The Jewish Floridian of South County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00174

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
The
Jewish Florid ian
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
Volume 6 Number 31
BocaRaton, Florida Friday, September 28, 1984
< FrtdStiochal
Price 35 Cents
Rabbi Winograd Takes
Pulpit At Temple Emeth
r
Temple Emeth of Delray has
announced the appointment of
Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd as its
new spiritual leader.
Rabbi Winograd, 49, was born
in Jerusalem, where his grand-
father had established and
directed a yeshiva called Torat
Haim which continues to func-
tion today.
The rabbi and his wife Aliza
married in 1956, and they have
four children and one grandchild.
Aliza Winograd teaches at the
Hillel Hebrew Academy in North
Miami Beach.
Rabbi Winograd studied at
Yeshiva University's Haim
Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd
Berlin Rabbinical College and at
Brooklyn College and New York
University. In addition to being a
Doctor of Divinity, he holds a
Master's degree in psychology.
Before taking the pulpit at
Temple Emeth he served as rabbi
and religious school principal at
Congregation First Sons of
Israel, Augustine, PI.; B'nai
Israel Synagogue, Pensacola,
Temple Shaare Emeth, Brooklyn,
and Temple Israel of Miramar.
For a time, Rabbi Winograd
fave up the pulpit to work for the
tate of Florida, coordinating the
Division of Family Services on a
state-wide basis, especially the
Bureau for the Aged. But his
dream was to return to working
Continued on Page 6
South County
Tops Others
In October Mission
South County Jewish Federation has more par-
ticipants enrolled for the October Regional Mission
to Israel than any of the other 21 federations taking
part.
The UJA mission, departing on Oct. 21, has a
number of other communities from around the
country taking part, in addition to those of the
Florida Region. However, South County, under the
leadership of missions chairman Ed Bobick, has
booked two buses for the more than 40 participants.
This achievement, according to UJA officials, is both
a credit to Ed Bobick and indicative of the growth
process of the South County Jewish Community.
[The proposed itinerary of the mission was
published in The Floridian's Sept. 14 issue.]
Unity Gov't. in Place; Seeks Hussein Talks
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel has a new govern-
ment a unity govern-
ment. Premier Shimon
Peres, leader of the Labor
Party, presented his unity
government to the Knesset
Sept. 13 after 40 days of ar-
duous inter-party negotia-
tions which lasted right up
to the very moment of the
presentation.
Peres termed the seven-party
coalition, which embraces 97
members of the 120-member
Knesset, "a bold and novel
experiment" and said it bore with
it "the genuine hopes of the
nation" for unity that could
transcend political differences.
PERES PRAISED his Deputy
Premier, Yitzhak Shamir (Likud-
Herat), for "his capability for
dialogue and his desire for
genuine cooperation towards a
unity government."
Under the coalition agreement,
Shamir will replace Peres as
Premier, and Peres will replace
Shamir as Deputy Premier and
Foreign Minister, 25 months into
the Knesset term.
In a brief and businesslike
presentation speech, Peres listed
the economy and Lebanon as the
two top priority items on the new
government's agenda. What was
needed on the former, he
declared, was "immediate and
energetic action." And he
predicted that with steady effort,
Israel could take its place in the
forefront of the world's nations in
the fields of science, technology,
agriculture and industry.
Peres pledged the government
would ensure the security of the
northern border villages in its
quest to end the Lebanon in-
volvement. And he stressed the
constant need to preserve and
expand the strength of the Israeli
Defense Force as Israel's prime
guarantee of peace and security.
HIS NEXT target, Peres said,
was to expand the peace process.
He called on all Israel's neighbors
to enter peace negotiations, and
addressed a special call to King
Hussein of Jordan, "at this
special moment," to join in talks
with Israel.
Carefully rehearsing the
delicate wording of the govern-
ment's policy-platform (the
wording was subject to intense
negotiation), Peres called on
Jordan to come to the nego-
tiating table where, he said, it
could put forward any proposals
and the new government
would consider them carefully.
By the same token, he added,
Jordan would be asked to listen
to and consider proposals put
forward by Israel.
Peres did not refer to the Camp
David process in this context. He
did, however, mention Camp
David in the context of Egypt,
calling on that country to return
its long-absent ambassador and
to help develop the peace treaty
with Israel into "a step towards"
much broader and deeper
regional cooperation.
IN A REFERENCE to the
Soviet Union, Peres read out a
moving cable received by Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog and the
Knesset from a group of Jews in
Moscow, Leningrad, Riga and
Odessa urging Israel to act in
their behalf and help them realize
their goal of aliya. "Our answer
is: your destiny is our des-
tiny ... we shall never forget,"
Peres declared.
He urged Moscow to re-
establish diplomatic ties with Is-
rael, "ties severed at a time of
anger." He added that Israel
would "continue knocking on the
closed door of China."
But the main focus of the
country's preoccupations and the
new government's efforts, Peres
said, was the home front. He
dwelt on the need to shore up
democracy and the rule of law,
and spoke of tolerance as a social
value that it was vital to enhance.
The Arab and Druze citizens
particularly, he said, must not
only be equal but feel they are
equal.
As his wife Sonia, sitting
alongside Shulamit Shamir,
looked down from the VIP
gallery, Peres spoke of his sense
of excitement and of deep
responsibility at this moment.
HE ALLOWED a smile to
cross his face when he read out
the list of Cabinet ministers:
LABOR: Shimon Peres;
Yitzhak Rabin, Defense; Mor-
dechai Gur, Health; Moshe
Shahal, Energy; Haim Barlev.
Police; Yitzhak Navon, Deputy
Premier and Education; Arye
Nehamkin, Agriculture; Yaakov
Tsur. Absortion; and Gad
Continued on Page 11
Candidates Urged to Shun It
Religion in Presidential Campaign Seen As Major Peril
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
American religious leaders
of various faiths has
warned against the injec-
tion of religion into the
current Presidential cam-
paign by both President
Reagan and leaders of the
Democratic Party.
They maintained that the
principle of separation of church
and state must be preserved to
allow the freedom of religion to
"flourish" in America. They
especially warned against the
introduction of prayers in
Notice
TO
OUR READERS: Please note that although the
fp'ton date fr this issue is September 28 the second day
% u Hashanah the issue is in fact off the presses before
ne Holy D<*y begins on September 26.
schools, claiming it will tamper
with the First Amendment.
At a press conference at the
American Jewish Committee's
headquarters here, leaders of the
Jewish, Protestant, Roman
Catholic and Baptist communi-
ties issued a joint statement
urging leaders of the Democratic
and Republican parties to oppose
"any and all efforts, whether
direct or subtle, to tamper with
the First Amendment.
"WE CALL on leaders of both
the Democratic and Republican
parties to reject categorically the
pernicious notion that only one
brand of politics or religion meets
with God's approval and that
others are necessarily evil."
The statement continued: "We
urge them to speak out now and
recommend both major parties ot
the spirit of religious tolerance
and religious forebearance that is
indispensable to a free society."
The statement was signed by
Rabbi Mordecai Waxman.
president of the Synagogue
Council of America; Dr. Claire
Randall, general secretary of the
national Council of Churches of
Christ in U.S.A.; Sister Margaret
Ellen Trailer, the founder and
past president of the National
Coalition of American Nuns and
executive director of the Institute
of Women Today; and Rev. Dr.
James Dunn, executive director
of the Baptist Joint Committee
Continued on Page 2


x aj4c iu i ne jtiwish r ioriaian oi ^outn county / t ndav. beDtemnp.r / Ivikj
Page 2 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, September 28,1984
Religion in Politics
Candidates Are Urged To Shun It
Continued from Page 1
on Public Affairs.
WE REGRET to ssy that
there has been a serious erosion
of governmental commitment to
the constitutional principle of
separation from religion from
government," the religious
leaders stated. They added:
"If the principle of separation
of church and state is to have
substance in America, it must
mean at least this: the state
should not behave as if it were a
church or synagogue. It should
not do for citizens what, in their
rightful free exercise of religion,
they are perfectly capable of
doing for themselves.
'"For government to intrude
itself into religious practices or to
seek to impose certain religious
belief or values on citizens who do
not share them, is a clear and
present danger to America for all
faiths. In sum, the state should
be neutral, not partisan, in
2 Jews Win
Senior Political
Appointments
In Britain
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Two British Jews, David
Young and Stanley Clinton
Davis, have been given
senior political appoint-
ments by Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher.
Young, a 52-year-old lawyer,
has been made a Cabinet minister
with responsibility for tackling
unemployment, regarded as the
country's main economic and
political problem. Young, who is
not a member of Parliament, will
become a member of the House of
Lords. He has spent the past
three years as head of the
Manpower Services Commission,
the country's main job creation
agency.
PREVIOUSLY, he was deeply
involved in Jewish communal
work as chairman of British
ORT His 50-year-old brother,
Stuart, former treasurer of the
Joint Israel Appeal, is chairman
of the British Broadcasting
Corporation Both were born in
Finchley. Thatcher's North
London constituency.
Young, whose official title will
be Minister-Without-Portfolio,
will be the fourth British Jew in
Thatcher s Cabinet. The others,
who are on the periphery of the
community, are Sir Keith Joseph,
= Education Secretary; Nigel
* Lawson. Chancellor of the
* Exchequer: and Leon Brit tan,
- Home Secretary.
All share Thatcher's views
about the need to revive the
British economy by enlarging the
private sector and limiting the
public sector.
s PRIME MINISTER also
x nominated Oavis, a 55-year-old-
> lawyer who was a junior trade
I minister in the last Labor
government, as one of the two
British members of the Com-
mission of the European Econ-
omic Community.
A member of the Board of
Deputies of British Jews, Davis
has long been an active supporter
_ of the Labor Zionist movement.
He lost his Parliamentary seat
- during the 19K3 general election
,' due 'to the elimination of his
North London constituency in
boundary changes
matters religious."
THE STATEMENT also
pointed out, "Some of our
citizens seem to imagine that
America officially is a Christian
republic. Yet in the Constitution
of the United States there is no
mention of Jesus and, in fact, no
mention of God either. Because
most of the founders were influ-
enced by Christianity, these
omissions from that splendid
document scarcely were inad-
vertent."
Wax man elaborated on the
concerns of the Jewish com-
munity in America. He said:
"Most American Jews are
greatly disturbed by the bet that
in the political campaign religion
has become an issue, in that there
seems to be a debate about the
'Christian' character of candi-
dates and platforms, and that
anti-Semitic attitudes have been
expressed."
On the issue of prayers in
schools, Waxman said: "The
question of prayer and the meet-
ing of religious groups in public
schools has become issues to the
point where a constitutional
amendment is being called for to
override the intentions of the Bill
of Rights which has served
America magnificently over
almost two centuries."
Correction
In last week's Rabbis' Proclamation in behalf of Israel Bonds,
the name of Rabbi Theodore Feldman of B'nai Torah
Congregation was inadvertently left out due to a typographical
error. Rabbi Feldman joins his fellow rabbis in the proclamation
and in calling on all congregants of South County to support the
efforts on behalf of Israel through Israel Bonds.
Western Powers Bar
Neo-Nazis from Marching
BONN (JTA) The Western Allied powers in
West Berlin have issued an order barring the neo-Nazi
National Democratic Party (NPD) from taking part in the
March 10, 1985, elections to the city's Parliament. The
NPD is banned in Berlin but has nevertheless a following
estimated at several thousand people.
THE ALLIED COMMAND order is meant to head
off a possible NPD initiative to try to gain seats in the
local Parliament. Elsewhere in West Germany the NPD is
not barred from participation in election campaigns.
On the national level it failed to win the five percent
of the popular vote necessary to qualify it for a
representation in the Bundestag. On the local level,
however, it did manage to penetrate into some elected
Assemblies.
West Berlin is a case apart because there is no West
German sovereignty there and the ultimate powers lie
with the Allied powers.
^vv'ianifiair o >
MOVING &
STORAGE
State Moving
Licensed & Insured
West Palm Beach
659-2222
Boca
428-8144
Ft. Lauderdale
563-5680
Yeshiva University undergraduate Joseph Muschel (right in
both pictures) and Dr. Robert D. Burk, pediatrician and cancer
researcher at the University's Albert Einstein College of
Medicine, conducted scientific research together this summer,
but they regularly switched roles when they studied Torah,
Muschel's work in the laboratory with Dr. Burk was part of the
University's Summer Honors Program in Biomedical Research.
The student plans to attend medical school after he graduates
next spring.

with
ICr^ 0CZAHf*T
f B0>W0WAU HOTEL
Strict* *2L24
POOl'rVMCh**
Comp*i*n*rim **""
SUMMER SPECIAL /usbk^
S4DA!fSI3 NIGHTS
HMtnn
NOW
perp*ron
^bor Day **"*
w Available
$78
roii
HIGH
HOLY DAYS
(3
-aagggpr
EMC JACOBS. Ownaf4lgw
Being seato*^*1-
50/o-e. Florida's
Come and see how much cruise can be yours in just one day.
W? call it SeaEscape. and it can be your great getaway day.
Your fun day to the Bahamas departs Miami each day at
8:30a.m., returning at 11:00p.m. Dine. Dance. Relax at
poolside. Play bingo or try your luck in the casino. There's so
much to do.
More good news. If you're 55 years or over let us
welcome you aboard with your spouse or a friend. You'll pay
our special senior citizen fare of only $83. Your spouse or
friend (also 55+) will pay only $41. That's a big discount.
Fares include port charges, three buffet meals and roundtrip
motorcoach from convenient locations in Dade. Broward and
Palm Beach counties. Ask us for details.
This discount offer is valid for same day round-trip travel
Sunday thru Friday; subject to space available and cannot be
combined with other discounts. Offer expires Nov. 15.1984.
So bring along this ad. proof of age. and a friend. You see.
being senior does pay on* on SeaEscape... Florida's #1 Fun
Day Afloat.
Call your travel agent or call us directly at SeaEscape.
1-800-432-0900 or 3794)000 in Dade County.
It's Better in the Bahamas.
s
hnm S. pt.-mbrr 2 2H 1*4. SeaKsiape operated on the M/S Buhemr
Iron, Miami. Her7. Ship s reuistry: Panama. ChanjpnK room faobtirs
im avaOablo on 0* M/S linhwne. Optional < abws available Inside
' SPfSTaaS!"^ l'am* *** S50- Minimum 2 persons per
'h uT'l-V wdina*ian Sun win n-turn to service September 29.
H4 Ships registry Kahamas. One seniorituen (! ?) travefcr*
alone n liana 25% nWuunt <4f the $K.'J fan-


Friday, September 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
Genocide Pact
Helms Debate Angers Sen. Percy
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Tfte Senate
Foreign Relations Com-
mittee was expected to
approve the United Nations
convention against
genocide no later than its
regular meeting Wed-
nesday.
But there was some question
whether the Senate would be able
to ratify the treaty before
Congress adjourns Oct. 5. Sen.
Jesse Helms (R., N.C.), who has
used his prerogative to delay the
vote, might threaten a filibuster
if the convention were brought to
the floor.
Elliott Abrams, Assistant
Secretary of State for Human
Kights and Humanitarian
Affairs, who urged the committee
to approve the convention, said
that the Reagan Administration
would not insist that the treaty
be brought to the floor if it faced
a filibuster that "might make it
impossible to do other important
business."
WHEN Sen. Charles Percy (R.,
111.) the committee's chairman,
sought to get a vote last week,
Helms accused him of trying to
"railroad" the treaty through
without considering two riders
that Helms offered. Percy angrily
replied that 35 years of hearings
"cannot be called railroading."
Helms, who like many other
conservatives, opposes the
treaty, said his riders were aimed
at preventing the convention
from superseding the Consti-
tution and to reserve the right of
the United States not to submit
certain matters covered by the
convention to the International
Court of Justice.
But Abrams, in his testimony,
stressed that after a compre-
hensive legal review by both the
State and Justice Departments,
"we are firm in our conviction
that all constitutional questions
Jerusalem Site
Honors Weiler
NEW YORK (JTA) For
the first time in Jerusalem's
history, a section of that city has
been named for an American.
On Sunday, Sept. 16, a portion
of suburban Gilo became Kiryat
Jack Weiler.
"The dedication of Kiryat
Weiler is historic: Never before in
Jerusalem has an American been
so honored by the City of Jeru-
salem." said Teddy Kollek, the
city s mayor.
This dedication is part of a
visit of 120 American Jewish
leaders to Spain and Israel. It is
the largest group of American
Jewish leaders to visit Spain, a
country that has no formal diplo-
matic ties with Israel. The
mission was organized by the
UJA-I-ederation Campaign of
Greater New York.
Weiler, a New York real estate
man and philanthropist, has
spent the past 40 years in service
J Jews throughout the world.
"unng this time, he shied away
m general publicity and
Permanent recognition of his
*rk. Now that he has turned 80,
permitting his leadership to
<* pubhcly recognized.
The section of Jerusalem that
"ecame Kiryat Weiler currently
ur** 3,000 people and covers
n! Tre8' Its Population is ex-
Kir. .J0 increase to 6,000.
*2 WeUer i8 nestled in th*
wuttern ridges of Jerusalem and
"IPMt of the suburb Gilo. The
onu.ny was attended by Kollek
2L0ff,nal8 of th* Israeli
^''"cun Jewish leaders.
Sen. Percy
have been answered." He noted
that the American Bar Asso-
ciation, which has long opposed
ratification, since 1976 has sup-
ported it and "its legal explana-
tion and defense of the present
proposal should satisfy all of the
prior constitutional objections to
the convention."
ABRAMS STRESSED that
the United States, "one of the
chief recipients of the survivors
of the Holocaust, has found itself
in the embarrassing position in
the international forum of having
failed to ratify the convention,
thereby not expressing formally
through an international treaty
our staunch opposition to the
heinous crime of genocide."
The Convention of the Preven-
tion and Punishment of the
Crime of Genocide was signed by
President Truman on December
11. 1948. Although approved by
96 other countries, and endorsed
by every president since Truman
except for Eisenhower, the
Senate has failed to ratify the
convention, largely because of
conservative opposition.
It was this opposition that was
apparently the reason for
President Reagan's long silence
on the convention. But on the eve
of Reagan's address to the B'nai
B'rith International convention
here, the Administration an-
nounced for ratification, and
Reagan reiterated the endorse-
ment to B'nai B'rith which, like
other American Jewish groups,
has long advocated ratification.
Who do^ou miss
who's 50 miles away?
Isn't that someone s|x-ci;il who seems tix> close to call and
tcx) far to visit, really worth a surprise- chat now and then? Well,
remember with Southern Bell, 50 miles is only a short long
distance call away.
In Florida, a 15-minute call this weekend within 50 miles,
dialed direct without the operator, costs no more than $1.72
till 5 p.m. Sunday.
At that rate, you can visit long and warm. Aixi often.
Make a short long distance call today.

Southern Bell
'//)<....*
0
Happy New Year
Jaime, Frimi, Brian,
Alicia Aialu
ISRAEL
TOUR OF LEISURE $1082. pius Air
Four Week Relaxed Vacation in Netanya & Jerusalem
Departures In September October
also TWO WEEK VACATIONS From$510. pius A.r
TRIANGLE TOURS
331-3031 Miami
From out ol town call Miriam collect
AMERICA'S PLUMPEST PITTED PRUNES
AMERICA'S FAVORITE
AMERICA'S RAISIN CHOICE
DmlMtahonil )ciunj."...ii''v IhnwM*"*ik>noia'wWi iiu.".i i.iiii.|..i.ii . fin .in... i ik.il '.ii'"- i.'Ai...?.! .mil Kum in1. >> y They're America's favorite noshes. When you nosh
one, you'll know why. Sunsweet* Prunes. Blue Ribbon' Figs
and Sun-Moid* Raisins each hove o fresh, naturally
sweet taste you won't find anywhere else. Add rhem to
your holiday recipes for more flavor and nutrition.
Or nosh them whenever you hove the notion. They re
certified kosher!
MMtoMfeMMtfCM**. W CERTIFIED KOSHER
3


a okc iu iii*j jewisn r joruiian 01 aoutn L/Ountv / r riday. September /. 19H4
Page 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, September 28,1984
Take Your Choice
s
Now Sandinistas Are Not Anti-SemiticMaybe
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK Whether
the ruling Sandinista junta
in Nicaragua has practiced
a deliberate poicy of
harassment and persecu-
tion of the tiny Jewish
community there since the
overthrow of the Somoza
government in 1979 was the
subject of debate at a news
conference here last week.
Rabbi Marshall Meyer,
founding rector of the Latin
America Rabbinical Assembly in
Buenos Aires and a member of
President Raul Alfonsin's
commission on disappeared
persons in Argentina, asserted
that during his recently con-
cluded five-day visit to
Nicaragua he found "no policy of
anti-Semitism" on the part of the
Sandinista government.
HOWEVER, Meyer's views on
the situation in Nicaragua were
challenged by a member of the
13-person delegation, which
included Meyer, that visited
Managua under the auspices of
the New Jewish Agenda. Rabbi
Francis Barry Silberg of Congre-
gation Emanu-El B'nei Jeshurun
in Milwaukee, in a statement
issued toward the conclusion of
the news conference last
Thursday, said:
"While there appears to have
been no program of persecution
of Jews in Nicaragua, the
Sandinista by a variety of actions
have certainly created a climate
of concern sufficient for the mass
emigration of Jews after the
'triumph of the revolution.' The
latter phrase is a reference to the
1979 overthrow of the Somoza
government.
The delegation spent five days
in Nicaragua last August
meeting with government of-
ficials, opposition leaders and
other personalities in an effort to
substantiate charges leveled by
President Reagan and others that
the Sandinista government has
singled out the Jewish com-
munity for persecution.
REAGAN, at a White House
meeting last summer, said that
"virtually the entire Jewish com-
munity has been frightened into
exile" by the Sandinistas.
According to Meyer, this was a
ploy by the Administration in an
effort to gain American Jewish
support for U.S. policies in
Central America where the
American government has sup-
ported rebel forces seeking to
overthrow the government in
Nicaragua.
The issue of Nicaraguan anti-
Semitism was the subject of
Grievance Upheld
Aussie Press Council Raps
Anti-Semitic Cartoon
By SAM LIPSKI
MELBOURNE (JTA)
In a precedent-setting
ruling, the Australian Press
Council has upheld a com-
plaint against a leading na-
tional weekly newspaper for
publishing an anti-Semitic
cartoon last May.
The complaint was brought by
the Executive Council of Aus-
tralian Jewry against The Na-
tional Times after a full-page car-
toon was published depicting a
satanic cloven-hoofed rabbi
slicing, with one hand, an infant
into pieces against a background
of a crescent moon dripping
blood. With the other hand, the
figure was dropping a bomb on a
mosque.
THE CARICATURE accom-
panied an article by a pro-Pales-
tinian academic. Dr. Jeremy Salt,
which dealt with what the news-
paper described as the "brutal
campaign to drive out the West
Bank Palestinians."
Although the article was
highly critical of the Israeli
government, Salt did not know of
the cartoon and subsequently
dissociated himself from it in a
letter to The National Times,
where he described the images
portrayed as "highly offensive"
not only to Jews but to others.
The ECAJ made no complaint
to the Press Council about the
article and made a distinction in
its submission between vigorous
and even harsh criticism of Israel
and incitement to racial hatred of
Jews.
The ECAJ pursued its com-
plaint to the Council, the news-
paper industry's editorial watch-
dog, after Brian Toohey, the
editor of The National Times, a
left-liberal weekly newspaper
published in Sydney, defended
the drawings by artist Michael
Fitzjames as a "legitimate strong
comment on Israeli policies."
ALTHOUGH THE Press
Council is traditionally headed by
a judge or barrister, it has no
legal powers. But its adjudi-
cations are widely published, and
they set the standards on such
issues as bias, journalist ethics
and racism.
In upholding the ECAJ com-
plaint, the Council said the
drawing had gone beyond strong
disapproval of the Israeli govern-
ment and used "images which
tapped deep well-springs of racial
and religious prejudice, thereby
giving deep offence to at least
some Jewish people through the
revival of memories of past per-
secution."
In his defense the cartoonist
said he did not intend to be anti-
Jewish, but was referring speci-
fically to Rabbi Meir Kahane,
since elected to the Knesset, who
was mentioned in the article.
considerable attention last year
when Rabin Morton Rosenthal,
Latin American affairs director of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, publicly charged
that the Nicaraguan government
has singled out the Jewish com-
munity for harassment and
claimed among other things that
the synagogue in Managua,
Nicaragua's only synagogue, had
been confiscated and turned into
a children's center.
There were some 160 Jews in
Nicaragua before the 1972 earth-
quake in Managua. Many left the
country after the earthquake, and
others left during the fighting
that preceded the overthrow of
the Somoza regime. There are
perhps fewer than 10 Jews in
Nicaragua today.
BUT MEYER, who just
assumed the post of vice pre-
sident of the University of Juda-
ism in Los Angeles, said he could
not find a policy of anti-Semitism
in Nicaragua. However, accord-
ing to Meyer, leading govern-
ment officials acknowledged that
there were "excesses" by the mil-
itary in the early stages of the
new government. He said he
viewed such an acknowedgement
as a positive development. The
exiled Jewish community of
Nicaragua, based in Miami, has
claimed, among other things,
that they had their property
cnfiscated and that the syna-
gogue was taken over by the
government and plastered with
anti-Israel and anti-Zionist
propaganda.
Abraham Gorn, the head of the
Jewish community there, was
arrested and forced to sweep the
steets of Managua before fleeing
the country
But Meyer, and Hector
Timmerman, a member of the
board of America's Watch, a
human rights organization,
asserted that the scenario
painted by the exiles is mis-
leading. They noted, for example,
that other persona had been
ordered to sweep the streets when
held in custody and that Gorn
was not singled out for this task
because he was Jewish.
WITH REGARD to the
confiscation of property, this was
" Jewish Floridian
of South County F,js*och,t
FRED SMOCMET SUZANNE SMOCHET MARTY ERANN
Editor and Publisner Executive Editor New Coofdinatot
NfcM Weekly Mt&fpfmbw through Mtd-Mav. W-WMkty teiwtc* Second Cl.it Poetee P.k) *l Soe. Halon. Fla USPSS50-250 ISSN 027*41 J4
BOCA RATON OFFICE 336 Spannh River Blvd N W Boca Raton. Fla 33431 Phon 368-2001
Mam Office Plant: 120 NE 6th St. Miami. Fla 33101 Phone 37^4605
Poetmetter Return toon M7t to Jewleh Floridtan. P.O. Box 01 2*71. Miami. Fla. 13101
Adwllalnfl Director. Stacl Leeee*. Phone SSSIttt
Comtxned Jewiah Appeal Sooth County Jewish Federation, mc.. Omcert President Marianne Botxcfc.
Vice Presidents. Marjorie Baer Eric W Oeckinger. Milton Kretsky, Secretary. Arnold Rosenthal.
Treasurer. Berenice Schanker man. Executive Director. Rabbi Bruce S Warsrui
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth of Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area *3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7). by membership South County
Jewish Federation. 336 Spanish River Blvd N W Boca Raton. Fla 33431 Phone 366-2737
Oul of Town. Upon Request -
Friday. September 28.1984 2 TISHRI 6746
Volume 6
attributed to a decree promul-
gated by the Sandinistas after
the revolution which called for
taking properties from persons
who had economic ties with the
Somoza regime. The law calls for
such action when it could be
shown that persons had close or
significant economic ties with the
Somoza regime or family, accord-
ing to Albert Stern, chairperson
of the NJA advisory board and a
Cleveland businessman, who was
a member of the delegation to
Nicaragua, and present at the
news conference at the Stephen
Wise Free Synagogue.
Meyer noted that the San-
dinista government has main-
tained that those who wish to
have their cases reviewed are free
to return to the country and have
their claims heard before a judi-
cial body. Timmerman offered to
travel back to Nicaragua with
members of the exiled Jewish
community to aid in thai effort.
THE NJA issued a 17-page
report on the conclusion of the
mission to Nicaragua saying they
found that "charges of
Nicaraguan government anti-
Semitism cannot be supported"
and that there is no evidence that
the government is pursuing at
this time or has in the past
pursued "a policy of discrimina-
tion or coercion against Jews, or
that Jewish people are not wel-
come to Uve and work in
Nicaragua."
Rabbi Silberg did not sign the
NJA report. The NJA delegation
met with members of the exiled
Nicaraguan Jewish community in
Miami before continuing on to
Managua. The conclusions of the
NJA mission have been chal-
lenged by Rosenthal as well as by
the exiled Nicaraguan Jewish
community in Miami in separate
statements issued last month.
Egypt Shuns Final Word
Issued By Non-Aligned
JERUSALEM (JTA) Egypt has refused to
associate itself with a final communique issued by non-
aligned states which denounced the Israeli-Egyptian
Camp David peace accords and Israeli and American
"provocations" off the coast of Libya, according to
reports received here from Valletta, Malta, where the two-
day conference was held.
A SENIOR EGYPTIAN delegate also rejected an
amendment submitted by Syria, declaring that the at-
tending Ministers "highly appreciated" the nullification
of the 1983 Lebanon-Israel agreement and "condemned all
similar agreements conducive to partial or separate
solutions" to the Middle East "crisis." President Amin
Gemayel of Lebanon dropped the accord under Syrian
pressures.
Nine Mediterranean countries and the PLO attended
the meeting, at which the amendment was approved by
the other delegations.
The final communique called for the withdrawal of
Israeli forces from occupied territories and self-
determination for the Palestinian Arabs and declared that
Israel "had intensified its expansionist and aggressive
policies" since the Camp David agreement.
'.-..-/>.'.?'.';'.:.'.".v.'i;'.
Number 91
This way, Shamir, we have a bettor chance to be mm In America'


....
Friday, September 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 5
Computers Aid Kids In Kfar Saba Deprived Neighborhoods
A decade ago the pocket calcu-
lator made its way into the class-
room. Now the calculator's
sophisticated cousin the
microcomputer is making the
same trip.
But the calculator only enabled
the students to find the correct
answer. The computer is doing
SET- it is teaching the stu-
dents and helps to keep them in
school.
Here in Kfar Saba at the
Remez and Etzion elementary
schools for the Yoseftal and
Kaplan Project Renewal neigh-
borhoods the children are
using computers to learn
Hebrew. English and math.
Epic Jewish Series
Starts Monday
The first of nine hour-
long programs in the series
"Heritage: Civilization and
the Jews" will air on Chan-
nels 2 and 42 this Monday
at 9 p.m. It is entitled "A
People is Born."
This introductory segment
covers a vast period of time, be-
ginning with Abraham and
tracing the evolution of the
Jewish nation through the cen-
tralized kingdom established by
King David. Actually, in order to
implement the series' basic intent
- that of depicting Jewish
History within the context of
western Civilization It starts
even further back looking at the
civilizations of Mesopotamia and
Egypt, which predated the
emergence of the Hebrews.
After comparing other archeo-
logical evidence with the Biblical
story of Noah and the Flood, the
program traces the stories of
Abraham and his descendants
through slavery in Egypt and the
Exodus, the crucible of wan-
dering in the Sinai desert and
giving of the Torah (the Law),
the federation of tribes ruled by
judges after settling in Canaan,
the monarchy and the prophets
- both those of doom and those
of hope.
On the following night (Tues-
day, Oct. 2), the second program
will be broadcast, entitled "The
Power Of The Word." Ita major
themes are the emergence of an
identity based on ideas, not on
territory; the interaction of ideas
between the Jewish people and
Readers Write
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Your Sept. 7 issue tells about
three Knesset members depart-
ing from the prescribed text of
their oath of office, and ends with
the statement that "their oaths
of office could not be nullified."
Please reconcile this statement
with the Kol Nidre formula which
nullifies all oaths with the
obvious exceptions that I believe
are not relevant here.
MORTON M.COHEN,
Delray Beach
EDITOR'S NOTE: Mr. Cohen
was quoting a legal opinion
stated by Israel's Attorney
General. However, to assist in
clarifying the application of the
"o/ Nidre formula, we asked
"06i Theodore Feldman of
Congregation B'nai Torah to
remark. His response follows:
*'H is clear that the "oath"
WKen by Knesset members does
not fa the Tabnudic definition of
n oath. There is no apparent
, wea"n.g in G-d's name which is
m u s of a re|Wus oath. The
k.s are merely declaring
themselves obligated to fulfill
their duties of office.
"Our tradition, viewing oaths
"w ,peat aeriousness. has
*"*rally discouraged any form
ol swearing in G-d's name. The
"T.pactof'kol Nidre to to teach
wt lesson of the importance of
n?LWord8 we "** tbe
promises we make."
the classical world of Greece and
Rome; and the birth of Christian-
ity, which takes the history of the
Jews and that of the Western
Civilization into a new dimen-
sion.
In this second program the role
of religion and the translation of
conflict of ideas into military and
material conflicts are traced
through the building and
destruction of the Holy Temples
Jerusalem, and through a
in
study of Greek and
edifices and sculptures.
Roman
The hour concludes with two
stories of the last attempts to
revolt against Roman rule the
stand in Masada and the Bar
Kochba uprising in Betar and
the emergence of scholastic
centers, rather than territorial
independence, as the guardians
and promoters of Judaism.
(In future weeks The Floridian
will continue to describe and
provide a synopsis of each
program. Readers' comments on
the programs and their contents
will be welcome.)
Slightly Wounded
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli soldier was slightly
wounded in south Lebanon
Saturday while dismantling an
explosive device found near the
Christian religious radio and tele-
vision station, "Voice of Hope,"
north of the Israeli border town
of Metullah.
The computers are not IBM
PCjrs, or Apple II s, but they do
the job intended teach the
children.
"It gives them enormous moti-
vation because they can see their
progress, and at the same time
they don't have to compete with
their comrades," said Hedva Gil,
teacher in the computer class-
room at the Remez school.
"They learn at their own speed.
If they make good progress they
get harder examples," she added.
"If they don't do well they stay
at the same level."
Mrs. Gil said the children like
using the computers just as they
would like playing with a toy.
"They are fascinated, and are
willing to come to class even
during the cold winter."
The children in Yoseftal and
Kaplan many of whom are
Sephardic are at a disad-
vantage in contrast to the stu-
dents who live in the center of the
city. These neighborhoods are
separated from the city proper,
and this has led to feelings of
isolation among the residents.
"The problem in this school is
that the children do not get too
much help at home," Mrs. Gil
said. In Yoseftal 21.6 percent of
the residents have not received
any formal education and in
Kaplan the figure is 30.5 percent.
The cultural deprivation of all
age groups is the major problem
facing the neighborhoods.
"When the children finish here
they have to go to Kfar Saba
High School," Mrs. Gil said,
adding that the children have to
be at the same level as the other
students they will meet.
That has not been the case be-
fore Project Renewal. In the past,
fewer students from the neigh-
borhoods went on to high school
while others who did enter were
at a lower level than students
from the center of the city.
But Project Renewal is
changing this. Today, more stu-
dents from the neighborhoods are
entering high school, and more
are ready to meet the scholastic
challenge. That is because
Project Renewal has devoted re-
sources to education programs
geared to helping the youth beat
the poverty and illiteracy cycle.
Project Renewal even pays the
rent for the computers used in the
schools.
Kfar Saba teacher helps student learn on a computer. The computers
are used to help teach English, Math, Hebrew. Photo and story by
Andrew Polin
Happy
Rosh Hashanah
great Juliet Prows* toasts the taste of
*Tb a professional dancer, health is everything,
it% not easy staying healthy on tight
missed meals. That* why I enjoy Sunsweet
Juice. IfS so rich and delicious yon can
the sunshine in it"
right Sunsweets a natural. With a
and minerals-but never any added
Be a Sunsweetie like Juliet
It pays to be a Sunsweetie.
Save 15c on any size bottle of
Sunsweet Prone Juice or
Sunsweet Prone Juice
with Pulp.


r m r.mman /\t saih n I flllnlv
Kruiav. .Sflntflmber /. I9HA
P*gg The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, September 28,1984
Barbara Stein To Chair Community Relations Council
Marianne Bobick, president of
the South County Jewish Feder
at ion, is pleased to announce the
Spointment of Barbara Stein as
airperson of the Community
Relations Council for the 1984-86
season.
The CRC is the central co-
ordinating body for policy and
action regarding issues germane
to quality Jewish life in South
County, nationally and abroad. It
is comprised of the presidents or
representatives from the 70 Jew-
ish organizations in the com-
munity as well as Federation rep-
resentatives.
The CRC educates and sen-
sitizes the community and
projects a unified Jewish voice on
such issues as Soviet Jewry,
separation of church and state
{e.g., prayer in public schools),
cults, Middle East affairs and Is-
rael, to name a few. The council
also functions as a vocal liaison
between our legislators and the
local community.
Barbara Stein is a family
therapist with offices in Boca
Raton and Coral Springs. She
holds an MS degree from Nova
University in Counseling Psy-
chology, and has done extensive
post-graduate study in counsel-
Rabbi Winograd
Continued from Page 1
full time in the rabbinate. His
religious philosophy is based on
the tenet of A ha vat Israel," love
of all fellow Jews, regardless of
affiliation.
Temple Emeth
Reaches Out
Temple Emeth of Delray will
accomodate residents who do not
hold High Holy Day tickets with
a second public Yizkor
(memorial) service on Yom
Kippur (Saturday, Oct. 6) at 3
p.m., with Rabbi Winograd and
Cantor Naftaly Linkofsky offi-
ciating. The temple is located at
5780 W. Atlantic Ave.
The temple also held a sup-
plementary service for the Jewish
residents at the Hillhaven
Convalescent Home in Delray on
the first day of Rosh Hashanah.
Cantor David Leon and three of
the Temple"s officers volunteered
to lead the service.
In other news from Temple
Emeth, a men's choir has been
organized and will be singing
with the cantor during the High
Holy Days services.
Local Young Judaea
Gets New Coordinator
Bari Stewart, a senior at
Florida Atlantic University, has
been appointed coordinator of the
North Rreward Palm Beach
County area for the Hadassah
Zionist Youth Commission.
The appointment was an-
nounced last week by Linda
Minkes. the Commission chair-
Kaon for the Florida region.
dassah. through its Zionist
Youth Commissions, sponsors
the Young Judaea (Haschachar)
youth movement on a nation-
wide basis. Bari Stewart's job
will be to advise the madrichim
(club leaders) from Fort
Lauderdale to West Palm Beach.
Ms. Stewart _
Criminal Justice at FAU,
she is active in the Jewish
Student Union-Hillel. In 1983-84
she served as Hillel's chairperson
for the United Jewish Appeal.
She also works part-time for the
South County Jewish Federation,
where she is Associate Chair-
person in charge of backroom and
logistics on the Super Sunday
studying
kU, where
A member of Young Judaea
since 1971, Bari Stewart brings s
wealth of numiissue and un-
bounded energy to the task of
making the Young Judaea clubs
grow in the Boca area. She will
welcome inquiries aft 395-2896 or
941-2377.
Women, and the Fort Lauderdale
Opera Society. Her bobbies
include orchid growing, photo-
graphy, needlepoint and classical
music appreciation.
The CRC which Mrs. Stein will
chair this year meets on a
monthly basis, and sponsors
stimulating programs through-
out the year. For information on
the council and its activities, call
Geri Rosenberg, Director of
Community Relations, at 368-
2737.
Barbara Stein
ing and therapy. She, her
husband David, and sons Craig,
16, and Todd, 14, have been
living in South Florida for eight
years. She is a member of
numerous professional asso-
ciations, of the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews, MADD
Mothers Against Drunk Driving,
the National Organization for
MISSION POSSI6LE
1*.-" O ft | A-l_
*0.*T
DOLPHINMANIA
WINNERS!
$500
Dotphmmania easy lo piay and no pot chase is necessary Just pick up a
tree DOLPrSNMAMA COLLECTOR CARD and GAME TICKET at your
nearest participating PuMx. scratch ofl the prize box squares on the game
ticket and you could become an INSTANT WINNER! It you don t win
instantly. YOU CAN STILL WIN by collecting the perforated pieces on the
game ticket and placing them in the matching picture and number spaces
on the collector card
s1,000
Mary LiiIm Clayli
Delray Beach
Alien C.
Miami
Ktvil Rifii
Miramar
SUIIi Maviii
Pembroke Pines
2,500
TuiWtttn
Miami Shores
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publlx Bakeries open at 8.-00 A.M.
Available) at PubMx Stores with
F reeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Ragutar or Round,
P1a4n (Chaaah)
Egg Bread
$109
4i
Each $1.39)
AvaiaMa at Pubax Store* with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
For the Jewien Hoanaya, Plain
Honey Cake
?189
-Each $1.99)
> .
AvaMabte at Pubax Stores with
Fraah Danish Bakeriea Only.
Topped with Assorted
Fruit IndMduaJ
Small Danish
3.M
Avasiabta at AH Pub*x Store*
and Danish Baa.arias.
Danish Cherry Strip.....-c'l89
Deep South
Carrot Cake..................m**tm
Gourmet
Chocolate
Chip Cookies................ Prices Effective
Sept. 27th thn Oct. 3rd. 1984
*&*&&__, -..: m
Available at Publix Storaa with Frash
Danish Bakarias Only.
FBad with Nuts
Chocolate Brownies.... 6 tor $1
ymtimmimmmHimmisoi
CAKE ORNAMENT
ia
lupto*15.00w*hth*
. and tho pure**** of any
Throa TkK of Laraar Wadawi Cafca
(Coupon EiptaaaWad.SapL 30. 19S4)
(Vere Saach aHoiiSui Only)
gfl0M808Q8MIWHi00>0t00OOOOflOOOgOQOOn^


Friday, September 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7
The surprising truth about
who's the lowest.
\
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
lhat Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
SOFT PACK 100s FILTER. MENTHOL: 3 mo, "w". 0.3 mo, nicotine
ev.pcig*efl by CTC method
Compenm tar level reHeca the feb/84 FTC Report
NOW. THE LOWEST OF ALL BRANDS.
I
1
I


X CUiC XV
i ne j ewisn r loriaian 01 aoutn county / riday. September /. 19H4
.-
/ '
r.
'
w
Page 8 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, September 28,1984
Before Unity
It Was A Night of Frenzied Deals
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
"Split it between you," a
bleary-eyed cameraman
told Shimon Peres, Yitzhak
Navon and Haim Barlev at
4 a.m. as he plonked down
in front of them a can of
Coca-Cola.
The three Labor leaders, grate-
fully and without overmuch
attention to protocol require-
ments, eagerly swilled back the
beverage, lubricating their
parched throats and keeping
them conscious for yet another
gruelling hour of pre-dawn nego-
tiations.
The cameraman's mate offered
them a hunk of bagel, still warm
from an Old City baker's van.
Greedily they gobbled it up.
AFTER ALL, the Knesset res-
taurants had all closed long hours
ago. But they and their aides
were still buried in the bowels of
the house, beavering away
toward the so-elusive goal:
wrapping up the coalition accord.
On the floor above, unattended
by media people, Yitzhak Shamir
and his aides were no doubt in
similarly hungry and thirsty con-
dition and similarly teetering
on the verge of physical
exhaustion.
The wheeling and dealing and
horse-trading was at last coming
to an end: the final, unchange-
able deadline had been set
Thursday afternoon, Sept. 13.
Labor had given notice, with
National Religious Party sup-
port, that if it could not announce
a unity government by then it
would present to the Knesset a
narrow-based one and squeak
home with the votes of the
Communists.
Peres and his aides were
awaiting Shamir's visit to them,
from the fourth floor to the fifth,
in order to hand him a copy of the
formal letter Peres proposed
sending President Chaim Herzog
informing the president that a
government had been formed.
Once Shamir took formal note of
that letter it would be all over.
"WHERE IS he?" Peres
asked, too tired, and too schooled
in delays and disappointments to
be impatient. "He's still stuck
with the Shas guys," someone
answered. "They've gone to say
selichot" (predawn prayers),
someone else volunteered.
And indeed, the Shas rabbi-
politicians had taken over a
committee room and were of-
fering penitential prayers in
between drafting sessions with
their Likud patrons over complex
compromise formulae in the
matter of the Religious Affairs
portfolio.
Earlier in the evening, the
NRP Executive met in the
Knesset and decided to accept a
Labor proposal whereby both
Religions and Interior NRP's
two "traditional" portfolios be
"deposited" with the Premier for
the time being, "until a solution
is worked out."
If Likud and Shas rejected
that, the NRP warned, there
would be a Labor-led narrow
government with NRP partici-
pation the next day.
FACED WITH that kind of
threat, Shamir had little choice
but to climb down. He met with
Peres and the two of them
called in Shas' Yitzhak Peretz (by
now it was well past 1 a.m.) to
cajole him into swallowing the
medicine, too.
The Shas politicians were
mortified. "We are being made
fools of," they railed. The two
ministries were run by NRP-
affiliated directors-general, and,
deposited with Peres, they would
continue in effect, therefore, to be
controlled by the NRP.
But Shamir was adamant.
Likud and Labor were going
ahead, he made it clear, with or
without Shas. "He's (Shamir) not
the whole of the Likud," a Shas
MK noted forcefully to reporters
a clear reference to Shas'
particular patron, Ariel Sharon.
And indeed, in a last-minute
turnabout engineered by Sharon,
Shas decided to join the govern-
ment after all and accept the
Fifth Jewish MP Elected
TORONTO. (JTA) Shela Feinstone is the fifth
and newest Jewish MP to be elected to the Parliament in
the general elections. She was elected in Montreal-Mt.
Royal as a Liberal, in spite of the Progressive Con-
servative landslide.
This is the constituency of former Prime Minister
Pierre Elliott Tmdeau. The other four Jewish MPs elected
are David Orlikow of Winnipeg, Robert Kaplan of
Toronto, Herbert Gray of Windsor, and David Berger of
Montreal.
It is a place for you in Israel
niKi
niiu
Best Wishes for the New Year
, ,,/4lph
7*-i/'7 n^i/n tdih ^center
Southeastern Regional Office
ft/. ~ SCA -TJE BOULE7APD
'/// = _'.-= Zit- 33137
ar HatimaTova
American Friends
el Aviv University
*
James H Nofcil Lauren Azoulai
Chairman Executive Director
Boca Raton Chapter .
Serving Palm Beach County
"deposit" scheme. Peretz told re-
porters Sharon*has specifically
undertaken that Shas would
eventually receive one or other of
the two disputed ministries.
BE THAT as it may, the unity
Cabinet has 25 members Shas'
entry was followed by that of
Morasha an unwieldy number
even in an optimal situation of
political homogeneity which this
certainly is not.
Peres and Shamir are aware of
the problem, however, and have
built into their agreement a
scheme that could, if it works, be
a solution.
It calls for an inner Cabinet of
10 members five Labor and
five Likud where key issues
will be brought for decision.
These decisions will "bind Labor
and Likud" thus ensuring
their endorsement in the Cabinet
plenary.
But observers believe that
even the 10-member forum, which
will also serve as the Ministerial
Defense Committee, may prove
unwieldy. They expect, therefore
if the unity government indeed
takes hold the informal
evolution of a still smaller forum,
comprising Peres and Shamir and
just a very few others, remini-
scent of Golda Meir's "Kitchen
Cabinet."
PRESUMABLY, Sharon
would not be part of such a body.
The question is, however,
whether he would be prepared to
countenance its existence
without his participation in it
and whether Shamir is strong
enough to resist Sharon's effor.
to undermine it.
No doubt, as the unity govern-
ment is launched on its way, the
problem of Sharon's open chal-
lenge to Shamir is one of the most
salient shadows threatening its
longevity and efficiency.
Sharon's challenge to Shamir was
dramatically in evidence when he
opposed Shamir's recommended
slate of Herat ministers in the
unity government during a
stormy meeting of the Herat
Central Committee. The slate
was approved nevertheless.
Adolph & Rose Levls
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
an Aotncy el the South County Jewish Federation
336 Spanish River Boulevard, N.W.
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(305) 395-5546
PROGRAM UPDATE
JEWISH COM REGIS ACTIVITY DEADLINE DON'T MISS EXCITING MUNITY CENTER CLASSES & C< OATES TIME Tuesdays, Oct. 23-Nov. 20 2-4 p.m. Thurs. Nov. 1,8,15 & 29 7-9 p.m. DURSES! COST
Chinese Kosher Cooking Session I Session II Oct. 15 Oct. 23 $10.00 Member $15.00 Non-Member
The Joys of Journeying Jewishly Ballroom Dancing Oct. 1 Oct. 8 Tues. Oct. 9 7:30 P.M. No Charge
Tues. Oct. 16-Dec.4 7-8 P.M. $12.00 Member $18.00 Non-Member
55 Alive/Mature Driving Oct. 10 Mon. & Wed. Oct. 22 & 24 9 A.M.-noon $7.50Member $10.00 Non-Member
Learn More About Medicare and Extended Care Facilities Oct. 10 Tues. Oct. 23 1-2 P.M. No Charge
Year End Tax Planning Oct. 22 Wed. Nov. 7 7:30 P.M. $1.50 Member $2.50 Non-Member
Ulpan Hebrew Class Oct. 10 Mon/Wed (Beginners) Oct. 22-Dec. 19 Tues/Thurs (Intermediate) Oct. 23-Dec. 20 No classes week of Nov 19 7:30-9 P.M. $16.00 Members $25.00 Non-Members
HOW TO REGISTER:
1. Since registration begins Immediately, complete and mall the form, or bring It to the Center Registra-
tion orrice. with the specified fees.
2. Registration must be accompanied by the FULL HE and NO telephone registration will be accepted
for fee activities.
3. Registration closes on the date
listed, or when the maximum
number of participants for
each class Is reached.
CANCELLATIONS
AND REFUNDS:
All activities are scheduled on a
predetermined minimum number of
participants. We regret that should
a class not register sufficient
numbers. It will be cancelled and all
fees will be refunded.
Because classes are based on a
limited enrollment, activity fees are
not refundable upon cancellation
by a participant unless the place can
be filled.
'J?-
REGISTRATION FORM
FAMILY NAME
AD0RESS ___
PHONE
0 MEMBER ? NON MEMBER?
FOR WHOM
CLASSyPROGRAM DAY(S) TIME FEE
jffl M
TOTAL S
YOUR SUGGESTIONS ARE ENCOURAGED
The Center s activities are based upon the Interests and concerns of our members. We hope to be flexible
enough to change, delete, and expand services where physically and financially possible. Therefore, your
suggestions and ideas are appreciated.
furthermore, you are cordially Invited to serve on any of the numerous program or administrative com-
mittees of the Center, and to thereby assist In Its growrh and development.


\ovietsSau
LS. Tourists Smuggle Dope for Moscow Prayers
Friday, September 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9
)AVID FRIEDMAN
Iashington -
L) Lynn Singer
fd three years as
lent of the Union of
kcils for Soviet Jews
ting that she was "not
luraged" but "angrier"
|t the Soviet clamp-
on Jewish emigration
the increasing anti-
Itism and harassment
/sin the USSR.
are watching a regression
net behavior that is ap-
ig a reStalinization," she
an interview with the
Telegraphic Agency
the UCSJ's annual meet-
the Capital Hilton Hotel
!ER, OF East Meadow,
Island, blamed the
fating situation for Soviet
"lack of specific leader-
the Soviet Union. This
i has reflected down to
er levels of leadership who
against the weakest
the Jewish community,
singer also believes that
[at ion may also be a result
"lack of discussion"
the United States and
Bt Union.
JC'S.J has always sought
the U.S. government
If the abuses against Jews
Lotto Winner
SALEM (JTA) A
of Petah Tikva, who
that he not be identified,
[record 59 million Shekels
in the national lotto
flast week. The man, a
seven children, was un-
1 until two months ago.
carried out by the Soviet govern-
ment. Singer will continue as
liaison to the government, as well
as chairperson of the UCSJ's
advisory board and a a member
of the Secretariat of the Interna-
tional Parliamentary Group of
Human Rights in the Soviet
Union which seeks to get other
Western countries to join in with
the U.S. on behalf of Soviet Jews.
SINGER SHOCKED UCSJ
members attending the meeting
from across the country when she
revealed that the latest tactic of
the Soviet government is to claim
that American tourists are bring-
ing opium and other drugs to the
USSR for Jews to "sniff on
Shabbat."
She received a promise from
Eliott Abrams, Assistant
Secretary of State for Human
Rights and Humanitarian
Affairs, who was present, that he
would disclose this to Secretary
of State George Shultz so that he
can bring it up when he meets
with Soviet Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko at the United
Nations in New York September
26.
Singer told the JTA that she
hopes that whoever is elected
president, the U.S. government
will continue to raise these
human rights issues with the
Soviet Union.
THE LATEST canard is part
of the Soviet Union's continuing
effort to frighten Jews and other
Soviet citizens from meeting with
tourists, Singer said. "We know
that Soviet Jews want to meet
with Westeners, Jews and non-
Jews," she stressed.
Singer said that the UCSJ will
continue to encourage Americans
to visit the Soviet Union and
meet with Jews there. But she
stressed that they should go
there informed and suggested one
way of doing it is read some of
the books by American journal-
ists who have worked in Moscow.
"No one should go to the Soviet
Union with blinders on," she
said.
?? ^~"
Jewish Family and
Children's Service
i i 'i
ANNOUNCES
TILL DEATH DO US PART
COPING WITH WIDOWHOOD
[week group for widowed men and worn- \
>e group will help participants during the,
process by providing a safe place to
feelings and learn new ways of coping,
intense emotional reactions, living.
in a coupled-world, holidays,
Mizing, and finding new directions for the
>UP FACILITATOR: Dena R. Feldman, L.C.S.W.
[ES: October 15-Dec. 3 (Mondays)
:: 1:30-3:00 p.m.
T: Sliding Fee Scale
WON: Jewish Family & Children's Service
of South Palm Beach County
fSTRATlON: Dena R. Feldman
'E: 395-3640
"Even now, when we all know
of the grave situation facing our
movement, grassroots advocacy
is still our best weapon in the
struggle with repression and anti-
Semitism," Singer said in her
address to the UCSJ meeting.
"OUR COUNCILS and
members have undertaken
campaigns on behalf of key
refuseniks and against the
frightening destruction of Jewish
identity attempted by the
Kremlin. We have prevented
show trials and awakened the
conscience of individuals and
governments. While much
remains to be done, let us remem-
ber that our work has made pos-
sible the survival of two-and-a-
half million Jews. It is an ac-
complishment that proves the
value of what individuals can
achieve in defending human
freedom."
Singer rejected the view in
some quarters that American
Jewry's support for the Soviet
Union Jewish movement has
slackened. She proudly told the
JTA that the UCSJ has grown
from a half dozen councils 15
years ago to "twice chai," 36
councils now and to more than
60,000 individual members.
The UCSJ's goal of "freedom
of Soviet Jews" will still be a long
struggle, Singer acknowledged.
She said as the Soviets become
harsher they seek to satisfy the
West with "a little," allowing one
family to emigrate or giving
someone a lesser sentence. "We
are not satisfied with a little,"
8he declared.
SINGER SAID the UCSJ will
continue to work for the "repa-
triation" of all Jews who want to
go to Israel," the reunification of
families and eventually free
emigration.
Singer was succeeded as pre-
sident by Morey Schapira, of San
Francisco, head of the Bay Area
Council for Soviet Jews.
Schapira, like Singer, has been an
activist with the UCSJ since its
founding.

The New
Adolph and Rose Levis I
JEWISH COMMUNITY i
CENTER I
T
Call for Membership
and Program Information
<336 N.W. Spanish River Blvd., Boca Raton 395-5546
6 |
Adolph & Rose Levis
o
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
an agency of the South County
Jewish Fededration
proudly announces the only scheduled
South Florida performance of
"GALGALIM"
m>
:."' ,' j "
Date: Saturday, December 8,1984
Time: 8 p.m.
Location: FAU, University Theatre
Tickets: $6, $8 Reserved Seats
$25 Patron Seat, to include
Cocktail Party following
performance!
aaaaawaeeaeaaweBaaaMBeaawaaaai
Group Discounts An Available
Contact Tha Cantar for Datails
At
3955546
or
Sand In Coupon
. -. V N '. '


a o*e j.xi me jewisnl1 loriaian 01 sotltn county / r naay. September /. 1984
Page 10 The Jewish Fbridian of South County / Friday, September 28,1984

Intense Battle
Religious Portfolio Struggle Nearly Stalled Unity
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
An intense conflict over
the religious affairs port-
folio in the new government
prevented Premier-desig-
nate Shimon Peres from
presenting his national
unity government to the
Knesset last week on
Wednesday, as had been
scheduled. The 11th hour
setback created the possi-
bility that a narrow-based
government would have to
be established after all.
This development followed an
entire night of backroom inter-
party negotiations involving
Labor, Likud and the two reli-
gious parties, Shas and the
National Religious Party. Both of
the religious parties, NRP with
four Knesset seats and Shas with
four seats, insist that for them
the religious portfolio is
"ultimate." The problem was
that Labor pledged its support to
the NRP on this issue while
Likud especially Ariel Sharon
pledged its support to Shas.
THE DRAMA came to a head
during the night when Yosef
Burg of the NRP informed Peres
that his party would be prepared
to join a narrow-based govern-
ment if Likud adhered to its
position on the religious post.
The NRP has traditionally held
the Religious Affairs Ministry.
Shas. a recently formed right-
wing religious party, claimed
that it should have that portfolio
because it lacks parliamentary
experience to hold any other post.
The dramatic turnabout in
events followed Sharon's stern
declaration on television that
Likud must stick to its commit-
ment to Shas even if this delayed
the creation of a unity govern-
ment. Sharon also insisted that a
delay was necessary, citing
unresolved disputes with Labor
over Jewish settlements in the
administered terrtories and over
peace terms for talks with
Jordan.
Political observers saw
Sharon's insistent loyalty to
Shas as another attempt by the
controversial former Defense
Minister to weaken Shamir, with
a view toward ultimately winning
the leadersship of Herat. This
view was given credence,
following Sharon's, opposition
and that of Deputy Premier
David Levy, to Shamir's recom-
mended slate of Herat ministers
in the unity government during a
stormy meeting of the Herat
Central Committee.
SHARON'S opposition to the
slate, which was approved never-
theless, was sparked by the fact
that Shamir failed to restore
Herat secretariat chairman
Yoram Aridor to the ministerial
rank of Finance Minister, a post
he resigned last October. Sharon,
incensed over this decision,
mounted the rostrum to urge a
secret vote in the name of demo-
cracy. He demanded that all
Herat ministers, except Shamir,
should be accepted by secret
ballot.
Sharon was supported by
Levy, but opposed by Shamir,
Defense Minister Moshe Arens
and MK Ronnie Milo. Sharon's
challenge, boosted by Levy, was
seen as a direct and unexpeced
challenge to Shamir's
authority.
In his television appearance
later. Sharon insisted, as he had
at the Herut Central Committee
meeting, that if the outstanding
issues between Likud and Labor
were not resolved to Likud's
satisfaction, the presentation of
the unity government to the
Knesset for approval should be
postponed for a few days, even
into this week.
SHARON INSISTED that
several settlements in central
Samaria decided on by the out-
going government must be
endorsed by the incoming unity
government and built during the
coming year, "not like Shimon
Peres says." This latter reference
was apparently to Peres' recent
public assertions that the
building of future settlements
will be circumscribed.
The suggestion by Sharon that
a unity government could be
postponed for a few days jarred
Organizations
In The News
I
HADASSAH
Hadassah Associates of Del-
ray, Boca and Boynton will hold
their first meeting of the season
on Monday. Oct. 8 at 9 a.m. at
the Bird's Nest Tree Restaurant,
25445 Military' Trail, Delray.
Many new plans will be formu-
lated and everyone will be asked
to provide their ideas. All Asso-
ciates are urged to attend this
important meeting. For further
information, please call Mark Sil-
verton 499-4706, David Kaplan
499-5972 or President Jack
Braver 499-1740.
B NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rhh Shomer Lodge will
hold their monthly breakfast
meeting on Sunday, Oct. 7 at 10
a.m. on the upper level of the
Administration Building, Cen-
tury- Village West. Ken Farber,
regional director of B'nai B'rith,
will be guest speaker. Members
and guests are welcome.
ORT
Women's American ORT, in
recognition of those members of
th- Boca blades Chapter who
have attained Donor status, or
ar<- prospective Donors, will hold
a Tea on Monday. Oct. H at 2 p.m.
m the- home i,\ Rjta Sadowsky.
Attendant** at the Tea is by invi-
tation For further information.
please
4184.
call Florence Cohen 482-
PIONEER WOMEN
Pioneer Women Kinneret,
Palm Greens, Delray will hold
their annual Scotch Bowling
Party on Sunday, Oct. 7 at 7:30
t.m. at the Don Carter Bowling
anes in Boca Raton. A charge of
SI3 per couple includes four
games, prizes and refreshments.
For more information, call Helen
Nathan 498-1441.
Pilgrims Stay
At Home
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Only 2,500 Arabs are scheduled
to leave this summer on the
annual pilgrimage to Mecca and
Medina, the holy places of Islam
in Saudi Arabia, compared to
more than 6,000 in previous
years. The reasons for the
decrease are a levy of about $400
imposed by the Saudi authorities
on each visitor, the limit of the
Jordanian authorities on the
entry of men younger than 26,
and a fare of about SI ,000.
Laborites, since Peres' second 21-
day mandate to form a govern-
ment was to end Sunday. Should
he have failed by then. President
Chaim Herzog would assign that
task to someone else. However,
Labor was determined to prevent
this.
In effect, this meant that last
Friday, Sept. 14, was Peres, last
chance to present a government,
since the Knesset rarely meets on
Friday or Sunday.
AND THIS time unlike at
earlier stages of the six-week
negotiations Labor found
itself obtaining the crucial and
pivotal support of the NRP. The
NRP leaders told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency they would
not countenance a postponement
of a week but would give their
votes to a Labor-led government
if this was what had to be
presented to the Knesset last
Friday. "We still want unity,"
the NRP leaders said, "but we
see the religious ministry as
vital."
The NRP argued that Shas,
heavily influenced by Aguda
Sage Rabbi Eliezer Schach, is a
non-Zionist party and thus
should not be entrusted with the
Religious Ministry, the embodi-
ment of religious-Zionism.
Aharon Abu Hatzeira, leader
of Tami and its sole Knesset
member, indicated that if the
Bat Mitzvah
Alison KylerArce
ALISON KYLER ARCE
Alison Kyler Arce, daughter of
Suzin and Fernando Arce, will be
called to the Tor ah as a Bat Mit-
zvah at Temple Beth El on
Saturday, Sept. 29. As part of an
ongoing Temple project, Alison
will be "twinning" with Rimma
Karpul of the Soviet Union.
Alison is a student at A.D. Hen-
derson University School and
attends Temple Beth El Reli-
gious School.
Sharing in the simcha will be
her brother Jonathan Miquel,
and her grandparents Mr. and
Mrs. Sy Kushner of Fort Lauder-
dale and Mr. and Mrs. Fernando
Arce of Puerto Rico. Also present
will be Mr. and Mrs. Phil
Kushner of Dallas, Tex., Mr. and
Mrs. William Pintras of New
York, Mr. and Mrs. Herb Amster
of Anni\rbor, Mich., and Mr.
anil Mr8>Warren Adamshaum of
Flushing, N.Y.
Alison is an aide at the reli-
gious school and a member of the
temple Club-8. Her hobbies
include dancing, acting, and
reading, and she attends the Jazz
Students Arts School. At Hen-
derson she is in the Girls' Chorus
and on the yearbook staff. She
has appeared in the Little Palm
Theatre production of "Aescap's
Fallables."
Mr. and Mrs. Arce will host a
kiddush in Alison's honor fol-
lowing the Shabbat services.
NRP swung behind Labor he
might to so too. And in Labor,
there were also hopes of winning
over Morasha, with two Knesset
seats. H these developmenu
materialized, Labor coidd C
assued of a majority in the m
member parliament, given th#
additional likelihood that
evolving Mapam-Citizens hW
Movement-Yossi Sarid bloc *L
a total of 10 seats, and the f0S
Communist and two Progressiv
List for Peace MKs would J
vote with Likud against Labor in
the new government.
Community Calendar
October 1
Women's League for Israel Board meeting, 10 a.m. Temple
Sinai Kulanu-Youth Family Group, 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Atid
meeting, 12 noon B'nai Torah Sisterhood Board meeting, 7:30
p.m. Brandeis Women Boca Board meeting, 10a.m.
October 2
Women's American ORT Boca Delray evening, 8 p.m. Brandeis
Women Boca Century Village meeting, 10 a.m. Anshei Emuno
Sisterhood meeting, 12 noon B'nai B'rith Boca Teeca Lodge
meeting, 9:30 a.m. Women's American ORT All Points Board
meeting, 12:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans Snyder Tokson Pojt
Auxiliary Miami Veterans Hospital, 1 p.m. Temple Emeth*
Brotherhood meting, 1:30 p.m.
October 3
Hadassah Shira Board meeting, 10 a.m. National Council
Jewish Women Boca, Delray Board meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Women's American ORT Region Executive Committee Meeting,
9:30 a.m. Hadassah Boca Maariv Board meeting, 10 a.m.
Hadassah Menachem Begin Board meeting, 9:30 a.m.
October 4
Temple Beth El Brotherhood Board meeting, 8 p.m. Jewish
War Veterans Snyder Tokson Post 459 meeting, 10 a.m. Jewish
War Veterans Snyder Tokson Post Auxiliary meeting, 10 a.m.
October 5
Yom Kippur Eve
October 6
Yom Kippur
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conservative
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Evening services Monday through Thursday 5:15 p.m.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101, Boca Raton, Florida
33433. Orthodox services held at Boca Teeca Country Club
Auditorium, Yamato Road, Boca Raton, every Friday, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday morning 9:30 a.m. Mincha-Maariv. Rabbi Mark
Dratch. Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd., Delray
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks.
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class 5
p.m. Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio Road,
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler.
Sabbath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10:15 a.m.
Mailing address: 950 Glades Road, Suite 1C, Boca Raton, FL
33432. Phone 392-9982.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan
Association Office, West Atlantic Ave., corner Carter Road,
Delray Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9
a.m. and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 498-2141
Office: 14600 Cumberland Drive, Delray Beach, Florida 33446,
Phone 495-0466.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Reform
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services
at 8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FL 33434
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Service8
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday
8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 483-
5557. Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Con
servative. Phone: 498-3536. Naftaly A. Linkovsky, Cantor
Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 8:45 a.m.
Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
84715 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Harwich
Road), Delray Heach, Florida 33445. Reform. Sabbath eve
services, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver, President
Samuel Rothstein, phone 276-6161.


ly, September!
le Jewisr
>unt
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
{Obituary
Sam Revits
[A series of KGB searches and
iHOLMIANSKY's arrest in
Jv indicate Soviet authorities
kve intensified their campaign
ujnst Jewish culture and
Sucation. Kholmiansky, who is
jjy? held in a Tallinn prison
B his trial on Sept. 25, is
ireed with alleged "mailbox
mpering." As the prosecution's
vestigation continues, related
-arches were made of six
oscow and four Odessa homes.
Aug. 29, KGB agents
[arched the apartment
eksandr shares with his
[rents and allegedly "found" a
btol and undeveloped film of
to books, one with a Jewish
[bject. Because searches
fianated from both Moscow and
am, Kholmiansky could face
ond trial, in Moscow.
Jon Sept. 8, Aleksandr's broth-
I MIKHAIL, was mugged and
lbbed of his internal passport
Id other official documents,
lemingly by "professionals
Jeking to harass him."
|0n Sept. 4, YULI
)ELSHTEIN was arrested and
home was subsequently
ched. KGB agents con-
-ited items left Dy foreign
kitors. as well as a tin of
liacco and a "box of stones."
[though no charges were made,
kviet authorities claimed they
lind opium in the stones and
Awed "foreigners of coming
Id corrupting Jewish youth
Ith medieval and mystical drug
luals." In relation to the alle-
Ition, many of Edelshtein's
pnaged Hebrew students were
[estioned and coerced to sign
Btements that they were
quired to purchase Hebrew
udy kits for 15 rubles each. On
ese grounds authorities claim
Belshtein is "corrupting youth
I become illegal profiteers."
Belshtein is being held in
ozna Prison in Moscow.
[n Leningrad, YAKOV
JWODETSKY was arrested
r refusing to inform the KGB
his employment status.
Blowing an administrative
deeding, he was sentenced to
) months of "correctional
or." Gorodetsky remains at
ne, as his sentence will be
ved in Leningrad.
Meanwhile, in the pending case
pinst YAKOV LEVIN of
lessa, his fiancee YEHUDIT
EPOMNIASHCHY petitioned
t General Procurator on his
Nf, claiming that "the KGB
carried out its threat to
prison Yakov" because of his
usal to testify against YAKOV
p-SH last July.
U.EKSANDR PARITSKY
urned to his family in Kharkov
er serving a three-year sen-
p in Stantsi Vydrino labor
lip for allegedly "defaming the
m' stat* Paritsky. 46, was
t?n u after a lon8 campaign of
fb harassment culminated in
search of his home. Prior to
arest, Paritsky's academic
ft Kandidat of Technical
lences, was rescinded by the
f lets because of his alleged
inti -patriotic activity,"
Tpong the first time such
'on was taken against a
ntist for his desire to
grate to Israel.
Fgity-three Jews left the
wm Union in August, con-
pwg the downward trend in
Tfftwn for 1984. Only 652
t i^L^'ved exit visas to
a\ 1384 as compared with
F^ tor the correspond ins
Km/^.theyearlotedM
WnUyeaT* "***"
gSSJW YAKIR
snav. d t0 Krasnaya
lit yi iPnson' "witing
CtJ!'1 w,th conditions
hiJ,1 Worse than Butyrka,"
It* W He has been
Itors recve. Packages or
WL L'Noting he has
* over half of hfs three-year
sentence and that he suffers from
chronic heart and gall bladder
ailments, 200 American chemists,
organized by the Committee of
Concerned Scientists, petitioned
the Soviet government for the
"early release of YURI
TARNOPOLSKY, on humanit-
arian grounds." ... A health
administrator has notified INN A
BEGUN that her husband,
IOSIF, has been released from
the hospital and is in "good
health," although Inna has
received no mail from Iosif
himself since June 22 ... In spite
of his poor health, MOSHE
ABRAMOV was transferred to
work in a cement factory.
Long-term refusenik
ALEKSANDR LERNER turned
71 on Sept. 7. Lerner's requests
to repatriate to Israel have been
denied for 13 years on the
grounds of his alleged exposure
to "state secrets."
. NADAZHDA
FARADKOVA, of Leningrad, is
in intensive care, where she
reportedly continues her hunger
strike. Following searches of
their Odessa homes, KGB agents
confiscated Hebrew books and
Israeli postcards from
ALEKSANDR KUSHNIR and
LEV PEVZNER, as well as
Kushnir's invitation to Israel
from his mother.
Take Up Jewry's Case With
Gromyko, Chiles Urges Reagan
Senator Lawton Chiles (D-Fl.)
has asked President Reagan to
confront Soviet Foreign M mister
Andrei Gromyko at their Sep-
tember 28 meeting with the
stepped-up campaign against
Jews in the Soviet Union.
In his letter to the President,
Chiles noted the celebrated cases
of nuclear physicist Andrei
Sakharov and his wife, Yelena
Bonner, as well as lesser known
refuseniks'" such as Zakhar
Zunsnine and three Hebrew
teachers who disappeared after
being arrested this summer on
fabricated charges.
As evidence of the crackdown
on Soviet Jews, the Senator
pointed to the recent decline in
Jewish emigration. "In 1979,"
Chiles wrote,"51,320 applications
by Jews for exit visas were ap-
proved. However, over the past
tour years, the Soviets have
increasingly clamped down on
Jewish emigration. This year to
date, with an estimated 300,000
applications pending, only 652
Jews have been granted permis-
sion to leave the Soviet Union. If
the rate of Jewish emigration
continues at this level, it will be
the lowest since emigration
Senator Lawton Chiles
began 20 years ago."
Chiles asked President Reagan
to place this item high on the
agenda when he meets with
Gromyko, commenting that the
Soviet Union "cannot expect the
American people to ignore such
gross violations of basic human
rights. Soviet Jews must be
allowed to practice their religion
and carry on their culture arid, if
they desire to do so, be permitted
to leave a country that denies
them these rights.'
New Bnai Brith Lodge Forming
At Villages of Oriole
A new B'nai B'rith Lodge is
being formed by veteran
members of the organization in
the Villages of Oriole in Delray,
with the first membership meet-
ing scheduled for Wednesday,
Oct. 31.
The new lodge will tentatively
be named Jacob Lodge, but its
charter members may choose
their own name, according to
Jack M. Levine, former national
officer of B'nai B'rith, who an-
nounced the new lodge. Leo E.
Brink of Bonaire Village is doing
the organizing, and the first
meeting will be held at the
Bonaire clubhouse at 1:30 p.m.
According to Levine, some of
those involved have been mem-
bers of B'nai B'rith for 30 or 40
years (one, Hank Duberstein,
toined 65 years ago, at the age of
Sam Revits, a noted philan-
thropist and former member of
the Board of the South County
Jewish Federation died recently
in New York City, aged 73. He is
buried in Boca Raton. Rabbi
Bruce S. Warshal officiated at
the ceremony.
Revits started his career in
Wall Street at the age of 17 as a
runner. He rose to become a
senior vice president of Merrill
Lynch. He was the leading expert
on government securities in the
United States and was an advisor
to the United States Govern-
ment. He retired in 1972.
Revits is survived by his wife
Verna, his daughter Jeannie
Rush, four grandchildren, a
great-grandchild, two brothers
and a sister. In his eulogy Rabbi
Warshal made the Following
statement:
"I have known Sam for the six
years that I have resided in Boca
Raton, and I consider it a
privilege to have known him. We
bandy the term 'gentlemen'
around quite gUbly these days,
yet truly there are very few
gentle men. Sam Revits was a
gentle man. He was sensitive,
honest, and unassuming. He
utterly lacked pomposity.
17), but while membership can be
transferred from any lodge any-
where in the world, the founders
would welcome those who have
never belonged to B'nai B'rith
before.
B'nai B'rith is a fraternal
organization founded in New
York in 1843, and now has more
than 500,000 members in 33
countries. It has 75 lodges in
Israel, where it began activities
in 1918. World headquarters is in
Washington, D.C., and besides
its men8 and women's lodges,
B'nai B'rith also sponsors a
youth organization BBYO,
with AZA for boys and BBG for
girls and helps support a net-
work of Hillel chapters on most
university campuses which have
sizeable numbers of Jewish
students.
Peres To Seek Talks


Continued from Page 1
Yaacobi, Economics and Plan-
ning.
Other ministers on the Labor
side of the Knesset announced
are: Amnon Rubinstein (Shinui),
Communications: Yigael Hurvitz
(Courage to Cure the Economy),
Without Portfolio. Ezer Weiz-
man (Yahad). Minister in the
Prime Minister's Office.
LIKUD: Yitzhak Shamir:
Moshe Arens. Without Portfolio:
David Levy, Deputy Premier and
Housing: Ariel Sharon. Trade
and Industry: Yitzhak Modai.
Finance: Moshe Nissim, Justice:
Gideon Patt. Without Portfolio;
Avraham Sharir, Tourism: Haim
Corfu. Transportation: Moshe
Katzav, Labor and Welfare.
Also on the Likud side of the
Knesset: Rabbi Yitzhak Peretz
(Shas). Without Portfolio: Yosef
Shapira (Morasha). Without
Portfolio: Yosef Burg (National
Religious Party). Without
Portfolio.
The late Sam Revits
Sincerity was so innate to his
being that one just took it for
granted when dealing with him.
As long as I live, I will always
feel that I have been touched by a
great man. Sam was 25 years
older than I, and in reflection, in
whatever time left that is alloted
to me, I hope that some of what
was Sam can be transmitted
through my life and my actions.
In this respect, Sam lives on
through the many people who
knew and loved him."
New Communications Head Named
For South County Federation
South County Jewish Federa-
tion has a new director of com-
munications. He is Marty Erann,
formerly a journalist with The
Jerusalem Post.
Erann's appointment, an-
nounced last week by Federation
President Marianne Bobick, took
effect September 1. One of his
prime tasks, she said, will be to
make The Jewish Floridian truly
an organ of and for the fast-
growing Jewish community of
south Palm Beach County.
Israeli-born Marty Erann
holds a Master's degree from
Long Island University in
Brooklyn, N.Y. He grew up in
Montreal, Canada, where he
attended yeshivas and secular
schools, and became deeply
involved in Jewish community
life. During the 1960's Erann
worked with Jewish youth in
Brooklyn, directing the youth
activities sponsored by
Hadassah. In 1970 with 20 other
American families, he and his
family went to Israel to establish
a new cooperative settlement at
Neve Ilan, near Jerusalem.
While living in Neve Ilan,
Marty Erann
Erann went to work for The
Jerusalem Post as a sub-editor,
and served as the daily's econ-
omic reporter from 1974-76. The
Eranns came to Florida in 1981,
settling in the Boca Raton area.
ALMOST A
CENTURY
of thoughtful, earing
service to the Jewish
community
of Greater
New York
stands behind the
Gutterma n fa miln's
new commitment
to provide service
that is faithful
to Jewish law
and ritual, in every respect,
for the Jewish community
of South Florida. We invite
you to inspect our beautiful
new memorial chapel and
consult on our pre-need plan.
OGuferman
MMarheiti
.CHAFCL
Fl'NJM** P.Hfv .>> :*' *#;
STEWART GUTTERMAN WALTER S WARMEIT MARK E OAVIS
rMON FE0tRALMWY.SCftm^aM
IN GREATER NEW YORK GUTTERMANS INC
ROCKVILLE CENTRE 11 WCOOBURY L I MANHATTAN QUEENS BROOKLYN BRONX


x cute in
1 uiruiian oi .inutn uountv / Friday. September /. ium4
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, September 28,1984
a
t
I
s
1
NORTON
TIRE CO.
ItffTVl
i
THE DISCOUNT TIRE CO.
WITH INTEGRITY
BELTED RADIAL WHITEWALLS
SIZE PRICE ^""
P165/80R13 34.83 X
P175/80R13 36.78 J
P185/80R13 38.01 ^"
P185/75R14 38.74 %w
P195/75R14 40.86 ^
P205/75R14 42.51 X
P215/75R14 44.45 ^_
P215/75R15 45.70 X
P225/75R15 48.17
P235/75R15 1.37 ^
NOW OPEN
OUR 35th STORE IN TITUSVIUE
109 S. HOPKINS AVE. '2684890
SPECIAL
PURCHASE
DISC

IIRELLI
RADIALS
40,000 MILE
WRITTEN LIMITED WARRANTY
AT NO EXTRA COST
ALL SIZES AVAILABLE
IMMEDIATELY AT OUR
SPECIAL DISCOUNTS
45 i Q95
xi2 I ^r
I 155SR12 P3 BLK. 145SR13 P3 BLK.
155SR13 P3 BLK. 165SR13 P3 BLK.
175SR13P3BLK. 175SR14P3BLK.
185SR14 P3 BLK 165SR15 P3 BLK
16S70SR13 P370 BLK. 17570SR13 P370
BLK 18&70SR13 Pa70BlK 18&70SR14
PSTO BLK 19S70SR14 P370 BLK
145SR12 P3 BLK 165SR14 P3 BLK.
18570SR15P3,70BLK.
18&*30HR13P6BLK 20S60VR13P7BLK.
iaVB6HR14 P6 BLK 19&C0HR14 P6 BLK
I206/8OHR14P6BLK. 2S50VR15P7BLK.
122S60HR14 P6 BLK. 195S6VH13 P7 BLK
122&S5VRI4 P7 BLK 21560HR15 P6 BLK.
17V50VR13 P7 BLK 2350VR15 P6 BLK.
195/S0VR15 P7 BLK. 20M0VR15 P7 BLK.
I22SSOVR15 P7 BLK 2*50\"R15 P7 BLK
|266*0VR16 P7 BLK. 18&70HR14 P5 BLK,
119&70HR14 PS BLK 20S70HR14 PS BLK.
I20S70VR14 PS BLK. 18S70VR15 P6 BLK.
I21S70VR15 PS BLK. 26540VR15 P7BLK.
I20S70VR15 PS BLK. 2OS60HR13 P6 BLK.
fieSeOMflU P6 BLK 22S60VR14 P6 BLK.
I19560HR15 P6 BLK. 20560HR15 P6 BLK.
|206OVR15 P6 BLK. 21S60VR15 P6 BLK
I23&S5VR15 P6 BLK 34535VR15 P7 BLK.
I205/S6VR14 P7 BLK. 20555VR16 P7 BLK.
I22&S0VR16 P7 BLK P19575R14 P77 WW.
IP21S75R15 P77 WW. 20S75R15 PTJ BLK
IP20S75R15 P77 WW P22S70R15 P77 WW.
IP19570R14 P77 BLK, P20570R14 P77 BLK.
I18&66SR15 P8 BLK. 17S70fi13 P77 BLK
I18570R13 P77 BLK. P20570P.13 P77 WW.
I18S70P.14 P77 BLK. P19&70R14 P77 WW.
|P20S70R14 P77 WW. P22S70B15 P77 BW
COME IN TODAY FOR
OUR DISCOUNT PRICE
PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
YOKOHAMA
40,000 MILE WRITTEN
LIMITED WARRANTY AT
NO EXTRA COST
Y865STEEL
BELT RADIAL
SIZE SALE
B78x13 23.32
D78x14 25.74
E78x14 26.18
F78x14 27.44
G78x14 28.92

SIZE SALE
H78x14 30.29
G78x15 29.00
H78x15 30.51
L78x15 32.21
TAKE ADVANTAGE
OF THESE BARGAINS
NOW!
SAFETY
SERVICE
CERTIFIED
MECHANICS
IN EVERY STORE
Most of our mechanics
have been TESTED I
and CERTIFIED by the
National Institute for Ser-
vice Excellence. They
are available at any ofj
our stores listed below.
OIL CHANGE,
FILTER & LUBE
BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES.
EZZSJ
ALL
SEASON
RADIAL
DELIVERS
UP TO
60,000
MILES
depending on
how you drive
SIZE
155SR12
PRICE
32.40
145SR13 33.17
155SR13 35.29 C
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
37.54
43.63
402
P-METRICTUBELESS
TWhitewall
SIZE
P185/80-13
P185/75-14
P195/75-14
42.91
Y885 STEEL
BELTED RADIAL
SIZE
175/70SR13
185/70SR13
185/70SR14
195/70SR14
205/70SR14
PRICE
43.10
46.36
49.09
_5242_
55.70
SMALL Y45 WHITE
TRUCK 600x14 OO03
SPECIAL 6 Ply VO
P205/75-14
P215/75-14
P225/75-14
P205/75-15
P215/75-15
P225/75-15
P235/75-15
PRICE
54.95
58.95
59.95
63.95
69.95
75.95
65.95
70.95
73.95
XZX TUBELESS BLACK
PRICE
34.95
145-13 MX 31.95
155-13
35.95
165-13 MX 40.95
175-13
155-14
165-14
175-14
185-14
165-15
165/70-13 MXL
175/70-13 MXL
185A70-13MXL
195/70-14 MXL 58.95
42.95
40.95
48.95
47.95
54.95
45.95
39.95
44.95
49.95
XZX TUBELESS WHITE
SIZE
P155/80-13
P165/80-13
P175/75-14 58.95
PRICE
37.95
44.95
TRX BLACKWALL
180/65-390
220/55-390
WHITE
UPT050TS OF
PREMIUM OIL
FOR GAS on
DIESEL ENQ
NEW FILTER
COMP LUBE
BU
AVAILABLE IN STOCK
P185/75-14, P195/75-14)
P205/75-14.P215/70-15
P215/75-15.P225/75-15
P235/75-15
SPECIAL DISCOUNT
PRICES ON THESE
XA4 TIRES
LIGHT TRUCK TIRES
185x146ply 84
SIZE
700-15 XCA 6 ply
700-15 XCA 8 ply
750-16 XCA 8 ply
750-16XCAT8p)y
215 85Rl6 8pty
235/85Rl6l0pry
800-16 5XCAT8ply
875-16 5XCAT8ply
95Q-16 5XCAT8ply
82.95 98.95
10Rl6 5XCAT8ply
8Rl7 5XCAT8ply
3**FETax 1010214
PRICE
79.95
FOfl MOST us
PASSENGER CARS AND LIGHT TRUCKS
use
BRAKE
SPECIAL
Install new disc pads Re-
surface rotors Install new
seals Repack bearings
Check calipers Check
system Inspect master
cylinder Add fluid as re-
quired Adjust and bleed
as required Check and ad-
just rear brakes Road test
30,000 mt Limited Warranty
ExrerrwoM on drum brakes
AIR CONDITIONING
CHECK-UP
Keep cool during the hoi
weather Available at stores
listed below wilh a (+)
86.95
89.95
109.95
99.95
119.95
102.95
114.95
124.95
139.95
119.95
NORTON TIRE CO-
^MONROE?
SHOCK ABSORBERS
AND STRUT
EPLACEMEI
CARTRIDGES
TOFIT
MOST
CARS AND
TRUCKS
TWKS ALMNNENT %
MAKES WLCTAMi *****
tH0CM-ian-H0ttj
ALL STORES OPEN 7:30 AM
CORAL GLABLEB
Bird ft Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH Ml 1*1 Ml
13360 N W 7th Ave 681-6541
' N MIAMI BEACH
1700N.E 163rdSt 945-7454
MMMM BCACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH OAOC
9001S Dixie Hwy 667-7575
CUTLER RIDOE
20390 S Dixie Hwy 233-5241
HLALEAH/RU.M !
127549m St
822-2500
NW2SSt.&MHm0tKyRd 593-1191
WIST MUM
Bird ft Galloway Rds 552-6656
KENOALL OR /HK1ATE SQUARE
13872 S.W8MI St 387-0128
W TAMLAMI TRAIL
12520 SW 8th St 551-1141
HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal Hwy 247-1622
W HOLLYWOOD
497 S State Rd 7 987-0450
tOAVW
St Rd MiustwestolUnivDr
473-4700
FT. LAUOCROALE
1740 E.Sunnse Blvd 463-7588
PLANTATION
381N State Rd 7 587-2166
PEMBROKE WNE8
H'Hyw'd Blvd. iust west otUnlv Dr. 435-1383
'TAMARAC
N UnrvDr SMcNabRd 721-4700
TAMARAC
441 ft W Commercial Btvd 735-2772
POMMNOtMACM
3151N Federal Hwy 943-4200
DEERTtELD BEACH
2265 WHiHsboro Blvd 427-8800
DELRAV BEACH
ILmtonBlvd 272-1022
OREENACREt
3636 Jog Rd 966-1014
ROYAL RALU BEACH
11451 Southern Blvd 793-1115
WET MLLM BEACH
515 South Dixie 632-4181
LAKE RARK/N PALM BCACH
532 N Lake Blvd 648-2544
TEOUttTA
Bridge Rd I Old OWt Hwy 746-9215
trtraftct mtM
2604South4|hSt. 464-8020
tVtnOMACN
7552Htt 567-1174
iTTTUeWtLLE
109 S HoptuntAve 26B-48W
otenomAWUCH
907VoluiaAve 255-7487
MAPLE*
2065E.TamiamiT> 774-4443
15135 McGregor Bwd 482-8M0
MASTERCARD VISA AMERICAN EXPRESS DINER S CLUB WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EHTZ1VPY5_CL7CGD INGEST_TIME 2013-06-06T01:39:23Z PACKAGE AA00014304_00174
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES