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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( January 18, 1985 )

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fage8 The Jewish Floridian of South County Friday. January 18, 1985
Flagler Federal Opens 37th
President Herschel Rosenthal, Flagler Federa1'9 *
Chairman Seymour B. Keith
Lead Board of Directors
President of Flagler Federal
since 1976, Herschel
Rosenthal has been associated
with the dynamic savings and
loan association for the past
28 years.
Active in the South Florida
Jewish community since
graduating from Miami Senior
High School and the Univer-
sity of Miami, Rosenthal was
chairman of the 50th anni-
versary dinner-dance of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida.
He was selected for that key
position because of his service
as president of the YM-
YWHA of Greater Miami and
his leadership roles for the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. He is a Pacesetter
of the annual CJA-IEF cam-
paign and was honored by
State of Israel Bonds for his
long service to Beth David
Congregation.
After receiving a BBA
degree from the U-M, where
he majored in accounting,
Rosenthal practiced public
accounting for seven years
before joining Flagler Federal
during its second year of
expansion. He was a partner
in a CPA firm until 1963 and
is a member of the American
and Florida Institutes of
Certified Public Accountants.
Rosenthal has been honored
Keith
by his colleagues through
election as chairman of the
Florida Savings and Loan
League. He also has served as
National League Representa-
tive of the Florida League and
was director of District 6 of
the statewide association.
Now a -member of the
United States League of
Savings Institutions Com-
mittee on Industry Re-
structuring, he is a member of
the U.S. League's executive
committee, a director of the
University of Miami's School
of Business Administration
Alumni Association and
countless other civic and busi-
ness associations.
Rosenthal long has been
committed to the role of
Flagler Federal in the tri-
county area of Palm Beach,
Broward and Dade. He has
participated in the growth of
the association to six offices in
Palm Beach County, 11 in
Broward and 20 in Dade with
the greatest expansion follow-
ing the population trends of
Pd. Adv.
Rosenthal
the Florida Gold Coast.
Herschel Rosenthal, his six
children and three grand-
children have witnessed the
explosive growth of South
Florida, and played a major
part in its community and
professional history.
Seymour B. Keith, a Flori-
dian since 1941 when he was
graduated from New York
University, has served with
distinction as chairman of the
board of Flagler Federal
Savings and Loan Association
since 1977.
After serving for four years
in the United States Army
during World War II. Keith
was separated as a captain
and was graduated from the
University of Miami School of
Law. He "has practiced law in
South Florida since 1947, and
is senior partner in the firm of
Keith, Mack, Lewis and
Allison.
A founding director and
general counsel for Flagler
Federal at the time of its
inception in 1955, he has
guided its steady progress
over the past three decades.
Keith was senior vice pre-
sident from 1970 until 1977,
when he was unanimously
elected chairman of the board.
His knowledge of the financial
and housing needs of Palm
Beach, Broward and Dade
counties has been a key factor
in the growth of Flagler
Federal throughout the state's
fastest growing region.
A Pacesetter of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
since 1979, Keith was the
honoree of the Builders,
Bankers and Allied Trades
division of Federation in 1977
for his dedicated service on
behalf of his profession, the
financial industry, the Jewish
people and the State of Israel.
Active in Temple Judea in
Coral Gables since 1960, he is
a director of such community
organizations as Goodwill
Industries and the Hope
School.
New Branch Office Opens In Village
of Golf, West Boynton Beach
Opening of Flagler
Federal's newest Palm Beach
county office in the Village of
Golf in December, 1984. set
the stage for the start of
Flagler Federal's year-long
observance of its 30th anni-
versary.
Located at 11082 South
Military Trail in West Boyn-
ton Beach, the new facility
joins offices in Delray Beach,
4767 West Atlantic Avenue;
Boynton Beach, 564 S.E. 15th
Avenue; Lantana, 1479 South
Dixie Highway; Lake Worth,
2575 North Dixie Highway;
I
Boynlcm Beach Blvd
< -h
Ragitr Federal
Village of (jotfBrmdt
II
Allan Ik Avrnur
IE
and Palm Beach Lakes, 1700
Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard.
Flagler Federal's complete-
ly computerized services make
all savings services available
at each office, with customers
able to make deposits and
other transactions at the
closest branch.
In addition, Flagler
Federal's commitment to
Palm Beach County makes
home mortgage and other
financing available to resi-
dents throughout the fast-
growing area.
The association plans to
build a permanent, free-
standing branch office directly
across from the existing store-
front branch located in the
Publix shopping center. The
new office building, with com-
pletion due sometime in 1985,
will contain many services
that Palm Beach County resi-
dents have asked for.
Reese
The history of Flagler Federal coincides
growth of South Florida during the past three de_
Founded in 1955 after the granting of a fedenU
savings and loan association an industry bomi
Flagler Federal grew from one office in down?
some 37 branches throughout Che tri-countv
Beach, Broward and Dade. y
The founding directors, under the leader*
Marks, led the association from initial deposta
million to $1 billion prior to his death in 1983
Named after Henry Flagler, the empire bi
who brought the railroad to West Palm Beach Mk
Key West, Flagler Federal has continued the pion
Flagler Federal Boai
Have Key Roles In All
Flagler Federal's board of i
of chairman Seymour B. Keith i
comprised of individuals whoh
for their communities throughoutlj
Native Floridian Sam
high schools, St. John's ,
University of Miami, is founder)
Seitlin and Company, one of!
insurance agencies.
Seitlin is a director of botkj
Trust Bank, N.A. and past
Insurance Board.
Former president of thee.
South Florida, Seitlin headed tki
during its period of greatest |
He is a member of the Ml.
Appeals Board of Dade County, 1
member of the Board of 0v
School of Medicine.
Albert J. Beer, a resident of S
a member of the first gradu
Elementary School in Miami
the University of Florida in
ministration degree. Two yeanl
Smith and became the youngest CP|
Past president of the Dade I
Public Accountants, he is a pa
stein, Covin, Beer and Company.
Beer has served as president i
is an active member of the borij
Jewish Education and of the Fe
An active member of the I
finds time to visit Israel frequentj
own an apartment in Jerusalem.'
eluding daughter Shelley Beer Ep
seven years, and son T.R. Beer,j
developer.
Director Sy Reese moved toft
in 1952. He has served on thei
Bank of Palm Beach County, I
Palm Beach.
Reese, who studied industry
Institute, founded Allstate
Lauderdale and Gas Service I
time he developed, built and obtaa
his vertical gas broiler, before r
Now developing two shopp
area, Reese is a prime mover ml
of Palm Beach county in Flondai
Service as a member of the I
Council, as vice prescbent of tw
National Association of Industrw
leadership in two Palm Beach'
combine to give Reese a keen p
the county and all South Flonda.
Beer
Babcock
Here Are Locations Of Flagler Federal
Offices Throughout Palm Beach County
DELRAY BEACH
4767 W. Atlantic Ave.
Delray Beach. FL 33445
498-7900
WEST PALM BEACH
1700 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
686-9400
LANTANA
1479 S.Dixie Hwy.
Lantana. FL 33462
586-8188
LAKE WORTH
2575 N. Dixie Hwy.
Lake Worth, FL 33460
582-6660
BOYNTON BEACH
564 S.E. 15th Ave.
Boynton Beach, FL 33435
734-8288
VILLAGE OF GOLF
11082 S. Military Trail
Boynton Beach, FL 33436
732-8880
Seitlin


Friday, January 18,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
;e, 6th in Palm Beach County
Keeps Pace With South Florida And All Of Palm Beach County
of the man in whose memory it is known.
Flagler was a philanthropist who donated money for
schools, parks and houses of worship.
And Flagler Federal has maintained that tradition of
participation in every phase of community life wherever it
maintains offices.
Nathan Meltzer, a past president of Flagler Federal now
deceased, met Henry Flagler on the historic day of January 22,
1912 when the first train rolled into Key West. Although the
Labor Day hurricane of 1935 was to wipe out the railroad tracks
to the Keys, the vision of Flagler opened up all Florida, and
particularly the Gold Coast to today's role as one of the world's
most desirable places to live, work and play.
bers
lorida
the leadership
Rosen thai, is
their concern
|nal careers.
M Dade County
(York and the
I of the board of
lost successful
leral and Royal
! Greater Miami
aity Centers of
YM-YWHA
lip.
iFire Prevention
itry Club and a
ersity of Miami
[since 1935, was
South Beach
raduated from
business ad-
larried Lillian
ter of Certified
firm of Gold-
Congregation,
ral Agency for
^tants division.
pard, Beer still
Hfe, where they
Vo children, in-
in Israel for
hi real estate
Miticello, N.Y.,
?irst American
|office in North
at Rensselaer
.ore in Fort
Jiami. At that
ates patent on
Ipanies.
pe Lake Worth
prominent role
nerce.
I Development
[chapter of the
rks and active
1 of commerce
solid future of
I
\


Lift
.

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^;*^CT
'BltHN
*te**".y

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i
f*


' 3*
'%
&
Guess how much money
you'll lose b
a Flagle
y not opening
era! IRA now?
A lot
As a matter of fact, the longer
you wait to open your individ-
ual retirement account the
more money you'll lose, lb
prove that point just look at
the chart.
At Flagler Federal it
doesn't take much to start
your future on the right road.
You can open your IRA for as
little as $100. And because we
don't charge administration
fees you actually wind up with
more money than with most
other IRA plans.
There's also another big
plus with a Flagler Federal IRA
You earn a Vz% cash bonus
on your IRA contributions
over $1,000. The larger your
contribution, the more bonus
you receive.
Whether you're single
or married, professional or
salaried, your future will be a
whole lot brighter with a tax-
deductible, tax-deferred
Flagler Federal IRA
So, don't put off the
decision for another year.
Come to Flagler Federal today
and plan for tomorrow.
IRAVili/UAf K "Wi aB^^^w^aup > ^*w, ^w^^f ^#ra%a vaa^avmav OaJM.lMCkyMr at t1% interest cMnpountat' quartarty
pf*y * wEr M aajrti
at I7i.au ci.aaa la4t.at.ai
ta.M tt.tN a7t.tM.41
*t* at.aat njm 4M.tT7.n
H.M u.aaa rn.iti.il
er Federal
Savings & Loan Association
It takes hometown
people to
understand
the needs of
a hometown.
FSLK
Pd. Adv,


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
January 18, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00190

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
January 18, 1985

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00190

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
Jewish Floridian
Off South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
J umber 3
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, January 18,1986
ZFndShochti
Price 35 Cents
es Supports Shultz Letter Critical of Economy
ID LANDAU
.EM (JTA)
[Shimon Peres
that Secre-
George Shultz
Israel's best
tshington, and
)roper for him
ice on how Is-
mdle its econ-
Perea, addressing a Labor Par-
ty group here, was referring to a
letter he received from Shultz two
weeks ago suggesting that the
Israeli government must take
tougher economic measures
before the U.S. considers its
request for increased economic
aid.
THE LETTER, leaked to the
press, drew a sharp response
from Gad Yaacobi. minister of
economics and planning, who
said the government knows what
has to be done and does not need
"lecturing." Peres, however,
defended Shultz. His advice, he
said was "truly that of a friend,
without pressure or insults."
The premier added that it was
natural and proper for Wash-
ington to carefully scrutinize
Israel's economic plans when it
was being asked for increased
aid. He said Shultz's letter was
0W8
Stand With Gromyko on Jews
IAKRABI state George Shultz "to
Ik (JTA) take a firm stand" on the
swish leaders
lalf of Soviet
Secretary of1
growing plight of Soviet
Jews, especially those who
seek exit visas, during his
(i-Nazis Demonstrate;
uths Shout 'Jews Out'
- (JTA) Several hundred anti-Nazis
here on New Year's Day against the
\i neo-Nazi youth groups in and around this
West Germany. They marched from the
lpus to the site of the former synagogue
Jsame time, neo-Nazi youths shouted anti-
js in another part of the city.
IWERE no clashes. The anti-Nazis, heavily
meeting this week with
Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko in Gene-
va.
"Positive movement on this
question must be a key com-
ponent of any improvement in
Soviet-American relations, and it
cannot be divorced from other
matters of mutual concern,"
Herbert Kronish. chairman of the
Greater New York Conference on
Soviet Jewry, said at a press
conference at the Roosevelt Hotel
here. The press conference was
jointly sponsored by the
GNYCSJ and the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
"We have urged the secretary
of state," Kronish disclosed, "to
be flexible in his search for an
lice, were protesting specifically against a g h which will work and ^
t-Nazi youth groups in the nearby town of underscore for Mr. Gromyko the
her Kulka, head of a group called "Fascism
said his organization was demanding
importance with which all
Americans regard the plight of
Soviet Jews."
NCSJ CHAIRMAN Morris
Abram said, in reply to a
question, that Shultz promised to
raise the issue of Soviet Jews in
all future meetings with Soviet
leaders. He said the promise was
made in a meeting with Jewish
leaders in Washington last year.
in,
lent outlaw neo-Nazi groups.
tostrators carried signs calling on federal,
il authorities to ban the traditional New
itherings of neo-Nazis, many of which are
|da area.
in Hilders drew such organizations as the
|end," "Skinheads," "Young National
id "National Socialist Actions Front." It
)ver by Thomas Brehl, identified as national
Inf fUaA *; i?^4. He conceded, however, that no
*>f the Action Front. specific promise ^ Tf^ae the
Nahrath, chairman of the Viking Jugend, plight of Soviet Jews during the
anization was not Nazi but an association Monday and Tuesday_ meetincp
n youths,
undred of these youths ranged through
"Jews Out" and "Germany, Wake Up."
ir leaders would be prosecuted for staging
demonstration.
with Gromyko was given, but it
was assumed that the commit-
ment of the administration to
raise the issue will apply to this
meeting as well.
[gels Endow Fund
r South County
pvin L. Siegel of
* established the
Siegel Philan-
jrt of the South
B Federation
idation, founda-
Bernstein an-
Siegel have
thropic interests
>C., Florida and
Siegel, now
grty a principal
llf supermarket
snington, Balti-
pware area. In
develop The
Mimosa in Miami Beach, as well
as other properties in South
Florida.
The Siegels decided to esta-
blish the Irvin and Fannie Siegel
Philanthropic Fund at the South
County Jewish Federation be-
cause, Mr. Siegel stated, they
have always believed in parti-
cipating fully in the community
where they are living.
Inquiries about establishing
endowment funds can be directed
to Arthur H. Jaffe, Endowment
Director, South County Jewish
Federation. (Telephone: 368-
2737).
not critical but in fact praised the
"general direction" of the
government's economic policies.
He simply urged greater urgency
and determination to implement
those policies, Peres said.
The Finance Ministry was
reported meanwhile to be work-
ing on a one-year wage-price
stabilization plan to take effect
when the three-month wage-price
freeze ends in January. Some ele-
ments of the plan, leaked to the
media, indicated that the min-
istry seeks to hold down real
wages. While workers will receive
their regular monthly cost-of-
living increments, there will be no
wage hikes during the year the
plan is in effect.
PERES WAS probably
According to unofficial reports,
the Finance Ministry will not im-
pose another blanket freeze on
the price of staple goods but
would try to control and
moderate price rises. Govern-
ment price subsidies would con-
tinue but at a relatively low level.
Abram and Kronish called on
the Reagan administration to
discuss with Soviet leaders the
release of all Soviet Jewish
Prisoners of Conscience and
cancel those trials which have not
yet occurred; grant exit visas to
those Jews who wish to emigrate;
and allow all Jews to Hve freely
and without discrimination in the
Soviet Union.
CHARGING THAT Soviet
Jews are facing currently a
"critical situation," Kronish and
Abram announced that the
number of Jews allowed to
emigrate from the Soviet Union
in 1984 was the lowest total for a
single year since the landmark
Leningrad Trials of 1970-71.
They noted that Jewish
emigration from the Soviet Union
has been steadily declining since
1979, when 61,320 Jews were
permitted to leave.
Prime Minister Peres
The prices of imports are ex-
pected to soar after the current
freeze expires. Thereafter, they
would be allowed to rise in
tandem with the price of the
dollar in Israeli currency.
alluding to this last night when
he said real wages would be held
io their 1982 levels during a one-
I >ar recovery plan.
Rabbi Shepard Takes
Pulpit At Anshei Shalom
Oriole Jewish Center (Temple
Anshei Shalom) in West Delray
has appointed its first spiritual
leader. He is Rabbi Jordan H.
Shepard, formerly of Temple
B'nai Israel in Kankakee, 111.
Born in Revere, Mass., Rabbi
Shepard was ordained at Chaim
Berlin Talmudical Seminary in
1946, and held pulpits in three
communities in Massachusetts
until he took the pulpit in Kan-
kakee. During his tenure in
Medford, Mass., Rabbi Shepard
also served as regional president
ofZOA.
Rabbi Shepard holds an MA in
psychology from the Chicago
Medical School, where he also
served as an adjunct instructor in
the Department of Psychiatry.
He was one of the founders of the
Kankakee Mental Health Center
and served on its board of dir-
ectors.
In 1968, Rabbi Shepard deliv-
ered the benediction at the
inauguration of Illinois Governor
Samuel H. Shapiro, a past pre-
sident of Rabbi Shepard's
congregation in Kankakee. Rabbi
Shepard was a faculty member of
the Glendale Christian Teachers'
Institute, where he taught a
course on the Jewish Bible; he
was president of the Interfaith
Clergy of Kankakee; and a pre-
sident of the B'nai B'rith Lodge
of Kankakee. He has now trans-
ferred his B'nai B'rith member-
ship to the newly- formed Jacob
Lodge No. 3246 in Delray.
Rabbi Shepard and his wife
Ilene have two daughters and a
son.
Temple Anshei Shalom's presi-
dent Edward Dorfman intro-
duced Rabbi Shepard to some 300
congregants at a recent Friday
night service the largest at-
tendance at a Sabbath service in
the temple's four-year history.
Services are currently held at the
Carteret Bank on Atlantic and
Carter Rd., pending completion
of the temple's new building on
Rabbi Jordan H. Shepard
Atlantk Blvd.. next to the Palm
Beach Public Library. The new
temple building is expected to be
completed within two months.
Anshei Shalom has a member-
ship of nearly 900; it was 500
when ground was broken just
over a year ago.


Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, January 18,1985_
Press Digest
(Compiled from Israeli dailies
and the English-language Jewish
Press, by Marty Erann, Director
of Communications, South
County Jewish Federation)
THE PITTSBURGH
JEWISH CHRONICLE teUs of a
Jewish woman, mother of three
school-age children in Bethel
Park, who spoke at a school
board meeting in praise of its
guidelines separating church and
state; she was subsequently
bombarded with at least 50 phone
calls, ranging from abusing to
threatening.
The woman, Carla Berenbaum,
was shocked to hear callers
saying things like: "The ovens
have started for you," "Did your
little Jew-boy get home OK?"
and threats to burn her house
down. Berenbaum said she was
the only one at the meeting of
some 180 parents to praise the
guidelines, and was hissed by
many of those present. But worst
of all. according to Berenbaum,
were the reactions from some of
her Jewish neighbors, who ac-
cused her of "creating anti-
Semitism."
Fortunately, later, more sup-
portive calls came, including one
from the Pittsburgh area and as
far away as Allentown and even
Florida.
THE NATIONAL JEWISH
POST AND OPINION continues
to play up the issue of patrilineal
descent, which relates to the
issue of "Who Is A Jew" in the
Israeli law as well as among the
Jewish religious movements. The
P AND O quotes a leading
Conservative rabbi, Harold
Schulweis, as saying, "It is
imperative for the Conservative
and Orthodox communities to
meet privately and immediately
to work out a modus vivendi
regarding converts to Judaism."
It says Rabbi Schulweis, consi-
dered the father of the wide-
spread Havurah movement, fore-
casts that patrilineal descent will
likely be accepted eventually, as
was recently stated by Reform
Rabbi Alexander Schindler, who
was instrumental in getting it
recognized in Reform Judaism. It
is anticipated, however, that
many voices within the Con-
servative rabbinate will be raised
in objection to this assessment
as has already been evident in a
recent issue of JUDAISM the
American Jewish Congress
quarterly, which devoted itself to
the issue.
(The issue is a vital one, since
Orthodox and Conservative
authorities, at present, recognize
only those born to Jewish
mothers as being Jewish, while
children of a Jewish father and a
non-Jewish mother must convert
but are not otherwise accepted as
Jews. In Israel, this has created
many problems in the past, since
the Law of Return, which states
that every Jew has an automatic
right to be admitted to Israel and
Israeli citizenship, has to date
t been interpreted according to
* halacha and the matrilineal
9 descent rule. M.E. I.
THE P AND O. in an obliquely
apologetic editorial, justifies
itself for being one of the early
Jewish publications to make
public the fact that a rescue
operation for Ethiopian Jewry
was under way, by attempting to
shift the blame on to Aryeh
Dulzin, head of the Jewish
Agency, and the U.S. Ambas-
sador for Refugees, H. Eugene
Douglas, who hinted at the
operation during their speeches
at the General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations in
Toronto back in November. Says
the P AND O: "No one at any
point approached this paper and
proposed that the news be
withheld for fear that its publica-
tion might cause Operation
Moses to be suspended."
i
a
l
A message to the Jewish Press
should have been sent in advance
about Operation Moses and the
need to refrain from publicizing
it, says the paper, and such a
request would then have been
"assiduously observed."
On the subject of placing guilt
about publicizing "Operation
Moses," the Israeli press also
splashed the subject on its front
pages last week, as the so-called
"secrecy" was broken. One
sidebar report, however, in
YEDIOT AHARONOT discloses
that an Israeli official has already
been axed for revealing secret
details about the operation.
Yehuda Dominitz, for many
years the director-general of the
Jewish Agency Aliyah Depart-
ment, was suspended by Haim
Aharon, the department chair,
for disclosing the information in
an interview with an Israeli
journalist. Dominitz himself told
VKDIQT that he specifically told
the journalist, Israel Harel. that '
this information was "off the
record" and had expected
Harel to respect this, as is cus-
tomary among journalists in
Israel. Only the information rela-
ting to absorption of Ethiopian
Jews, which was not to remain
classified, was supposed to be
published .
YEDIOT, as well as
MA'ARIV, report on a crisis that
is developing in government hos-
pitals in Israel (the majority of
hosptiaU, with noted exceptions
such as Hadassah Medical Center
and Sha'are Zedek, are govern-
ment hospitals M.E.). It
seems hospitals have been
running out of medications, food
and supplies of all sorts, in-
cluding surgical supplies. The
head of the cardiac unit at Sheba
Hospital in Tel Aviv complained
that he had only one pacemaker
left in stock; most hospitals were
almost out of blood for transfu-
sions, and Rambam Hospital in
Haifa issued a notice that it
would accept none but serious
emergency cases.
The crisis resulted from failure
of the Health Ministry to transfer
funds to the hospitals so they
could pay suppliers and order
material the Health Ministry,
in turn, blamed the Finance Min-
istry for failing to provide its
allocation, and all blamed the
budget cuts. Last minute reports
had it that Premier Shimon Peres
had instructed the Treasury to
"infuse" five billion Shekels (less
than $5 millionlinto the Health
Ministry, in order to overcome
the immediate problem, which
was exacerbated by a strike of
workers in Magen David Adorn
(Israel's equivalent of the Red
Cross, which operates ambul-
ances and emergency services.
M.E). However, HAARETZ
reported that only $2 million was
actually paid to the Health
Ministry.
The biggest uproar of the past j
two weeks in Israel fboiit
which much more will probably
be heard is a scandal which
came into light at the beginning
of January, and concerns a col-
lapse of the bank stocks in
October. 1983. With the publica-
tion of a scathing report by State
Comptroller Yitzhak Tunik, the
Knesset Watchdog Committee
gathered to discuss th.
ment of a judicial co^,
inquiry to investimuT!*
aons of wrongdoing Iff
guilt for the crisis ul
many accusations or
have been raised m
heads of Israels bffl
were not subject uTL]
comptroller s investiatil
were not included m 3
(More on this subject
reported in detail in ntal
Floridian. M.E.) & .
Israel Tried To Exchaiu
PLO Burial for POWs
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel offered to allow
burial in Hebron of the
town's former mayor,
Fahed Kawasme, in ex-
change for four Israeli sol-
diers missing in Lebanon
for more than a year, it was
disclosed here.
The offer was relayed to
Amman, where Kawasme was as-
sassinated, apparently with the
intention that the Jordanian
authorities would pass it on to
Green Party in Israel Tell
Knesset of Enormous 'Crimes'
BONN (JTA) -
Green Party officials here
view the latest trip of their
delegation to Israel as an
enormous success in gain-
ing publicity for the party's
ideas. Never before in its
short history has the Green
Party had such favorable
attention focused by the
media on its view that a
Palestinian state should be
created in the West Bank,
and that what it terms "Is-
raeli crimes" in Lebanon
should be denounced by
Bonn.
The six-member Green Party
delegation ended its four-day
tour of Israel and admitted that
they had come to Israel with
fixed ideas and were returning
home with those same opinions
unchanged, it was reported by
Hugh Orgel, the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency's correspondent
in Tel Aviv.
HE WROTE that Jurgen
Reents, the delegation's spokes-
man and leader, told a press con-
ference in Tel Aviv that the
Greens still thought that Israel
should withdraw to its pre-June
1967 borders and recognize a
Palestinian state in the West
Bank to afford the Palestinians
their "natural right of self-
expression."
The West German media
coverage of the delegation
concentrated heavily on the dif-
ference of opinion between Israel
and the Greens on the Palestinian
issue. It either left unmentioned
or strongly downplayed other
elements in the present contro-
versy over the visit and over the
party's anti-Semitic tendencies.
The German media largely
ignored the fact that the delega-
tion had prepared its itinerary in
Lebanon, in Syria and Jordan
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization and with the
governments of these countries.
This happened, according to well-
informed sources in the party,
months or weeks before the
delegation was slated to leave
West Germany.
MOST WEST German news-
papers failed to report, as well,
that the Greens had prepared an
anti-Israel strategy paper before
the delegation began its trip. Nor
did most publications report that
the Israeli ambassador here
labelled the paper as anti-
Semitic.
The paper, published early in
December, denounced Israel as
"fascist and terrorist" and
referred to "terrorist policies" of
Israel in south Lebanon which
allegedly include random arrests
and tortures in specially desig-
nated concentration camps.
Most of the press also ignored
the fact that the Greens had
failed to contact the Israeli
embassy here, or the foreign min-
istry in Jerusalem, before they
were forced to do so when the
strategy paper was published by
a local Bonn newspaper and by
the Israeli media.
THE VISIT of the Greens'
delegation to Israel was pre-
sented in the media here as some-
thing that puzzled Israeli public
opinion and disturbed the
government of Premier Shimon
Peres. One radio commentator,
describing the Dec. 26 Knesset
incident in which members of the
Tehiya Party displayed a banner
saying Braune Gruenne Raus
(Browns Greens Ou') during the
delegation's visit to the parlia-
ment, said:
"The Israeli nationalistic
Tehiya Party has adopted the
methods of our own nationalistic
party, namely the Greens." He
was referring to the Greens' esta-
blished practice in the Bundestag
and in the parliaments of federal
states of attracting attention to
their opinions by displaying
banners which in most cases
denounce America as an aggres-
sive and imperialist power en-
dangering world peace. i
The Tehiya banner was a refer-
ence to the equation, according to
Tehiya, between the Greens and
the Nazi stormtroopers who wore
brown uniforms.
Another point left almost com-
pletely unmentioned in the West
German media is the disturbing
evidence accumulating on the
anti-Semitic tendencies of the
Greens an aspect widely
reported in Israel but which
some Green Party leaders deny.
NO GERMAN newspaper or
radio station has mentioned in
recent days the circulation of
anti-Semitic calendars by the
Greens; the frequent equations
Continued on Page 3
the Palestine Liberation,
ization. But there was no |
response from Amman
Kawasme was buried.
According to Shmuel L
coordinator of govenunentil
in the West Bank, who <
the attempted trt
Kawasme's burial is an ind
that there is no deal.
Shimon Peres, replying toj
tions in the Knesset, said I
offer still stands.
KAWASME was d
1980 and deported for
pro-PLO activities. At the
his death he was a rankini
ber of the PLO's ex
council. His killers are beli
be PLO dissidents opp
Yasir Arafat. The Israeli aU
ties had reportedly
request from the Kii
family that the remains M
turned for burial in Hebron.
Goren disclosed that
authorities informed the L
that Israel was prepared to i
their request in return fotj
missing soldiers.
Three of them,
Baumel, Yehuda Katz
Keldman, have been
since they abandoned their
in the battle of Sultan Ya
the Bekaa Valley of
Lebanon on June 11, 1981
fourth soldier, Samir As'adl
served in the Sidon area, hn|
missing since April, 1983.
ISRAEL HAD re*ra|
believe that the soldiers i
alive or, at least, that theirh
are in the hands of the PU
the basis of information I
back from Amman a mo
by Israeli journalist
Kapelyuk.
Kapelyuk, who covend|
meeting of the Palestine Ni
Council in the Jordanuuir
reported that PLO chiefJ
had offered to return the I
of eight or nine Israeli i
killed in Lebanon in exch'
PLO prisoners in Israel sk
Peres, discussing thei
the Knesset, was skeptflll
said this was not the H
the PLO spread rumotir
could cause anguish to
families of missing ?fri
sources in Amman saidtne"
did not seem to have any<
edge of the four nus
sought by Israel.
LEVINE, SCHWARTZ, GOLD AND COHEN, P.A.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
SSfJ-iS" *"" H- Schrt*
P.ulaS. Gold Edward B. Cohan
PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH
COMMERCIAL LITIGATION
CRIMINAL LAW
CIVIL & CRIMINAL APPEALS
REAL ESTATE & CONDOMINIUMS
CORPORATIONS & BUSINESS LAW
MARITAL A FAMILY LAW
WILLS. ESTATES & PROBATE
5500 NORTH FEDERAL HIGHWAY, BOCA RATON
BOCA RATON PALM BEACH BROWARD
997-6800 732-4699 421-4977,
The Hamlet Del Aire
Indian Springs Boca Teeca
Hunters' Run Boca Point
Boca West Boca Lago
Super Priced Homes & Condos Available
in these Golf Course Communities'
Gimelstob Realty, H
Licensed Real Estate Brokers
Comer Powerline and Palmetto Park Road
Boca Raton, Florida
392-2822


Names in the News
iFriday, January 18,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
eball
Los
nan
Commissioner Peter
th, former president of
Angeles Olympic
ling Committee and Time
fine's 1984 Man of the
will be guest of honor at the
' annual Sports Torch of
jig dinner sponsored by the
ican Friends of the Hebrew
ersity.
Iberroth, who took office as
league baseball's sixth
dssioner Oct. 1, will receive
Torch of Learning Award at
onual dinner held in memory
e eleven Israeli athletes
by terrorists during the
[Munich Olympics.
i selection as the 1985 Torch
aming laureate was an-
by Robert S. Savin,
of the American
National Munich Eleven
Is Program, and by Howard
honorary national chair-
af the sports program.
Charles H. Revson
dation has announced a new
year grant to the Jewish
logical Seminary of
rica. The grant will enable
minary to name ten Revson
i in each of the next three
continuing a program
in 1979 and designed to
n qualified students each
to pursue their graduate
ies in Judaica.
ie terms of the new grant of
,000 for the three-year term
increase the value of each
wship to $13,500, in
ignition of rising costs in the
of higher education.
notifying Chancellor Gerson
ohen of the allocation, Eli N.
Mis, president of the foun-
lauded the achievements
e program to date.
irect political action is less
I to bring on social change in
oviet Union than the current
i rights movement, asserts
loted authority on Soviet
pssion of dissidents, himself a
pian emigre now living in the
ed States.
Jery Chalidze, co-founder
Andrew Sakharov and
ei Tverdokhlebov of the
Human Rights Commit-
oints out that there is no
how long a preliminary
must continue in the
Union before direct
ical action becomes possible.
ilidze's views are exrpessed
M)-page pamphlet entitled
Soviet Human Rights
Nent: A Memoir" just
shed by the American Jew-
ommittees Jacob Blauatein
tute for the Advancement of
Mn Rights.
Green Party
Continued from Page 2-
thbeyN0embetweentheJew8
t+k& 0r the ^im*
"wish views of their candi-
' president, author<(J
> ^al attempt has been made
the press or within the
1 "rty itself to take issue
\m accusations that the
[* engaged, directly or
. voluntarily or through
n<*. lack of attention or
Zu? reviving notorious
N* traditions harbored
mrman nationalistic
"Hit.
4 "V8" ,intrview with
Ltiom,' ?shed <""** dl
n8 hke them. When offered
evidence or presented
"^commented that he
Party could not be held
bfsinf/rUnfawrableb*k*-
f8lngle individuals
Jacob K. Javits, former U.S.
senator from New York, will
receive the American ORT
Federation Community
Achievement Award at the
AOF National Conference
Jan. 25-27 in New York.
A spokesman for Reform
Judaism has criticized New
York's Mayor Edward Koch for
having made a "wholesale
condemnation of black leadership
as anti-Semitic."
Albert Vorspan, vice president
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, said such "loose
talk" is "harmful and inflam-
matory, just as is loose talk that
the mayor is anti-black." He
urged that the mayor declare "a
moratorium on racial rhetoric and
polarization beginning with
himself."
The Union of American
Hebrew Congregations is
composed of 780 Reform syna-
gogues in the United States and
Canada with a membership of
1.25 million.
Delegates from American ORT
Federation chapters and
divisions throughout the U.S.
will participate in a three-day
round of discussions and ac-
tivities marking the 60th anni-
versary of the incorporation of
the American ORT Federation at
the AOF National Conference
slated for Jan. 25-27 at the
Sheraton Centre in New York,
announced Alvin L. Gray, AOF
president.
A special American ORT Fed-
eration Community Achievement
Award will be presented to
former Sen. Jacob K. Javits at
the Saturday night banquet
session, Jan. 26. Javits has been
a member of the AOF board of
i directors since 1946 when he saw
ORT schools in operation in
Displaced Persons Camps in
Europe after the Second World
War.
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith called on the
Greek government to "repudiate
ahd dissasociate" itself from a
ruling by a court in Candia,
Crete, that the Jehovah's
Witnesses, a Christian sect, is
"an organization close to
Judaism aiming at the creation of
a world Zionist empire with Jeru-
salem at its center."
In a cable to Prime Minister
Andreas Papandreou, Abraham
H. Foxman, ADL's associate
national director and head of its
International Affairs Division,
said it is "vital" that the
government of Greece make clear
that it "rejects this ruling and
the attitude it reflects."
Dr. Roger S. Kohn, a former
archivist at the Consistory of
Paris, has been appointed ar-
chivist at the Yeshiva University
libraries. Dr. Kohn, who holds a
PhD degree in history from the
University of Paris- Sor bonne,
previously taught Jewish history
and thought at Gratz College in
Philadelphia.
In his position at Yeehiva
University, Dr. Kohn will be
processing some 30 collections of
archives (a total of 500 linear feet
of archives), including the
collection from the Central Relief
Committee, an organization
founded during World War I as
the Orthodox branch of the Joint
Distribution Committee.
Tel Aviv Univ.
Names New Dean
TEL AVIV (JTA) Prof.
Iafa Keydar, a microbiologist
who is internationally known for
her research in breast cancer, has
been elected dean of Tel Aviv
University's George Wise
Faculty of Life Sciences. She is
the first woman to head an
academic faculty at the
university.
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Available at PubMx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Homemade Goodness
Available at Publlx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Pumpkin Pie
$149
each
Available at Publlx Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Made with Tender Puff Pastry
Apple
Turnovers
289
Available at All PuMx Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Filled with Fruit and Nuts
Fruit Stollen.................. $229
Delightfully Fresh
Bran Muffins..............6 tor 99*
Powdered Sugar mm^_____
Mini Donuts................... m'I09
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Wholesome and Nutritious
Plain Bagels...............6 for 99*
Delicious
Chocolate Chip
Cookies....................12 $149
Bake and Serve, Gourmet
Hors D'Oeuvres..........1(b?xt$1995
Prices Effective
Jan. 17th thru 23rd. 1985
i
<


Tammy; muay,
T, 1WB4
-------
Page 4 The Jewish Floridiii of South County 7 Friday, January 18,1985
Israel's Chief of Staff
Deputy Discusses
Combat, Cutbacks
How was the transition from
being G.O.C of the-Air Force to
vour present position as Deputy
Chief of Staff?
The main difference is that the
IAF is a tightly knit, compact
organization. Although it
deploys highly complex weapon
systems, it is a simpler organi-
zation to run than the IDF
General Staff. The IAF decision-
making process and related staff
work is a streamlined, relatively
problem-free, logical procedure.
Is this because of its smaller
sue?
Not only because of the IAF's
relatively small size, but because
of its organizational structure.
The functioning of the IDF
General Staff is more com-
plicated, because it is also the
staff of IDF land-based forces. In
addition, it is in contact with a
wide variety of civilian bodies,
and this generates friction. The
IAF. by contrast, has only one
"outside body" to deal with: the
General Staff, with whom friction
is minimal.
Would you like to see General
Staff organizational procedures
remodeled upon those of the Air
Force ?
I do not think it is possible to
disregard the constraints and
complexities that face the
General Staff. To a large extent
they are an integral part of any
large organization. There is. of
course, room for improvement
and for simplifying the decision-
making process. I believe that it
is possible to make progress in
these directions and. in all
modesty. I believe that we have
been successful in stremlining the
decision-making process.
How has your experience in
civilian industry contributed to
the relationship between the IDF
and the industrial complex?
I hope that I was able to exert
a positive influence in this
domain. I believe that my
knowledge of what industries are
and how they operate, as well as
my experience at the user level,
place me in a position to improve
IDF decision-making in the
selection of appropriate systems.
I believe that my IAF experience
was particularly valuable in this
respect The IAF has had more
contact nth Israeli industrial
processes, not only with respect
to formulating system require-
ments and specifications, but
also in the broader perspective of
system integration which in-
cludes servicing, documentation,
construction, and training
Because of the sheer
sophistication of Air Force
systems, the IAF has reached
higher standards and amassed
greater knowledge in these areas.
I hope that, at the General Staff
level. I have managed to bring
some of this experience to the
ground forces. I hope that I was
able to influence thinking
regarding efficient utilization of
the defense budget, as far as both
industry and defense are con-
cerned. There is sometimes, but
not always, a positive correlation
between the two. If you invest in
one system too heavily at too
early a stage, you will be unable
to undertake other projects.
However, if you commit just the
essential funding, you can free
other funds for additional
projects, thus obtaining more
marginal defense per dollar. This
approach is beneficial to industry
since you can extend funding
over a wider range of products
and commit yourself to broader,
more comprehensive programs.
What percentage of the
materiel used by the IDF is made
in Israel?
There are certain systems,
such as the Merkava tank, where
we are almost self-sufficient in
our acquisition. The problem is
not a technological one. We have
the know-how to produce almost
all the combat materiel which we
need. But budgetary constraints
and delivery-time requirements
occasionally oblige us to com-
promise and procure abroad.
You are the officer responsible
for preparing the annual work
plan for the Chief of Staffs
approval What are the areas
emphasized in the current plan,
and what changes have you made
since you assumed your func-
tions ?
WE have placed the emphasis
on improving the quality of the
order of battle. This can be ac-
complished in part by organi-
zational means.
During my term we established
the widely publicized Ground
Forces Command, which is now a
year in existence. We recently
dealt with matters including
increasing the efficiency of the
logistical organization for
wartime, the reduction of total
days of reserve service and their
reallocation to permit reserve
components to carry out training
and undertake ongoing security
assignments. We drew up annual
and multi-year plans and
amended them. We made quick
decisions regarding ground, sea
and air weapons systems. Many
of these decisions were influenced
by the lessons of Operation Peace
for Galilee and its aftermath.
The redeployment of forces in
Lebanon to the Awali line was
under our responsibility as well.
Our interests and our daily
concerns with organization are
motivated by the need to find
solutions for problems as they
arise. One such problem is the
economic situation of the State of
Israel. Unforseen budgetary cuts
and inflation require the work
plan to be amended every month.
Because of inflation every delay
in decision-making regarding
acquisitions of weapon systems
reduces the amount of materiel
which the IDF will be able to
procure. You therefore find
yourself in a race against time.
Likewise, problems in the field
require real-time appropriate
r**rjonses. These constraints
Continued on Page 6
The
Jewish Floridian
FRED SMOCMET
Editor and PuOhane-
of South County r,.
SUZANNE SHOCHET MM ERAN.
mi. i .,_ "*>Coordinate*
,, m.jgMQftmd ela|, St-Waeaii aetewcao Second Cleee PMtao* ett at Boca Raton Fie US>S 540 250 ISSN oStwmVi^
BOCA RATON OFFICE 136 Spamth hW Btad N W.Boca Rator, TT, SnEorwVsiOl
Ma.nOft.ce Plant 120 NE 6th St M.am. F 33,01 Prne1tti*laK
______ awmalaa Director. Suet lac, Pha mUtU^
ConjnadJ^nah AppaatSoutn County Jawian Federaton. inc Officer* PraaKtam Manama Rr*-,
*ce Praartanta. Manor* Baar. Enc W Deckmoar Larry (^i^yrSs^S^kirS^SLS^,
Treeeurer. Sheldon Jontrft E*ecuie Oweclor. Rate. Bruce S Werahai ^^' "oaenmai
- iV"** Fl<>"*an don not guarantee Kaanrvth or Mercrtendiaa Advemaen
S2SE52 RATES LOC" *" ** Annu" <2 "'""^^^moe^Soutf. Count
Jew-sr. Federal**. 330 Span.an fW BMj N W Boca Raton Fi. JjijY PtowaS??r*7 ^1
Out Of Town. Upon Requeat ~>jiw*j/
Maj. Gen. David Ivry
In 1983, Maj. Gen. David Ivry, former Gen-
eral Commanding Officer of the Israel Air
Force, was called back from civilian industry
to serve,as deputy chief of staff. Gen. Ivry is
a former combat pilot and has held an array
of senior command and staff positions in the
IAF. In this interview withLt. CoL Yehudah
Weinraub, Gen. Ivry gives his views as to
the effects of budgetary cuts on theh
Defense Force's fighting capability, "
organization and the combat mix of I
I990's. The Jewish Floridian has
granted special permission by the
Spokesman's Office in Tel Aviv to puh
the interview which appears in theDecen
issue of the IDF Journal.
After Much Suffering
Finally, the Falashas Have Come Ho*
Friday. January 18. 1965
Volume 7
25 TEVETH 5746
Number 3
JERUSALEM -
Today's headlines reveal
that 'most of the 25,000
Jews of Ethiopia have now
reached Israel including
many children who have
come without their parents.
After much suffering,
severe ordeals and long
treks in the sun-parched
African desert."
Israel's newspapers also reveal
for the first time that "dozens of
Ethiopians, mainly children,
have been admitted to Jeru-
salem's Shaare Zedek Medical
Center, where a special emer-
gency facility medical team has
been established."
SHAARE ZEDEK'S Prof.
Chain) Hershko stated, "We are
faced again with the terrible
symptoms found when the
concentration camps in Europe
were liberated."
Dr. Yaakov Adler, Shaare
Zedek's director of emergency
services, returned this week from
famine stricken Ethiopia, said
that "it was a shocking, hear-
trending experience. I saw a
desperately sick child. His
mother covered him with a
blanket and let him die under a
tree in the corner of our camp.
"When I offered to treat him
and to try to save his life, her
reaction was, 'He will die in any
case then is nothing to be
done.' I saw apathy everywhere.
Thev simply lie in their tents,
waiting for death."
Dr. Adler, who previously went
to Cambodia with a relief mission
organized by Abie Nathan, had
joined Nathan again on the
mission to Ethiopia where they
set up a camp for 10,000 people
some 400 km north of the capital,
Addis Ababa.
"PEOPLE died in our camp
before we could get to them,"
stated Adler.
"They suffer from many
diseases and have gradually lost
their immunity. Although we had
steeled ourselves emotionally, we
were overcome by the tragic
scenes of people dying of hunger,
disease and lack of will to live."
Dr. Adler also told the story of
a mother of four who saw three of
her children die within one week.
"She stopped eating and
drinking, and she even refused to
take medication. When we tried
to spoon-feed her, she said, 'I
don't want to live.' "
The dictionary of Amharic
phrases posted next to the
nurse's station on the 6th Floor
at Shaare Zedek Medical Center
here is one that you won't find in
any Berlitz language series. It
says: megev. food;
allu?. how are you feelii
breakfast: messa,
igziabber yestiligin.
morning; tira. very good.
The list is long, but'
the staff would not be I
communicate with the|
highly valued and very I
patients. Jews from
who only speak the"
Amharic tongue and not!
PROF. Chaim H
heads Shaare Zedekjs
ment of Internal Medn
Dr. S. Freier. head of |
send teams to visit'
tkra center at Bar Giort
are all very sick,' '
Hershko, "and they
help."
The Ethiopians are
from such severe cond
malaria, tuberculosis,
fever and dysentry
them are emaciated, but i
to day the improy
dramatic. Shaare Zee
own way of winning
dence. When they are
mitted they are obijj I
frightened by the rtafl
dressed in white in
unfamiliar hospital aw
Continued on Wl
'They suffer from disei
and have lost immunil


......


-
(Friday, January 18,1986 / The Jewiah Floridian of South County Page 5
ederation/UJA Campaign f85 Update
aring Up For A Record Dinner-Dance
Kautman, chair of the
1 County Jewish Federa
, Annual Dinner-Dance, has
anted a number of area
fenators to take reservations
[arrange table seating for
respective areas. The
Lr-dance will be held on
Day Feb. 9, at the new
Hott Harbor Beach Resort in
Lauderdale. The guest
& will be Senator Bob
wood of Oregon.
Le following area coordinat-
ors have been named:
Dr. Arnold Berliner, for Young
Professionals and Estancia; Gary
Bernstein for Boca Grove
Benjamin Borsuk for Boca Lago
Joseph Bowman for Del-A ire
Eric Deckinger and Kenneth
Endelson for Woodfield Hunt
Club; Samuel Fox and Seymour
Rappaport for The Hamlet; Dr.
Nathan Hoffeld and Herbert
London for Boca West; Theodore
Liebowitz for Boca Del Mar;
Robert Mufson for the Young
Zealots and Estancia; Dr. Rubin
Pyner for St. Andrews.
There will be appointments in
other areas made in the near
future. Shep Kaufman is confi-
dent that with the help of these
able men, this year's gala dinner-
dance will far surpass any that
South County Jewish Federation
has held in the past.
Reservations are coming in at a
rapid pace and a capacity crowd
is expected.
Ezra Mermelstein
Sanford Milter
Dr. Victor Perlow
New Chair Named For Boca Lago Women
lirley Green will chair the
ten's Division campaign in
i Lago this year, according to
his Squires, Women's Divi-
Ichair of the Federation-UJA
lign.
Boca Lago luncheon,
i event of the women's cam-
j there, will be held this year
le Boca Lago Country Club
Monday, Feb. 25. The guest
er will be Gerda Klein, a
I author and lecturer.
Jiirley Green, who came to
Eda from Cleveland, Ohio in
I is a mother of four who still
time to be very active in
lunitv and philanthroDic
work. She served as Women's
Division chair and Campaign co-
chair in the Cleveland Federa-
tion, as well as on numerous com-
mittees at various times, and was
a member of the Board of
Trustees and the executive com-
mittee. She also chaired the
women's division of Israel Bonds,
receiving the Woman of Valor
Award, and held high offices in
the Jewish National Fund,
Hadassah, the United Way,
Group Foster Homes and Bell-
faire. Since coming to Florida she
has performed volunteer work for
The Haven, the home for
troubled teenagers.
Federation 'Oneg' Held
it Temple Beth Shalom
Oneg Shabbat sponsored
| the South County Jewish
eration at Temple Beth
|lom in Century Village would
: been almost a routine affair,
the 200 participants were so
ressed by the guest speaker
; they asked him to come back
|next morning for the Sabbath
uing services, when more
1400 people took part.
larvey Grossman, South
inty's Federation-UJA
ipaign Director, was given
pulpit by Rabbi Donald
on Jan. 4, in order to
ress the congregants on the
rtect of Operation Moses, the
rescue project for Ethiopian
Jewry. Several leaders of the
campaign in Century Village took
part in leading the Friday
Evening service, with Benjamin
Bussin, Family Division chair,
and his wife Evelyn, co-chair of
the Family Division Luncheon, in
attendance.
The next event at Century
Village will be a luncheon, on
Feb. 17, at 1:30, at which Dora
Roth will be guest speaker and
Rabbi Josenh Pollack. Temple
Beth Shalom's cantor, will be
honored. Rabbi Pollack is the
Federation's director of chap-
laincy.
MARK YOUR CALENDAR
FOR
"An Enchanted Evening"
SATURDAY, FEB. 9,1985
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION'S
6TH ANNUAL DINNER DANCE
South County
Jewish Federation
WOMEN'S DIVISION
Country Club Luncheon
PLACE: The Breakers Hotel
DATE: Monday, February 9,1985
COST: $25.00
Minimum gift $250.00
Program includes a Fashion Show by the Boutique of
The Esplanade of Palm Beach.
For more information call the Women's Division,
368-2737
"With a woman possessed of
such experience," said Mrs.
Squires, "the campaign is bound
to surge ahead with record
success."
Boca Lago Drive
Gets Moving
The full Men's Division execu-
tive of Boca Lago met recently
with Federation President
Marianne Bobick to get things
rolling for this year's campaign,
which will see a number of in-
novations.
After a briefing by Mrs.
Bobick, who outlined local needs
as well as the situation in Israel
and internationally, including a
special update on the Ethiopian
Jewry rescue efforts, the execu-
tive discussed plans for the
campaign.
Among the "firsts" in Boca
Lago this year are a breakfast
which was held last week at the
country club; a cocktail party
planned by one of the pods the
Pines of Boca Lago honoring
Earl Fox; and the dinner dance
(for contributors of $300 or more)
which will be held for the first
time at the country club, making
it easier for everyone to attend.
More than 100 volunteers have
already signed up and have re-
ceived specific assignments.
Taking part at the meeting
were Saul White, chair for Boca
Lago; Ezra Mermelstein, co-
chair; Dr. Victor Perlow, co-
chair; Sanford Milter, co-chair;
Ben Borsuk, Boca Lago repre-
sentative for the Federation
Annual Dinner Dance Com-
mittee; Charlie Lefkowitz
(Cypresses); Saul Fischler and
Maurice Gunn (Fairways); Joe
Delman (Horizons), Hank Heller
and Lester Hersch (the Pines);
and Scotch Green (Vistas). Also
at the meeting was Arnold
Rosen thai, past chair for Boca
Lago.
Shirley Green
Boca Lago chair Saul White with Federation president Marianne
Bobick.
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L. __
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, January 18.1986
Israeli Deputy Chief Discusses Combat, Cutbacks
Continued from Page 4
render routine planning difficult.
What lessons were learned
from Operation Peace for Galilee
and its aftermath? Have they
been implemented?
I shall relate to the organi-
zational lessons on the General
Staff level only. After extensive
debriefings and investigations,
the General Staff approved a
body of conclusions drawn up
according to subjects. These were
fed into our computers, and their
implementation by the units
concerned is being closely
followed. It is already apparent,
however, that many of these
lessons will have to be overruled
since developments in the field
which occurred after the
operation often contradicted the
lessons of the war, and lessons of
the post-war period have been no
less important to us.
This is especially true in the
field of combat materiel. The
materiel which we deploy today
has changed both quantitatively
and qualitatively since the
operation. We have had to find
new logistical solutions for this
materiel. The lessons drawn from
the operation could not provide
us with the answers.
One of the principal tenets of
military planning is not to
prepare yourself for the last war,
but for the one to come. It is
extremely important to formulate
the lessons from the correct pers-
pective, with an eye to the future,
not merely from the viewpoint of
the past.
Has the war in Lebanon hurt
troop morale? Is it true that
reserve soldiers are less willing to
report for duty or that fewer
conscripts are volunteering for
elite combat units or officer
candidate school?
To analyze morale is a very
complex matter. Morale can be
low among soldiers serving in
southern Israel and higher in
Lebanon, since on the level of the
individual soldier, morale is often
affected by such factors as his
relationship with his com-
manding officer, the type of
training he is undergoing, job
challenge and satisfaction. This
is not to make light of the fact
that soldiers are also thinking
individuals who reason and
question. But to a large extent a
soldier's morale is influenced by
his immediate environment.
As far as reserve component is
concerned, the situation in Leba-
non has had a slight influence
upon readiness to report for
reserve duty. This is a natural
and understandable phenomenon
and is not necessarily related to
the political-military situation
regarding Lebanon per se, but
rather to work overload: the
accumulation of extensive
periods of reserve service over a
given time. I admit that it is
difficult for people to carry such a
burden for a long period of time.
Boca Raton
Synagogue
First Anniversary
Boca Raton Synagogue, the
first Orthodox synagogue in
Boca Raton, has a membership of
50 families at its first anni-
versary, according to the
congregation's spiritual leader,
Rabbi Mark Dratch.
The congregation meets for
Shabbat morning services at
Verde Elementary School in Boca
at 9:30 a.m. and on Friday and
Saturday evenings at members
homes.
Aa far as compulsory service
conscripts are concerned, there
has been no adverse effect what-
soever. On the contrary, there
has been a alight increase in the
number of volunteers for elite
ground, sea, and air combat
units, although there has never
been a problem in finding
volunteers for such units and we
have always had many more
volunteers than we could accom-
modate.
What will be the IAFs combat
aircraft mix of the 1990's ?
To make maximum use of
force, we should not speak of a
combat aircraft mix, but rather of
the broader integrated operation
of the IDF from a systems ap-
proach. This does not lessen the
importance of the IAF. There is
no doubt that certain missions
can only be performed by a given
service or branch. But victory or
defeat will ultimately be
determined in those areas where
there is a greater integration of
systems or, to be more specific,
the battle is decided by the in-
tegration and coordination of
different bodies in ground
warfare. As forces become more
complex, progress in this domain
is essential. We must therefore
build our air force and navy as a
function of the overall solution
for Israel.
In the 1990s, the IAFs main
aircraft will be the Lavi as well as
the F-15, the F-16, and the
Phantom, which we are presently
upgrading. The Air Force will
have to decide upon another
aircraft to answer particular,
sophisticated mission challenges.
I do not know whether this will
be the F-18 or some other air-
craft. We have recently been
stressing the use of helicopters.
What is the state of the Lavi
figh ter-in terceptor project ?
Development is proceeding on
schedule. Indeed, the minister of
defense issued a directive to
advance the project by one year.
What about the future shape of
the naval forces?
We are devoting much effort to
building up the naval order of
battle and weapon systems. We
are currently working on a long-
range program including fiscal
proposals. Of course, there is a
constant need to keep our order
of battle up to date. There is
likewise a need to find adequate
responses to serious threats
which are currently being intro-
duced into the theater. I would
say that the lessons of the
Falklands War should be taken
into account. Some of the an-
swers to these threats will be
incorporated into existing ships,
and others into future craft.
Do you see the Ground Forces
Command developing into a
service branch?
The Chief of Staff has decided
that the GFC should not be an
independent service, though it
has been invested with many of
the responsibilities of an inde-
pendent service in matters
concerning buildup, doctrine and
training. The GFC does not
deploy ground forces in the field
as do the regional commands, the
Air Force and the Navy. The
GFC's mission is rather to build
forces for the regional commands.
Had the establishment of the
GFC contributed to the overall
efficiency of the General Staff?
Yes, the GFC received some of
the General Staff responsibilities
regarding development of
materiel and doctrine in ground
force units. The GFC has likewise
inherited some of the responsi-
bilities generally entrusted to
units in the field. A consequence
of this concentration of authority
is a more rapid and efficient
decision-making process. This is
especially true in such areas as
research and development for
materiel which cannot clearly be
defined as belonging to a single
arm: force build-up, instruction,
and training.
What is the present state of the
IDF redeployment in the Negev? '
The redeployment has
proceeded according to schedule
and the infrastructure is of high
quality. The third air base has
been operational since October
1983, but it has been functioning
at a slower pace because of the
need to relocate the Bedouin to
different parts of the Negev,
which was a complex problem
with political ramifications. It
was handled most intelligently
by allowing the Bedouin to
resettle gradually in a peaceful,
amicable manner, simultaneous
with the building of the airbase.
The Air Force encounters no
operational problems from the
Negev deployment, and planes
have taken off from the Negev for
Lebanon.
What constraints has the Negev
redeployment imposed upon the
IDF?
The constraints are primarily
in the domain of ground forces
and air force training. Some of
the IAF flight paths overlap with
civilian air traffic corridors. The
ground forces are beset with the
problem of finding sufficient
firing ranges and training areas.
Finally, the Negev redeploy-
ment has increased friction with
the civilian population. Many of
our ground and airforce training
areas border on Jewish and Arab
settlements. Some friction is
therefore inevitable. We shall ap-
proach the problem with under-
standing and consideration, and I
am certain that we shall find a
modus vivendi agreeable to all
parties concerned.
Can use of simulators com-
pensate for lack of training
space?
The use of simulators can be
partial solution, but whoever
thinks that simulators can offer a
total answer is deluding himself.
Simulators are necessary first
and foremost to enable better,
more efficient, and quicker train-
ing on highly sophisticated new
weapon systems. They can help
reduce the number of reserve
service hours spent on training
and instruction. If reservists
come to a centrally located urban
training center and brush up
their skills on such devices, they
will be more proficient. But there
is no substitute for training
grounds. We will do everything
in our power to upgrade our
soldiers' proficiency as far as we
are able, but simulators cannot
constitute a complete substitute
for live training.
Have the recent reductions in
the defense budget cut into the
"flesh" of the army, as well as the
"fat"?
The reductions have been on
two levels resources and man-
power.
Until now, our guiding
principle has been to prevent
Israel's future defense posture
from being jeopardized. To do
this we have continued to invest
in materiel procurement and
development, at least on the 1982
level (the last "normal" annual
program prior to Operation Peace
for Galilee. In 1983 we had to re-
plenish materiel expended in the
war). This can only be ac-
complished at the expense of
current activities. We must cut
back in areas of current opera-
tions and endeavor to optimize
efficiency with the reduced means
at our disposal in a word,
tighten our belt.
The effect of budget cuts is felt
unevenly. The General Staff feels
the cuts immediately since it has
to abandon some of its programs.
As you proceed down the
echelons, however, the effects be-
come less immediate. Some will
be felt only after a year or two, if
not later. For example, the effects
of reductions in vehicle purchases
will become more and more
noticeable as existing vehicles
wear out with the passage of
time. Reduction in the food
budget, on the other hand, is felt
immediately.
The cuts in the 1984 defense
budget were in the region of 13
percent. But you should not see
this as an across-the-board cut.
Certain components of the
budget are inflexible and cannot
be cut, such as indemnities to
families and wounded -veterans
(which have, indeed, actually
risen) and payment of prior
financial commitments. Other
areas therefore must sometimes
be reduced by as much as 40
percent to accomodate for thai
inflexibility.
The second area of budget
cuts, manpower, is very difficult.
On the one hand, the level of our
ongoing security operations
remains constant and, indeed,
has even increased, while on the
other hand, we are being asked to
cut back on many hundreds of
career military personnel.
Since we are at the same time
introducing new, sophisticated
materiel, we must also recruit
new personnel for this purpose.
Therefore to abide by the man-
power reduction quota we must
actually release many more exist-
ing personnel during the next
fiscal year. Although it is simple
to speak in numerical terms, it is
much more difficult to tell some-
one that you are not renewing his
service contract or that you must
abolish posts in a given unit.
When you betray the trust and
commitment of those who have
volunteered to serve under you,
you are undermining the set of
relationships upon which career
service is built. The IDF is based
to a large extent on volunteer
spirit and good will. There exists
a commitment between a com-
mander and his men that cannot
be expressed in monetary terms.
How can you retain high
quality personnel when you are
forced to make budget cuts?
The answer is not a simple one.
There is no panacea. The IDF has
made unprecedented efforts to
restore some fo the value of the
salary which has been eroded in
recent years, but we cannot com-
pete monetarily with civilian
industry. What we hoped to
achieve by this raise was to make
it clear to our career personnel
that they matter to us as people
and as skilled professionals and
because of this we are willing to
pay them more than we normally
should allow, given the budget-
ary restraints. We are trying to
assure them the minimum needed
to support themselves and their
families in a decent fashion.
The essential motives for rem-
aining in the IDF, however, are
the possibilities for self-
expression, creativity and ad-
vancement. The professional
challenges and possibilities are
very large. The IDF is at the
forefront in quality a^ tui
industry. The IDF inSL?
wide variety of equip,^
operational chaHeZT^
engineer, technician
ant are great. Likewi i
operational level, theft?!
offer challenges in Wtf
leadership and managerajf
The major criterion mJ
that of self-image. If Jf
sonnel are proud to sen,1
given unit, they will be!,,
to leave it. They will be Z
to leave a unit in which tO
satisfied. Career soloW!
serve just because of i
Therefore, above and bevn
efforts to maintain Lm
pecuniary standards Iwh3
still not satisfactory to ailJ
also endeavoring to J
those personnel who are
the best standard, and toi
sure that the best remain ]
a challenge for every comrm
and not for the general
alone.
Given the IDFs need J
quality personnel, is the.
tendency to encoungt
officers (even general offk
retire at an early agejiutifi
I think that it is ^
fied. I do not wish to say L
should be an ironcast rule,)
eliminate the two or thm|
Gaulles, Pattons or MacA
from service. These are rati.
exceptions that prove the i
Can you envisage an
50,000 deGaulles or Pa
Experience is important,
too is fresh blood and fra,
advance is also important. J
wise the best will leave.
The IDF pattern of con
and job rotation is in
do not underestimate i__
(I am proud of my ownfl.l
feel that it is important to r^
people so that others cu |
experience. Such rotation a
ages open-mindednessandi
ness to learn new things, i
are qualities which people rid
experience usually lack, i
they tend to rely purely on 1
own past experience.
Have the cuts hurt thei
educational activities whick]
IDF has traditionally
taken, such as remedial
education and vocational rial
for disadvantaged eiemeiHl
the population?
We have had to cut backi
what on the number of p
assigned to the IDF edi
network. We hope thill
becoming more efficient
taking better advantage of]
talents of the remaining pr
nel the education service* i
the IDF offers will not hi
vereely affected. I beUwf
this has been the case up tD
I do not know how muca 1
we can continue in this i
Ripers Show Britain
Eyed Invasion of Israel
.. _.___________ .- _LUl
for military
iction, *W*1
of !
volved the invasion -
British forces from the sow
Israel attacked Jordan.
CHURCHILL'S only <
i much r
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
The British army had a
plan to invade Israel 30
years ago in defense of Jor- was that he was much raj
dan, but Prime Minister hear that the chiefs of m
Winston Churchill insisted not in favor of disckwai
it be kept secret. This *f*ffi-L_U
emerged from British
Cabinet papers of 1954 re-
leased last week for scruti-
ny by journalists and his-
torians.
Leakage of such
have had very
quences.
of
a P""
grave
British chiefs of staff also had
plans to invade Egypt and Iraq
m 1964, a year dominated by
discussions on the future of the
80,000 British troops in the Suez
Canal zone. At the time, Britain
also had troops stationed in
Cyprus, Libya, Jordan, Iraq,
Kuwait and the Trucial sheik-
doms en the Persian Gulf.
Discussion of the mv
in the cabinet followed
decision that Anthony
then foreign secretary.
secret mediator
aa
Jordan and Israel over
clashes.
The plan to invade
to be seen in the lightoM
contractual obligate
-------..0UvJui.. members of the Arab i*-
On March 31, 1964. Lord that Israel's borders j
contractual uw-i
members of the AW
"u marai 9l, iyo4, Lord that Israel's borders
Alexander of Tunis, the defense the scene of frequent
minister, told the cabinet that the Arab infiltrators -
chiefs of staff had prepared a plan retaliation raids


lecial fcr Teens:
fnique 8-Week High School In Israel
Friday, January 18,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
! record number of teenagers
| South County are expected
articipate in one of several
il tour-study programs this
\ During the next few weeks,
'Jewish Floridan of South
nty will feature several ar-
ts describing some of these
\rams. It should be noted
the South County Jewish
tration participates in the
\of most such programs for
\s, in amounts up to $600).
must be doing something
It: the Alexander Muss High
Ul in Israel program will
more than 700 students
part in one or another of
Bht-week sessions this year.
,i the Boca Raton area alone,
;20 students will be going.
Istablished 11 years ago with
nitial enrollment of 30, the
;ram was started by Rabbi
ris Kipper of Miami, former
ptual leader of Temple Judea.
ow has 14 directors of admis-
all over the U.S. (the
Tarn became a national one a
. four years ago), and is
^ersally recognized for acad-
credit by the high schools
. which the participants
e. In fact, it is often possible
as many as six college
fits as well.
he increased participation
this area is due, in no small
sure, to the efforts of Linda
local director of admis-
3, who assumed her duties in
Raton about three months
(Formerly she worked in
|ie County.) Linda herself had
two of her children on this
am. and her third is looking
' to going as soon as he is
ale.
great thing about the
am is that it uses all of
as a classroom," says
Ba. The curriculum consists of
htensive survey of Western
Dization with the course of
Ish history as the connecting
Bd from Biblical to modern
s. All teachers are Americans
advanced degrees, and all
uction is in English. The
o itself is located on a high
Jpl campus in Hod Hasharon
purb north of Tel Aviv, which
Stamps to
Honor Revel
fnited States postal stamp
ymg Dr. Bernard Revel
President of Yeshiva
^ersity, will be issued in
the year the university
at* its centennial, Dr.
Lamm, president of
i "yyer'ity, has an-
[jced Dr. Revel served as
ent of the institution
would later become
E"Jj* University from 1916
Linda Krone
is shared by 300 Israeli students.
In addition to the regular course
of study coupled with tours and
field research, students are given
individual attention with their
regular school requirements in
math, science and foreign lan-
guage, for which they must bring
their assigned texts with them
so that there is no loss of acad-
emic standing.
Former President of Israel
Yitzhak Navon, who now serves
as education minister, met with
three different groups of particip-
ants in the course. He was so im-
pressed that he asked to arrange
a private meeting with the school
staff, to learn how it was that
they were able to generate such
enthusiasm among the American
teenagers in the program.
So far, a total of some 5,000
students have taken part in the
program, and their reactions
have invariably been enthu-
siastic. One of the original parti-
cipants in the course was Rabbi
Gregory Marx, currently the
assistant rabbi at Temple Beth
El of Boca Raton. The cost of the
program varies, depending on the
time of year in which the session
occurs. There are five to choose
from, costing between $ 1,600 and
$2,550. This is the net cost after
some $1,000 provided by the
Federation and Israel's Ministry
of Education. It includes all
travel, food and lodging, and
school expenses.
For more information, call
Linda Krone at 368-2737.
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
WHEN SCHOOL'S OUT-CENTER S IN!!!
A 1-DAY-CAMP EXPERIENCE
(for children who have no school that day)
Arts-Crafts, Sports, Song, Games, more .
DATE: MONDAY, JANUARY
28,1985
TIME: 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
(Pre and Post Camp care available)
AGES: 3 to 11 years
COST: $10 Members. $20 Non-Members
CONTACT: Sarah Landa, 395-5546
HELP WANTED
COUNSELORS: Min. age 19. June 20-August 16, top
Sister-Brother camps in N.E. Department Heads, Unit
Leaders, Tripmaster, Tennis Pro, W.S.I.'s, all activity
specialists.
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9600 N.W. 25th Street, Suite 5AA, Miami, FL 33172
(305)591-3339
AND
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at 'Pafm-Aiix
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music room and auditorium
And much more
.1 would like more information about
"1
The Court at Palm-Aire
Name---------------------
Address------------------
Ciry-----------------------
State-------------
Zip
Phone
2701 North Course Drive
Pompano Beach, FL 3.MHS9
(305)975-8900
I l'*rt. Ijh JJSCF 1/11


* age 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, January 18,1986
Flagler Federal Opens 37th
President Herschel Rosenthal,
Chairman Seymour B. Keith
Lead Board of Directors
Flagler Federal's Rapid Gi
The history of Flagler Federal coincides all
growth of South Florida during the pastiL
President of Flagler Federal
since 1976, Herschel
Rosenthal has been associated
with the dynamic savings and
loan association for the past
28 years.
Active in the South Florida
Jewish community since
Saduating from Miami Senior
igh School and the Univer-
sity of Miami, Rosenthal was
chairman of the 50th anni-
versary dinner-dance of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida.
He was selected for that key
position because of his service
as president of the YM-
YWHA of Greater Miami and
his leadership roles for the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. He is a Pacesetter
of the annual CJA-IEF cam-
paign and was honored by
State of Israel Bonds for his
long service to Beth David
Congregation.
After receiving a BBA
degree from the U-M, where
he majored in accounting,
Rosenthal practiced public
accounting for seven years
before joining Flagler Federal
during its second year of
expansion. He was a partner
in a CPA firm until 1963 and
is a member of the American
and Florida Institutes of
Certified Public Accountants.
Rosenthal has been honored
.
Keith
by his colleagues through
election as chairman of the
Florida Savings and Loan
League. He also has served as
National League Representa-
tive of the Florida League and
was director of District 6 of
the statewide association.
Now a member of the
United States League of
Savings Institutions Com-
mittee on Industry Re-
structuring, he is a member of
the U.S. League's executive
committee, a director of the
University of Miami's School
of Business Administration
Alumni Association and
countless other civic and busi-
ness associations.
Rosenthal long has been
committed to the role of
Flagler Federal in the tri-
county area of Palm Beach,
Broward and Dade. He has
participated in the growth of
the association to six offices in
Palm Beach County, 11 in
Broward and 20 in Dade with
the greatest expansion follow-
ing the population trends of
Pd. Adv.
Rosenthal
the Florida Gold Coast.
Herschel Rosenthal, his six
children and three grand-
children have witnessed the
explosive growth of South
Florida, and played a major
part in its community and
professional history.
Seymour B. Keith, a Flori-
dian since 1941 when he was
graduated from New York
University, has served with
distinction as chairman of the
board of Flagler Federal
Savings and Loan Association
since 1977.
After serving for four years
in the United States Army
during World War II, Keith
was separated as a captain
and was graduated from the
University of Miami School of
Law. He qas practiced law in
South Florida since 1947, and
is senior partner in the firm of
Keith, Mack, Lewis and
Allison.
A founding director and
general counsel for Flagler
Federal at the time of its
inception in 1955, he has
guided its steady progress
over the past three decades.
Keith was senior vice pre-
sident from 1970 until 1977,
when he was unanimously
elected chairman of the board.
His knowledge of the financial
and housing needs of Palm
Beach, Broward and Dade
counties has been a key factor
in the growth of Flagler
Federal throughout the state's
fastest growing region.
A Pacesetter of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
since 1979, Keith was the
honoree of the Builders,
Bankers and Allied Trades
division of Federation in 1977
for his dedicated service on
behalf of his profession, the
financial industry, the Jewish
people and the State of Israel.
Active in Temple Judea in
Coral Gables since 1960, he is
a director of such community
organizations as Goodwill
Industries and the Hope
School.
New Branch Office Opens In Village
of Golf, West Boynton Beach
Opening of Flagler
Federal's newest Palm Beach
county office in the Village of
Golf in December, 1984, set
the stage for the start of
Flagler Federal's year-long
observance of its 30th anni-
versary.
Located at 11082 South
Military Trail in West Boyn-
ton Beach, the new facility
joins offices in Delray Beach,
4767 West Atlantic Avenue;
Boynton Beach, 564 S.E. 15th
Avenue; Lantana, 1479 South
Dixie Highway; Lake Worth,
2575 North Dixie Highway;
Boynlon Bgach Blvd.
S&SL
3
N
FfagfcrFcderal
Village of Golf Brandt
I lU S Military Irall
" loyMon karri
1
Atlantic Avenue
Ov
n
and Palm Beach Lakes, 1700
Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard.
Flagler Federal's complete-
ly computerized services make
all savings services available
at each office, with customers
able to make deposits and
other transactions at the
closest branch.
In addition, Flagler
Federal's commitment to
Palm Beach County makes
home mortgage and other
financing available to resi-
dents throughout the fast-
growing area.
The association plans to
build a permanent, free-
standing branch office directly
across from the existing store-
front branch located in the
Publix shopping center. The
new office building, with com-
pletion due sometime in 1985,
will contain many services
that Palm Beach County resi-
dents have asked for.
Reese
Founded in 1965 after the granting of a federal .
savings and loan association an industry born i
Flagler Federal grew from one office in downtoil
some 37 branches throughout the tri-countv
Beach, Broward and Dade. y
The founding directors, under the leader
Marks, led the association from initial deposits di
million to $ 1 billion prior to his death in 1983 '
Named after Henry Flagler, the empire builder
who brought the railroad to West Palm Beach Mi
Key West, Flagler Federal has continued the pio
Flagler Federal Boan
Have Key Roles In All
Flagler Federal's board of
of chairman Seymour B. Keith.
comprised of individuals who havtl
for their communities throughout t
Native Floridian Sam Seitlini
high schools, St. John's Colleal
University of Miami, is founder tnl
Seitlin and Company, one of SouUil
insurance agencies.
Seitlin is a director of both
Trust Bank, N.A. and past pr
Insurance Board.
Former president of the Je
South Florida, Seitlin headed the L
during its period of greatest growth^
He is a member of the Masons, |
Appeals Board of Dade County, Wa
member of the Board of Overseen i
School of Medicine.
Albert J. Beer, a resident of i
a member of the first gradual
Elementary School in Miami Beac
the University of Florida in IS
ministration degree. Two years
Smith and became the youngest CP/
Past president of the Dade
Public Accountants, he is a partner|
stein, Covin, Beer and Company.
Beer has served as president of j
is an active member of the board i
Jewish Education and of the Federati
An active member of the Flagk
finds time to visit Israel frequendy |
own an apartment in Jerusalem.
eluding daughter Shelley Beer Epsb
seven years, and son T.R. Beer,
developer.
Director Sy Reese moved to Flori
in 1952. He has served on theadvir
Bank of Palm Beach County, and I
Palm Beach.
Reese, who studied industrial i
Institute, founded Allstate Oaa
Lauderdale and Gas Service Cor
time he developed, built and obtained!
his vertical gas broiler, before selling'
Now developing two shopping.0
area, Reese is a prime mover in tier
of Palm Beach county in Florida g
Service as a member of the 1
Council, as vice presdient of the
National Association of Industrial!
leadership in two Palm Beach Gounj
combine to give Reese a keen per-'
the county and all South Florida.
Beer
Bdboock
Here Are Locations Of Flagler Federal
Offices Throughout Palm Beach County
DELRAY BEACH
4767 W. Atlantic Ave.
Delray Beach, FL 33445
498-7900
WEST PALM BEACH
1700 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
West Palm Beach, FL 33401
686-9400
LANTANA
1479 S. Dixie Hwy.
Lantana, FL 33462
586-8188
LAKE WORTH
2575 N. Dixie Hwy.
Lake Worth, FL 33460
582-6660
BOYNTON BEACH
564 S.E. 15th Ave.
Boynton Beach, FL 33435
734-8288
VILLAGE OF GOLF
11082 S. Military Trail
Boynton Beach, FL 33436
732-8880
Seitlin


, Friday, January 18,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
ce, 6th in Palm Beach County
Keeps Pace With South Florida And All Of Palm Beach County
of the man in whose memory it is known.
Flagler was a philanthropist who donated money for
schools, parks and houses of worship.
And Flagler Federal has maintained that tradition of
participation in every phase of community life wherever it
maintains offices.
^\
bers
\florida
ier the leadership
Rosen thai, is
ated their concern
sional careers.
of Dade County
York and the
i of the board of
|s most successful
federal and Royal
Greater Miami
lunity Centers of
liami YM-YWHA
rship.
Fire Prevention
ountry Club and a
diversity of Miami
ia since 1935, was
of South Beach
graduated from
a business ad-
married Lillian
la.
pter of Certified
KPA firm of Gold-
krid Congregation,
rotral Agency for
puntants division.
I board, Beer still
i wife, where they
i two children, in-
lived in Israel for
ercial real estate
[Monticello, N.Y.,
jof First American
i office in North
ng at Rensselaer
butors in Fort
Miami. At that
I States patent on
ompanies.
i the Lake Worth
y prominent role
ommerce.
I Development
chapter of the
[Parks and active
Pers of commerce
Ine solid future of
Nathan Meltzer, a past president of Flagler Federal now
deceased, met Henry Flagler on the historic day of January 22,
1912 when the first train rolled into Key West. Although the
Labor Day hurricane of 1935 was to wipe out the railroad tracks
to the Keys, the vision of Flagler opened up all Florida, and
particularly the Gold Coast to today's role as one of the world's
most desirable places to live, work and play.
\
w

W*.

****!!?
-* V
**-V
'\^*>-'^Mi%^.i -,
-. ^.
->.*
*Y#.
rv *<
' ~ *>*

fp


?**.
,-***..
Guess how much money
youll lose by not opening
a Flagler Federal IRA now?
A lot
As a matter of fact, the longer
you wait to open your individ-
ual retirement account the
more money you'll lose. To
prove that point just look at
the chart.
At Flagler Federal it
doesn't take much to start
your future on the right road.
You can open your IRA for as
little as $100. And because we
don't charge administration
fees you actually wind up with
more money than with most
other IRA plans.
There's also another big
plus with a Flagler Federal IRA
You earn a Vz% cash bonus
on your IRA contributions
over $1,000.The larger your
contribution, the more bonus
you receive.
Whether you're single
or married, professional or
salaried, your future will be a
whole lot brighter with a tax-
deductible, tax-deferred
Flagler Federal IRA
So, don't put off the
decision for another year.
Come to Flagler Federal today
and plan for tomorrow.
OaJaa.lMckyMr it tt% Interest compotfMM juartefty
+*>_ *> kMk u
* tn.m bum U4I.2MK
*t .wa mm 7I.W4.41
M.tM mm 4t4,77 75
M.M 1t.NI 273.N1 31
er Federal
Savings & Loan Association
It takes hometown
people to
understand
the needs of
ahometown
ESEK
Pd. Ad>


rrcsr

Page 10 The Jewish Horidian of South County Friday, January ab, A9H6i
In Israel's Colleges.. JJid Local Friends
TAU Students Reach Out To The Community
Israelis Vow They Don't Fear
Inquiry Into Shares Manipulation
Each week hundreds of senior problem children. According to
citizens, hospital patients and jiro Tzur. coordinator of the pro-
underprivileged youth are given gram at TAU. the project began
advice, help and encouragement out of social need and has since
by Tel Aviv University students developed into a major program,
participating in two programs There were 1.350 student
aimed at helping members of the participants at TAU during the
community. ^m^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
The Community Involvement
Program, in which students meet
with the aged, underprivileged
and handicapped, aims to provide
students with a chance to com-
bine theoretical and practical
work in their fields and to offer
companionship and assistance to
those in need.
The second program.
"Perach," encourages university
students throughout Israel to
help children from low-income
areas with family, school and
environmental problems.
Students participating in this
program have 60 percent of their
tuition fees paid for by the Min-
istry of Education.
The Community Involvement
Program, developed about nine
years ago by TAU psychology
professor Ron Shouval. is an ac-
ademic credit program for
students from the psychology,
theatre and general BA depart-
ments, pre-unhersity prepar-
atory program and the Overseas
Student Program.
According to Prof. Shouval. it
was developed out of a desire to
be involved in and committed to
Israeli society. Students make
weekly visits to schools, homes
and institutions for the under-
privileged, retarded and dis-
turbed children, and senior
citizens.
last academic year. The Uni-
versity deals directly with
schools in different areas of Tel
financial cirdes that an m
might undenn"
Israeli banks
and
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Finance Minister Yit-
zhak Modai said that Israel
has nothing to fear from a
ArfTwnkh supply nama'af full-dress inquiry into the viduals and mmfmdmwJZ
pupils in need of assistance, collapse of commercial many of them Jewish or Jewial
either as a result of learning
problems or family difficulties.
might m^atco;^Slih
banks hold bi
deposit* from indj.
abroad. The banks hold billZ
of dollars in deposits tr^T??
After Much Suffering, Finally
Falashas Have Come Home
Continued from Page 4
The program is mandatory for
psychology students throughout
their three-year study period. The
first year involves work with
underprivileged youth. During
the second year, students work
with children who are brain-
damaged and have mental and
intellectual disorders, and with
senior citizens. The third year in-
volves work with children and
adults with behavioral distur-
bances and mental problems. The
program, for which all students
receive academic credit, is vol-
untary for other participants,
who work primarily with under-
privileged youth.
Last year, within the frame-
work of the Community Involve-
ment Program and with the help
of the Association for Planning
and Development of Services for
the Aged in Israel, an experi-
mental field studies project was
initiated for psychology students
at homes and institutions of the
aged. Tel Aviv University's
psychology department is the
first in the country to provide
practical work in this area.
Students assist the aged w
social and personal problems, be-
come their confidants and
provide them with companion-
ship. During the festival of Purim
students organized a Purim party
for senior citizens at a Tel Aviv
old-age home.
"For the people at that home,
where the average age is 86. it
was something very special. They
were occupied for days before,
making masks and decorations.
At the party itself, there was
tremendous involvement, smiles
on their lips and happiness in
their eyes," explained Nitza
Eyal, TAU coordinator of studies
on the aged.
Unlike the Community
Involvement Program where the
academic growth of the uni-
versity is strongly emphasized,
the nation-wide Perach program
is aimed exchnleafy at helping
underprivilegft youth. It was
developed abset 10 years ago by
a science student studying at the
Weizmann Institute, who recog-
nized the necessity for helping
How has Shaare Zedek
achieved this? By breaking down
the classic admission boundaries
of children and adults and allow-
ing them to stay together, the
hospital is fostering their to ge-
therness. and thus they feel less
isolated. There are no visiting
hours for their families.
Whenever they want to visit
them, that is fine.
ARRANGEMENTS are made
even if they want to sleep over
and tend their children them-
selves. An exceptional effort has
been made by the staff to master
key phrases in their Amharic
language. And their eyes light up
when they hear a familiar word.
The staff is also very sensitive to
their cultural differences.
For example, they know it is
not permitted to cook on the
Sabbath, so nothing will induce
them to eat hot food on Saturday.
Even though the hospital rabbi
came down and tried to tell them
Shaare Zedek prepares the food
beforehand, they could not
comprehend Sabbath warming
platters and such sophisticated
things, so they would only eat
cold food.
They also looked with greet
distaste on the food offered them.
never having come across many
of the foods before. So when it
was learned that they favored a
mixture of potatoes and rice, this
was prepared for them and eaten
with relish. Little by little, they
are beginning to taste other
meals.
IT IS NOT easy for the nurses
to learn their names. They do not
have family names. All are
named after their grandparents,
so many of them have the same
names. In some ways, they are
very unsophisticated and naive
one woman who had a baby
was disappointed it wasn't white
like all the other people she saw
in Israel.
They respond warmly to the
staff's kindness. Parents, as well
as the children, can be seen
playing with the toys provided
for them.
From a financial and man-
power point of view, these arr-
vials are a burden. The medical
center does not have extra per-
sonnel to handle them, which
means that the staff is working
with them in addition to their
regular duties.
)llapse
bank shares in October,
1983, the subject of a
scathing report by State
Comptroller Yitzhais Tunik
released.
Tunik's report accused Israel's
largest banks and their senior
officials of manipulating the
shares buying and selling
them so as to inflate their price.
Tens of thousands of small
investors sustained severe finan-
cial losses when fear of a new,
sharp devaluation of the shekel
precipitated a mass dumping of
the bank shares in order to buy
dollars. The government acted to
staunch the flow by subsidizing
the price of the shares.
ADDRESSING a group of
Anglo-Jewish journalists. Modai
said the inquiry at the very worst
would force the heads of some
banks to resign. This would be
very sad, he said, "but so what?
What does that have to do with
the banks themselves? The banks
are solid and the value of the
bank shares is guaranteed by the
government." Modai said.
He spoke in response to a
question by the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency about
reported fears in banking and
owned.
Modai stated that the inquiry
probably would not proffi
information that is not alreadv
known. "What would be go^
avoid, however, is the time-lar*!
between the appointment olFa
commission of inquiry and th*
submission of its finding
During this period people would
imagine all sorts of things,"
Knesset's Control Committee
over the commission's terms of
reference. Several members of the
Knesset panel proposed that the
heads of the banks involved and
the several government economic
figures criticized in Tunik's
report be allowed to state their
case before there is a final deci-
sion on how the commission will
operate.
Modai. who served as Energy
Minister in previous govern-
ments, said that he now regrets
that he remained in the Likud-led
cabinets of the early 1980s
knowing, as he did at 'the time!
what the banks were doing. He
said he had repeatedly warned
against their practices as the
price of bank shares continued to
rise out of all proportion to the
banks' assets.
Israel Says 25,000
Falashas Have Migrated
By HUGH ORGEL Details of a secret airlift and
TFI AVIV uta. absorption process were disclosed
ILL AVIV (JTA) at a hastily called press con-
Oovernment and Jewish ference in Jerusalem after the
Agency officials confirmed k>cal media broke the story which
that large numbers of had 55 subject to military
Ethiopian Jews nrob- cen.90rshlP ta "; The offi-
QKK- H^.,r F cials appeared to have been taken
ably the vast majority of by surprise by these accounts
that community estimated but readily confirmed their sc-
at about 25,000 are now car*cy-
in Israel.
Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner A Smith Inc.
6100 Glades Road
Town Executive Center
Suite 101
Boca Raton. FL 33434
305/487-7010
National Watts 800/327-3352
FL Watts 800/4 i2-0447
m
^ Merrill Lynch
Richard E. Fishman, CFP
Vice Prw)ent
57th Year Of Quality Camping
FLORIDA OPEN HOUSE January 19
Saturday. 1:30 P.M.-4:30 P.M.
Don Carter's Bowling Lanes
13600 N. Kendall Drive. Miami
CAMP WOHELO for Girts
CAMP COMET for Boys
COMET TRAILS for Teenage Boys
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CALL MORGAN LEVY (305) 591 3339"
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cfbibot
mm


Friday, January 18,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
A Rabbi Comments
The following is brought to our
readers by the South County
Rabbinical Association. If there
are topics you would Bk* our
Rabbis to discuss, please submit
them to The Floridian,
"So teach ua to number our
days that we may acquire a heart
of wisdom." So prayed Moses,
the man of G-d, a semiiialprayer .
recited by the traditional Jew on
each Sabbath, holiday and holy
day.
How much more meaningful
and enriched our lives would be if
we understood properly the value
of time as underscored by Moses
our Teacher. Too often time is
what we want most but what
we use worst. Again and again we
are cautioned not to waste time
because "That's the stuff life is
made of." We are enjoined to use
time wisely. We are admonished
that yesterday cannot be
recalled; tomorrow cannot be
assured; only today is ours,
which if we procrastinate, we
lose. And what we lose is lost for-
ever.
The older we get, the more we
value time. We realize that time
rushes by like a restless stream.
How wise was the savant who
observed, "Lost yesterday,
somewhere between sunrise and
sunset, two golden hours, each
set with 60 diamond minutes. No
reward is offered, for they are
gone forever."
Each new day of the year
beckons us to intensify our faith
in G-d and Torah, to hope for the
future, and to quest for the
sanctities of our peerless tradi-
tion. It calls us to live today, to
create today, to produce and
grow today. It pleads with us not
to postpone living; that when we
make a daily withdrawal from the
everdecreasing bank of time, that
we use this most precious com-
modity wisely and creatively.
Today is sufficient for
The burdens we must bear;
Today is ours, to live,
to love,
Our wealth to share.
Tomorrow never comes to
us,
And yesterday is gone
Therefore, today is all the
time.
We have to build upon.
Tomorrow is far away
As yesterday, it seemed
So wake up, make full use
Do the things you dreamed.
Long-Time
Zionist Leader
Passes
NEW YORK (JTAI -
Phyllis Frank, a long-time leader
in Zionist causes and Jewish
communal affairs, died at her
home in Silver Spring, Md., after
a long illness. She was 51 years
old.
At her death she waa national
vice president for Zionist-
American affairs of Pioneer
Women-Na'amat, the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of
America, of which she had been a
member for 30 years. She for-
merly served the organization as
vice president of program and
education.
Frank was a past president of
the Jewish Community Council
of Greater Washington and was a
ward member of the American
&oniat Federation and the
Jewish Social Service Agency of
Greater Washington. She served
^ a delegate to the most recent
J^etings of the World Zionist
^ongress and the World Labor
Zionist Movement executive.
Rabbi Louis L. Sacks
A famed and insightful student
of human nature has written
directly to this theme:
"I believe that only one person
in a thousand knows the trick of
really living in the present. Most
of us spend 59 minutes an hour
living in the past, with regret for
lost joys, or shame for things
badly done both utterly
useless and weakening, or in a
future, that we either long for or
dread. Yet, the past is gone
beyond prayer, and every minute
we spend in the vain effort to
anticipate the future is a moment
lost. There is only one world, the
world pressing against you at
this minute. There is only one
minute in which you are alive,
this minute here and now. The
only way to live is by accepting
each minute as an unrepeatable
miracle. Which is exactly what it
is a Miracle and Unrepeat-
able."
The recognition that each day
is another gift from G-d, that
each day is an occasion for joy
and gladness, can make us aware
of the extraordinary privilege of
being alive right here and now.
This awareness and cognizance
can inspire us to live each day
more hilly and more fruitfully.
Yesterday is a cancelled check,
and tomorrow is a promissory
note. Only today is cash at hand
for us to spend. Today is not a
parenthesis between yesterday
and tomorrow. Good things can
happen, do happen, and should
happen today, if we make sure
that they happen if we learn
how to live today.
As we grow older and as the
years flee by, may we grasp ever
more intensely the sage and
sagacious words of the Psalmist,
"This is the day that the Lord
has made, let us rejoice and be
glad in it."
Amen. RABBI
LOUIS L. SACKS,
PhD.ThD.DHL
Spiritual Leader
Congregation Aushei Emuna
Irving
Seid
73
Irving "Cy" Seid
Irving "Cy" Seid died last Tuesday, Jan. 8, at his home in Coco
Wood Lakes, Delray Beach. He was 73.
Seid had been an active Jew and Zionist all his life, starting
with his membership in Masada as a teenager, where he served
on the national executive. He was president of the ZOA in
Hempstead, N.Y., where he also served as UJA chair. He re-
ceived the Service Award from UJA of Greater New York.
Seid was a life member of B'nai B'rith, and of the Masonic
Order. He also served as president of the Brookline, Mass.
Mutual Agents Association. Before retiring to Florida, Seid was
an actuary in the insurance industry.
When he came to Florida, in 1976, Seid was an organizer and
vice president of the ZOA chapter of Fort Lauderdale, and when
he moved to Delray he organized the Delray-Boynton Chapter of
ZOA, serving as president until his death. He was active in the
South County Jewish Federation, and served as campaign chair
for his area of Coco Wood Lakes, as well as on various com-
mittees and the Community Relations Council. He was active
also in Temple Emeth, serving as a board member.
Irving is survived by his wife, Phyllis, daughters Barbara
Larshen of Las Vegas and Elaine Gardner of New York, brothers
Jack and Morris, sister Jean Seid and two grandchildren.
Services were held at the Beth Israel-Rubin Memorial Chapel
in Delray Beach on Jan. 10; interment was at Sharon Gardens in
Fort Lauderdale.

Come to the world
of the American Jewish Congress.
A World of Difference.
Come to one of our Travel Presen-
tations, this winter in Florida, and hear
about our spectacular 1985 Travel Pro-
gram, featuring tours to 34 countries.
For 27 years, AJCongress members
have been traveling with us to Israel,
Egypt, Europe, China, the Orient in
fact, to all six continents, as part of our
dedication to the strengthening of ties
between the Jews of America and those
of other lands. We are proud of our
reputation for excellence. A reputation
based on superb planning; unique and
sophisticated touring combining Jew-
ish and general interest; a sense of car-
ing, personalization and luxury all
at the best possible value.
Travel Presentations are being held
throughout Florida. They will feature
our new travel movie, "A World of Dif-
ference," refreshments and door prizes.
Our staff will be on hand to answer
your questions and to take your res-
ervations.
Choose the date/location most con-
venient for you. and return the coupon
below or. call us at (Dade) 305-576-
4330, (Broward) 305-763-8177. (Palm
Beach) 305-689-0258.
We look forward to showing you our
world. Truly, a World of Difference.
TV AKonfielntrnmioiITril fmftim if a mrfnlwnhip vrvicc of ihc
Amcncm Jcwik < MMM
BOCA RATON
Wednesday Feb 6 at 7 PM
Holiday Inn 195
1950 Glades Rd
DEERFIELD BEACH
Wednesday Feb 6 at I PM
Temple Beth Israel
200 South Century Blvd
DELRAY BEACH
Tuesday Jan 29 at 7:30 PM
Temple Emeth
57S0 West Atlantic Av
LAUDERHILL
Thursday Jan 31 at 7:30 PM
Invcrrary Country Club
3M0 Invcrrary Blvd
MIAMI BEACH
Wednesday Jan 30 at I PM
Temple Beth Sholom
4144 Chase Av
MIAMI BEACH
Tuesday Feb 5 at 7 30 PM
Marco Polo Hotel
19201 Collins Av
NORTH MIAMI
Thursday Feb 7 at 7:30 PM
California Country Club
750 North East 195 St
SARASOTA
Sunday Feb 3 at 3 PM
Hyatt Sarasota Hotel
1000 Blvd of the Arts
TAMPA
Monday Feb 4 at 730 PM
Jewish Community Center
2WW Horatio St
WEST PALM BEACH
Tuesday Jan 24 at I PM
Holiday Inn
6255 Okecchobec Rd
Detach and mail to:
American Jewish Congress
4200 Biscayne Blvd
Miami FL 331J7
? We plan to come to the Travel Presentation,
city_________________date______________
number of persons_________________
? We cannot attend, but please mail us your
1985 Travel Guide.
D I am interested in details of
American Jewish Congress membership.
Name .
Street__________________________________
City____________________________________
State _______________
Zip
Telephone


Page 12 The Jewish FToridkn of Sooth County / Friday. January 18,1966
Local 'Sabra' Gets A Break
Ya'acov Sassi. an Israeli folk
singer who has lived in Ddray for
the past two yean, had to come
to Florida to be 'discovered" by
a top-notch Israeli star.
After spending the past two
years teaching music and song at
Hebrew schools and community
centers. Ya'acov s break came in
December when Yehoram Gaon.
one of Israel's most popular
singers, gave a performance in
Miami. Sassi. like many others,
went to greet the star after the
performance, and overheard his
manager asking if anyone knew
of locally available Israeli talent
who might want to share a con-
cert with Yehoram Gaon.
Sassi said he knew of several
singers, but that he also sang: he
was given an immediate audition
I without accompaniment I. and
was told he had the job. Gaon's
manager immediately arranged
for a ticket to Montreal, where
the concert was to take place
three days later. For Sassi this
was a most fortunate coincid-
ence: he had lived for two years
in Montreal before relocating to
Florida's warmer climate, and
had made many small appear-
ances there, as well as teaching at
schools and summer camps.
The concert with Yehoram
Gaon. however, was a big one
it was the annual concert of the
Canadian Mizrachi Women, at
the Place Des Arts, with an au-
dience of more than 2.500. And it
Sassi. left uith Yehoram Gaon at
MontreaTs Place-des-Arts.
gave Sassi a chance to sing an
original song. "Yirat Shamayim"
which is also the anchor song on
an album he has recorded and is
soon to be released. "I couldn't
believe it." says Sassi. "The
crowd actually stood up and ap-
plauded for several minutes,
that's how much they liked the
song."
Sasei. born in the N'eve-Israel
quarter of Herzliya in 1962, is the
son of a cantor, and one of 10
children. His oldest brother, a
graduate of the Israeli Musk
Academy, was his teacher and
helped him produce his album.
Four other brothers are also en-
gaged in musical activity, either
singing or playing various in-
struments. Ya'acov himself
studied folk-dancing at the famed
Beersheba Folk Dance School
headed by Y'ossi Abuhav.
"The greatest influence on
me." says Ya'acov. "came from
Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach. who
has influenced so many through
religious Hebrew folk songs
(almost all with original musk).
In fact. I have used some of his
songs in my album." Sassi
doesn't quite yet see himself
performing in Carnegie Hall, nor
does he feel that he has already
"made it." but "at least some
doors have been opened for me."
he says hopefully.
American Red Cross
Babysitting Course
Learn how to act in an
emergency or illness Prevent
accidents Play with children of
different ages Select safe toys
and games Supervise children
Diaper and dress infants
Feed babies and prepare simple
foods for children- taught by an
American Red Cross certified
instructor. Starts Wednesday.
Jan. 23 -9 sessions. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Ages: 12-15 years. Cost:
Members $5: Non-Members
$7.50. Contact Sarah Landa. 395-
5546.
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
After a four-hour trial in
Moscow in December. YULI
EDELSHTEIN was convicted of
allegedly "possessing drugs."
and sentenced to three years in a
labor camp. Although many
Jewish activists arrived in
Moscow for the trial, only his
mother and his wife were per-
mitted in the courtroom. No
testimony was allowed on behalf
of Edelshtein, a Hebrew teacher
who had long been warned by the
KGB to end his teaching acti-
vities. Edelshtein has been on a
hunger strike since Dec. 1. and he
was reserved and quiet during
the trial. In his final statement,
he reaffirmed his innocence,
saying: "I am a religious man
and I would like to live in Israel. I
am not guilty and I expect justice
to be done. But if the court is not
just I. as a religious man. will
bear the punishment I get."
Edelshtein was arrested in
September after a house search in
which Hebrew books were confis-
cated. Following the search.
Soviet authorities claimed to
have found drugs in a container,
and charged that Yuli was in-
volved with 'foreigners who
corrupt Jewish youth with
medieval and mystical drug
rituals." Following his arrest,
additional allegations were made
linking Judaism with drug use,
and religious articles were confis-
cated in related searches.
In a letter to his wife. INA.
IOSIF BEGUN wrote that his
stay in solitary confinement has
been extended and that his period
of isolation will not be subtracted
from his sentence. Although a
Perm attorney told Ina that
reasons for the prolonged punish-
ment must be stated, he
acknowledged this is not always
the practice. Ina. who has repeat-
edly been denied information
concerning the extenskn to
Iosif's sentence, expressed
concern for his health after learn-
ing that he was hospitalized in
the prison infirmary on Dec. 7.
She has appealed to Israel's
Knesset, asking that they inquire
into Iosif's physical condition
and the reasons for his continued
punishment. ... A letter received
by TATIANA ZUNSHAIN from
her husband. ZAKHAR, indi-
cated he has begun a hunger
strike. YAKOV LEVIN will
appeal his convktion on charges
of allegedly "defaming the Soviet
state" on Jan. 10.
allegedly "resisting arrest" and
sentenced to four years imprison-
ment on Dec. 10. Berenshtein was
arrested on Nov. 12 while in
Novograd Vilinsky to answer
allegations of economic crimes
made against his aunt, which
have since been dropped. The
warrant for his arrest, however
was dated Nov. 13. leaving ques-
tkns concerning the legality of
the procedure, as well as the pur-
ported grounds for his arrest.
Berenshtein. a 47-year-old
engineer and unofficial'Hebrew-
teacher, has sought to emigrate
to Israel since 1978.
Kiev refusenik IOSIF
BERENSHTEIN is reported to
have suffered severe damage to
one eye. after two inmates at-
tacked him with broken glass
upon his arrival at prison.
Berenshtein is in solitary con-
finement since being convicted of
New Winter '85
Hours At JCC
Levis JCC has new Winter' 85
hours: The center is genea'ly
open Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3
p.m.; Monday through Thur-
sday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m.
to 10 p.m.; ar.d Fridays 9 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. (hours subject to
change for specific programs).
The pool will only be open
Sundays 11 a.m.- 3 p.m., and
Thursdays 1-6 p.m. The pool
schedule will be expanded in
March. Teen Game Room hours
will be Monday through Thur-
sday 2:30-5 p.m. and 7-9:30 p.m
and Sunday 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
In addition, the Center will
hold a Wine and Cheese Building
Tour on Tuesday evening Jan 22
at 7:30 p.m. (RSVP). Contact Les
Scheineld, 395-5546.
After filing a complaint
against the KGB. MIKHAIL
ELMAN, of Leningrad, was
called to the District Attorney's
office and warned that he may
face charges on grounds of
defaming the Soviet state."
YAKOV MESH. reportedly
suffering from hepatitis after
being beaten in the lower ab-
domen and liver, was released
from the prison where he was
held until his trial, for which no
date has been set
VLADIMIR TSUKERMAN is
now employed in Kishinev
After ALEKSANDR PARIT-
SKY reapplied for an exit permit
to Israel, his daughter DORINA
was fired from her job. After
attempting to dictate a letter to
Secretary of State George P
Shultz and Soviet Foreign Min-
ister Andrei A. Gromyko over the
telephone, GRIGORY
LEIDERMAN, of Kishinev, was
arrested and subsequently
released. '
While outside the courtroom
where YULI EDELSHTEIN was
tried, DAN SHAPIRA was
arrested when he allegedly
refused to identify himself to a
pobce officer. He was sentenced
to 10 days detentkn, after first
being brought to the police
station where he received threats
that he would be "beaten and
taken away." Before he was
placed in detention, his eye-
glasses, whkh he needs badly
were confiscated.
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Regarding:
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Call WILLIAM DUGAN
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vJC
I Friday, January 18,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 13
>4dolph and Rose Levis JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
an agency of the South County Jewish Federation
^v^
Activities Program Update
Winter 1985 Spring
TIME
COST
ACTIVITY START DATE
Ceramics Instructor: Gloria Weiss
5.8 yrs. Mon.,Jan. 21 3:45-4:45 p.m. $45 member
$60 non-mem.
9-12 yrs. Mon.,Jan. 21 4:45-5:45 p.m. $45 member
$60 non-mem.
8 sessions
Adults Mon., Jan. 21 7-8:30 p.m. $45 member
$60 non-mem.
8 sessions
Babysitting Course
12-15 yrs. Wed., Jan. 23 7-8 p.m.
$5 member
$7.50 non-mem
9 sessions
S.A.T. Prep Court* Instructor: Gloria Quinter, Ben Greenberg
High School Soph. Sun., Jan. 27 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $90 member
g,jr $125 non-mem
6 sessions
Driver Education Call for more information.
Film Series
The Shop on
Main Street
(1965, Czech)
Sundays
Jan.20
3 p.m.
Early Bird
and 7 p.m.
$3 ea. at door
$10 advance
subscription
for series
Holistic Health
Series
Neuro-Muscular
Integration
Wednesdays
Jan.23
7:30 p.m.
$2 non-mem.
No cost mem.
$2 non-mem.
Advance
Registration
Tues., Jan. 22
7:30 p.m.
$2
New Tax Law
Presentation
Beginning Israeli Dancing Instructor. Rickie Fried
Tues., Jan. 29 7:30-9 p.m. $6 member
$10 non-mem.
4 sessions
Ulpan Hebrew Class Instructor: Tamar Ben Ami
Beginners Mon. & Wed. 7:30-9 p.m. $16 member
beginning Jan. 21 $25 non-mem.
Intermediate Tues. &Thurs. 7:30-9 p.m. $16 member
beginning Jan. 22 25 non-mem.
Chinese Kosher Cooking Instructor: Hy Folkman
Seniors Tues., Jan. 29 2-4 p.m.
Adults
Thurs., Jan. 31 7-9 p.m.
$20 member
$30 non-mem.
$20 member
$30 non-mem.
5 sessions
Bridge For Beginners Instructor: Meyer Monchick
Mon., Wed., 1-3 p.m. $15 member
beginning Jan. 21 $25 non-mem.
24 sessions
$2 member
$2.50 non-mem
each session
Duplicate Bridge
(Sanctioned &
Supervised)
Thurs., Jan. 24 1 p.m.
1 p.m.
Novice Duplicate Thurs., Jan. 24
(20 Master points
or less) ____________
intermediate Bridge Instructor: Temi Linzner
Tues., Jan. 22 10a.m.-noon
$2 member
$2.50 non-mem
each session
$35 member
$45 non-mem.
8 sessions
Ballroom Dancing Instructors: Sol & Millie Gorlick
Tues., Jan. 29 7-8 p.m.
$12 member
$18 non-mem.
per person
8 sessions
Ceramics Instructor: Gloria Weiss
Mon., Jan. 28 23p.m.
$30 member
$45 non-mem.
8 sessions
Book Discussion Group Instructor: Elsa Marx
Thursdays 1:30 p.m.
The Family Moskat: Jan. 24
IB. Singer
The Fixer: Feb. 28
B. Malamud
The Victim: S. Bellow March 28
Call it Sleep: H. Roth April 25
$10 member
$15 non-mem.
for all
sessions
Does NOT
include books.
"Humor of the ShtetT Tues., Jan. 22
Instructor
Sol Moskowltz,
M.A., Ed.
1-3 p.m.
$16 member
$24 non-mem.
8 sessions
Jewish Heroes
Instructor
Milton Greenbera,
Ph.D.-
Mon., Jan. 21
1-3 p.m.
$15 member
$25 non-mem.
6 sessions
55 Alive/ Mon. & Wed.
Mature Driving Jazn. 28 & 30
Instructor: Ed. Roberts______
Conversational
Yiddish for
Beginners
Instructor:
Sol Moskowltz
-' an "
9 a.ro-noon $7 per person
Tues., Jan. 22
10a.m.-noon
$16 member
$24 non-mem.
HOW TO REGISTER:
1. Review the program list with your family and decide which activ-
ities you and your family would like to participate in.
2. Since registration begins immediately, complete and mail the
form, or bring it to the Center Registration Office, with the specified
fees.
3. Registration must be accompanied by the FULL FEE and NO
telephone registration will be accepted for activities.
4. Registration closes one week prior to starting date, or when the
maximum number of participants for each class is reached.
5. A $2.00 Late Fee will be charged for registering after deadline.
* Members have first priority for class sign up.
CANCELLATIONS AND REFUNDS:
All activities are scheduled on a predetermined minimum number
of participants. We regret that should a class not register sufficient
numbers, it will be cancelled and all fees will be refunded.
Your cancelled check will be your receipt for courses you register
for. You will be notified by phone only if the course is cancelled.
There will be no other correspondence regarding your registration.
Because classes are based on a limited enrollment, activity fees
are not refundable upon cancellation by a participant unless the
place can be filled.
ACTIVITY REGISTRATION FORM
FAMILY NAME
ADDRESS
ZIP CODE
TELEPHONE NO
MEMBER _______
.BUSINESS/EMERGENCY NO .
_NON MEMBER_____________
KXWHOM
FO*U>
Aot/ta'Grad*
CLASS/PKOCd AM
DAVIS
TMK
F
TOTALS
PARENT'S PERMISSION: My child/children is/are in good physical condition, and
has/have my permission to participate In this Center program.
PARENT'S SIGNATURE --------------------------
Please apply to my (circle one)
Credit Card Number-------------
Bank--------------------------------
MasterCard
________Card
visa 5
ird Expiration Date
Amount enclosed
.Signature.
SEND TO: 336 N.W. Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton 33431,
or call 395-5546 for more information.
CERAMICS AT THE JCC
Children will be taught to
create beautiful ceramic pieces
from greenware. They will do-
their own cleaning of the pieces,
as well as painting and glazing.
At the end of the eight sessions
each child will have created a
beautiful ceramic piece and leave
with a smile on his or her face.
All sessions begin Monday,
Jan. 21. Ages 5-8 at 3:45-4:45
p.m; ages 9-12 at 4:46-5:45 p.m.;
adulta at 7-8:30 p.m. Coat:
I$45 members; $60 non-members,
(includes all the material!) Call
Sarah Landa 395-5546.
ULPAN HEBREW CLASS
Conversational Hebrew with
Tamar Ben Ami. Basic Hebrew
phrases will be applied to every-
day situations relating to
shopping, touring, foods and
more!
Dates: Beginners Mondays
and Wednesdays, Jan. 21-March
13; Intermediates Tuesdays and
Thursdays, Jan. 22-March 14.
Time: 7:30-9 p.m. Coat: Mem-
bers 116; Non-Members $25.
FILM SERIES
"THESHOPON
MAIN STREET'
Czech with English subtitles.
Starring: Joseph Kroner, Ida
KamJnska, Hana Slivkova.
Date: Sunday, Jan. 20. Time: 3.
p.m. and 7 p.m. Cost: $3 at door
per film. $10 for advance subs-
cription to include all four films
of the series. Refreshments will
be served.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE
Enjoy your favorite game
while making new friends and
winning Master points! Sanc-
tioned by the American Contract
Bridge League and supervised by
Bernie Liner, certified Bridge
Director.
Dates: Thursday, beginning
Jan. 24. After first week, call
Center before attending. Time: 1
p.m. Cost: Member $2, each
session, Non-Member $2.50 (per
session). Refreshments will be
, served.
Introducing Novice Duplicate
Bridge on Thursdays, beginning
Jan. 24 at 1 p.m. Participants
limited to those with less than 20
Master points. Members $2 each
session; Non-Members $2.50
each session. Refreshments will
be served.
LECTURE SERIES ..
"NEW TAX LAW"
Presentation Marilyn Lew, a
partner in the firm of Wallach,
Greene and Lew, P.A., wul
review implications of the Tax
Reform Act of 1984, at the JCC,
Tuesday, Jan. 22, at 7:30 p.m.
Coat: $2.
BOOK DISCUSSION
Four important books four
important authors and four
important Thursdays ... led by
Elsa Marx, an experienced Book
Discussion Leader who is consi-
dered the outstanding book
reviewer on the Gold Coast.
Dates: Thursday, Jan. 24 The
, Family Moskat; Thursday, Feb.
28 The Fixer; Thursday, March
28 The Victim; Thursday, April
25 Call It Sleep. Cost: Members
$10 for all sessions (does not
include books). Non-Members
$15 for all sessions (does not
include books).
CONVERSATIONAL
YIDDISH
FOR BEGINNERS
Useful and common expres-
sions in Yiddish will be covered in
this class. Knowledge of the
Hebrew alphabet is desirable and
will be helpful to the student. The
course will include conversational
topics such as greetings, travel,
restaurant, shopping, health and
more! Some reading practice
involving the above will be in-
cluded as part of the course.
Popular Yiddish folk songs will
be explained and sung in class.
Say It In Yiddish, $2.25 (can be
purchased from instructor).
Recommended text: English-
Yiddish, Yiddish-English Dic-
tionary $5 (instructor will advise
, where to purchase).
Dates: Tuesdays, Jan. 22-
March 12 (Regular attendance is
a must). Time: 10 ajn. Noon.
Cost: Members $16; Non-
Members $24.
LECTURES "HUMOR
OFTHESHTETL"
(Small Town in Eastern Europe)
The major emphasis of this
course is the brilliant short
stories, monologues and dia-
logues of Sholem Aleichem. the
"Jewish Mark Twain." The
course will consist of lectures
dealing with shtetl lifestyle, as
well as readings from Sholem
Aleichem's masterpieces. The
readings will be in English yet
interspersed with the Yiddish
text. Time permitting, mention
will be made of other Yiddish
humorists. Suggested text
(instructor will make book avail-
able): The World of Sholem
Aleichem by Maurice Samuel.
Dates: Tuesdays, Jan. 22-
March 12. Time: 1-3 p.m. Cost:
Members $16. Non-Members $24.
LECTURE
JEWISH HEROES
Abraham, Moses, David,
Maimonides, Theodor Herzl, and
.David Ben Gurion What kind
of men were they? What kind of
times produced them? How did
their stature emerge? This course
will analyze psychologically six
outstanding Jewish leaders to
ascertain what was unique about
them and their moral stature.
Panel groups will discuss the
'lives of these heroes to evaluate
their place in Jewish history.
Dates: Mondays, Jan. 21-Feb.
25; 1-3 p.m. Cost: Members $15;
Non-Members $25.
SOUTH COUNTY
JEWISH SINGLES
Thursday, Jan. 24 7:30 p.m.
,... For Singles 21-39 and 36-66.
Israeli Folk Singing and
\Dancing with Yaacov Sassi. To
be bald at JCC. Refreshments
Members $2. Non-Members as.


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SHALOM
I- The SYNAGOGUES
and TEMPLES

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-asnrsw ..miEr*tscjxaa saaraa
inuaft ^anr. smart n mi:-
larsmnte- laa i jmau-tm mm u
Ulia IMS! mi'i^-jugn ic _u CTHfl
T'xa a-Tjcim :^ven 3a reo
_-JHC-aar_i:ni( a raw *nn*-ni c*
sammt frjtfs. j -facetiae v. -.an-
ui:na -jar, ir-.*! Turwaen _ih
3aca me .'wan _immunir-es
:r "jh Tgr-.ntm a*">i. 2ev
Snliitay *nc Lac>:i *./ w :Mpn
neiejur v. ~mh vtr-i :: ncrfaaa
initancaniantf ccail*> T'ib rv.
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mcacn. r w.nm ; -.,*_._-. -:
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ir^crfjEenci -je unuu -sc:i* .:
Birji nr.iar.rna ;iucin ts
Janit* n -ncn *^-^ aacar n:
2~m: uh namnan :r tm
' '*" ".nitrvce^rx. ;x ;iin:.
Jia "id. Tinmcx ^aar"7 hu--jk-
"u. r b *fuud'' uaar -jac
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T'llB^ a jt-T^WTTimr ||) -ja an
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c" mir mnrxar.rn :: -ja ."m.
naar-ruf :!.*"j!ii -ja rw.
:r.ii|r*if i..<: t:f M-.t .t--'
i^i'' ^-iar. aac un ^-:-
m w ir :aatnnmjf vil icn
any -"amme ia-? n i:a iK.;i:
^ir. an iuk: mh-" la i :a:iMi hr
xier -r-.m
a.cnar. a_i^ Lace ht. u **.?<::
'.ursjer !: is -ail' -ja :c-7
vr v. z>'^Li: ~iacj"Jiaiixa. ^nt.v*
lnitHrTt.inidnj i^it h::tit'' :afti'j>
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acam
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an
AJHIM! jB.Vlik.
ja Mas i
Ja -Mfluriiiiwt
7iin vil nac i VLna U.i V -
-it* n-^nr-.iru* ; S T u--r
5:ai:. lainy ^ir. .:-ta .*i^ Ir
-' : ~ *. '^i-i-i B;ccar v :^
". t "".ui'.'W'iC :-} m>r.j-
"arm "":.: :::-- ; ?.; ;.; ^^
z*r~fr.n .-Vmhr ::i_ ?uaaE LiSf/
TTMPLSI>'A]
. "snjut 5oi4i ^*r- -1- _.)
l '- -Hn;a .i":
'-tJ J L. t. la .~i ~ --^i..
:l- k HI ; Si-
r-:r- -^,i-t
^*'- :'-r-r-r.tr-.-. ir. ; : ioj:
S*y ^mr-.-.r -r- -.r&iiZirrs. mtt
raa: ^_
CX =- -- tr:i
:. .: -s -_ r---1 -..-jHr
'.-.:'. .:-'.: \ a.iit
MM
Belgian .\irline Made 40 Trips
Before Falasha Emigration Halted
BRUSSELS ;:a -
over :-% .- -. -- .- j-.^
>fc*jt.^ rrV.-a_:
*.ia* :..--x i-.t. ..-...-: v: ^ui
Jfva v>'i."s iuw* dfes-
.-.-X .'/-. --.la;. rx.Tr Trara
r.. rrjr*az. Airway 5 TE A
tW Be.gia^ ciiar.e:
oxspany er-gsi-^: fo* .,-j%
"-as* rr-ar^jgec :.-. operav&
* erzryjr
r-i^a '.
IDU r.
ja:
Kzarv.'.- Sxlar. v. Tr
--..- -. -.raf v^*i'. t Brajwti.*
. -a ax S^r.; ->rf **: ;.'..( u ~.c-._?--. ii-
TW Ks.ifKA.er ac fw wj| M
'^nl became Sodm. aw Arab
LaaiT-a mainber-auae hamo* no
reaaUMu witatevtr with Israal
vxtid not aaVyv dract f^fVf
hran KhartMnn to Td Arir. Tnai
CMnpbcaccd the "!iiaem 1 of
rac> Bat A mm never
breached.
THIS WAS attributed to the
model of organ raaton and
diacipenie by the 200 peraoas
nwbuxzed at PrnaarU airport for
variooa talka durmg the two-hoar
atopover. TEA'a Boeing 707s
aivanabrjr landed at midnight
for refueling and other services
The Belgian) aothoritiae hated
them m charter flighta in transit
mud they arrived and departed
unnoticed. The passengers
tayed on the plane daring the
lence x. jras -r.^^. -y
Lzoxwc r*t.jniia *%. Biffe-.-^
=~an Ka^.acr.e =.; .u-ar.1 -.?
v^iea. aavaaswa Tbe? wr
?T'c =a2cai -ji.- ri^caj ice
-^" *-^c; _.ia K*;zr.~- *r fr
.'.".ra.-;-.i.-. v. 7^
. ^a v.'^rras ser ^jscxaac -ja:
s*'.r- ogcsat* 3ir*w isc
.'.:x:^*n partacatec .- ..-
i. *..:': The rfig* were
"prr-cw. wwh specaal tac?
KUptac v. -jear pejsica. x:-
TEA CONTTatMED M cedar
*-^*c x ^*s awawsskded -^a
psawiaaw It refjaec v. aaj why
&3t -^a premature ctackacre of
"-be i_-.J-. _- Israe-. appearec :/-.
.--a-.* djst.-i.-bed aaW tjocipai;.
The cbarter company, owned
by George Gotehnaa. a' R%i~
Jew. was nngaaaBy atatettd t*
the as Lift earner h*^*"iw erf xa
good retationa wwh the Swansea
wchorwiea. Each rear TEA
enarter piazaa carr. .btxaaaada of
Mome from tCkartr.T- oc
annual pugrsnage to Mecca.
It was learned that the__
government had been informed of
TEA s aaeigiiiiuia which the Is-
rael dabbed Operation Moahe.
MeanwbJe. a spokesman for
the United Nations International
Children's Fond denied here any
financial participation by that
agency in the rescue c^jerauon.
*-V*HEI5HAL0M
/TW15H CEVTER
Aaahei Shaaawt
" :r.'.: :-rr zki:
=aacx-r :c M-.tu^r? ,'ir. ;; -.-.
j"P^ri ?i-x '*< y..j-rae A%e
-^p1."' -"- -~'-r"a". .1:;. Sa^aer*
^ s-. *c hj-jar ---r..
H Aashei ShaJoai
*" scccjct a
-:x:i!-. 1: -.-* 3:zi .--
Gnu* Vitp DairiT 5c=cav
-*--- -' 1- -- .; .- lWfam.al
Nwaear Abqcw spcascced by
r* -* -~*-~- Cz-aeca fcr Soai:
W-a.:-!/ AI tre wekome
v. asecc F-r =for=at*>c call
K-f.-.-i^x. Vrjo* a sci room for
"*" =*'-r* -.Kit** v. uke :.--
.-jsrxaj? 5 7 -.1^
TEMPLE BETH EL
Teaaaaa Beth D wi =od a
--"^^ =ccacc f-.r Jew-gh
sjvtjm ix: an Oaeg Shabca: :c
:-.ur.w aa ser-. jce -.= Fnday Jt-
l'-j." f ~ .K 'J*Tp~z*&*:* 333
-**- 3oca. spocsored
->*- *.. Soaos For further
~^: paa* call Sid
***** 483-^13. Don Shmder
MHI Pbbjj Waajajsal^ 49c,
^2 or 'J temple office 391-
TEMPLE EMETH
The concert series at Teas pie
Eaaeth wtucfc began on Jan. 6 is
beaaw apataMred by the Brother
hooa of Temple Emeth, not the
bawarhood as stated in the Jan. 4
fw of The Florklian Future
hows are set for Sunday. Feb
24. 8:30 pjn Forever Yours ;
Sanday. March 31. 8 pjn. "An
<>dsng BaT : and Sundav
April 28. 8 pjn. Lea Chan^
" For ticket information
call Joies Daroe. 498-7422. Jack
Stoler. 498-4349 or Ruth Daroe
2318. AD tickets an re-
served: Mann Sanctuary $4.50
per person. Whuck Hall. $3.50
per person.
wil M
V(Lm >-uur Maracjcna
Wi-.iiit .1: '-'- tcul eniswaj at
,'ine. Tie il a sa-gc^r..*
Hi-mmatf. 7 -j lArrracaBT
j:cnacr. i-ina SCuasar^ Of'i-KlK
Community Calendar
"*; 5 .to? ; y. z -
'":-*- : .t-zri.* ; n.-^e *'-.; \ A
a-- :;- I*- .:,- = -. -; 1 y. z x ... j*
.'.-. .a- :- "-.:.; --- -.; I }C ^. /_
A-*--:;- 7v" '..;-;c -;c' -- -; ;- ; -,; tt-^1
w.-.- -*-.; I JT. ; Mzr- 7 ::: ; : 'i\ z -
;*- : *.a- :;- !" -act *
-.---*- Z-zccrzr ---; I -Cc- -,-:. ;
- .*- :- --; :- z-.--.-z -*a- -9 i ; -
.* : ,',-. itz-:--.: Iz-z e-- -.;";- "-;. j... t
:-:c-: -a* ; i = *;-*-! *.-* :--;;-; 7 -V.. *
::>::- ; -,; ; :-- -.. s M-... :...
aVal
*- : -. ': -. : :-c!
HLfa
a
=rc Me-iCc M.: ;
- '.'-.-
: : "X
mumv
-'.* f. z ir=a : : :: : *;.
'*--= ~ "e~s zr-f zz'z trv*
Religious Directory
BS.Kl T0R.AH CONGREGAnON
Boca Raion. Honda 33432. Cccsa.-vauve.
rzr.im Rabbt Theodore Feadman. Har/ar Donald
Saaskalai Servxea Fnday at 8:15 pjc Bataadajrw
i .- ir._;. Saaabkwi Service 2nd Friday of e*:n zxith.
- ^--^ services Moocay -trough ThursdaT 5 'l: p
BOCA BATON SYNAGOGUE
Ma^zg .Address 22130 Beimar No. 1101. Boca Rates Florida
Orthodox services head at Verde Eaemecun School
Cafeteria. 6590 Verde Trai. Boca. SatardeT morning 9 50 am
For zformatjon regarding Fridav. Sundown services Mincha-
Maarrv. call Rabb: Mark Dratch Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Ca-ter Road 1 bfock sooth of Limon Bhd Dehay
Beacn. Florida 33445 Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L Sacks
Dairy Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 aun. and5pjn.
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:45 %m Sabbath Torah class 5
PJB Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION MUM ISRAEL
ServTces at Center for Group Counaewng 23445 Boca R Road,
Boca Raton. Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Afffe
sabbath Services Fridav at 8 pjn.. Saturdav at 10:18 JH-
MaOaaj address: 950 Glades Road. Suite IC Boca Raton. FL
33432 Phone 392-9982.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
-itive Services at Carteret Savings and bo"
-----^on Office. West Atlantic Ave.. corner Canar Road.
Delray Beach. Fridays. 8 pjn. and One* a>>t Saturdays. 9
ejo. and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman. Prsjwient 498-2141
Office: 14600 Cumberland Drive. Detrav Beach. Florida 33446,
Phone 49^0466.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA BATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer. Assistant Rtbbi
Gregory S.Jf an. Canto/ Martin Rosen Shabbat Eve Sen-ices
at 8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 pjn. 2nd Friday of each
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015. Boca Raton. FL 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village. Boca. Dairy Senicss
a t;m tnd 5 P* Saturday 8:45 aan. and 5:15 pja. Sunday
;f. \m- 5 P-m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Pbone: 483-
S55, Joseph M. Polkck. Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
vltWLAU*?.** ***** B^- Fs 33445. Conser-
JSZ E*T5 4*-3536. Rabbi FJhot J. Wmograd- Naftahy A.
LMaWaayi, Cantor. Sabbath Serhces: Friday at 8 pm-
baturdayat8:46ajn. Dairy Minyansat8:45uaiad5pJB.
TEMPLE SINAI
yA.Wg>."rtltl Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Berwick
Road). Dehay Beach. Florida 33446. Reabrm. Sabbath Eve-
rvcss. Friday at 8:15 pjn. Sat.. 10 ajn. Rabbi Samuel SUvw,
Pnwwiaaartt Qam..l D*i___< t .*.. ....
w


L
EWS From Local
I Clubs & Org.'s
Profile: Women's American ORT
South County Region
Friday, January 18,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 16

lA'orma
\South
{Region
\ORT.
Heit, president of the
Palm Beach County
of Women's American
The South Palm Beach County
legion of Women's American
)RT had its beginnings three
nd a half years ago, when the
'aim Beach County Region was
livided into two regions, North
nd South. Betty Siegel of Delray
vas its first president and served
or two years. Today, Norma
leit of Boca Raton is serving her
cond term as president of the
egion.
The South County region
i with five chapters, and has
iwn to 10 chapters, with three
nore in formation. The total
ncm her ship is now about 2,000.
The elected executive commit-
consists of the following
vomen:
Norma Heit president: A
[graduate architect an ORT
member for 28 years. She started
[two chapters: the first 27 years
lago in Englewood, N.J., the
second seven years ago in Boca
Raton. She is a national board
! member.
Anita Kessler chair of the
Executive Committee A
member of ORT for 30 years.
Former president of the Malveme
Chapter and member of the
South Nassau Long Island
Region.
Natalie Berman vice-
president in charge of Expansion.
Former school teacher, she was
first chairman of the executive
committee of the Region. Has
been a national delegate since
1975.
Elayne Fischer vice president
in charge of Membership for-
merly of the Chicago area, where
she served as vice president of
District VIII and as region pre-
sident of Northern Illinois. She is
now a national board member.
Kay Freedman vice president
in charge of Public Relations and
Publicity Former president of
the Charles River Chapter in
Newton, Mass.. and Education
chair of the New England Region.
Bramson chair for the former
Palm Beach Region and a na-
tional board member. Former
Speech and English teacher.
Doris Glantz vice president in
charge of Donor. Doris has been a
trainer of adults in business
programs, a director of market-
ing for a New York corporation
and recently gave a course at
FAU for women wishing to start
their own business.
. Roz Schneider vice president
jn charge of Education, she has
held many ORT portfolios in both
the original Palm Beach County
Region and newly formed South
Palm Beach County Region.
Anne Stele vice president in
charge of MOT (Maintenance
ORT Training) has been an ORT
member for 32 years. A past pre-
sident of the West Orange
Chapter of New Jersey and a past
President of United Order of True
Sisters.
Marilyn Selevan finnril se-
cretary Former president of
Pembroke Lakes Chapter
former personnel director of a
Brooklyn, New York, Hospital.
Harriet Brenner recording
secretary Former Chapter
president in Skokie, 111.
Delia Schmid corresponding
secretary Former teacher and
charter member and president of
the Pelham Parkway Chapter in
the Bronx and Chair for the
Bronx Region.
Dina Schiff treasurei Past
president of Jewish War
Veterans in Allen town, Pa. -
former bookkeeper and a past
treasurer of her Sisterhood.
Barbara Knee parliamen-
tarian In ORT for 37 years and
founding president of the Ocean-
side Chapter in Long Island. She
holds an MA degree and is an
interior decorator.
This is only part of a group of
dedicated women who strive to
uphold the principles of the ORT
program. ORT (Organization for
Rehabilitation through Training)
is an international network of
vocational and technical schools
which provide young and old
with a way to learn a skill which
will help them become self
supporting and independent.
Founded in 1880, ORT has
trained more than two million
people to date. It operates 800
vocational and technical training
facilities in 24 countries.
On the American scene, ORT
has established the Bramson
School in New York City; there is
an ORT 'track' used in the
Jewish High School of North
Miami Beach and in 1986 LAOTI
(Los Angeles ORT Technical
Institute) will open in Los
Angeles. Calif.
Women's American ORT is the
largest single contributor to
world ORT. For more informa-
tion please call 395-6677 or 482-
0189.
ORT
Women's American ORT
Region will hold their "Mother to
Another Luncheon" on Monday,
Jan. 28 at 12 noon at the Boca
Pointe Country Club. Marcia
Light, president of District VI,
will present her slides and per-
sonal experiences encountered in
visiting the ORT schools in
France, Italy and Israel during
the national overseas delegation
tour of 1984. This luncheon will
benefit the Social Assistance
program of ORT. For further
information, please call Rae
Marin 278-6313 or your chapter
Social Assistance chairman.
Women's American ORT Boca
Century Village Chapter will
sponsor a card party and lun-
cheon at the On Luck Restaurant
in Piccadilly Square. For reserva-
tions call Clara Mautner 482-
9682. The cost is $9 per person
which includes gratuities and
raffles. Also plan to join the
"Mother to Another Luncheon"
at Boca Pointe Country Club,
Monday, Jan. 28 at 12 noon. For
reservations contact Marilyn
Levine 483-2113.
Women's American ORT Boca
Glades Chapter will hold their
f irst meeting of the New Year on
Monday, Jan. 21 at 10:30 a.m. at
the South Palm Beach Library
located in Piccadilly Square.
Their featured speaker will be
Marilyn Selevan who will talk on
"ORT in Italy." For further
information call Lida Fox 482-
6878.
Women's American ORT Pines
of Delray North Chapter will hold
their next meeting on Monday,
Jan. 21 at 12:30 p.m. at the Adult
Recreation Center, 801 NE 1st
Street, Delray. Their program
will feature artist OBICAN,
famous for his folk themes, who
will give a speech and a demon-
stration. Bagels and coffee will be
served. Everyone is welcome.
Women's American ORT Boca
Delray Evening Chapter are
offering home delivery of bagels
and lox on Super Bowl Sunday,
Jan. 20. Each brunch includes
two bagels, half a pound of lox, a
quarter pound of cream cheese
and two mini-danish. For a tax
deductible contribution of $7.60,
this delicious meal can be del-
ivered to you. For additional
information, call 994-0043.
HADASSAH
Hadassah Shira Delray will
hold their next meeting on
Wednesday, Jan. 23 at 12:30
p.m. at Temple Emeth, 5789 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray. The
program will be a book review on
"Being a Jewish Feminist."
Discussion will foUow. Refresh-
ments will be served and guests
are welcome. Please note change
of place and time. For further
information please call Gert Sch-
wartz 278-9530. Also make your
reservations now for the Big
Gifts Champagne Brunch at the
Wellington home of Mr. and Mrs.
Aaron Franzblau on Sunday,
Jan. 27 at 11 a.m. This brunch
will benefit the Hadassah Neo-
Natal Clinic in Jerusalem. The
guest speaker will be Mrs.
Morton Ellish of the National
Board who will highlight the
medical miracles taking place at
the Clinic. For further informa-
tion and reservations call Isabel
276-4386 or Betty 499-6089.
Hadassah Menachem Begin
will hold an Executive Board
meeting on Wednesday, Feb. 6 at
the American Savings Bank, W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray at 9:30
a.m.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women Boca will
hold a brunch and card party on
Tuesday, Jan. 29 at 11:30 a.m. at
Temple Beth El, 333 S.W. 4th
Ave., Boca. The cost is $7 per
person. For reservations call
Marian 426-3026 or Marilyn 482-
3335. Also the Boca Chapter of
B'nai B'rith will celebrate Educa-
tion Day on Thursday, Jan. 31 at
Temple Beth El. The session will
be held from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Lunch will be served. The price of
admission one prospective
member. For reservations, call
Renee 487-5331.
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi
Chapter will hold the next meet-
ing on Monday, Jan. 21 at 12:30
p.m. at Temple Emeth, 5780 W.
Atlantic Ave., Delray. The guest
speaker will be lecturer and
humorist Oscar Goldstein. Mr.
Goldstein has visited Jewish
communities in 45 different coun-
tries including the Soviet Union.
Much of his experience in the
field of humor stems from his
travels abroad. Don't miss this
meeting.
B'nai B'rith Olympic XI Lodge
will hold their next meeting on
Sunday, Jan. 20 at 9:30 a.m. at
B'nai Torah Congregation, 1401
N.W. 4th Ave., Boca. The guest
speaker will be Louise Shure, dir-
ector, Anti-Defamation League of
Palm Beach regional office, who
will talk on anti-Semitism in the
Palm Beach area. Breakfast of
bagels and lox and cream cheese
will be served. All members,
prospective members and guests
are welcome. For further in-
formation call 395-4816.
AJC
The Boca Raton Unit of the
American Jewish Committee will
host Rabbi James A. Rudin,
national director of Interreligious
Affairs of the AJC, at a brunch to
be held on Friday, Jan. 18 at
10:30 a.m. at the Adolph and
Rose Levis Jewish Community
Center, 336 N.W. Spanish River
Blvd., Boca. For additional
information and reservations, call
the AJC office 656-5118.
JWV
Jewish War Veterans Delray
Post No. 266 will hold their next
meeting on Thursday, Jan. 24 at
7 p.m. sharp at Anshei Emuna,
16189 Carter Rd., Delray. The
Nominating Committee will
present a slate of officers. All
FREE SEMINAR
Information on Funeral Pre-Arrangements
presented as a community service by Beth
lsrael-Rubln A Family Protection Plan Chapel
Topics Include:
Who shoukl pre-arrange a funeral
Why shoukl you pre-arrange a funeral
How can the price be guaranteed
How can you pre-plan a funeral
Can you change your mind
When should you pre-plan a funeral
Refreshments will be served.
Door prizes will be given away.
Grand Prize -" COLOR TV
1st Prize CRUISE TRIP FOR 2
2nd Prize DINNER THEATRE FOR 2
The free seminar will be:
A W PioltttaHWtnCmp*
Thursday. Jan. 31,1985
7:30 PM at Temple Sinai
2475 w. Atlantic Ave.
(/i mile west of 1-95)
Delray Beach. FL
members are urged to attend.
PIONEER WOMEN
Pioneer Women Zipporah
Chapter will hold their next
meeting on Tuesday, Jan. 22 at
12 noon at the American Savings
Bank, W. Atlantic Ave., Delray.
New members are welcome for
enrollment. For membership
information call 499-1789.
Refreshments will be served.
Tickets are now available for
their Jan. 30 luncheon and card
party. Contact Florence Feinberg
498-0342.
BRANDEIS
Brandeis Women Boca will
hold a book review of "The
Anatomy Lesson" by Philip Roth
on Wednesday, Jan. 23. Dr.
Hertz will review this book.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Women's League for Israel
Mitzvah Chapter will hold their
next meeting on Monday, Jan. 21
at 10 a.m. at the Administration
Bldg., Century Village West,
Boca. Their guest speaker will be
ophthalmologist Dr. Kenneth L.
Lipsitt on the care of your eyes.
Refreshments will be served and
their boutique will be open.
NCJW
National Council of Jewish
Women, Boca-Delray Section and
Branch will have the annual paid
up membership luncheon on
Monday, Jan. 21. It will be held
at Temple Beth El. 333 S.W.
Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla.
The theme "A New Beginning"
will mark the evolving of branch
into an independent section.
Rabbi Singer will offer a prayer
for the success of the new section.
A program will follow. For
reservations call 498-1378.
Bar Mitzvah
JASON FOX
On Saturday, Jan. 12, Jason
Charles Fox, son of Alice and
Gary Fox, was called to the
Torah at Temple Beth El of Boca
Raton as a Bar Mitzvah.
Jason is a 7th grade student at
Boca Raton Academy and at-
tends the Temple Beth El Reli-
gious School. Family members
sharing in the simcha were
Jason'8 brother, Allen, and
sister, Rhonda; grandparents,
Olivia Roth of Hackensack, N.J.,
and Clara Fox of Williamsville,
N.Y.
Jason's hobbies include com-
puters, reading, drawing and
sports.
Mr. and Mrs. Fox were hosts
at a kiddush in Jason's honor
immediately following Shabbat
morning services.
For more Information call 49B-5700
Our new pre-need program considers all your family needs
and protects you from spiraling costs in the future. ,
Call us for an appointment to discuss the advantages
of the Sentinel Plan. There is no obligation.
]&Gutterman
^Warhett:
.CHAKL
FUNERAl DintCIWW SINCt 1M
STEWART GUTTERMAN WALTER S. WARHEIT MARK E DAVIS
7M0N FEDERAL MWY SOCA RATON. FL M7-WO0 DADE Wfl'
SROWARO 742-4SH
IN GREATER NEW YORK, QUTTERMAN'S. INC
ROCKVILLE CENTRE. LI WOODBURY. LI MANHATTAN QUEENS BROOKLYN BRONX


/, 1WJ4
Page 16 The Jewish Floridim at Sooth County / Friday. January 18.1966
COUNTRYC4N
IVMKE

JERUSALEM. FOR 6 DAYS.
Oriel Aviv. Choose one. Onlv Israel offers the hmelessness of
Jerusalem. And the pulsating excitement of Tel Aviv. But vou must
fly now. An offer this g(xxd won't last forever.
Until February 28,1985 El Al Israel Airlines gives vou its
"Sunsarion" vacation package to Israel. Package price includes
n >und tnp airfare from Miami, six davs five nights in a first class
h( tel, including breakfast and a Hertz Rent-A-Car for five davs
And El Al is the only airline that flies direct from Miami to Tef Aviv
Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra S100 the
deluxe I xiromme Jerusalem Hotel, the Tel Aviv or Jerusalem Hilton
>nu can always add extra days. (Package not available 1214 W thru
I ~> s~> )
$111.* EL AL GIVES YOU EILAT.
Just $l 11 and we'll give you round trip airfare from Tel Aviv
to the beautiful Red Sea resort of Eilat.
Plus that- nights at the fabulous Laromme I lotel Wealso
include-two sumptuous buffet breakfasts and one delicious conti-
nental breakfast. Plus a complimentary drink on arrival. This spe-
rial package is available thru March 15,1985. < Not available 12 24 84
thru 1 5 85. > The deluxe Sonesta Hotel is also available for $144
$249* ISRAEL AND CAIRO.
An El Al exclusive thru March 15,1985. Now the airline of
Israel rhes you round trio from Tel Aviv to Cairo to spend three fab-
ulous days in Egypt at the beautiful Ramses Hilton. All for onlv
This package also includes being met at the airport bv English
speaking representarix es and transfer to and from the Ramses.
Now vou can nave it all. Israel and Cairo in one magical trip
OnlyIsraeIandEIAlcanmaketheseoffers,butonlvtora
limited time. Don't miss out, call today
522?2E i/ltlwlrmatlon C<*U vour travel agent or El Al toll free at
for a five detailed color brochure on our packages, xxiite El Al
Israel Airlines, Tour Brochure, I?Q Box 10777, Lone Island Citv.
New Wk 11101.
Na me________
The airline of Israel.
-Pphl.M*^,<1,.ir|IAIta,-rtilhjB-|i|f%|n_______
*