilize American
Jews as partners. The money
borrowed thus by the State of
Israel is always paid back, but
the bonds also serve as a means
of creating greater identification
for the Jews here. So much so,
that Israel has innovated ways
for bond purchasers to redeem
them earlier at full maturity
value when investing the money
in approved high-tech en-
terprises. It is also the reason
that Halevi innovated the $250
instruments, in order to reach a
much broader base and many
more young people, who will
hopefully remain involved with
Israel's development in future
years.
ALMOST A
CENTURY
of thoughtful, caring
K&P^m sennce to the Jewish
-t^flk community
'^H & of Greater
-j Hl New York
stands behind the
Gutterman fa m i1 // a
i$9 ^F new commitment
Jaw^ to provide service
(fSJSF that is faithful
$w to Jewish law
^-il^^^^^MBL and ritual, in every respect.
jjgggl Bk for the Jewish community
Tifi B^ of South Florida. We invite
3a & you to inspect our beautiful
'JJzHl Sk new memorial chapel and
lP^ consult on our pre-need plan.
OGutterman
MAfeirheftsssr
rowtxAi niRtctoflssmcf in?
STEWART GUTTERMAN WALTER S WARHEIT MARK E DAVIS
7240 N FEDERAL MWY BOCA RATON. FL 1 7-N00 DAOf M44X7* HOWARD 7424103
IN QREATER NEW YORK GUTT6RMAN'S. INC
ROCKVILLE CENTRE. L 1 WOODBURY L 1 rfANMATTAN. QUEERS BROOKLYN BRONX .


rage lb The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, February 15,1985
COUNTRYC4N
IVMKE
JERUSALEM. FOR 6 DAYS.
Or Tel Aviv. Choose one. Onlv Israel offers the timelessness of
Jerusalem. And the pulsating excitement of Tel Aviv. But vou must
fly now. An offer this good won't last forever.
Until February 28,1985 El Al Israel Airlines gives vou its
'Sunsation" vacation package to Israel. Package price includes
round trio airfare from Miami, six davs/five nights in a first class
hotel incuding breakfast and a Herb Rent-A-Car for five davs
And El Al is the only airline that flies direct from Miami to Tef Aviv.
Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra $100, the
deluxe Laromme Jerusalem Hotel, the Tel Aviv or Jerusalem Hilton
JSVo?!1 ays add extra davs- (ftKkage not available 12/14/84 thru '
l/D/85.)
$111.* EL ALGIVESYOU EILAT.
Just $111 and we'll give you round trip airfare from Tel Aviv
to the beautiful Red Sea resort of Eilat.
Plus three nights at the fabulous Laromme Hotel. We also
include two sumptuous buffet breakfasts and one delicious conti-
nental breakfast. Plus a complimentary drink on arrival. This spe-
rial package is available thru March 15,1985. (Not available 12/24/84
thru 1/5/85.) The deluxe Sonesta Hotel is also available for $144.
$249* ISRAEL AND CAIRO.
A" EI Al exclusive thru March 15,1985. Now the airline of
Israel flies you round trip from Tel Aviv to Cairo to spend three fab-
ulous days in Egypt at the beautiful Ramses Hilton. All for only
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This package also includes being met at the airport bv English
speaking representatives and transfer to and from the Ramses.
Now vou can have it all. Israel and Cairo in one magical trip.
Only Israel and El AJ can make these offers, but onlv for a
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For more information call your travel agent or El Al toll free at
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For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, write El Al
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NewYorklllOl. a
1
Name
Mrh.Hi,,pp|v (.nu,t, ,w, _,,,, (, A,)of drtJiU
*nd lam hum wximtv.


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