The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00162

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
be
Jewish Florldian
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
17 Number 1
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, January 4,1986
FrtdShochit
Price 35 Cents
X
.7*
\
Bobicks Honored
By Israel Bonds
1
I and Marianne Bobick, honored at Israel Bonds Gala Dinner of
Bounty. (Dennis Alton)
The premier Israel Bonds Gala
dinner held last week produced as
much in bond purchases as the
entire Israel Bonds campaign of
the previous year, according to
Eugene Squires, executive chair
for South County Israel Bonds
drive.
The dinner-dance, held at Boca
Pointe, honored South County
Jewish Federation president
Marianne Bobick and her
husband Edward for their
devoted service to the Jewish
community and their efforts on
behalf of Israel. A special
mezuzah display created by
renowned artist Ya'acov Agam
was presented to the Bobicks.
Squires thanked the Bobicks
not only for their work in the
community, but for getting him
involved in it and its philan-
thropic work. "You have changed
my life and enriched it," he said,
bringing tears to Mrs. Bobick's
eyes.
Squires also announced that
Abner Levine, one of the leaders
of the Federation-UJA campaign,
had called him last week minutes
before being admitted to the
hospital for major surgery, to tell
him he was buying a $25,000
Variable Rate of Interest (VRI)
bond, and to ask him to tell
others he had done this, so that
they may follow Levine's
3xample.
Bill Miller, branch manager for
Florida National Bank, an-
nounced that his bank was
purchasing $1 million in Israel
Bonds on a statewide basis, with
a portion of the purchase
"credited" to South County.
Gov. Hunt To Speak At Masada Dinner
nor Jim Hunt of North
who achieved national
ence in the recent
lions when he tried to
Senator Jesse Helms, will
guest speaker at the
Dinner of the Men's
Rieder, chair of the
ind Abner Levine, Men's
chair for Major Gifts
pointed out that
Jr Hunt has close ties
Jewish community both
in North Carolina and nationally,
and has long been considered a
strong pro-Israel voice in U.S.
politics.
Governor Hunt, a Democrat, is
the first North Carolina governor
to be elected for two successsive
terms. Since his inauguration in
1977 his state has achieved a
wide reputation as a leader in
education and economic growth,
with many innovative legislative
actions and reforms implemented
by Hunt, despite the fact that
North Carolina is the only state
which does not give its governor
any veto powers.
Hunt has championed the
Equal Rights Amendment and
affirmative action in state hiring.
He first won state office in 1972,
when he was elected lieutenant
governor despite a Republican
landslide that brought in North
Carolina' first Republican
governor and Republican senator
(Jesse Helms) in this century. In
the 1982 congressional elections
he spearheaded a
campaign which
Israel Was Not Created
by UNationsRosenne
Democratic
not only
defeated the efforts by Jesse
Helms' group to unseat Demo-
cratic incumbents, but regained
two seats from Republicans.
The Masada Dinner, for those
who have pledged a major gift to
the campaign (96,500 or more),
has established a tradition of
"making history" both in the
Federation-UJA Campaign and
in the community. It will be held
this year on Thursday, Jan. 17, at
the home of Jordan and Betty
Ginsburg, and will honor Philip
Zinman.
Gov. Jim Hunt
[SHINGTON -
Ambassador Meir
ie declared here last
^hat it is time to end
-th that Israel was
by the United
Is.
king before the closing
I of the Zionist Organiza-
jAmerica's annual conven-
bsenne said that, in 1948,
kah countries invaded
knd not one member of the
Nations came to the aid of
lAEL WAS created by the
I boys who gave their
IRosenne said. The ZOA is
rear-old organization with
I than 120,000 members
ide. Rosenne delivered
narks before a capacity
I at the Mayflower Hotel
at the dinner a message
ad from President Reagan
1. and the Justice Louis D.
pa Award was presented to
^atz, philanthropist and
benefactor, of Corpus
Ambassador Rosenne
Christi, Tex.; and Jack
Lefkowitz, ZOA associate trea-
surer, of New York. The award
has been given in the past to such
notables as Jacob Javits, Eliza-
beth Taylor, Louis Lehrman, and
Golda Meir.
Costs of Living Up 19 Percent
. AVIV The cost of
[index rose by 19.6 percent
November, the Central
of Statistics announced
m It was the first COL
[published since the start of
I three-month economic
p; deal freezing prices and
P> but it also covered price
>aes in the two weeks before
*** agreement started.
index announcement was
i with mixed feelings, al-
though there was general
satisfaction that it was below 20
percent.
While some economists and
business leaders saw it as herald-
ing a successful outcome of the
efforts to halt runaway inflation,
others said the comparatively
high figure indicated that manu-
facturers and merchants had
artificially raised their prices in
the days before the price freeze
halted such possibilities.
ROSENNE cited Britain's
recent decision to sell sophistic-
ated weapon systems to Arab
states as "an example of how all
European countries recklessly
arm Arab countries." Rosenne
said that "this forces Israel to
maintain a balance of power,
which strains the Israeli
economy."
Rosenne also declared that in
recent weeks "newspapers have
been reporting the economy of
only one country: Israel." He
charged that the "dispropor-
tionate focus on Israel at the ex-
pense of other countries which
are also struggling economically
reflects hypocrisy in the press."
Delegates from across the
country unanimously reelected
Alleck A. Resnick of Baltimore to
a second two-year term as pres-
ident of the Zionist Organization
of America. The election took
place on the closing day of the
ZOA's annual convention.
He said that Israel now spends
26 percent of its gross national
product on defense, as compared
to the 6.4 percent which the U.S.
spends.
Rosenne was optimistic, how-
ever, when he spoke of the recent
Free Trade Agreement passed by
the U.S. government on trade
with Israel. He said that the
agreement passed the Senate 97-0
and passed the House of Repres-
entatives by 416-6.
He was also optimistic that
just as Egypt came to sit and
negotiate peace with Israel, other
Arab countries will follow suit.
However, he said, this will only
come about if Israel remains
strong.
41 Jewish Families
Reported to Have
Received Exit Visas
NEW YORK (JTA) -
At least 10 Soviet Jewish
families from Moscow, all
long-term refuseniks, have
received exit visas to Israel,
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry has reported.
The news, which the NCSJ
said it sees as a "small but signi-
ficant reversal in annual emigra-
tion trends," marks only the
second time in over eight months
that Jews from the Soviet capital
were granted permission to
emigrate. The first visas issued in
that city came in November,
when 12 Muscovite Jews were
permitted to leave.
Included in the report, and be-
ing confirmed by the NCSJ, is
news that an additional 30 fami-
lies from Tbilisi and one family
from Kaunus, in Lithuania, have
also received exit permits. All are
long-term refuseniks, who have
sought emigration to Israel for
more than eight years.
Although the identities and the
size of each family are unknown
at this time, the NCSJ noted that
the total number could well
surpass the monthly emigration
average of 73 which has distin-
guished 1984 as the "worst year
for emigration in nearly 20
years." To date, only 806 Soviet
Jews have been permitted to
emigrate to Israel.
A spokesperson for the NCSJ
suggested that the "sudden
increase, most welcome by those
involved, may be intended as a
gesture of good will by the
Soviets" in advance of the meet-
ings scheduled for January
between Secretary of State
George Shultz and Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko. He added it is "hope-
fully the first step in a trend
which will continue well beyond
those sessions."


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*
Press Digest
Israel Today ran a front page
story of the "Sad U.S. Record on
Nazis'' desaiUng the progress of
the Office of Special Investi-
gations of the Justice Depart-
ment which has produced quite a
bit of activity in investigating
former Nazis in the US since its
creation in 1979.
According to the report, some
10.000 former Nazis found an
easy refuge in the U.S. after
World War II. and for nearly 40
years virtually nothing was done
about them. The OSI. in a few
short years, exposed the Opera-
tion Paperclip of the US
government, which spirited some
120 German scientists into the
L\S. to work on rocket research:
it was responsible for one of
them. Arthur Rudolph, leaving
the US rather than face OSI
charges that he headed a slave
labor camp under Hitler. It ar-
rested and jailed Andrija Artu-
kovK. who headed the exter-
mination of Jews and other
minority groups in Yugoslavia. It
has also forced the expulsion of
five Nazi war criminals within the
last two years, and has begun
actions against seven more this
past year alone.
The OSI was established under
the initiative of Elizabeth Holtz-
man. Brooklyn's district attorney
who was then serving as con-
gresswoman With a battery of
20 lawyers it is currently headed
by Neal M. Sher. The "sad
record" alluded to was the
inaction for four decades, and
possibly even some government
collusion in protecting ex-Nazis,
such as in the case of Operation
Paperclip.
Support for Israel among
Americans runs considerably
higher than the impression which
might be created by the general
press. The .Wear East Report
reports on a recent study issued
by AIPAC (American Israel
Public Affairs Committee) which
clearly shows that the American
public for the past 35 years has
supported pro-Israel policy by a
ratio of four to one or better. The
study covered 60 polls such as
those of Harris. Gallup and other
respectable firms over the 35
years, and found overwhelming
support was expressed for
continued U.S. aid, from all
walks of American life men
and women. Catholics and Pro-
testants, rural and city popu-
lations, Republicans and Demo-
crats, and yes, even blacks by a
ratio of three to one. Wide
majorities support Israel's right
to live within secure boundaries:
oppose sale of advanced weapons
to belligerent Arab states; prefer
continued Israeli control of Jeru-
salem; and hold negative views
on the PLO.
A 1983 poll by The Washing-
ton Post found that black Ameri-
cans favored Israel over the
Arabs by 3-to-l. and 16 of 21
members of the Black Congres-
sional Caucus have consistently
voted for aid to Israel and
against arms
to the Arabs.
In New York City a coalition of
black and Jewish leaders has
been meeting for nearly a year to
establish a "common human
agenda" and work to ease ten-
sions between the two groups.
which grew to a peak during the
1964 election campaign. The
agenda includes three items:
apartheid and South African
relations with other countries:
affirmative action in employment
of minorities: and the conditions
of pubbc education in New York
City (where a majority of children
are non-whitei. The coalition, ac-
cording to The Jewish Week, has
been criticized for adopting an
agenda of issues that concern
mostly blacks, but no issues that
concern the Jewish minority
specifically, such as the plight of
Soviet Jewry. (In fact, the Jewish
Week itself carries, in the same
issue, an editorial .blasting the
coalition for its obvious im-
balance.!
Malcolm Hoenlein. director of
the New York Jewish Commu-
nity Relations Council and
member of the coalition, defended
the coalition's move by saying its
chief aim was to "dispel mis-
conceptions'" and "limit
negative forces' that drive
blacks and Jews apart.'' The real
Jewish agenda item is to sensitize
black leadership to Jewish
concerns. Hoenlein said, adding
that a focus on Israel and Soviet
Jewry will eventually come. New-
York Mayor Ed Koch, mean-
while, has charged that the
coalition was formed primarily to
oppose his re-election. It was "a
camouflage operation intended to
put together a group against
me." he said.
There is a struggle going on
within the Orthodox Jewish
community in America, and it is
typified by statements made in
connection with reports that a
fourth year was added to the
ordination program at Yeshiva
University's Rabbi Ekrhanan
Theological Seminary, says The
Jewish Post and Opinion. YU
president Rabbi Norman I-nmm
said the additional year will
prevent students from being
misled "into thinking that
halacha was fixated at a certain
pre-modern level and that it is
incapable of addressing the
concerns of contemporary man."
Such a quote, says the Post
and Opinion, could well have
come from Rabbi Gerson Cohen,
president of the Conservative
Jewish Theological Seminary
so close is it to the Conservative
view. The additional year, ac-
cording to the report, was needed
to deal with new ethical and
moral questions such as artificial
hearts and animal heart trans-
plants, and with how a rabbi
should react to proposed
legislation barring discrimination
against homosexuals, while the
Torah prescribes a death penalty
and refers to homosexuality as an
i
8
Boston
University
k
Ben Gurion
I "Diversity
of the Negev
Israel
Master of Science In Management
Full time degree studies in Israel
One Year Program Taught in English
Joint Degree Full Campus Facilities
Mail Inquiry to:
Director. MSM Program in Israel
Boston University Metropolitan College
755 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
Tel (617) 353-2987
Ptease send infnrmaiar)
ahum the MSM nr-jgram
m Israd
I* iu< i I nrvcr\\ is an FxjuaJ Opp>*iun*> Inn turn
abomination.
The Israeli press has been
focusing its attention on the
dash between the two Israeli reli-
gious parties i National Religious
Party or NRP. and the Torah
Guardians or SHASl and the
resulting danger to the national
unity government. Premier
Shimon Peres, in an effort to find
a compromise, went so far as to
go late on a Saturday night to
meet with some of the recognized
rabbinic authorities known s
Gedolei Ha torah" at the office
of former Chief Rabbi Ovadia
Yosef.
The dash between the two
groups, explains The Jerusalem
Post, stems from the insistence of
the NRP. a traditional partner in
every coalition since Israel's
independence, that all religious
functions handled within the
Interior Ministry which their
leader Dr. Yosef Burg headed for
14 years but will now go to SHAS
be transferred to the Religious
Affairs Ministry, which was al-
located to the NRP. (To put it
differently, the issue is who will
control various funds, such as
allocations to religious insti-
tutions, and thus exercise greater
political patronage.)
Since the Likud bloc more
specifically, its Herut component
has given SHAS a commit-
ment for support, the clash
meant that the Likud might have
to walk out of the unity govern-
ment if SHAS did. and the
government would fall. On the
other hand, the Labor party had
a similar commitment to the
NRP. Apparently. SHAS even-
tually won and the crisis was
averted after Peres managed to
pressure the NRP to accept a
compromise.
Another issue making head-
lines for the past several weeks is
the bankruptcy of Ata. Israel's
largest and oldest textile firm,
which has been employing
several thousands of employees
whose livelihood was on the line.
Peres and several other Cabinet
ministers in Israd were attempt-
ing to pressure the Histadrut to
buy Ata "as a challenge" and re-
vive it as a going concern, while
Industry and Commerce Minister
Ariel Sharon, who has been in
New York for the past few weeks
in connection with his libel trial
against TIME magazine, has
been trying to find an American
buyer for the firm.
The plant's workers in Haifa,
meanwhile, have been holding
meetings, headed by a works
committee chairman whom the
press has likened to Lech Walesa
of Poland's Solidarity fame. The
workers urged, cajoled, and
threatened the government to see
to it that the plant continues in
operation saying they would
ass to it that every factory in
Haifa dosed down if theirs did.
In brief, from The Jerusalem
Post:
While in Washington
recently, Vice Premier and For-
eign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
concluded an agreement with
Venezuela to promote joint
farming ventures in the Carib-
bean, and another agreement to
promote technological coopera-
tion between the two countries.
What was to be a massive
demonstration for Soviet Jewry
in Tel Aviv during Chanukah
turned out to be a disappoint-
ment marred even further by
the participation of Meir Kahane,
who insisted on joining other
Knesset members invited to
address the crowd, and whose
followers started a fist fight in
the crowd when organizers
refused to let him speak.
Israels foreign trade deficit
h^t6K*S^ "fated I
thanks to ifcflatkmai^Sz
dating back to Vigil cS|
C^a term in office^ fi*
miniater (during Likud J^Zl
ment days), helped aloof^M
SS& c "Sfcj
An ad hoc meeting of J
100 persona, including 3
Orthodox Jews, was hdd h!3
salem's City Hall recently to
discuss what steps can be uka
to counter increasing violence J
the ultra-Orthodox extremis
known as the "Haredim" (which
include, but are not limited to'
the Naturei Karta group) &
seems the latter have not beal
restricting themselves to throw
ing rocks at vehicles on tin
Sabbath they have picked on
individuals in their neighbor-
hoods as well, shaving womeni
heads, beating and ostracizini
men and bullying children.
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Synagogue services
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Friday, January 4, 1985 /The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 3
\flews in Brief
Prelate Gets Good Neighbor Award
ByJTA Services
3STON Magr. Jorge
eUa. Secretary of the.Vatican's
Umission for Religious Rela-
M with Judaism, was in
ystnut Hill, Mass., earlier this
onth to recede the annual Good
hbor Award of Mishkan
a Conservative congre-
whose Brotherhood esta-
jheii the award 25 years ago.
[Mejia is the first Vatican offi-
Addressing a meeting of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations here, Rosenne said,
however, that "the cold peace"
between Israel and Egypt which
started with the war in Lebanon
in June, 1982, still continues.
director of the WJC Latin Amer-
ican branch, observed that "clear
to all the participants was the
increasing vulnerability of the
Jewish communities becoming
trapped by the various conflict-
ing situations on the continent of
a general nature." These conflicts
arise, he noted, from the region's
serious economic problems which
lead to indebtedness and its
adverse social effects.
"We hope there will be a
change in the future," Rosenne
said, adding that he also hoped
that when the negotiations
to be a recipient. The decision between Israel and Egypt begin,
they will discuss the return of the
honor him followed a vimt to
ne last June by Rabbi Richard
spiritual leader of
fijhkan Tefila, which included a
eting with Pope John Paul II.
had first met Mejia a year
r when both attended an
emational interfaith meeting
i Boston.
'he presentation was made in
presence of Boston's Arch-
shop Bernard Law at the
nual Good Neighbor Dinner
4, sponsored by the
fishkan Tefila Brotherhood and
I by Benjamin Lipson. The
nests included Rabbi Henry
chelman, executive vice pre-
_nt of the Synagogue Council
[America, the rabbinical branch
Conservative Judaism in the
I.S.
I Mejia, in accepting the tribute,
nderscored its significance when
i noted that Vatican officials are
kldom allowed to accept such
Onors.
;banon Solution
leeds Syria Rabin
TEL AVIV Defense Min-
Iter Yitzhak Rabin believes that
accommodation with Syria is
bential to an agreement with
ebanon that would permit the
ithdrawal of the Israel Defense
brce from Lebanese soil and
isure the security of Israel's
krthern borders.
According to Rabin, Syria
bids the key to the dead-locked
lraell*banon military talks,
bw in their third week at
akura, under the auspices of the
nited Nations Interim Force in
bbanon.
Furthermore, the Israeli de-
nse chief told journalists at a
Dreign Press Association
ncheon here last Friday, an ex-
Inded role for UNIFIL in south
fbanon after the IDF with-
is the paramount con-
feration, superseding the
ppute between Israel and
fbanon over the role to be
ayed by the Israel-backed
buih Lebanon Army.
'of Activists
sen Cause for Concern
[NEW YORK The National
(inference on Soviet Jewry has
pressed "grave concern" over
le conditions of three Soviet
*'ish activists and Hebrew
achers currently awaiting trial,
peksandr Kholmiansky, Yuli
delshtein and Yakov Mesh.
Kholmiansky, arrested in July
allegedly "possessing
"pons and ammunition," is
ently in the third month of a
Ner strike begun to protest
.beatings he received when he
ived in prison.
KrsLa medicai cm-
gg? which recently amninad
pv'*authont,es determined his
"MOB was "not life threat-
. medical experts have
ahvmfathe Past that such a
K "t,can Produce "rever-
se Physical damage.
jsenne Hopeful Talks
^ Egypt on Tap
gjf YORK -Meir Rosenne,
the
hope
ambassador to
KeSft8- "pressed nope
oblem,PLn the ^standing
2abetween the two coun
^ start in the near future.
Egyptian ambassador to Israel
after a more than two-year ab-
sence and a resolution of the
border dispute over Taba.
The meeting of the presidents
conference was convened to
honor its immediate past
chairman, Julius Barman, who
was succeeded by Kenneth
Bialkin last July after serving
two one-year terms.
Tel Aviv Workers
Return to Their Jobs
TEL AVIV The 11-day
strike of Tel Aviv municipal
workers ended late Saturday,
after weekend negotiations
resulted in the agreement of the
commercial banks to lend the city
council an additional two billion
shekels (some $3.3 million).
Sanitation workers agreed to
begin work during the night
Latin American Reps
Air Regional Concerns
SAO PAULO Representa-
tives of the principal Jewish com-
munities of Latin America reaf-
firmed the inviolability of human
rights and the democratic process
in addressing issues of Jewish
and general regional concern at
the three-day Annual Plenary
Assembly of the Latin American
branch of the World Jewish
Congress which just ended here.
The gathering brought
together Jewish leaders from
Mexico and Central America,
Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Peru,
Paraguay, Uruguay and Vene-
zuela to analyze the problems of
Latin America and their effect on
the life of the Jewish communi-
ties.
Prof. Manuel Tenenbaum,
United Israel Appeal Elects
funds for Project
United Israel Appeal re-elected
Irwin Field of Los Angeles as
chairman during its annual
meeting of trustees this month in
New York City. UIA, the major
beneficiary of United Jewish
Appeal funds, announced the
allocation of $316,279,806 in
fiscal 1984 for programs of the
Jewish Agency for Israel, in-
cluding
Renewal.
Field in his chairman's report
underlined the excellent relations
between UIA and the U.S.
Department of State, saying,
"Constructive contacts with
Washington have led to fruitful
cooperation in the rescue of
endangered Jewish com-
munities."
CONGRATULATIONS TO
Barbara Stein
SHE has been elected to
WHO'S WHO IN AMERICA.
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and love you
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Onion Bagels.............6 99*
Prices Effective
January 3rd thru 9th. 1985
,\.


.uuiiiA i11'iuay, jjucuuioer /, i w*
fage 4 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, January 4,1985
Shlomo Hillel
w
What Being New Speaker Means to Him
By SIMON GRIVER
In being elected Speaker of the
eleventh Knesset Shlomo Hillel
presides over a parliament that
embodies the realization of
Jewish aspirations for self-
determination through demo-
cratic principles. This crucial
position crowns a career that
encompasses a lifelong dedication
to the well-being of his people.
Iraqi-born Hillel is a seasoned
parliamentarian who among
numerous other things has
served in Israel's cabinet on two
occasions, developed Israel's ties
with several African nations as a
foreign office diplomat, and
supervised the exodus of tens of
thousands of persecuted Jews
from their native Arab lands.
The role of Speaker is modelled
on that of the British House of
Commons, though most demo-
cratically elected chambers, as in
America's Congress, have
speakers who act as chairpeople.
One significant difference, how-
ever, is that in the absence of the
president of Israel, the Knesset
speaker becomes acting presi-
dent.
THE KNESSET Speaker also
determines the agenda for
debates, though in effect he bows
to the government's wishes.
More crucially, however, during
debates the Speaker's gavel
decides what can and cannot be
said. If a member persistently
interrupts debates or does not
accede to the Speaker's demands
to cease a speech, the Speaker
may even call upon the Knesset
ushers to eject a member from
the hall. In Israel's parliament,
where unruly behavior and melo-
dramatic gestures are not un-
common, the ushers are regret-
tably called into action all too
often.
And as Hillel hinted in his ac-
ceptance speech, it is to be anti-
cipated that there may be those
in the current Knesset who will
attempt to ignore politeness and
protocol: "It is one of my duties
to protect the Knesset from as-
saults upon democracy," he
asserted, "including assaults
from within the Knesset itself."
This reference was clearly dir-
ected at Rabbi Meir Kahane, the
leader of the extreme right wing
racist Kach Party who is newly
elected to the Knesset and has
expressed the sentiment that
democracy in Israel is dis-
pensable.
A further theme of Hfllel's ac-
ceptance speech was Arab-Jewish
co-existence within Israel, and
this was no doubt a response to
Kahane's intention of presenting
a bill to the Knesset proposing
the expulsion of all Israel's
Arabs. Hillel invoked the Bible's
injunction to protect and respect
minorities, and recalled that full
civil rights for all Israelis, Arabs
and Jews alike, was central to the
country's Proclamation of Inde-
pendence in 1948.
Names in News
Peres at Hadassah Donors' Fete
Prime Minister Shimon Peres,
speaking at a briefing for
members of Hadassah's Golden
Wreath Society of Major Donors
in Jerusalem, cited lasting peace
between Israel and her neighbors
and the nation's economic
recovery as his government's top
priorities for the coming year.
The briefing took place during a
mission of the Society led by
Ruth Popkin, Hadassah national
president.
The Prime Minister said that
he had invited President Hooni
Mubarak of Egypt to meet with
him on Israel's border with
Egypt to discuss "warming up"
relations between the two
countries.
According to Peres, Mubarak
had responded positively to his
invitation and agreed to send a
top envoy to Jerusalem for preli-
minary talks with him and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir.
I. L. Kenen, one of American
Jewry's prominent personalities.
is being honored by having a
forest of the Jewish National
Fund in Israel dedicated in his
name.
The I. L. Kenen Forest will be
located in American Indepen-
dence Park, "flagship" of the
major recreational nature
reserves being developed
throughout Israel by JNF. Just
outside Jerusalem, the park is the
site of other forests already dedi-
cated to prominent American
friends of Israel.
Kenen, 79, helped establish
AIPAC, the only pro-Israel orga-
nization registered to lobby Con-
gress on behalf of close U.S.-
Israeli relations. He served as
AIPAC's founding executive
director from 1952 to 1972, and is
the organization's honorary
chairman.
Paul Cowan, author of "An
Orphan in History" and a staff-
writer for the Village Voice, will
be a featured speaker at the
Jewish Student Press Service's
National Editors Conference
from Dec. 23-25 at the American
Jewish Congress in New York
City.
In addition to Cowan, rabbis
Avraham Weiss and Walter
Wurzburger, leaders of the
Orthodox Jewish community,
will debate on the subject of the
Jewish "underground" in Israel.
William Gray Hi, vice chairman
of the Congressional Black
Caucus, will be among the
panelists in a discussion of Black-
Jewish relations.
Pledging to seek "innovative
responses to the pressing
problems of our era," Selma
Weintraub of Hartsdale, N.Y.,
was installed this week for her
second two-year term as national
president of Women's League for
Conservative Judaism. Mrs.
Weintraub placed high on
Women's League agenda for the
next two years battered women,
the terminally ill, alcoholism,
Jewish singles, and day care cen-
ters.
"We have recently been ex-
posed to a most unpleasant
Jewish dimension domestic
violence," she told 2,000 dele-
gates at the organization's na-
tional biennial convention in
Kiamasha Lake, N.Y. "There
may have been as many as
100,000 cases reported annually
in the United States, with the
vast majority unreported," she
said. "In earlier times, this
problem was rare for Jews."
The American Jewish Commit-
tee has called upon the South
African Government "to take the
necessary steps, starting with the
immediate release of trade union
leaders, to end finally the gross
violation of human rights
inherent in apartheid."
AJC President Howard I.
Friedman said it was "heart-
ening" to note "the major escala-
tion of public calls for such elimi-
nation of aprtheid" and to find
"bi-partisan support and par-
ticipation" in recent declarations.
"There are understandable dif-
ferences over some proposals that
have been made to encourage
changes in South African
policies," Friedman declared.
"But there can be no differences
among advocates of basic human
rights on the need for all people of
conscience to speak out on the
moral issue involved."
Rabbi Feivel Wagner, spiritual
leader of the Young Israel of
Forest Hills, N.Y., has been
selected to chair the program of
the second annual midwinter
Torah Retreat of the National
Council of Young Israel in Feb-
ruary.
WHILE HILLEL is polite,
gentle and diffident in manner
(he seemed extremely embar-
rassed by the excited congratula-
tions he received from his col-
leagues after being elected
Speaker), he is not a man to sit
quietly when his indignation is
roused. No leniency can be ex-
pected from him towards Kahane
or any other Knesset member
who attempts to disrupt or
threaten Israeli democracy, for
Hillel vigorously supports issues
he feels strongly about. Born in
Baghdad, Iraq in 1923, Hillel
came to Israel in 1930 and settled
with his family in Tel Aviv. After
graduating from the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem in econ-
omics and political science, he
moved to Kibbutz Ma'agan
Michael near Haifa where he
remained till 1958.
During the early fifties Hillel
supervised the mass exodus of
Jews from his native Iraq and be-
came deeply involved in helping
persecuted Jews in Arab lands.
Hillel also championed the cause
of Oriental Jews who had already
settled in Israel.
Entering the Knesset in 1952,
and as one of the few Oriental
Jews in the Mapai (the fore-
runner of the Labor Party)
hierarchy, Hillel became an out-
spoken critic of government
policy when he felt the hundreds
of thousands of Jewish im-
migrants who were then pouring
into Israel from Arab lands were
being given a raw deal. In parti-
cular he had a strained relation-
ship with Golda Meir, who was
then minister of Housing.
IN 1959 Hillel was dispatched
overseas to become ambassador
to Guinea and he also served as
ambassador to the Ivory Coast,
Upper Volta, Nigeria and
Dahomey. On his return to Israel
in 1963 he became director of the
Foreign Ministry's African
Department. During this period
Hillel developed an intimate
rapport with many African
leaders. His former adversary
Golda Meir was so impressed by
the manner in which he advanced
Israel's ties with Africa, that
when she became prime minister
she insisted on having Hillel in
her cabinet.
MK Speaker Hillel
Consequently, in 1969 l
came minister of Pq&J
retained this post until
electoral defeat in 1977"
during this period also sera
minister of Interior for i
caretaker spell.
In opposition Hillel
many of his Labor coUaumJ
voting against the Camp D,
Peace Treaty with Egypt!
argued that while he did,
agree with the Likud's cone*
a Greater Israel, he felt thd
proposed autonomy for ]
administered territories, and]
complete withdrawal from
Sinai, would compromise Is
security. After the 1981
Hillel stood as Labor's t
for Speaker but was _
defeated by 61 votes to 56...
ever, this time around he L
comfortably 60 votes to .]
HILLEL SUCCEEDS i,
line of esteemed
Speakers. The first
Yosef Sprinzak, chaired
Knesset from its founding to I
death in 1959. His
deliberated decisions
the written rules and uni
conventions of today's
Kaddish Luz, who was
from 1959 to 1969, set the 1
of moderation and
that subsequent Speakers
adhered to. In recent
Yitzhak Shamir, Yitzhak I
and Menachem Savidor hivel
the Speaker's gavel. Hillel ill
to be modest and unobtruim|
his role as Speaker, but
certainly not hesitate to _
whatever steps are required |
defend democracy in Israel.
Tdc
Jewish Floridian
of South County ^,*s>ot*.f
FREDSHOCMET SUZANNE SHOCHET MARTY ERANN
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor News Coordinator
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H&& Me jO5 Atvoti'
Friday, January 4,1985
Volume 7
11TEVETH5745
Number 1
ere
OCr*eArirJ LateA^OrJ.

_MT Mim syoja


Friday, January 4,1985 /The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 6
rederation/UJA Campaign f85 Update
Young Leaders' Mission
Is A 'Bridge'.. And More
The Young Leadership Mission
to Israel, slated for Feb. 24 to
March 5, goes under the name
"Gesher" meaning bridge. The
reference is to the bridge created
between young leaders taking
part, and their counterparts in
Israel.
From past experience, it is
evident that a UJA mission like
Gesher is not only a better way
of touring Israel (because of the
Ispeaai onetings, visits and
I programs arranged with UJA
participants in mind), but also a
key instrument in developing the
potential of young leaders for
greater involvement in their local
community. Many of the Feder-
ation's young leaders in South
County have said that their
participation in such a mission
was the catalyst in preparing
them to take on greater
challenges in community ac-
tivity.
Among the highlights of the
mission's itinerary are meetings
with young members of the
Knesset, visits to Israel Defense
Force bases, and a fact-finding
tour of Judaea and Samaria and
the northern border, as well as
seeing Project Renewal's ac-
complishments and the operation
of immigrant absorption
facilities. For more information
on this mission, as well as details
on the optional pre-mission visit
to Poland (Warsaw and Krakow),
please call Dr. Robert Fishman at
368-2737.
New Leaders Boost
Bo co Lago Drive
(Left to right) Frank White, Joseph Katz, Gilbert Freeman, Joseph
Bowman, William Isenstein, Marianne Bobick, Arthur Jaffe, Maurice
Schiller. Present but not in picture, William Doninger.
New things are hap-
Ipening in the Boca Lago men's
Division Campaign this year.
And a new leadership is emerging
Ito help make the campaign's
impact in Boca Lago.
A new chair, Saul White, was
[appointed last week by Larry S.
Charme, M.D., chair of the Men's
Division. He will be joined by
three co-chairs, Dr. Vic Perlow,
Ezra Mermelstein and Sandy
Milter. Their kickoff for the cam-
paign will be a breakfast on
Friday, Jan. 11 at 9 a.m., at the
Boca Lago Clubhouse. Harvey
Grossman, the Federation's cam-
paign director, will be guest
speaker there will be no
solicitation and no couvert.
The eight pods' chairs and co-
chairs, along with Arnold
Rosenthal who chaired the cam-
paign for the past five years,
have asked their neighbors in all
of Boca Lago to participate in
this event, at which a confidential
report and update on Israeli and
international Jewish develop-
ments will be given.
Kings Point Gears Up
For Double-Chai Drive
The East and West areas of
I Kings Point, in the newly -
I decentralized structure, held
separate meetings recently at the
homes of respective chairs Joe
Master and Sol Lapidus to
I discuss how to reach every resi-
Ident of Kings Point in the for-
thcoming Federation-UJA cam-
paign.
Working with Joe Master are
David Kaplan and Martha
iWeiner for Burgundy; Eli
-

Abrams for Capri; Jerry Ballet,
Max Brandeis and Ruby
Horowitz for Flanders; Julie
Kohel for Isle of Capri; Sam
Eckstein, Fay Glatt, George
Gold and Herman Wald for Nor-
mandy; Eddie Abrams and
Barney Dub in for Piedmont.
The West division area chairs
working with Sol Lapidus are Sid
Polet'rk, Abe Black and Elsie
Schwartz for Brittany; Sam
Goldberg and Arthur Lucker for
. .
Monaco; Phil Plotkin and Henry
Merrin for Saxony; Sid Wirth
and Carolyn Moritz for Seville;
Murray Lowenbrau for Valencia;
and Harry Wilson for Waterford.
Lapidus himself will head the
drive in his area of Tuscany.
The campaign in Kings Point
will last for 36 days and will call
on everyone to pledge at least
"double chai" (twice 18, or $36),
honoring Israel's 36th anniver-
sary.
Israel Silent on Hussein Communique
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
r- The government has re-
pined from any official
reaction to the joint
pommunique by King Hus-
pein of Jordan and Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak of
Pjgypt which many offi-
pls said privately was
^tantamount to an Egyptian
repudiation of the Camp
David accords.
1 Senior officials here cited
[mixed and contradictory
P'gnals from Cairo to explain
P* government's deliberate
Ficence. It was evident when,
P*J to expectations, Deputy
jmrnier and Foreign Minister
LJ" Shamir avoided any
E*3? th Joint commu-
srsetreignpoUcy8peechto
I THE COMMUNIQUE re-
r888** simultaneously in Cairo
and Amman, followed a scathing
attack on the Camp David agree-
ments by Hussein in his address
to the Egyptian Parliament two
weeks ago. Officials here noted,
however, that Egypt's Premier
Kemal Hassan Ali said this week
that the communique was not a
deviation from Camp David but
rather an elucidation of Egypt's
interpretation of the Camp David
accords.
Hussein and Mubarak called
for, among other things, an inter-
national peace conference on the
Middle East under United
Nations auspices, based on Secu-
rity Council Resolution 242.
Israel maintains such a confer-
ence would be contrary to the
Camp David formula which
requires direct negotiations
between Israel and the Arab
states.
Another mitigating factor
noted by Israeli officials was the
weekend interview of Egyptian
Minister of State Butros Ghali in
MARK YOUR CALENDAR
FOR
AN ENCHANTED EVENING
SATURDAY FEB. 9,1986
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION'S
6TH ANNUAL DINNER DANCE
the Jewish Chronicle of London.
Ghali proposed four-party talks
among Israel, Egypt, Jordan and
the Palestinians, a pattern close
to that envisaged by Camp
David.
ON THE other hand, there
have been hardline statements
from Mubarak's top political
aide, Osama El-Baz which have
heightened concern in Jerusalem.
Shamir's decision not to com-
ment on the joint communique
does not mean he intends to
ignore it, his senior aides said.
3 PeopleWounded In
Grenade Attack
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
hand grenade tossed at a bus
near a vegetable market sent
three people to the hospital for
treatment of slight wounds and
shock. Police cordoned off the
area in central Tel Aviv to search
for the assailants.
The bus was waiting at a stop
on Hashmonayim Street outside
the wholesale vegetable market
when a grenade was hurled over
the wall that surrounds the
market. Eyewitnesses said they
saw several men running from
the scene. All of the bus windows
were shattered, littering a wide
area with broken glass.
Seated (left to right): Ruth White, Elaine Friedman, Bernice Lebbin.
Standing: Sylvia Elstein, Joan Gottsegen, Kelly Freeman, Rabbi
Joseph Pollack, Marianne Bobick, Anita Shalley.
Mini ^Missions Tour
South County
Marianne Bobick, president of
the South County Jewish Feder-
ation, recently escorted two
"mini-missions" tours of the
Federation and its community
agencies. One was for a group of
men, the first in a series of such
men's missions organized by
Joseph Woolman, chair of the
mini-missions from Del-Aire; the
other for a group of women from
Del-Aire.
The tour included visits to the
Jewish Community Day School,
the Federation offices and the
Adolph and Rose Levis Jewish
Community Center at the James
and Marjorie Baer Jewish
Campus, and a description of the
various social and community
services provided by the Feder-
ation. A highlight was lunch and
a musical program at the Kosher
Konnection in Delray.
Mini-missions take place
periodically, to provide members
of the Federation with a first-
hand look at the agencies and
services funded by the Feder-
ation.
Correction
Women's Division
Country Club Luncheon
The article on the Del-
Aires Women's Division on
December 21, saying the
campaign will culminate in a
luncheon at the Breakers
Hotel, may have given the
wrong impression. The
luncheon will include many
Country Club areas, not just
Del-Aire: other areas in-
cluded in the luncheon will be
Hamlet, St. Andrews, Boca
Greens, Boca Grove, Boca
Pointe, Bocaire, Boca West,
Boca Lago and Estancia. We
apologize if any misunder-
standing was caused.
The Hamlet Del Aire
Indian Springs Boca Teeca
Hunters' Run Boca Point
Boca West Boca Lago
Super Priced Homes & Condos Available
in these Golf Course Communities.
Gimelstob Realty, Inc.
Licensed Real Estate Brokers
Corner Powerline and Palmetto Park Road
Boca Raton, Florida
392-2822


/, iy4
Page 6 The Jewish Floridian of South County / Friday, January 4,1986
Does Green Party Parallel Pre-Hitler Politics?
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) -
Frequent allegations of a
resemblance between the
Green Party, which has
won 10 percent of the po-
pular vote in recent na-
tional and regional elec-
tions, and the rise of the
Nazi Party in the Weimar
Republic more than a half
century ago has irritated
leftwing Jewish intellec-
tuals who share the eco-
logical and pacifist philo-
sophy of the Greens.
Nevertheless, the parallels are
disturbing to many Germans,
Jews and non-Jews, because the
Greens manifest certain nation-
alistic tendencies and are dis-
tinctly unfriendly toward Israel.
UNTIL RECENTLY, compa-
risons were drawn by political
opponents of the Green Party,
notably the ruling Christian
Democratic Union (CDU) and its
Bavarian counterpart, the
Christian Social Union (CSU),
both conservative. But at the
Green Party's last convention,
the Nazi analogy was expressed
from within its ranks.
It came from Rudolf Bahro, an
ideological father figure of the
Greens who complained that the
party's rise in recent years was
similar to that of the Nazis. His
remarks triggered shouts of
protest, and Bahro undoubtedly
forfeited much of the high regard
b_ enjoyed among the Greens.
But clearly, his outspoken crit-
icism set a precedent which
cannot be ignored.
There have since been other
voices raised in the party for a
frank discussion of its ideologic-
ally nationalistic tendencies and
of its organizational structures
which bear an unpleasant kinship
to those of the Nazis.
THE FIRST evidence of a
hostile attitude toward Jews
emerged in 1981 when some
branches of the party circulated a
calendar containing anti-Semitic
propaganda. When the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency questioned
this at the time, party officials
initially tried to brush it aside.
But when evidence of the anti-
Semitic nature of the calendar
was produced, the same officials
repudiated the behavior of the
branches concerned. They main-
tained they could not be held
responsible for every incident
that occurred in the party which
was then new and growing at a
rapid pace.
During the war in Lebanon in
1982, the Greens issued a strong
anti-Jewish statement. They
urged the Bonn government to
withdraw reparations money
from Jewish Holocaust victims
and make it available instead to
the Palestinian and Lebanese
victims of what they called a
Jewish-made "holocaust."
AFTER THEIR election to the
Bundestag for the first time in
March, 1983, the Greens ad-
mitted that several top party
officials, including a member of
the Bundestag, had Nazi records.
Two of the officials were dis-
missed, but the others retained
their positions in the party.
In the summer of 1984, a dele-
gation of the Green Party visited
Israel to express support for the
Progressive List For Peace, a
coalition of Jewish leftists and
Israeli Arab nationalists stand-
ing for election to the Knesset on
a platform which called for the
creation of a Palestinian state.
When the German-Israel Asso-
ciation met for its annual con-
ference in Bonn last month, the
Greens were the only party in the
Bundestag that did not send a
representative, although they
were invited. Concern over the
Green Party's nationalistic
tendencies arises partly from
Many Fear the Parallel, But 'Reformer'
Otto Schily Hopes Otherwise
Tough, Passionate Tug-of-War
By WOLFGANG WEBER
HAMBURG (DaD) The
national congress of the Greens political
party in Hamburg always promised to be
a tough and passionate tug-of-war. The
burning issue was whether they should
enter alliances with the Social Democrats
or continue with their politics of op-
posing.
The Greens are now the fourth party in the
Federal Republic, and in some areas even the
third party, following many election successes in
the States, at local government level, and after
the general election in 1983. The question is:
should they consider cooperation with other
parties as a way of sharing power?
EVENTUALLY AFTER hours of tough
discussion, the delegates reached a compromise
formula. The principle of alliances is not ruled
out, but a decision about forming alliances as a
policy has been deferred until 1986.
There was a clear majority in favor of a paper
which leaves decisions over coalitions and power-
sharing to the States and municipalities that
might be affected. That in fact is what has been
happening up to now. Since the last municipal
elections in North Rhine-Westphalia, there have
been alliances with the Social Democrats in some
areas. A Green has even become a deputy mayor.
There has even been an attempt at State level
to cooperate, in Hesse. But it broke up only
recently because of a dispute over giving per-
mission to build a nuclear enrichment plant. It
was this disagreement and the subsequent
collapse of the alliance that heated the at-
mosphere at the congress.
The contest was between two groups the
'reformers" and the "fundamentalists." The
former, who include members of the Bundestag
Otto Schily and Joseph Fischer, favor in certain
circumstances cooperation with the Social
Democrats. The fundamentalists, who are equally
strong, demand that the party maintain its policy
of opposition, the sort of policy out of which
sprang the peace and protest movements.
WALTRAUD SCHOPPE, who is
spokesperson for the Greens in the Bundestag
says that with the compromise, all options remain
open: coalition, toleration of a Social Democrat-
ted government such as in the case of Hesse until
recently, or opposition.
So the Greens have shunted their internal
dissent to one side and have given themselves
breathing space to consider the next moves.
However, the ruling parties in Bonn see things
J??!?^1 ^nUy- % Chriatin Den*>crat.
li.DU) say the Greens are just as muddled as thev
ever were. And the Free Democrats (FDP) sayi
split in the Greens is possible.
Greens shunt differences aside and
take breather to consider future.
their anti-Western and anti-
American slogans which some.
times resemble the slogans of
neo-Nazi groups.
MANY GREENS regard
American troops in West Ger-
many as an occupying fore*
which makes it impossible for
Germany to express its own spe-
cific national interests. The U S
is largely linked by them to a
"Jewish lobby" and its "aggres-
sive" client, Israel.
The natural sympathies of
most Greens lie with the Third
World countries and the "libera-
tion movements." The Palestine
Liberation Organization is consi-
dered a liberation movement;
Zionism is regarded as an oppr
sive tool of Western imperialism,
especially of American interests.
While the Greens do not ques-
tion Israel's legitimacy as a
nation, they give the clear im-
pression that to achieve an
understanding with the Araba
the Israelis must give up even
more than just the occupied Arab
territories.
THE TYPICAL Green atti-
tude is that justice must be done
to the Palestinian refugees who
left the territory of Israel in 1948.
They are unaware of, or ignore,
the fate of Jewish refugees who
formerly lived in Arab countries.
According to party spokesman
Heinz Suhr, the Greens have not
had time to debate the Arab-
Israeli conflict in any detail. He
said such a debate was highly
desirable and would definitely
take place sometime in the
future. Suhr sharply denied that
the Greens have anti-Jewish or
anti-Israel attitudes.
Nevertheless, earlier this
month a so-called "strategic
paper" circulated among the
leaders of the Green Party de-
nounced Israel as "fascist and
terrorist" and referred to "terror-
ist policies" of Israel in south
Lebanon which allegedly include
random arrests and frequent
tortures in specially designated
concentration camps.
THIS SECRET document,
which was apparently leaked to
the press, has triggered a sharp
reaction by the Israeli ambas-
sador, Yitzhak Ben An, and has
touched off an internal debate
between the "hardliners" and
"moderates" within the party. A
party spokesman insisted that
the document was a "mere
suggestion" that was never ap-
proved. But the party has not
denied that all members of its
leading body had seen the "stra
tegic paper" and had failed to
react.
Juergen Reents, a Green Party
member of the Bundestag who is
heading a party delegation to
four Middle East countries, said
in a telephone interview that he
did not see any reason to repu
diate the authors of the document
since the party did not officially
accept it.
THE PRESENT trip to the
Mideast by the party's delega-
tion, which is composed ot
hardline radical elements,
sign that this faction is no'
pleased by the earlier tnp
Israel last July by the more
moderate faction. The earwr
delegation was headed by Otw
Schily, a Bundestag member
who has won a reputation
pragmatist and a realist.
While Schily has sharply criti-
cized Israeli policies he has also
gone out of his way to denounce
anti-Semitic manifestations in W
party. According to him, toe
Green Party is still organ"*
tionally fluid and has not yet tor-
mally and sharply identified V
political position on a number o
issues, including the Mjde**.
and that some who idenW
themselves as Greens M*
gravely damaged the reputation
of the party.



In Israel's Colleges.. And Local Friends
Watch Syria, Fight Terror, Strategy Expert Says
Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 7t
I Israel's only concrete, imme-
ite threat to its military eecur-
at present is posed by Syria
h and Israel must guard against
rDreemptive strike in an attempt
j recapture the Golan Heights.
This is the expert opinion of
beneral (Res.) Aharon Yariv, a
brmer chief of Israeli Intel-
ence, who is now head of the
> Center for Strategic Studies
Tel Aviv University. Israel's
st hope for peace lies in main-
pining a favorable military
alance against her Arab neigh
Soviet Union. In addition, Syrian
forces are in a constant state of
battle-readiness, while Israeli
troops would have to be mobil-
ized in the event of an outbreak.
The other continuing threat to
Israel's security, which the Jaffe
Center deals with as one of its
major topics, is that of terrorism,
which Israel began to combat
effectively in 1965. It was terror-
ism which enabled Yasser Arafat,
head of the PLO, to achieve so
much in the world arena, up to
and including his appearance at
and isolating Syria from the the UN General Assembly with a
[ther Arab states, he added.
Yariv was in Boca Raton
_ntly to inaugurate a series of
ctures for the American Friends
: Tel Aviv University Seminar
Associates.
i While Israel and Syria are
irly on a par in military terms,
ording to Yariv, Israel's
ualitative superiority is being
oded by the infusion of large
luantities of sophisticated
apons into Syria from the
pistol holster on his hip.
But today Arafat portrays the
spectacle of a "stripped hero,"
Yariv said. This is one of the
things achieved by the invasion
of Lebanon the PLO lost its
only independent base of opera-
tions, where they practically had
a "mini-state." The PLO had ac-
tually prepared in South Lebanon
for a military option, and referred
to Beirut as "our Saigon."
There are many things con-
!GUEthics In Medicine
The first International Con
ess on Ethics in Medicine wil
> held at Ben-Gurion University
the Negev in Beersheba,
riarch 10-13.
Jointly sponsored by the uni-
ersity and the Beth Israel
[dedical Center of New York, the
ongress will examine the thorny
psuc of the ethical implications
f breakthroughs in creating and
ustaining life, which are cur-
pntly much debated.
Among speakers and leaders of
congress will be Morris B.
kbrams, former chair of the Pre-
ndent's Commission for Study of
Ethical Problems in Medicine;
thief Rabbi Sir Immanuel
lakobovits of Great Britain;
ceraing the battle against terror-
ism which cannot be made public,
Yariv said. Even the public in
Israel is unaware of perhaps as
much as 96 percent of what has
taken place. And there have been
some failures, including a few
serious ones. But apart from the
classified work, "including plenty
of cloak-and-dagger activity
which goes even further than
what is described in fiction
books," one of the major bul-
warks against terrorist success is
the constant awareness and
commitment which the entire
nation in Israel possesses. Thus,
simple safety measures, often ne-
glected in other countries where
terrorism is not seen as an imme-
diate, defined threat, help to stop
the terrorists.
For example, there is the story
of the two terrorists who began
shooting indiscriminately in
downtown Jerusalem several
months ago, killing one person
and wounding numerous others.
The two had infiltrated from
southern Lebanon, posing as
Druze, and received their
weapons from contacts inside
Israel. Their assignment was to
get into the Ministry of Tourism
office and take it over, holding
hostages for the release of a large
number of terrorist prisoners.
However, when they walked up
to the ministry office they found
that armed guards were routinely
examining everyone who entered,
so they could not go through with
their plan. Being the fanatics
they were, they chose the suicidal
alternative of shooting anyone
they could on the street. (One of
them was shot and killed by a
passing reservist; the other fled
and was caught by civilians who
chased him.)
General Yariv, who spent 28
years in military service, became
minister of information for a
short stint when Yitzhak Rabin
was prime minister. His aware-
ness of Israel's special needs in
the information field in the face of
well-funded Arab propaganda is
keen; however, as he told The
Floridian, in Israel every minister
has to have his own ministry of
information it is impossible to
coordinate it all in one govern-
ment office. He therefore chose to
resign and help establish the
center for strategic studies, the
only independent center and
think-tank of its kind in Israel,
which performs its work on an
academic and contractual basis.
Willard Gaylin, M.D., president
of the Hastings Center; and
Joseph A. Califano, Jr., former
U.S. Secretary of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare; and other
leading professors of medicine,
research, sociology and law.
The congress, co-chaired by
Dr. Elliot Leiter, urology chief
at Beth Israel, and Dr. Lech aim
Naggan, dean ot neaitn sciences
at Ben-Gurion University, will
bring together doctors involved
in the state of the art for organ
replacement, life support systems
and embryo transfers along with
experts examining their legal and
ethical implications, to "start an
ongoing dialogue," as Dr. Leiter
put it.
echnion Film Wins Award
I "Future Tech from
jechnion," a documentary film
Justrating the contribution of
he Technion and its graduates to
pad's science-based industries,
[on a bronze medal in the 1984
ptemational Film and TV
festival of New York.
The 15-minute color film was
duced by Yale Roe. TRC
auctions International, for
m Technions 60th anniversary
pebration. It features Theodore
JiKel as narrator and demon-
ptes the impact of the
fechmon and its graduates on
r. success of high-technology
Nustnes in Israel. The viewer
ws behind the scenes of Israel's
"gest science-based industries
pre Technion graduates are
^rgmg innovations in the areas
.robotics, electronics, agri-
uiture, aeronautics and medical
p rumen tation.
[The 16mm film is available for
pemng free 0f charge through aU
nrn Technion Society
regional offices and the national
ATS oifire in New York.
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UU1IIV 1 11UU> .
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Pae8 The Jewish Floridian of South County /Friday, January 4, 1986
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
A Rabbi Comments
An hour-long documentary
featured on Leningrad television
in November advanced the
strong Soviet line equating
refuseniks with anti-Soviet
behavior, alleging they are
coerced by American and Israeli
Zionists to continue their
emigration activities. The film,
entitled "Hirelings and
Accomplices," claimed that
American Jews with "no desire to
emigrate to Israel have per-
suaded Soviet Jews to pursue
settling there," and warned that
"these Soviet Jews will then be
used as cannon fodder against
the Arabs." Several leading Jew-
ish activists from Moscow and
Leningrad, including LEV
SHAPIRO, YAKOV
GORODETSKY, IOSIF
RADOMYSLSKY and ABA
TARATUTA, were identified as
"Zionists who are nurtured by
gifts they receive from the
West." Taratuta in particular,
the report claimed, "receives an
unlimited amount of gifts." All,
it was alleged, "refuse to do
productive work, preferring to do
manual jobs and live on gifts."
The broadcast concluded that life
in Israel is terrible, interspersing
footage of demonstrations by
Jews and Arabs, and warning the
Soviet people and "progressive
elements of society" to beware of
the dangers of Zionism.
Only 55 Jews were granted exit
visas from the Soviet Union
during November, showing a
slight increase from the October
low of 29. Included in the figure
are 12 Muscovite Jews, marking
the first time in over seven
months that Jews from the
\ Soviet capital were permitted to
emigrate. Only 805 Jews have
emigrated since January 1984,
indicating an annual figure of less
than 1,000.
The penetration of anti-
Semitism throughout Soviet
society is evident in a report from
an Odessa elementary school. A
second-grade class preparing
essay assignments was told that
compositions could be written in
any language except that of "the
Zhids," a term used by Czarist
pogrom organizers.
Meanwhile, in a press con-
ference at the Soviet Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, Anti-Zionist
Committee Chairman David
Dragunsky reiterated
propagandist claims that
Zionists and Nazis collaborated
during World War II. He alluded
to a "deal between the Zionists
and Hitler" and blamed them for
"launching the war and the
policy of genocide." Ignoring the
destruction of six million Jews,
and the arrest of known Zionists
by the Nazis and Stalin's regime,
Dragunsky charged that the
motivation for the alleged
collaboration was the "removal of
capital belonging to the big Jew-
ish bourgeoisie from Germany to
Palestine."
Public opinion and action on
his behalf in the West may have
influenced the "improved treat-
ment" of ZAKHAR
ZUNSHAIN, according to his
wife, TATYANA. In a conversa-
tion witt her, the director of the
labor camp where Zakhar is held
demanded that the activity be
stopped, to which Tatyana
replied it will continue "as long
as Zakhar is imprisoned." ... In
a meeting at the labor camp's
health department, INNA
BEGUN received reports that
her husband IOSIF, was
examined by the camp doctor and
found to be in "satisfactory"
condition. However, the clerk
denounced Iosif's "lack of
discipline" and "refusal to
work," saying they had resulted
in his punishment. Inna has since
sent a letter to the Supreme
Soviet demanding an end to
further action against Iosif, and
the ongoing denial of his right to
see his family.
Describing themselves as "old-
time refuseniks and those still
unable to apply for emigration
because of artificially-created
bureaucratic obstacles," nearly
300 Soviet Jews have refuted
Soviet claims that "all Jews
wishing to leave the USSR for Is-
rael have realized their wish." In
an open letter to Soviet President
Konstantin Chernenko, they
noted "our signatures are
evidence of the fact that the
problem of repatriation of Jews
from the USSR to Israel exists
and is a very acute problem." The
signatories, Jews from Moscow,
Leningrad, Odessa and Kiev,
confirmed their "strong intention
to leave for national, family,
religious and other reasons."
LEVINE, SCHWARTZ, GOLD AND COHEN, P.A.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Curtis G. Levine
Paula S. Gold
PERSONAL INJURY & WRONGFUL DEATH
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The following is brought to our
readers by the South County
Rabbinical Association. If there
are topics you would like our
Rabbis to discuss, please submit
them to The Floridian.
Webster's dictionary defines
"trivia" as "trifles; unimportant
matters." It would, therefore,
seem that millions of people are
currently interested in "unim-
portant matters" judging by the
sales of the various games on the
market. Pursuit of this trivia
does, however, provide hours and
hours of entertainment for these
people.
Does it really matter whether
you know the name of Roy
Roger's horse or who played what
part in which movie? Taking
advantage of this current craze
("this too shall pass"), I would
like to present herewith what I
call "non-trivia."
1. From a purely mathematical
point of view, why was the world
created in six days?
2. Why is the second day of
creation called by some "Blue
Monday?"
3. Why is the third day
(Tuesday) considered lucky?
4. Who was the first person
permitted to eat meat?
5. Did Abraham know his
grandchildren?
6. In which college was
Hebrew a required language in
the 18th Century?
7. Which non-Jewish
university has the name of God in
its seal?
Rabbi Joseph Noble
8. Which non-Jewish univer-
sity has Hebrew in its seal? (hint
the two words are those worn by
the High Priest on his breast-
plate.)
9. Who was Eliezer Perelman?
10. Name a book of the Bible
that does not contain the name of
God.
Can you identify these expres-
sions?
11. A drop in the bucket.
12. A still small voice.
13. There is nothing new under
the sun.
14. The apple of his eye.
15. God will provide.
16. I have escaped with the
skin of my teeth.
17. A living dog is better than
a dead lion.
18. A man after his own heart.
Finance Ministry Working on
Postfreeze Plan to Prevent
Resurgence of Inflation in 1985
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A committee of senior
Finance Ministry officials
and academicians is
working on plans to fore-
stall a feared resurgence of
hyper-inflation when the
present wage-price freeze
package expires in
January. Experts predicted
that February would be the
critical month for the eco-
nomy.
They say it will be known by
then whether the freeze put a
permanent brake on inflation or
whether it will burst out anew
once the wage price restraints are
lifted. The team preparing for the
post-freeze period consists of the
director general of the Finance
Ministry, Emanuel Sharon;
Deputy Finance Minister Adi
Amorai; and two economists,
Profs. Michael Bruno and Eitan
Berglass.
FINANCE MINISTER Yit-
zhak Modai maintains that a new
round of inflation after the freeze
is not inevitable. He said that
much depends on the behavior of
the public and predicted a
gradual but significant slowdown
in the inflation rate between now
and January.
According to Modai, the price
index for October, before the
freeze took effect, wil be very
high. The November index will
show an 18-21 percent inflation
rate, the December index bet-
ween 10-12 percent and the
January index between 7-9
percent, the first break in the
double-digit phenomenon.
Avraham Shapira of the
Aguda Israel Party, chairman of
the Knesset Finance Committee,
has called for draconian measures
to restore economic health. He
urged the government to declare
a two-year emergency during
which all strikes would be banned
in the vital services sectors and
any minister who refuses to
accept budget cuts would be
replaced.
19. Am I my brothers keep*
20 Love your neighbor as vo*
equal. *"*
R-bbiJoaepaS.Nokt,
DebayBa
Answer to Non-Trivia
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Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 9,
_ v4dolph and Rose Levis JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
^^flr^i^r an agency of the South County Jewish Federation
X5
/Jafpe*U*u^
The season is here and the
Adolph and Rose Levis Jewish
Community Center's Winter-
Spring 1985 catalog of activities
has arrived. (Hopefully, you
saved last week's pull-out section
from "The Floridian.")
From Toddlers (12-36 months)
to Prime Tuners (55 years plus),
the Center offers a wide array of
programs designed to enhance
positive Jewish expression,
personal fulfillment and life.
Tennis, basketball, toddler's
Shabbat Fun Shop, Yiddish,
ceramics, belly dancing, Hebrew
Ulpan, yoga, bowling The list
goes on and on. So many dif-
ferent programs to choose from,
for all ages.
The center, located on the
James and Marjorie Baer Jewish
Campus at 336 NW Spanish
River Blvd., in Boca Raton, is the
newest agency of the South Palm
Beach County Jewish Federa-
tion. Through committed and
dedicated volunteers and staff,
the center is able to offer
programs designed to meet the
many needs of its membership
and the South County Jewish
community.
Membership is available for
anyone at any time of the year.
The fees for membership are as
follows:
$120 Family (includes
dependent children under 21
years)
$96 Young Family (Head of
Household under 30 years)
$60 Individual Adult
$36 Full Time College Stu-
dent
As a member you would be en-
titled to free use of the recrea-
tional facilities (junior Olympic
size swimming pool, tennis
courts, basketball courts) and
reduced registration fees for most
Jtt programs.
Registration is now underway
[or the new program offerings for
Winter-Spring 1985. The Adolph
and Rose Levis Jewish Commu-
mty Center invites you to come
to visit the facilities and talk to
the staff and-or volunteers about
its programs and purpose.
The center is generally open on
J'unday from 11 ajn. to 3 pjn., on
Monday through Thursday from
a.m. to 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 10
P.m. and on Friday from 9 a jn. to
**> P m. (Hours are subject to
change for specific programs.)
rif addit. the center will
conduct guided group tours on
T&Land Thursday mornings
1U:30 a.m. and on Tuesday
evenmg, Jan. 22, the Center wifi
3u Wine *<* Cheese
ouuding Tour starting at 7:30
p.m.
JtOL 3966M ^ additional
Program or membership informa-
" We Belong Together!"
JCC TO BEGIN
MASTER POINT
DUPLICATE BRIDGE
Enjoy your favorite game
while making new friends and
winning Master Points!
The games take place on
Thursday afternoons, beginning
Jan. 24 at 1 p.m. The games are
sanctioned by the American Con-
tract Bridge League and will be
supervised by Bernard Liner,
Certified Bridge Director. Re-
freshments will be served at
games. The fee for JCC members
is $2 per game and $2.50 per
game for non-members.
The JCC is also introducing a
Novice duplicate bridge game at
the same time and day as the
aforementioned game. Participa-
tion is limited to those with less
than 20 Master Points. The cost
is the same.
Contact the center for details
395-5546.
MID EASTERN DANCE
COMES TO LEVIS JCC
Mid-Eastern dance classes will
be taught by Betty Rohack in
two eight-week sessions.
Betty, a resident of Delray
Beach, is a professioanl Mid-
Eastern dancer who was first at-
tracteH to this ancient genre and
its music while living in Athens,
Greece in 1964. She has a back-
ground in ballet, modern dance,
and jazz and has studied, taught
and performed this ancient art
form since 1976. She is a member
of the Palm Beach Council of
Arts, host and sponsor of ethnic
dance workshops and shows, and
instructs classes in Mid-Eastern
dance throughout the commu-
nity.
Mid-Eastern dance is for those
who love dancing and dreaming.
An exciting, fun approach to
dance-exercise is guaranteed to
make one feel more glamorous
and full of life. There will be
special classes for children,
adults and senior adults. Betty
will also be teaching tonetics at
the center. Classes begin the
week of Jan. 14. Call David at the
center for more information
regarding classes 395-5546.
SCHOOL'S OUT-
CENTER'S IN
Where Adolph and Rose
Levis Jewish Community Center
When Monday, Jan. 21;
Monday, Feb. 18
Time 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
Cost per Day Members $10,
Non-Members $20
Come join us for a Day of Fun
(Pre and post care available 8-
9:30 a.m., 4-5:30 p.m. at addi-
tional charge of $1.50 per hour
We provide drink and kosher
snack children bring lunch
SINGLES 21-89
Saturday, Jan. 5, 7:30 p.m.,
Dinner at Scarlett O'Hara's,
The going, at times, got a little
rough. .
corner Linton Blvd. and Federal
Hwy. The cost is $9.54 which in-
cludes entree choice of fish,
chicken or steak. Tax and tip in-
cluded. Music at 9 p.m.
Saturday, Jan. 13, noon, Beach
party. Meet in Delray Beach
across from Bostons located AIA
south of Atlantic Ave. Bring
your own food and drinks. Look
for Beth Wolk as coordinator.
SINGLES 21-39
AND 35-55
Tuesday, Jan. 8, 5:30-8 p.m.,'
Happy Hour at Marina Del Ray
in Delray Beach, located east on
Atlantic Ave., cross Intracoastal
Waterway and take first right
after bridge which is Venetian
Drive. Restaurant is 5'/i blocks
on right. There will be hors
d'oeuvres and cash bar. Members
$2, non-members $3.
SINGLES 35-55
Tuesday, Jan. 15, 7:30 p.m.,
Rap session entitled "Living
Together vs. Marriage"
presented by a therapist from
Jewish Family and Children's
Service to be conducted at Ann's
house. Directions will be pro-
vided when you RSVP. Refresh-
ments will be served. Members
cost is $3, non-members $4.
Please RSVP by Jan. 10.
OPEN TO ALL
INTERESTED IN
PARTICIPATING
Meet new friends and learn to
paint with Sophie. Classes will be
held from 1:30-3:30 p.m. begin-
ning Tuesday, Jan. 15 through
Tuesday, March 5. Cost is $15 for
members, $25 non-members.
Registration deadline is Jan. 11.
Learn Mid-Eastern Dance
(Belly Dancing) for Seniors 11:45
a.m.-12:45 p.m. (Session I),
beginning Tuesday, Jan. 15 for
eight weeks: or (Session II) 6:30-
7:30 p.m., beginning Thursday,
Jan. 17 for eight weeks. Cost,
members $35 and non-members
$46.
CANOE TRIP
On a bright Sunday in Novem-
ber, 16 families braved the ele-
ments to paddle down the Loxa-
hatchee River in Jupiter, Fla. The
trip, sponsored by the Adolph
and Rose Levis Jewish Commu-
nity Center, was a huge success,
and many of the participants are
anxiously awaiting the next trip
which will be an overnight on the
Peace River sometime in March.
The Warshal family pulls in after a long day of paddling.
-'
P.O. Box 1379
Delray Beach, Fla. 33447
Yaacov Sassi
ISRAELI
FOLK SINGER
for all occasions
Hebrew Hasidic
Yiddish & English
For more information call:
272-1287

Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner A Smith Inc.
6100 Glades Road
Town Executive Center
Suite 101
Boca Raton, FL 33434
305/487-7010
National Watts 800/327-3352
FL Watts 800/432-0447
Merrill Lynch
Richard E. Fishman, CFP
Vice President
' Horizons Adult Education
Daytime Classes
395-7067
The classes listed below are part of a larger Adult
Education program with 50 offerings. For Info call us.
Sponsored by South County Neighborhood Center.
The following 4 classes held in the University Center, FAU
HOW TO WRITE YOUR PERSONAL LIFE HISTORY
starts Mon., Jan. 21, Rm. 207 8 wks. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $16
VERDI, THE MAN, HIS LIFE, HIS MUSIC
starts Tues., Jan. 22, Rm. 213-8 wks. -1-3 p.m. $16
JAPAN: KIMONO TO BLUE JEANS
starts Wed., Jan. 23, Rm. 198 8 wks. 10-noon. $16
PROPHETS OF THE OLD TESTAMENT 4 THE MESSIANIC HOPE
starts Fri., Jan. 25, Rm. 207 8 wks. -1-2:30 p.m. $16
The following 2 classes held at Boca Library, 200 NW 2 Ave.
GREAT COMPOSERS AND THEIR MUSIC
starts Tues., Jan. 22 8 wks. -1:30 3:30 p.m. $16
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF HEROES GREAT MEN AND THEIR TIMES
starts Thurs., Jan. 24 8 wks. -1:30-3:30 p.m. $16
The following 2 classes at PBC Library, 8821 W. Glades Rd., Boca
GIANTS OF JEWISH THOUGHT
starts Tues., Jan. 22 8 wks. 1-3 p.m. $16
LITERATURE AND WORLD OF SCHOLEM ALEICHEM
, starts Wed., Jan. 23 -8 wks. 10:30-12:30 p.m. $16
REGISTRATION FORM: Make check payable and mail
to South County Neighborhood Center, 2248 N. Dixie
Highway, Boca Raton, FL 33431. Indicate name of
class(es) desired.
Nam Addr.tt:
Phona:.
Classes):


.J
. .iuuj uuiiuui;
-*, lilUU
In The SYNAGOGUES
and TEMPLES
BOCA RATON
SYNAGOGUE
Boca Raton Synagogue will no
longer be meeting for Sabbath
services at the Boca Teeca
Country Club. Effective imme-
diately, Saturday morning
services will begin at 9:30 a.m.
and will be held at the Verde Ele-
mentary School, locaed at 6590
Verde Trail, Boca. Friday
evening and Saturday evening
services will begin at 5:15 p.m.
and the location will vary from
week to week. Interested parties
should call 368-9047.
TEMPLE EMETH
Singles will hold their next
meeting on Monday, Jan. 14 at
12 noon. Blanche Herzlich will
review the book "Ellis Island"
and refreshments will be served.
The meeting will take place at the
synagogue, 5780 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray. All single men and
women are invited to join.
Brotherhood will hold their in-
stallation of officers and Board
members on Tuesday, Jan. 8 at 7
p.m. in the Mann Sanctuary of
Temple Emeth, 5780 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray. Rabbi Elliot J.
Winograd will conduct the in-
stallation ceremony. Music and a
collation will follow.
Sisterhood will hold a concert
series beginning Sunday, Jan. 6
at 8 p.m. with"On Silver Wings,"
an American-Israeli Micro
Musical, starring Donny
Maseng, featuring Leslie Roth-
stein and Dorit Zinger. For ticket
information, call Jules or Ruby
498-7422. Mann Sanctuary $4.50,
Winnick Hall $3.50. Future
shows, Sunday, Feb. 24, 8:30
p.m., "Forever Yours"; Sunday,
March 31, 8 p.m. "An Outstand-
ing Bill"; and Sunday, April 28,8
p.m. "Lee Chanteurs."
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Sisterhood will hold their next
luncheon and card party on Mon-
day, Jan. 7. $5 donation includes
door prizes. Reservations must
be made in advance and table ar-
rangements for group players.
Chair for January is Bea Borruso.
Please call her for reservations at
483-2474 or Ann Alster, 483-4964
or Ann Siegelheim 483-1315.
ANSHEI SHALOM
Anshei Shalom Oriole Jewish
Center Sisterhood will run a
Rummage Sale on Sunday, Jan.
13 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. in the
parking lot of the Fidelity
Federal Bank on Military Trail
and Atlantic Ave. For more in-
formation, call 499-9252.
TEMPLE SINAI
Brotherhood will hold their
next meeting on Sunday, Jan. 13
at 9:30 a.m. at the synagogue,
2475 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray.
Rabbi Casriel Brusowankin,
director of Chabad House in
North Miami, will speak on "The
Answer to the Cult Missionary
Problem." The public is invited.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Forum Lecture Series. Sam
Gejdenson, congressman from
Connecticut, will be the speaker
for the second of this year's
Forum Lecture series on Sunday
evening, Jan. 13 at 7:30 p.m. His
topic will be "A Jewish Presence
on Capitol Hill."
Gejdenson has been a member
of the House of Representatives
since 1980. He serves as a
member of the House Foreign
Affairs and the House Interior
committees. He successfully led
the campaign aeainst the
Frisco's Monument to Holocaust
Stood There 4 Days Before Attack
SAN FRANCISCO -
(JTA) Less than four
days after its dedication,
San Francisco's monument
to the Holocaust, one of the
few memorials to the Holo-
caust on public property in
the United States, was
desecrated. Clean-up work
began immediately, accord-
ing to Peggy Isaak Gluck
of the Jewish Bulletin of
Northern California.
The target of the vandals was
the 11 white plaster bronze
figures created by sculptor
George Segal, ten of the repre-
sentations prone and one, a man,
staring out of a barbed-wire en-
closure. Segal titled the work,
"The Holocaust."
THE MEMORIAL is located
in Lincoln Park, overlooking San
Francisco Bay. The desecration
took place apparently sometime
between Saturday night and
Sunday morning. The faces of the
ten corpses were found covered
with black and yellow spray
paint. The memorial was dedi-
cated in a solemn ceremony
attended by some 500 survivors
and relatives and friends.
The desecration discovery was
made by a security employe of
the American Protective Services
during a shift of guards in the
arounds-the-clock surveillance.
The guard on the midnight to 8
a.m. graveyard shift, the ap-
parent period of the vandalism,
was dismissed.
At about 9 a.m., the day shift
guard alerted his company, police
and representatives of the Jewish
Community Relations Council
(JCRC) of San Francisco. Rita
Semel, JCRC associate director,
said the security company was
taking "full responsibility" for
the damage.
Also found in black spray paint
on the back wall on two sides of
the massive monument were the
words, "Is this necessary?" The
standing figure was not hit by
the vandals.
BECAUSE THE city public
works department does not work
on Sunday and was closed, a pri-
vate steam-cleaning company
was hired t) remove the
daubings. Seme said every effort
will be made to restore the Segal
sculptures to their original state.
She also noted that private
security will continue around the
clock, and the city police depart-
ment also will continue to patrol
the area. Restoration cost was
estimated at $1,000.
The JCRC issued a statement
declaring that holocaust
memorials all over the United
States "have been assaulted by
vandals and grafitti, as have
other public structures, whether
by mindless youths or anti-
Semites. This is a form of terror-
ism and we will not be swayed by
it."
But Mayor Dianne Feinstein's
Committee for a Memorial to the
Holocaust, which includes Jews
and non-Jews, reiterated con-
cerns expressed when the site
was "selected, an open area where
visitors could walk around it "to
become involved,"could remain
as is.
RHODA GOLDMAN, chair
woman of the Mayor's Commit-
tee, said she was surprised that
the vandalism "happened so
quickly. It hurts all of us and
what hurts even more is that
people do this, whatever negative
feelings they have."
Continued on Page 11
Community Calendar
Jorury6
B'nai B'nth Shomer Lodge meeting, 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith North
Pines Lodge meeting, 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth El Young Artist
Series, 3 p.m. Temple Sinai Chavurah program, 2 p.m.
Jcnny7
Women's League for Israel Board meeting, 10 a.m. Anshei
Emuna Sisterhood meeting, 12 noon Temple Sinai Kulanu
meeting, 7:30 p.m. Hadassah Atid meeting, noon Women's
American ORT North Pines Board meeting, 1 p.m. B'nai Torah
Sisterhood Board meeting, 7:30 p.m. Free Sons of Israel
meeting, 1 p.m.
Jmny8
Women's American ORT Boca-Delray, 8 p.m. meeting
Hadassah Ben Gurion Board meeting, 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith
Delray Lodge No. 2965 Board meeting, 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth
El Solos Board meeting, 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Palm Green*
Lodge Board meeting, 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Boca Teeca Lodge
No. 31 19 breakfast meeting, 9:30 a.m.
Jmay9
Temple Sinai Board meeting, 7:30 p.m. Women's American
ORT Boca Century Village, 2 p.m. general meeting; 10 a.m.
Board meeting Pioneer Women Beersheba meeting, 1 2 noon
JoruvylO
Jewish War Veterans Post 266 Board meeting, 7 p.m. Temple
Beth El Sisterhood Board meeting, 10:30 a.m. Temple Beth El
Single Parents meeting, 7:30 p.m. Temple Beth El Brotherhood
Board meeting, 8 p.m. Women's American ORT Delpointe
Board meeting, 12 noon B'nai B'rith Women Boca meeting, 12
noon Women's American ORT Region meeting, 1 p.m.
Jmyll
Notional Council Jewish Women Boca-Delray Branch Board
meeting, 9:30a.m.
Jmyl2
Anshei Emuna Sisterhood Malava Malka
JmvM
B'nai Torah Congregation Lox Box Breakfast a.m. B'nai B'rith
Integrity Council meeting, 9:30 a.m. Israel Bonds B'nai Torah
Israel Night, 6 p.m. Temple Sinai Brotherhood meeting, 9:30
a.m. Temple Beth El Brotherhood breakfast meeting, 10a.m.
nomination of Warren Richard-
son, chief lobbyist for the
"Liberty Lobby" an extreme
right-wing anti-Semitic, anti-
black organization. Also,
Gejdenson is continually in-
volved in promoting human
rights for Soviet, Argentine and
Syrian Jews. He has traveled to
Russia to meet with Jewish dis-
sidents, and co-sponsored House
Resolution 118 disapproving the
sale of AWACS and enhance-
ment equipment to Saudi Arabia.
Rep. Gejdenson was born in
Eschwege, Germany, in 1948, in
an American displaced persons
camp. He is the first child of sur-
vivors of the Holocaust to serve
in Congress. His parents fled Po-
land after World War II, settling
on a small dairy farm in Botrah,
Conn.
Rep. Gejdenson has said, "You
have an extra responsibility, if
you're a Jewish congressman;
you have all your normal con-
stituencies, plus an extra re-
sponsibility."
Admission is S6 and tickets
may be purchased at the door.
This promises to be an outstand-
ing, informative evening. Con-
gress is in session now, so we will
be receiving up-to-date informa-
tion on many areas of great
interest to all.
Sisterhood is offering an ex-
ceptional Jewish Heritage Tour
of the Miami area on Jan. 21. Old
synagogues, monuments, and
schools take on new meanings
due to the interpretation by their
lecturer and guide, Dr. Sam
Brown. Dr. Brown was executive
regional director of the American
Jewish Congress. The cost of the
tour is $12.50. For information
and reservations contact Sylvia
Roberts 499-7603.
Jennifer Hermansen
Bat Mitzvah

JENNIFER HERMANSEN
On Saturday, Jan. 5, Jennifc,
Hermansen, daughter of Dim
and Dr. Eric Hermansen, will b,
called to the Torah at Tempi,
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bit
Mitzvah. Jennifer is an 8th grade
student at Boca Raton Academy
and attends the Temple Beth El
Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
simcha are sister, Vicki; brother,
Jason; grandparents Mrs. Clarice
Levy of Boynton Beach, and Mr
and Mrs. Paul Barberio of
Bay side, New York; and great
grandmother, Dora Zen* of
Bayside, New York. Other gueau
will include Margy Schenberg,
Barbara Toffler and Kara
Cracco.
Jennifer's hobbies include
dance and tennis. At school sheis
in the Beta Club, and is on the
Headmaster's List and Honor
Roll.
Dr. and Mrs. Hermansen will
host a kiddush in Jennifer's
honor following Shabbat morninj
services.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Evening services Monday through Thursday 5:15 p.m.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101, Boca Raton. Florida
33433. Orthodox services held at Boca Teeca Country Club
Auditorium, Yamato Road, Boca Raton, every Friday, Sun-
down. Saturday morning 9:30 a.m. Mincha-Maariv. Rabbi Mark
Dratch. Phone: 368-9047.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd.. Delray
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks.
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class 5
p.m. Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio Road.
Boca Raton, Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler.
Sabbath Services Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 10:15 a.m.
Mailing address: 950 Glades Road, Suite 1C, Boca Raton, FL
33432. Phone 392-9982.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan
Association Office, West Atlantic Ave., corner Carter Road,
Delray Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9
a.m. and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 498'21"ji
Office: 14600 Cumberland Drive, Delray Beach, Florida 3344b,
Phone 495-0466.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services
at 8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of eacn
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FL 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sun^
8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone:
5557. Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Conser-
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd. Naftaly A.
Linkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Serivcee: Friday at 8 p-m-.
Saturday at 8:45 a.m. Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2476 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Barwic
Road), Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Reform. Sabbath >
services, Friday at 8:16 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m. Rabbi Samuel ou*
President Samuel Rothstein, phone 276-6161.

t+fm


Friday, January 4,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
NEWS From Local I
I Clubs & Org.'s
(embers of Hadassah's Ben-Gurion Chapter committee for the Big
lifts Luncheon (left to right): Sid Wirth, Betty Gerber, Blanch
ierzlich, Lillian Shucard, Miriam Greenberg, Ruth Fisher (chair),
Stta Do'gan, Lee Rosenberg (co-chair), Ruth Feinstein. The luncheon
[ill take place on January 23, at the Hunter's Run Country Club.
Profile: Ben-Gurion
Chapter, Hadassah
Ten years ago, the Ben-Gurion
hapter of Hadassah was estab-
^hed in Delray Beach by a group
Hadassah members who had
i to South Florida.
day the chapter has a member-
|iip of some 700 women, ranging
I age from 50 to 94.
Like all Hadassah chapters,
he main functions of the group
kclude fund-raising activities for
ladassah projects, chiefly the
ledical Center in Jerusalem and
fouth Aliyah, and educational
ctivities revolving around
Brael. Jewish concerns, and
American affairs.
The Ben-Gurion Chapter holds
regular meetings at Temple
ieth and has various annual
rograms such as luncheons and
ips. Currently, chapter presi-
ent is Ida Feldman, former pro-
ramming and fund-raising vice
resident, who was active in her
iple and in Hadassah in
Jueens, N.Y.
Other executive board mem-
ere are Blanche Herzlich,
iucation vice president, who is a
1 speaker and book reviewer,
brmerly of New York City; Leah
evine, membership vice presi-
nt, a Hadassah veteran from
' Jersey who speaks Hebrew;
ah Schonhaut, program vice
esident, who has an extensive
background and taught
Hebrew schools; and Ann
lortman, fund-raising vice
esident, who plans all the
tiapter's fund-raising events.
Listed below are three of the
hapter's coming events, includ-
the major annual luncheon
"d its planning committee.
Jan. 15 Lunch and card
ty, Temple Emeth, 5780 W.
Atlantic Ave., 12 noon. $5.50.
[w tickets please call 499-1234 or
-1791.
Jan 17 Monthly meeting at
lemple Emeth, 12:30 p.m. Sarah
finer will portray Eleanor
osevelt in monologue an
anting experience. Refresh-
ments.
[* 28 Big Gifts at
Punters Run Country Club,
ongress Ave., Boynton Beach,
I000 Professional entertain-
ni sumptuous luncheon,
L*j peTson l*0 credit).
["nds for Hadassah hospitals.
N-85l7rVatK)n8 CaU 499-5210 or
HADASSAH
UihS" D*V wiu hoW a
E*y.*m Nosh Card Party to
17? Yuth AUyah on Wednea-
Cl T9 at !2 noon at the Boca
E^Untry Club Auditorium.
oS iV ^?d ***** m wel-
M*i Itlket8 and information
^3452 amnan> SylviaT*>ff.
^REE SONS OP ISRAEL
kS*2 Lodge No. 224 will hold
nt meeting on Monday,
Jan. 7 at 1 p.m. at Congregation
Anshei Emuna, 16189 Carter Rd.,
Delray. The High-Stepping Can
Can Girls will entertain. Collation
to follow.
B^AI B'RITH WOMEN
Boca Chapter will hold a birth-
day party meeting on Thursday,
Jan. 10 at 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Beth El, 333 SW 4th Ave., Boca.
Humorist Oscar Goldstein will be
the guest speaker. A mini lunch
will be served. Members free,
guests $2.50. By reservations
only. Please call Pearl 482-5193 or
Marilyn 482-8335. Mark your
calendars for a trip to Dania Jai
Alai on Tuesday, Jan. 15. The
cost is $16 which includes trans-
portation, entrance fee, program
and lunch. Bus pickup at Boca
Lakes at 10:20 a.m. or Town
Center at 10:30 a.m. For reserva-
tions, call Sybil 482-3205.
B'NAI B'RITH
Boca Teeca Lodge No. 3119
will hold their breakfast meeting
in the activities building, Tues-
day, Jan. 8 at 9:30 a.m. Their
guest speaker will be Sally
Sweigart, Health Education Co-
ordinator at the Boca Raton
Community Hospital, on the
subject, "How to Communicate
With Your Doctor." Ladies are
invited to attend.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
Delray will hold their annual
"University on Wheels," Thurs-
day, Jan. 10 at 9:30 a.m. at
Temple Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray. The theme is "The
Familv Moving Toward the Year
2000." Dr. Michael Kaufman,
associate professor of university
studies in humanities, will dis-
cuss "My Daughter's Mother."
Dr. Jay Brodbar Nemzer,,
assistant professor of contem-
porary Jewish studies, will speak
on "The American Jewish Family
and Their Future." Question and
answer period will follow. Dona-
tion $10. For tickets call Hannah
Israel 498-1713, or Sylvia Feld-
man 499-6493.
Boca will take a trip to the Miami
Center for the Fine Arts on Fri-
day, Jan. 11, to see "Silk Roads
and China Ships," a display of
400 exotic objects illustrating
2,000 years of international trade
between the east and west. Then
on to the new South Florida His-
t/ideal Museum and lunch. The
bus leaves at the S.E. corner of
the Boca Mall. The cost is $20 for
bus and all expenses. Lunch cost
will be collected separately.
Guests are welcome. For reserva-
tions call Sarah 392-6360.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI
WOMEN
Beersheva Chapter will hold
their next meeting on Wednes-
day, Jan. 9 at 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank, W. At-
Frisco's Monument To Holocaust
Stood There 4 Days Before Attack
Continued from Page 10-
Segal, reached at his New
Brunswick, N.J. home, told the
Jewish Bulletin that the desecra-
tion was "ugly and brutal" and
that he personally felt "violated"
by the vandalism.
Three years of fund-raising
produced $500,000 for the memo-
rial and an additional $250,000
educational endowment. The
campaign was under the patron-
age of Mayor Feinstein, who
attended the dedication.
Ernest Michel, who survived
Auschwitz and is now executive
vice president of the United
Jewish Appeal in New York, said
in his dedication address that
what he had most feared in the
camps was dying with the world
not even knowing of the unen-
ding gassing and burnings of the
victims.
NOTING THAT books have
been written calling the Holo-
caust a "hoax," Michel said
memorials like the one in San
Francisco helped to keep the
truth alive.
Segal told the assemblage that
he had learned about the Holo-
caust from survivors, adding that
many kept quiet about their
terrible experience, not even
wishing to share those horrors
with their children. He started
work on "The Holocaust" two
years ago.
A reception was held after the
unveiling, with wine and bread
and other foods, a final act for
participants to mark
remembrsmc*4fr. and part'
educational campaign which the
memorial committee indicated it
.hoped would help "assure that
the world will never countenance
such a tragedy again."
Ian tic Ave., Delray. A paid-up
membership luncheon and enter-
tainment will be enjoyed. All are
welcome.
ORT
South Palm Beach County
Region will be forming a new
chapter, Boca Barwood, on
Thursday, Jan. 10 at 1 p.m. at
the home of Peter and Evelyn
Savino, Boca Greens. Everyone
who would like to participate is
welcome. Light refreshments will
be served. For further details,
please call Evelyn Savino 483-
4760 or Barbara Knee 483-3676.
All Points Chapter will enjoy a
night at the races at Pompano
Race Track on Saturday, Jan. 12.
Deluxe dinner at the Top of the
Park, admission and program.
For further information, call
Dolly 499-4851.
Boca Teeca will hold a mini-
brunch in the upstairs card room
of Boca Teeca at 11 a.m. on
Thursday, Jan. 10. This is a
newly-formed chapter of ORT
and all are welcome to attend.
For further information, call
Natalie Berman, 272-4474.
the. joy of
part of an
"Your Courteous And
Professional Manner Deserves
To Be Complimented."
warmth and Comfort Sensitivity and Consideration
Compassion in your time of need We understand.
A mm PiulscttonWnChspsI
We honor all pre-need programs.
S808 w Atlantic Avenue Delray Beach. FL, 33445
305-499-8000__________

Milton
Kretsky,
69
Milton Kretsky
Milton Kretsky of Delray
Beach, a prominent leader in the
Jewish Community of South
County, died on Monday, Dec.
24, at age 69.
Kretsky was a former vice pre-
sident of the South County
Jewish Federation and a member
of its board from its inception. He
served as chair of the Family and
Men's Division of the Federation-
UJA Campaign in 1983, and as
chair of the Community Rela-
tions Council in 83-84.
He was a devoted member of
Temple Emeth, serving on the
temple board and on the board of
the temple's brotherhood. In the
past year Kretsky was chair of
the temple's 10th anniversary
jubilee celebrations, which ended
just two weeks before his
passing.

"Milton Kretsky was a rare
human being. He wa one of the
key people who molded the
identity of the Jewish community
in South County; he was a deeply
committed Jew who translated
this commitment into action. I
shall personally miss him," said
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, executive
director of the Federation. "He
was a great leader and a fine
human being," added Marianne
Bobick, Federation president.
Kretsky, born in Pennsylvania,
was director of the B'nai B.'rith
New York area office, and headed
the Cleveland office of the Na-
tional Jewish Hospital at Denver.
He is survived by his wife Ethel;
two daughters, Myrna Markin
and Arlene Worth; four grand-
children and two brothers. Inter-
ment was at Mount Hebron
Cemetery in Flushing, New York.
An od Jewish todfon has
a beautiful new location.
For over ninety years, the Gutterman family has served the
Jewish community in Metropolitan New York with funeral service
of the highest standard. Now we proudly extend our commitment
to the Jewish people in a gracious new setting in South Florida.
We invite your inspection of our beautiful new funeral home in
which no detail in design or appointments has been overlooked
to create an environment that will comfort the bereaved.
Count on us to serve you here with the same dignity that has
given us our standing In New York since 1892.
A CALL FOR INFORMATION RE:"SENTINEL PLAN"
Xf^&r^ _aa PRE-ARRANGEMENTS
OGutterman
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iimui art lion s~ct w
7M0 Nwttl FW MftaMf Swa SMW. FlwM* M74M0
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IN GRIMER MM VWMl OUTTtMiUM* IMC _^
ROCKVH.k.t CtNTM.LI WOOOMM. 1.1 AMAnN OUCtM WOOKITW-own


iMMMMMHH^^H
Page 12 The Jewish Floridian of South County Friday. January 4, 1986
COUNTRYC4N
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Full Text
tyuiiUMi^ IfiKM
In The SYNAGOGUES
and TEMPLES
BOCA RATON
SYNAGOGUE
Boca Raton Synagogue will no
longer be meeting for Sabbath
services at the Boca Teeca
Country Club Effective anme-
diately, Saturday morning
aervicea will begs at 5 3C la
and will be head at the Vrse Ele-
mentary School, txmc ac 35SC
Verde Trail Boca Fann
evening and Satufa-.i t-aeamg
aervicea wi begs ac : j.m.
and the irxaocc wtil ir> Tim
week to wee*. Imer
should ca_ *>'*.*'
TEMFLEDOTE
Ave. Defray R*;a *^_*x .'
Winograd wi mnifan the a-
ftailacjoc caei-inir Maaa
cc-a'jcc wil xxc
u. -
- ac
K. '-I*
Wli tilul
nnttnj -sc W :citir>
12 noon. **** ra
review ** i*- *^i j
and r^brmrr'tBXji vil
The m-_jiz vil j pane
tynagog-- :"*'. 1R
Ave Deire;. AI taaer* j
women art arvxee v: -.-oe.
Brotherhood wu. he*; thaar b-
stallauoc of officers anc Boarc
members on Tuesday. Jan 6 at 7
p.m. in the Mann Sanctuary of
Temple Emeth, 5780 W Atlantic
wiD run a
Sale osi Sunday. Jan.
a .is -2 p jr. in the
of the Fidelity
ob Military Trail
Ave. For more in-
499-9252.
TEMPLE SINAI
will hold their
J oa Sunday. Jan. 13
r 3C ajc at the svnagogue.
Wl W .Atlantic Ave.. Defray
Rabbc Caarial Bruaowankin.
hill.i of Cbaoad House in
North Miami wil apeak on "The
.Answer to the Cuh M iaaionary
Probkrc The public is invited.
TEMPLE BETH EL
TQIFLE BETH SHALOM
r_ x*z *-tea
aad care party an Man-
as? .at K donatavn Tr^W
i-xr praat Reservatucj must
advance and '-able ar-
for group players.
Cfefcgior January is Bea Borruso
Please call her for nations at
?83-2474 or Ann Aister. 483-4964
or Ann StegeeSeim 483-1315.
ANSHEI SHALOM
Ansfaei Shalom Oriole Jewish
Sam
from
Geydenson. congressman
Connecticut, wfl] be the
for the second of this year's
Forum Lecture series on Sunday
evening. Jan. 13 at 7:30 p.m. His
topic will be "A Jewish Presence
on Capitol Hill."
Gejdenaon has been a member
of the House of Representatives
since I960. He serves as a
member of the House Foreign
Affairs and the House Interior
committees. He successfully led
the campaign against the
Frisco's Monument to Holocaust
Stood There 4 Days Before Attack
SAN FRANCISCO -
IJTA) Less than four
days after its dedication,
San Francisco's monument
to the Holocaust, one of the
few memorials to the Holo-
caust on public property in
the United States, was
desecrated. Clean-up work
began immediately, accord-
ing to Peggy Isaak Gluck
of the Jewish Bulletin of
Northern California.
The target of the vandals was
the 11 white plaster bronze
figures created by sculptor
Qaorga Segal, ten of the repre-
sentations prone and one, a man,
staring out of a barbed-wire en-
pkwure Segal titled the work.
I be Holocaust."
THE MEMORIAL is located
in Lincoln Park, overlooking San
Prl Hay The desecration
tOOh [/la"- apparently sometime
between Saturday night and
ruing The faces of the
' m found covered
' black and y-llow spray
pa BMnoriaJ was dedi-
*'*: .r. a solemn ceremony
ftstldad by v,rrx- 600 survivors
M and friends.
>se/ rat ion discovery was
sneurity employe of
tin American Protective Services
<: vteg a shift of guards in the
a/oundvthe 'lock surveillance.
I he guard on the midnight to 8
a m graveyard shift, the ap-
parent period of the vandalism,
was dismissed.
At about 9 a.m., the day shift
guard alerted his company, police
and representatives of the Jewish
Community Relations Council
(JCRC) of San Francisco. Rita
Semel, JCRC associate director,
said the security company was
taking "full responsibility" for
i Ik- damage.
Also found in black spray paint
on the back wall on two sides of
the massive monument were the
words, "Is this necessary?" The.
standing figure was not hit by
the vandals.
BECAUSE THE city public
works department does not work
on Sunday and was closed, a pri-
vate steam-cleaning company
was hired t\ remove the
daubings. Seme; said every effort
will be made to restore the Segal
sculptures to their original state.
She also noted that private
security will continue around the
dock, and the city police depart-
ment also will continue to patrol
the area. Restoration cost was
estimated at f 1,000.
The JCRC issued a statement
declaring that holocaust
memorials ail over the United
States "have been assaulted by
vandals and grafitti. as have
other public structures, whether
by mindless youths or anti-
Semites. This is a form of terror-
ism and we will not be swayed by
it."
Hut Mayor Dianne Feinstein's
Committee for a Memorial to the
Holocaust, which includes Jews
and non-Jews, reiterated con-
cerns expressed when the site
was selected, an open area where
visitors could walk around it "to
become involved."could remain
as is.
RHODA GOLDMAN, chair
woman of the Mayor's Commit-
tee, said she was surprised that
the vandalism "happened so
quickly. It hurts all of us and
what hurts even more is that
people do this, whatever negative
feelings they have."
Continued on Page 11
Community Calendar
Jonuory6
Bf a far || ,- on er Lodge meeting, 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith North
Sting, 930 a.m. Temple Beth El Young Artist
Series, 3pm. Temple Sinai Chavurah program, 2 p.m.
January 8
Women's American ORT Boca-Delray, 8 p.m. meeting
Hadassah Ben Gurion Board meeting, 9:30 a.m. B'nai B'rith
Delray Lodge No. 2965 Board meeting, 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth
El Solos Board meeting, 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith Palm Greens
Lodge Board meeting, 10 a.m. B'nai B'rith Boca Teeca Lodge
No. 3119 breakfast meeting, 9:30 a.m.
Temple Sinai Board meeting, 7:30 p.m. Women's American
ORT Boca Century Village, 2 p.m. general meeting; 10 a.m.
Board meeting Pioneer Women Beersheba meeting, 1 2 noon
Jenny 10
Jewish War Veterans Post 266 Board meeting, 7 p.m. Temple
Beth El Sisterhood Board meeting, 10:30 a.m. Temple Beth El
Single Parents meeting, 7:30 p.m. Temple Beth El Brotherhood
Board meeting, 8 p.m. Women's American ORT Delpointe
Board meeting, 12 noon B'nai B'rith Women Boca meeting, 12
noon Women's American ORT Region meeting, 1 p.m.
Jnuryll
National Council Jewish Women Boca-Delray Branch Board
meeting, 9:30a.m.
Jmnyl2
Anshei Emuna Sisterhood AAalava AAalka
JmnyU
B'nai Torah Congregation Lox Box Breakfast a.m. B'nai B'rith
Integrity Council meeting, 9:30 a.m. Israel Bonds B'nai Torah
Israel Night, 6 p.m. Temple Sinai Brotherhood meeting, 9:30
a.m. Temple Beth El Brotherhood breakfast meeting, lOa.m
nomination of Warren Richard-
son, chief lobbyist for the
"Liberty Lobby" an extreme
right-wing anti-Semitic, anti-
black organization. Also.
Gejdenson is continually in-
volved in promoting human
rights for Soviet. Argentine and
Syrian Jews. He has traveled to
Russia to meet with Jewish dis-
sidents, and co-sponsored House
Resolution 118 disapproving the
sale of AWACS and enhance-
ment equipment to Saudi Arabia.
Rep. Gejdenson was born in
Eschwege. Germany, in 1948, in
an American displaced persons
camp. He is the first child of sur-
vivors of the Holocaust to serve
in Congress. His parents fled Po-
land after World War II, settling
on a small dairy farm in Boxrah,
Conn.
Rep. Gejdenaon has said, "You
have an extra responsibility, if
you're a Jewish rongieasniau;
you have all your normal con-
stituencies, plus an extra re-
sponsibility."
Admission is 86 and tickets
may be purchased at the door.
This promises to be an outstand-
ing, informative evening. Con-
gress is in session now, so we will
be receiving up-to-date informa-
tion on many areas of great
interest to all.
Sisterhood is offering an ex-
ceptional Jewish Heritage Tour
of the Miami area on Jan. 21. Old
synagogues, monuments, and
schools take on new meanings
due to the interpretation by their
lecturer and guide. Dr. Sam
Brown. Dr. Brown was executive
regional director of the American
Jewish Congress. The cost of the
tour is $12.50. For information
and reservations contact Svlvia
Roberts 499-7603.
V
Jennifer Hermansen
BatMitzvah
JENNIFER HERMANSEN
On Saturday, Jan. 5, Jennife
Hermansen, daughter of Dun,
and Dr. Eric Hermansen, wfl] be
called to the Torah at Tuk
Beth El of Boca Raton as C
Mitzvah. Jennifer is an 8th grade
student at Boca Raton Academy
and attends the Temple BethH
Religious School. F U
Family members sharing in the
simeka are sister, Vidri; brothe
Jason; grandparents Mrs. CUrice
Levy of Boynton Beach, and Mr
and Mrs. Paul Barbsrio of
Bayside. New York: and great-
grandmother. Dora Zeff of
Bayside. New York. Other guesu
will include Margy Schenberg
Barbara Toffler and Kara
Cracco.
Jennifer's hobbies include
dance and tennis. At school she it
in the Beta Club, and is on the
Headmaster's List and Honor
Roll.
Dr. and Mrs. Hermansen will
host a kiddush in Jennifer's ,-
honor following Shabbat mornmj
services.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton. Florida 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m.. Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Evening services Monday through Thursday 5:15 p.m.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: 22130 Belmar No. 1101, Boca Raton. Florida
33433. Orthodox services held at Boca Teeca Country Club
Auditorium, Vamato Road. Boca Raton, every Friday. Sun-
down. Saturday morning 9:30 a.m. Mincha-Maariv. Rabbi Mark
Dratch. Phone: 368-904".
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd.. Delray
Beach. Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L Sacks.
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:45 a.m. Sabbath Torah class 5
p.m. Phone 499-9229.
CONGREGATION B'NAI ISRAEL
Services at Center for Group Counseling, 22445 Boca Rio Road.
Boca Raton. Florida 33433. Reform. Rabbi Richard Agler.
Sabbath Services Fridav at 8 p.m.. Saturday at 10:15 a.m.
Mailing address: 950 Glades Road. Suite 1C. Boca Raton. FL
33432. Phone 392-9982.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan
Association Office, West Atlantic Ave., corner Carter Road,
Delray Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9
a.m. and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 498-2141.
Office: 14600 Cumberland Drive, Delray Beach, Florida 33446,
Phone 495-0466.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Gregory S. Marx, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services
at 8 p.m. Family Shabbat Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, FL 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday
8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Rabbi Donald David Crain. Phone: 483-
5557. Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Conser-
vative. Phone: 498-3536. Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd. Naftaly A.
Lmkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Serivces: Friday at 8 p.m.,
Saturday at 8:45 a.m. Daily Minyans at 8:46 a.m. and 6 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
2475 West Atlantic Ave. (Between Congress Ave. and Berwick
Road), Delray Beach, Florida 33445. Reform. Sabbath Eve
services, Friday at 8:15 p.m. Sat., 10 a.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver,
President Samuel Rothstein, phone 276-6161.
^-m


Friday, January 4,1986 / The Jewish Floridian of South County Page 11
EWS From Local
I Clubs St Org.
L

IB
\embers of Hadassah's Ben-Gurion Chapter committee for the Big
s Luncheon (left to right): Sid Wirth, Betty Gerber, Blanch
irzlich, Lillian Shucard, Miriam Greenberg, Ruth Fisher (chair),
tta Dogan, Lee Rosenberg (co-chair), Ruth Feins tein. The luncheon
ill take place on January 23, at the Hunter's Run Country Club.
Profile: Ben-Gurion
Chapter, Hadassah
[Ten years ago, the Ben-Gurion
er of Hadassah was estab-
hed in Delray Beach by a group
Hadassah members who had
cated to South Florida.
day the chapter has a member-
lip of some 700 women, ranging
[age from 50 to 94.
I Like all Hadassah chapters,
main functions of the group
blude fund-raising activities for
adassah projects, chiefly the
edical Center in Jerusalem and
buth Aliyah, and educational
ttivities revolving around
el, Jewish concerns, and
nerican affairs.
The Ben-Gurion Chapter holds
regular meetings at Temple
eth and has various annual
grams such as luncheons and
Currently, chapter presi-
it is Ida Feldman, former pro-
mming and fund-raising vice
sident, who was active in her
pie and in Hadassah in
ens, N.Y.
Other executive board mem-
rs are Blanche Herzlich,
lucation vice president, who is a
speaker and book reviewer,
nerly of New York City; Leah
vine, membership vice presi-
t, a Hadassah veteran from
Jersey who speaks Hebrew;
in Schonhaut, program vice
ident, who has an extensive
sical background and taught
Hebrew schools; and Ann
rtman, fund-raising vice
sident, who plans all the
apter's fund-raising events.
Listed below are three of the
J** coming events, includ-
tne major annual luncheon
its planning committee.
Jan. 15 Lunch and card
y. Temple Emeth, 5780 W.
WC Ave., 12 noon. $5.50.
tickets please call 499-1234 or
fe Monthly meeting at
{mple Emeth, 12:30 p.m. Sarah
"! 1wU.1 Portray Eleanor
osevelt in monologue an
Wg experience. Refreeh-
ents.
fcjL. Big Gifts at
fcs ARun Countrv C1b.
TET to ***** ***.
*T Profe88ionl entertain-
ic ~ sumptuous luncheon,
End?. ^l rs for Hadassah hospitals.
-8517rVatl0nS CaU 499"6210 or
HADASSAH
lihht' ^b*y wiu hoW a
P. Y^h Aliyah on Wednes-
|eLp-9*tl2noonat the Boca
Emh?Untly Club Auditorium.
Ell til! u lket8 and hiformation
J-3462 an' SylviaTraa>ff,
** SONS OP ISRAEL
"ext meetmg on Monday,
Jan. 7 at 1 p.m. at Congregation
Anshei Emuna, 16189 Carter Rd.,
Delray. The High-Stepping Can
Can Girls will entertain. Collation
to follow.
BWAI B'RITH WOMEN
Boca Chapter will hold a birth-
day party meeting on Thursday,
Jan. 10 at 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Beth El, 333 SW 4th Ave., Boca.
Humorist Oscar Goldstein will be
the guest speaker. A mini lunch
will be served. Members free,
guests $2.50. By reservations
only. Please call Pearl 482-5193 or
Marilyn 482-8335. Mark your
calendars for a trip to Dania Jai
Alai on Tuesday, Jan. 15. The
cost is $16 which includes trans-
portation, entrance fee, program
and lunch. Bus pickup at Boca
Lakes at 10:20 a.m. or Town
Center at 10:30 a.m. For reserva-
tions, call Sybil 482-3205.
B'NAI B'RITH
Boca Teeca Lodge No. 3119
will hold their breakfast meeting
in the activities building, Tues-
day, Jan. 8 at 9:30 a.m. Their
guest speaker will be Sally
Sweigart, Health Education Co-
ordinator at the Boca Raton
Community Hospital, on the
subject, "How to Communicate
With Your Doctor." Ladies are
invited to attend.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
Delray will hold their annual
"University on Wheels," Thurs-
day, Jan. 10 at 9:30 a.m. at
Temple Sinai, 2475 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray. The theme is "The
Family Moving Toward the Year
2000- Dr. Michael Kaufman,
associate professor of university
studies in humanities, will dis-
cuss "My Daughter's Mother."
Dr. Jay Brodbar Nemrer,.
assistant professor of contem-
porary Jewish studies, will speak
on "The American Jewish Family
and Their Future." Question and
answer period will follow. Dona-
tion $10. For tickets call Hannah
Israel 498-1713, or Sylvia Feld-
man 499-6493.
Boca will take a trip to the Miami
Center for the Fine Arts on Fri-
day, Jan. 11, to see "Silk Roads
and China Ships," a display of
400 exotic objects illustrating
2,000 years of international trade
between the east and west. Then
on to the new South Florida His-
torical Museum and lunch. The
bus leaves at the S.E. corner of
the Boca Mall. The cost is $20 for
bus and all expenses. Lunch cost
will be collected separately.
Guests are welcome. For reserva-
tions call Sarah 392-6360.
AMERICAN MIZRACHI
WOMEN
Beersheva Chapter will hold
their next meeting on Wednes-
day, Jan. 9 at 12:30 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank, W. At-
Frisco's Monument To Holocaust
Stood There 4 Days Before Attack
Continued from Page 10
Segal, reached at his New
Brunswick, N.J. home, told the
Jewish Bulletin that the desecra-
tion was "ugly and brutal" and
that he personally felt "violated"
by the vandalism.
Three years of fund-raising
produced $500,000 for the memo-
rial and an additional $250,000
educational endowment. The
campaign was under the patron-
age of Mayor Feinstein, who
attended the dedication.
Ernest Michel, who survived
Auschwitz and is now executive
vice president of the United
Jewish Appeal in New York, said
in his dedication address that
what he had most feared in the
camps was dying with the world
not even knowing of the unen-
ding gassing and burnings of the
victims.
NOTING THAT books have
been written calling the Holo-
caust a "hoax," Michel said
memorials like the one in San
Francisco helped to keep the
truth alive.
Segal told the assemblage that
he had learned about the Holo-
caust from survivors, adding that
many kept quiet about their
terrible experience, not even
wishing to share those horrors
with their children. He started
work on "The Holocaust" two
years ago.
A reception was held after the
unveiling, with wine and bread
and other foods, a final act for
participants to mark the joy of
rememhrancaa^jand-'part of an
educational' campaign which the
memorial committee indicated it
hoped would help "assure that
"Your Courteous And
Professional Manner Deserves
To Be Complimented."
warmth and Comfort Sensitivity and Consideration
Compassion in your time of need We understand.
A FanHy Protection Plan Chapel
we honor all pre-need programs.
5808 w. Atlantic Avenue Deiray Beach. FL, 33445
305-499-8000
the world will never countenance
such a tragedy again."
Ian tic Ave., Delray. A paid-up
membership luncheon and enter-
tainment will be enjoyed. All are
welcome.
out
Sooth Palm Beach County
Region will be forming a new
chapter, Boca Barwood, on
Thursday, Jan. 10 at 1 p.m. at
the home of Peter and Evelyn
Savino, Boca Greens. Everyone
who would like to participate is
welcome. Light refreshments will
be served. For further details,
please call Evelyn Savino 483-
4760 or Barbara Knee 483-3676.
All Points Chapter will enjoy a
night at the races at Pompano
Race Track on Saturday, Jan. 12.
Deluxe dinner at the Top of the
Park, admission and program.
For further information, call
Dolly 499-4851.
Boca Teeca will hold a mini-
brunch in the upstairs card room
of Boca Teeca at 11 a.m. on
Thursday, Jan. 10. This is a
newly-formed chapter of ORT
and all are welcome to attend.
For further information, call
Natalie Berman, 272-4474.
Milton
Kretsky,
69
Milton Kretsky
Milton Kretsky of Delray
Beach, a prominent leader in the
Jewish Community of South
County, died on Monday, Dec.
24, at age 69.
Kretsky was a former vice pre-
sident of the South County
Jewish Federation and a member
of its board from its inception. He
served as chair of the Family and
Men's Division of the Federation-
UJA Campaign in 1983, and as
chair of the Community Rela-
tions Council in 83-84.
He was a devoted member of
Temple Emeth, serving on the
temple board and on the board of
the temple's brotherhood. In the
past year Kretsky was chair of
the temple's 10th anniversary
jubilee celebrations, which ended
just two weeks before his
passing.
"Milton Kretsky was a rare
human being. He wa one of the
key people who molded the
identity of the Jewish community
in South County; he was a deeply
committed Jew who translated
this commitment into action. I
shall personally miss him," said
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, executive
director of the Federation. "He
was a great leader and a fine
human being," added Marianne
Bobick, Federation president.
Kretsky, born in Pennsylvania,
was director of the B'nai B.'rith
New York area office, and headed
the Cleveland office of the Na-
tional Jewish Hospital at Denver.
He is survived by his wife Ethel;
two daughters, Myrna Marion
and Arlene Worth; four grand-
children and two brothers. Inter-
ment was at Mount Hebron
Cemetery in Flushing, New York.
An old Ja/vishlradtbn has
a beautiful new location.
For over ninety years, the Gutterman family has served the
Jewish community in Metropolitan New York with funeral service
of the highest standard. Now we proudly extend our commitment
to the Jewish people in a gracious new setting in South Florida.
We invite your inspection of our beautiful new funeral home in
which no detail in design or appointments has been overlooked
to create an environment that will comfort the bereaved.
Count on us to serve you here with the same dignity that has
given us our standing in New York since 1892.
A CALL FOR INFORMATION RE:"SENTINEL PLAN"
OGutterman
Warheitsisr
luNtMM OMCIom SMCf ma
7240 North Fodwal Highway oca Raton. Florida M7 MOO
DM*. SMesr* tawt 742 M
IN CHEATER NEW VOMK OUTTEMUN? INC
NOCKVK.lt CENTM..U WOOOMMY. I I MANHATTAN QUEENS OCMUYN MON*


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