The Jewish Floridian of South County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00146

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
"rnuuv. rcuiuni/ *>, iaot
"Jewish Floridian
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
Volume 6 Number 2
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, January 13,1984
FndShochii
Price 35 Cents

>fiSf

Installation Of Hazzan Roberts
Leo Frank
Pardon
Georgia Rebuff
Angers U.S. Jews
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Major American Jewish or-
ganizations have~expressed
shock and outrage over the
decision by the Georgia
JState Board of Pardons and
Paroles to deny posthu-
mous pardon to Leo Frank,
a Jewish factory superin-
tendent who was convicted
of the murder of a 13-year-
old girl in Atlanta in 1913
and who was lynched two
years later by a mob in one
of the nation's worst out-
*
Inside
Margolit Navon Part
2. Last week we met
Margolit, a rare
person who cares.
The story continues.
Page 7.
GUILTY OR
INNOCENT? Ethel
and Julius
Rosenberg are still
on trial in the annals
of history. Is it
important for us?
One opinion on
Page 8.
LETTERS TO
EDITOR. One
challenges a rabbi
and one rabbi
challenges. Page 8.

ADOPT A CABBAGE
PATCH DOLL. If she
finds a home, the
Day School will
benefit. Page 3.
bursts of anti-Semitism.
The State Board chairman,
Mobley llowell, said after the de-
cision was announced that
Jewish organizations that had
sought the exoneration of Frank
tailed to show beyond doubt that
he was innocent. In a written
statement, Howellsaid:
"After an exhaustive review
and many hour? of deliberation,
it is impossible to decide conclu-
sively the guilt or innocence of
Leo Frank. There are many in-
consistencies in the accounts of
what happened."
THE BOARD of Pardons re-
viewed the case after Alonzo
Mann, now 85 years old, who was
a 14-year-old office boy at the
time Mary Phagan. an employe
of the National Pencil Company,
was killed, told reporters last
year that he had seen the fac-
tory's janitor, Jim Conley, carry-
ing the limp, unconscious body of
the young girl to the factory
basement. The parole board
claimed that Mann's statement
did not provide any new
evidence. Jewish organizations
Continued on Page 11
Very soon B'nai Torah will be
celebrating another milestone in
its history of growth. On Friday,
Jan. 13, Hazzan Donald Roberts
will be officially installed in his
position. At this point in this
year, Hazzan Roberts is not a
stranger to B'nai Torah Congreg-
ation. His voice and artistic
sensitivity to the liturgy have en-
hanced services over the past six
months. His skill as a teacher in
their religious school is obvious
to students and parents. His
ability and commitment to pre-
pare children for Bar Mitzvah
will add significantly to that spe-
cial day for them. His role in
adult education has brought a
new dimension to that facet of
life.
Beyond all of that, though,
Hazzan Roberts is interested and
concerned about the total con-
gregation. Hazzan Roberts chose
this synagogue because of the ex-
citing potential this community
holds for growth and Jewish
experience.
Donald Roberts was commis-
sioned a cantor by the Cantors'
Assembly, the organization of
Hazzanim in the Conservative
Movement. He came from
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He has
served congregations there, in
Chicago, and in Washington,
Hazzan Donald Roberts
D.C., following his gradua-i
tion from the Hebrew
Union College, School of
Sacred Music. Hazzan Roberts'
musical award, his own composi-
tion, his concerts, his record, all
attest to the quality of his talent
and his involvement in Jewish
life. In addition, he has done
extensive graduate work in
counseling and education.
He is married to the former
Barbara Rapp and has two
children, Jennifer and Darren.
Hazzan Moses Silverman of
Chicago, 111., and Rabbi Feldman
will serve as installing officers.
Music is the heritage of Moses
J. Silverman, who represents the
fifth generation of Cantors in his
family. He is the distinguished
Hazzan of the Anshe Emet Syn-
agogue (43 years) and has served
as President of the Cantors As-
sembly of America and as a
member of the Board of Over-
seers of the Jewish Theological
Seminary. He is a graduate of the
Damrosch Institute of Music.
A number of years ago the
Cantors Assembly of America, in
cooperation with the Cantors In-
stitute of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, established
the Moses J. Silverman Scholar-
ship in perpetuity "in deep ap-
preciation of his heroic efforts in
behalf of the sacred calling of
Hazzanut."
He has done recordings, radio
and television work and is well
known for his lecture recitals on
Jewish music which have been
presented all over the country.
The community is invited to
join B'nai Torah Congregation at
8:15 p.m., Friday, Jan. 13, as
Hazzan Roberts is installed.
U.S.-Israel Relations
Strained Over Arafat
Bv.lTA Wire Services
U.S.-Israel relations, re-
cently improved, are
strained anew over the
Reagan Administration's
optimistic view of the
apparent reconciliation be-
tween the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and
Egypt.
Israel regards the meeting in
Cairo last week between
President Hosni Mubarak and
PLO chief Yasir Arafat as a blow
to peace prospects in the region.
The Administration called it "an
Saltzman Honored
By Local Federation
On Jan. 29, the South County
Jewish Federation, in conjunc-
tion with the annual UJA cam-
paign in Century Village, will
have a testimonial luncheon in
honor of Reuben Saltzman, It will
be held on the second floor of the
Administration Building;
minimum family donation of
$1000 plus $7 per person couvert.
Dr. Hyman Henkin, Chairman
of the Century Village campaign
announced, "the committee
selected Ruby because of the
great amount of respect he com-
mands and because of his intense
Jewish activities."
Saltzman is the current presid-
ent of Temple Beth Shalom, the
Synagogue on the grounds of
Century Village.
Howard Stone will be the spe-
cial guest speaker at the fund
raising event. He has spent most
of his adult life in what he calls
"the historic adventure of saving
Jewish lives." While traveling
through Europe more than 20
years ago, he became involved in
a clandestine operation smug-
gling Jews out of North Africa
and into Israel.
Stone lived on a Kibbutz and
worked on sensitive projects for
the State of Israel, still classified
today. Currently he is a writer
and lecturer.
Henkin' said, "We are fortun-
ate in having such a fine gentle-
man as Reuben Saltzman within
our community and such an
eloquent speaker as Howard
Stone. This event is guaranteed
to be successful."
encouraging development," and
President Reagan has said, "We
are optimistic about this be-
cause Mubarak is the head of
state of the one country in the
Arab world that has gone for-
ward and has a peace treaty with
Israel."
BUT ACCORDING to Premier
Yitzhak Shamir, the Americans
are making a grave mistake if
they believe the Mubarak-Arafat
meeting would help advance
Reagan's Middle East peace
initiative of Sept. 1,1982. Shamir
sent Reagan a cable warning that
American support for the Egypt-
PLO rapprochement would only
dissuade moderate Palestinians
from coming to the negotiating
table.
Shimon Peres, chairman of the
opposition Labor Party,
disagreed with Shamir's assess-
ment and warned that Israel
must strive for a "common stra-
tegy" with the U.S. to achieve
peace. But the Shamir govern-
ment's attitude drew strong
support from American Jewish
leaders who flooded the White
House with statements of protest
over the weekend.
The sharp differences between
Jerusalem and Washington
emerged after Arafat, ousted
from Lebanon by Syrian-backed
PLO dissidents, was warmly
embraced in Cairo by Mubarak.
That created bitter feelings in
Israel where the Foreign
Ministry labeled "the reception
accorded ... in Cairo to the
head of the murderous PLO a
severe blow to the peace process
in the Middle East."
ON THE same day, however,
State Department snokesman
John Hughes noted that the
meeting in Cairo took place in the
context of "Egypt's adherence to
the Camp David accords and its
outspoken support" for Reagan's
peace initiative.
Reagan, at a White House
interview, cited the Mubarak-
Arafat meeting as a reason for
optimism over his peace plan
which was rejected by both Israel
and the Palestinians when it was
enunciated more than a year ago.
"I'm always a little leery about
Continued on Page 11
*


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, January 13,1984

j
f
i
Benefits Seen
By Generals, Admirals Back from Tour
NEW YORK A lead-
ing American military
authority expects expanded
strategic military coopera-
tion between the United
States and Israel to benefit
both countries.
Returning from a mission of 13
retired American generals and
admirals to Israel held Dec. 4-11,
Lt. General (Ret.) Harry Kin
nard, former commander of the
U.S. Army Development Com-
mand, said that the Jewish State
would contribute combat expert-
ise and experience and the U.S.
its global view.
He pointed out that although
"the Israelis are very, very good
at some things we've had
worldwide experience, and I
think we can still teach the Is-
raelis a great deal."
Lt. General (Ret.) William Nel-
son, former commander of the
12th Air Force, said that he wel-
comed the joint training of
American and Israeli combat
pilots.
IN SIMILAR vein, retired Ad-
miral Maurice "Mickey" Wea-
ver, former U.S. Navy command-
er in chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet, said
that "there's been a substantial
exchange of information on
tactics and procedures, how we
go about the various parts ol
warfare."
Admiral Weisner contrasted
the different naval missions of
the fleets of each nation, observ-
ing "Israel has hundreds of kilo-
meters of coastline to protect and
must protect its commerce as
.well, while the U.S. Navy has a .
world role arid different goals.*1
He added, however, taht "they
can cooperate and exchange
information."
EMPHASIZING that the
extent and means of increased
strategic cooperation remain to
be worked out, the American of-
ficers anticipated that a great
deal of progress in this area will
be made at a joint U.S.-Israeli
military political meeting sched-
uled to assemble in Washington
in January.
In a press conference in Tel
Aviv following a visit to the
Rambam Hospital in Haifa, Is-
rael's noted burn and trauma
center for combat wounds, the
American military men said they
were convinced that the hospital
was capable of caring for burn
casualties resulting from the
October bombing of the Marine
headquarters in Beirut and did
not know why the victims were
not flown there for treatment.
The retired U.S. military lead-
ers who toured Israeli defense in-
stallations and visited troops at
forward positions in Lebanon's
Bekaa Valley were briefed by
senior officers in Israel's Defense
Forces. The Israelis included Lt.
Gen. Moshe Levy, Chief of Staff;
Maj. Gen. (Res.) Menachem
Meron, director general of the
Defense Ministry, and Maj. Gen.
Ehud Barak, chief of Military
Intelligence. The Americans also
met with Rear Admiral Zeev
Almog at Israel Naval Head-
quarters, Haifa.
PARTICIPANTS in the mili-
tary mission, which was spon-
sored by the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, were Maj.
Gen. Gerald J. Carey, USAF,
Atlanta; Lt. Gen. Richard E.
Carey, USMC. Columbus; Maj.
General Robert Cocklin, AUS,
Arlington, Va; Admiral Donald
Davis, USN, LaJolla, Calif.; Gen.
Hamilton H. Howze, AUS, Fort
Worth, Tex.; Lt. Gen. Harry
Kinnard, AUS, Arlington, Va.;
Maj. Gen. Doyle Larson, USAF,
Burns ville. Minn.; Lt. Gen.
Thomas H. Miller. USMC. Arl-
ington, Va.; Lt. Gen. William R.
Nelson, USAF, Sequim, Wash.;
Lt. Gen. Adolph G. Schwenk.
USMC. Pinehurst, N.C.: Vice
Admiral William St. George.
USN. San Diego, Calif.; Gen.
Volney F. Warner. AUS. Mac-
Lean, Va.; and Admiral Maurice
F. Weisner, USN. Pensacola. Fla.
all retired.
Among the military installa-
tions the American group visited
were an air base in the Negev
desert built following the Camp
David accords which eliminated
bases in the Sinai; the port in
Haifa; a sophisticated electronics
plant using the most up-to-date
technology for combat weaponry;
and a military hospital minutes
from the front lines whose
specialty is treating shrapnel
wounds.
In addition, the group visited
the West Bank, a kibbutz in the
Jordan Valley, Masada, the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Memorial, the
Western Wall and Christian holy
sites in the Galilee, Jerusalem
and Bethlehem.
Mrs. Erica Jesselson receives Yeshiva University's
Distinguished Service Award from Dr. Norman Lamm,
president of the University, at the University's 59th annual
Chanukah Dinner. Mrs. Jesselson is the first woman to receive
the prestigious award from the University. Together with her
husband, Ludwig, the Jessebons are Benefactors of the
University and take special interest in the activities of the
University Museum and libraries.
Reagan Vows U.S. Will Stay
In Lebanon to Press for Peace
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
has stressed again that the
U.S. will remain in Leba-
non "while there's hope for
peace."
But the President, responding
to questions at a brief news
conference before he left for a
vacation- in California, added that
'he U.S. is "stepping up our
diplomatic efforts" to bring
about "not a military but a
political solution" in Lebanon.
"There is reason to believe
that that the presence of the
multinational force has made
some progress," Reagan said.
"We have now an agreement be-
tween Lebanon and Israel which
has Israel's agreement to with-
draw. I don't _believe that it's
impossible to have a similar kind
of agreement with Syria, which
would recognize some of Syria's
interests."
HE ADDED that the various
factions in Lebanon which met in
Geneva recently achieved a "kind
of tacit recognition" that the
governments of President Amin
Gemayel "was the government of
Lebanon."
The President called the brief
news conference to issue a state-
ment in which he said the local
Marine commanders in Beirut
should not be blamed for the
terrorist bombing that killed
some 240 American servicemen
at the Marine headaiiartera in
Beirut. "If there is to be olame, it
probably rests here, in this office
and with this President," he said.
"And I accept responsibility for
the bad as well as the good."
Reagan stressed that terrorism
today is not just a deed of
fanatical individuals but is
sponsored by various political
groups and even some countries.

Juwadl Jtobfiev- JJtafewxA
S*n <>/' mm
*^e KQO 17QP Steve
Nauen OO^-l / OO Greenseid
Under North & South County Rabbinical Supervision
\ / 5801 Parker Ave.. W.P.B.. FL 33405
AllVKKTISKMkNT
REGIONAL ARTS PRESENTS
W TWO GREAT ORCHESTRAS
.BACK TO BACK
by Clyde Fyfe
r
i
Term Life Insurance
CHEAP!
35
45
55
250K
263
398
838
500K 1 Million
485
735
1,555
860
1,360
2,700
In Most Cases, No Examination
H. STERN & CO.
Call 305-533-1126
WEST PALM BEACH (RAK) Mid-
January ushers in two out-
standing southern symphony
orchestras at the West Palm Beach
Auditorium. On January 15th "At
Two" in the afternoon, the
FLORIDA SYMPHONY conducted
by SIDNEY ROTHSTEIN with re-
nowned pianist JOHN BROWNING.
The next evening "At Eight" the
ATLANTA SYMPHONY conducted
by ROBERT SHAW with award
winning pianist JEFFREY
KAHANE.
For the Sunday matinee per-
formance at 2 PM, Maestro
Rothstein, newly appointed Music
Director of the Orlando based
Florida Symphony Orchestra, has
chosen an all Russian program.
Nicolai Miakovsky's seldom heard
Symphony No. 21 will open this
musical evening and the magnifi-
cent Symphony
No. 6 (The
Pathetique) by
Tchaikovsky will
close. John
Browning, "holds
music up to the
light and compels
his audience to
pay rapt attention to each nuance,
each breath," joins the orchestra
to perform the electrifying Piano
Concerto No. 3 by Serge Prokofiev.
Acclaimed Music Director
Robert Shaw will
conduct his
Atlanta Sym-
phony for the
Monday evening
program at 8 PM
in a highly di-
verse selection of
major works.
iiusiloi cvetiui
0
They will perform Beethoven's
Symphony No. I and the enigma-
tic Suite from "Nobilissima
Visone" by Paul Hindemith.
Jeffrey Kahane youthful Grand
Prize winner of the Arthur
Rubinstein Piano Competition
last year in Israel, will play the
demandingly beautiful Piano
Concerto in A minor by Robert
Schumann.
Come and enjoy these two out-
standing concerts at the Audi-
torium on the 15th and 16th. Indi-
vidual tickets for all Regional Arts
events are now on sale at the Box
Office which is open weekdays
from 10 AM to 6 PM. All seats are
reserved and valet parking is
available. Phone 68&6012 for
reservations.
The West Palm Beach Audi-
torium is conveniently located just
off 195 on Palm Beach Lakes
Blvd. at North Congress Avenue.
"These programs sponsored by
the Regional Arts Foundation and
the State of Florida through the
Fine Arts Council of Florida.
Department of State, with the
assistance of the National Endow-
ment for the Arts, a federal agency.
Hie programs prohibit discrimi-
nation on grounds of race, color
national origin, sex, handicap or
age in accordance with Federal
law." Further, this is "A Tourist
Development Tax Project accom-
plished with the support of the
Palm Beach County Council of the
Arts, Inc., the Palm Beach County
I ounst Development Council, and
the Board of County Commis-
sioners of Palm Beach County "
*


Kffi
V. rnnuaiv h. inrw
ay, January 13,1984
The Jewish t'loridian of South County
Page 3
Cabbage Patch
Doll For Sale
Tony Williams, owner of Ms.
Sparkles Detail Housekeeping
Service has donated a Cabbage
Patch Doll to the South County
Jewish Federation Community
Day School. He purchased the
much sought after doll via a radio
auction for almost $500; the
money going to the Salvation
Army.
The doll will be auctioned off
once again, with 100 percent of
the proceeds going to the Day
School. To place a bid and make a
tax deductible gift, telephone the
school at 395-3212. The success-
ful bidder will be the highest bid
received by noon on Jan. 30.
Williams, not Jewish, when
asked why this effort for the
Jewish Day School responded,
"If not for the local Jewish com-
munity, I would not have a suc-
cessful business. This is my
small way of paying a debt."
James Roosevelt (center), oldest son of the
late President and Mrs. Franklin Delano
Roosevelt, helps launch the year-long, na-
tionwide Israel Bond tribute to Eleanor
Roosevelt in 1984 commemorating the 100th
anniversary of her birth by purchasing the
first Bond of the centennial observance at
ceremonies held in New York in December.
Shown with Mr. Roosevelt, who is national
honorary chairman of the Eleanor Roosevelt
Honorary Centennial Committee, are (from
left) Susan Weikers, associate national
chairman, and Alice K. Peerce, national
chairman of the Centennial Celebration;
Brig. Gen (Res.) Yehudah Halevy, president
and chief executive officer of Israel Bonds,
and Rosalie K. Gerson, national chairman of
the Women's Division.
Names in News
AJComm. Names Gordis Executive Veep

Dr. David M. Gordis has been
appointed executive vice presi-
dent of the American Jewish
Committee, it is announced by
Howard I. Friedman, AJC's na-
tional president.
Dr. Gordis, who currently
serves as vice president of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America and of the University of
Judaism in Los Angeles, which is
affiliated with the Seminary, will
assume the AJC position next
July. William Troaten, who has
been serving as AJC's acting ex-
ecutive director, will continue in
that position until July.
In his new role. Dr. Gordis will
head the AJC's 300-member
staff, located in its New York
headquarters as well as in 33 local
offices around the United States
and in Jerusalem. Paris and
Mexico City.
Ann H. Jackowitz has been
named recipient of the second
annual Matthew B. Rosenhaus
Fellowship for the training and
development of human relations
professionals, the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B"rith as an-
nounced. She will serve as an as-
sistant in the Television, Radio
and Film Department of ADL's
Intergroup Relations Division.
The Fellowship was set up with
an endowment by Gila Rosen-
haus as a memorial to her hus-
band, who died in 1980. Mr. Ros-
enhaus was president and chair-
man of the board of the J.B. Wil-
liams Co., Inc.; an official of
Nabisco, Inc., and Columbia Pic-
tures Industries, Inc., and an
honorary vice chairman of the
League.
Saul Rubenatein, senior vice
president for merchandising of a
toy and hobby shops chain, will
receive Brandeis University's
Distinguished Community
Service Award on Feb. 18 at the
Grand Hyatt in New York City.
The Brandeis award is present-
ed to persons who have combined
successful careers with a commit-
ment of service to others. Pro-
ceeds from the event will estab-
lish a scholarship fund at Bran-
deis University in Rubenstein's
name.
Jewish Music Season poster
inaugurates this year's 11-week
celebration of Jewish music
sponsored by JWB's Jewish
Music Council. Jewish Music
Season lasts from Jan. 14 to May
7. These are the dates from Shab-
bat Shirah (Sabbath of Song) to
Yom Ha'Atzmaut (Israel Inde-
pendence Day).
According to Leonard Kaplan,
chairman of the JWB Jewish
Music Council, "We are holding
Jewish Music Season as a way of
highlighting the richness and
diversity of Jewish music and the
important role it plays in Jewish
life from the haunting melodies of
cantorial music to the spirited
tunes of Israeli folk music."
The 16-by-20-inch Jewish
Music Season poster, which is in
full color, was created by Morde-
chai Rosenstein who is one of
America's foremost Hebraic
artists.
Jewish emigration from the
Soviet Union fell to the lowest
point in nearly 20 years during
1983, a year marked by increased
harassment of Jews and an
onslaught" of anti-Semitic pro-
paganda using Tsarist and neo-
Nazi themes, it was reported last
week by the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry.
Morris Abram, chairman of the
Conference, said in releasing a
year-end report that the past 12
months which coincided with
the first year in power of Soviet
President Yuri Andropov were
marked by the denial of exit visas
to all but a handful of Jews and
strong efforts to discourage and
inhibit Jews from applying to
emigrate; harsh measures
against Jews seeking to express
their cultural and religious
heritage; an alarming hate cam-
paign against Jews using Zion-
ism as the ostensible target and
portraying Jews as potential
traitors to the Soviet mother-
land; and intensified efforts to
reduce and eliminate contacts be-
tween Soviet Jews and Jews
living abroad.
Through Dec. 22, Jewish emi-
gration from the USSR totaled
only 1,284, the Conference re-
ported. This number less than
half the 1982 total was the
lowest annual figure since records
have been kept of the Soviet
Jewry emigration movement,
which dates from 1965, according
to a year-by-year tabulation con-
tained in the reoort.
The Executive of the Jewish
Agency has concluded two days
of meetings in New York. Chair-
man, Leon Dubrin, announced
that the Executive voted for a
budget framework of $360 million
for the Agency's fiscal 1984-85
year, and a budget of $48 million
for Project Renewal.
This recommended budget
frame will be presented to the
meeting of the Jewish Agency's
Board of Governors in Jerusalem
in February.
Dulzin stressed that the
budget framework, which the
Jewish Agency treasurer, Akiva
Lewinsky, presented to the Exec-
utive, is a balanced budget, with
no provision for deficits.
Inna Elbert of Kiev, wife of
Prisoner of Conscience Lev El-
bert, has been fired from her job
for "absenteeism," the Union of
Councils for Soviet Jews has
learned.
Inna's six-week hunger strike
last Fall in protest of the accusa-
tions against her husband left her
with liver damage. Last month,
she suffered a small heart attack.
Although home for a short time
to recover, Soviet authorities in
both Moscow and Kiev had
assured her that she would have
her job when she returned to
work.
Shocked by the "flip-flop" and
injustice of the Soviet action,
UCSJ President Lynn Singer
stated: "As long as Lev Elbert
remains in prison. Inna Elbert is
the sole supporter of her family.
She and her young son Carmi
have been deprived of the right to
survive."
Researchers in the
Physiological Psychology
laboratories at the University of
Haifa have developed a new
process for detecting the source
of foods that have been contami-
nated with poison. The process,
developed by Prof. Barry Berger,
makes use of well-known princi-
ples of behavioral psychology
that relate to humans, as well as
to animals. The test is based
upon the phenomenon of taste
aversion, and laboratory animals
are used to indicate exactly which
food substance has been contam-
inated.
Pass the Baton
From generation to generation, the legacy of our an-
cestors and our Torah has been passed. You could
help continue this process by establishing a Legacy,
Trust or Endowment Fund. Enjoy the religious rewards
by giving while also receiving tax benefits.
*******
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION
368-2737
BOCA RATON
DELRAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
Waldman hotel
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt Koshei Cuisine
Your Hos Sam and Morris Waldman. Gary Shar. David Diamond
PASSOVER SPECIALS
11 Days-10 Nights
Apr.15-Apr.25 enCA
2 Meals daily included 0")U
3 Meals Sat. and holidays
Ooc.
Stay at Adjoining Atlantic Towers Hotel-
Meals at Waldman
575
PfSor
Dbl.
Occ
Per
Parson
Single
Occ.
/I0 Days-9 Nights$0A
Apr. 16-Apr. 25 W\J
Dining Room Open to the Public
Phone for Reservations
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWNED CANTOR
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTTED
Phone Sam Waldman 538-5731 of 534-4751
ON THE OCEAN AT 43rd STREET
Passover- 1984
universal kosher tours inc
Loldially invites you to L*leo\ate
A TRADITIONAL AND KOSHER
PASSOVER HOLIDAY
at the {Diplomat Motel
i^Hollywooa, Jtla.
APRIL 16 -APRIL 24, 1984
Complete Holiday Program
From $799 to $1099 per person double occupancy
Plus 18% taxes and gratuities
Jo\ .Additional InfoHrwtu*} Contact
Unive\sat Jlojliri -/outs Snc.
) iTtnn -llaza
7U q/Ut, %m %*k ,000,
212 J 94-08 J 6 800-221-2791
ExcbisvE OpoiATo* Urn DIPLOMAT HOTEL



maiy.JancMiylS.iatu
New Demands for Hikes
Plague Gov't. As
Inflation Rate Booms
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Strikes, slowdowns and protest
meetings continue to plague the
country as government workers
press for higher pay. The Cabinet
was scheduled to convene a spe-
cial session at the end of last
week to discuss the growing
economic crisis and to consider
Finance Minister Yigal Cohen
Orgad's economic plans and the
proposed trimmed budget for the
new fiscal year.
All postal services were
paralyzed as 3,500 post office em-
ployees, including workers at the
post office banks, stayed at
home. Mail was not collected
from post office boxes and del-
ivery of mail was halted. The
Ctal workers have not indicated
i long they intend to continue
their stoppage.
LABOR AND Welfare Min-
istry employes also continued
their partial work stoppage which
involves not dealing with the
public or making payments. In-
come tax and property tax work-
ers also continued their strike.
Administrative employes in gov-
ernment hospitals have threaten-
ed to stop work if they are not
granted a 5,000 Shekel (S50) al-
lowance. They have also threat-
ened to halt work on the 24th of
each month in the future if cuts in
overtime allowances are not
restored.
Orgad, addressing the Knesset
Economic Committee, warned
that unless Israel reduces the
deficit in its balance of payments
by $1 billion, it will not be able to
find additional sources of financ-
ing to repay loans. On the other
hand, he said, if the gap in the
balance of payments is narrowed
by $1 billion, the economy will be
able to grow at an annual rate of
1.5 percent beginning in 1985.
Gad Yaacobi, chairman of the
Economic Committee, said at the
same session that the present
economic hardships were a direct
outcome of the "stupid economic
policy of the government in the
past few years." He predicted
that in 1984 inflation will soar to
300 percent. Under such circum-
stances, he warned, the economy
will become paralyzed.
ECONOMIC experts ex-
pressed doubts that Cohen-Orgad
will be able to achieve his econ-
omic objectives because of the
growing unrest and turmoil in the
economic sector of the country
and because of internal difficul-
ties in the Likud coalition.
Deputy Premier David Levy
has already announced his op-
position to a policy of "controlled
unemployment," a predictable
consequence of the government's
economic policy, and a tough at-
titude toward the demands of the
workers. The Tami party, which
represents the low income seg-
ment of Israel's population,
primarily the Sephardim, is also
opposed to further economic
hardships which would intensify
the poverty and misery of low in-
come families.
In addition to the narrow
majority of the coalition 64
members in the 120-member
Knesset, including former
Premier Menachem Begin who
has not been a functioning Knes-
set member in the last few
months the coalition is also
beset by other difficulties. Fore-
most among them is the pressing
demand of the Aguda Party to
pass legislation banning all pub-
lic transportation on Saturdays.
Israelis Discover
New Herpes Treatment
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Hebrew University
scientists have developed a new preparation for treatment
of the type of herpes that infects the mouth and nasal
regions. It contains natural ingredients already approved
by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Prof. Ruth Segal, who helped develop the new
medication, believes it may prove effective in the treat-
ment of genital herpes. The Yissum Research Develop-
ment Co. of the Hebrew University is seeking financial
support for further research.
THE ANTI-VIRAL agent, IDU, incorporated in the
new preparation was found to be more effective than other
preparations currently in use for the treatment of cold
sores. It permits better contact with the skin and
mucuous membranes, has a cooling, soothing effect and a
pleasant taste.
Ill Starred Predictions
The
Jewish Floridian
Of South County
f/KlSnocnti
FHEDSMOCMET SUZANNE SMOCMET GERI ROSENBERG
Editor and Publisher Executive Editor News Coordinator
uMlehed Weekly Mid September through Mid-May, Si Whii, balance of year. (43 mm)
Second Class Postage Paid at Boca Raton, Fla uSPS 550-250 ISSN 0274 a114
BOCA RATON OFFICE 2200 N Federal Mwy., Suite 206. Boca Raton. Fla 3J432 Phone 36*2001
Mam Otlice Plant 120 N E 6th St. Miami. Fla 33101 Phone 1 373-4605
Poatmaater Return lorm 3571 lo Jewish Floridian, P.O. Boa 01-2J73. Miami, Fla. 33101
Advertising Director, Stacl Learner Phone SM-1M2
Combined Jewish Appeal South County Jewish Federation, Inc.. Ollicers: President Marianne Boot ,
Vice Presidenis, Marrorie Baer, Eric W Oeckmger, Milton Kretsky. Secretary. Arnold Rosenthai
Treasurer, Berenice Schankerman. E>ecutie Director. Rabbi Bruce S Warshal
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area $3 50 Annual (2 Year Minimum $7). by membership South Count*
Jewish Federation. 2200 N Federal Hwy Suite 206. Boca Raton. Fta 33432 Phone 368 2737
Out of Town Upon Request
Friday, January 13, 1984
Volume 6
9SHEVAT5744
Number 2
By CARL ALPERT
HAIFA Many Israelis take
astrology seriously, and the
forecasts for the future based on
horoscopes are often factors to be
considered when business or
personal affairs are being plan-
ned. A review of the forecasts in
recent years shows a fair degree
of successful predictions, in-
cluding a couple of bulls eyes. At
the end of December, 1982, the
astrologists studied their graphs,
charted the heavenly movements
of the planets, and pinpointed the
zodiac signs of public personal-
ities. They then went on public
record with their predictions for
the year 1983.
We never accept blindly their
own reports of success. A year
ago we carefully snipped from the
papers the various prophecies
and now that 1983 reaches its
close we compare the prognosti-
cations with what actually
happened.
IT HAS been a catastrophic
year for the soothsayers. Herzl
Lipshitz, the most distinguished
forecaster of them all, managed
to produce a mixed record. Last
year he foresaw the war in Leba-
non and told us that the Reagan
Plan was not worth the paper it
was written on. To be sure he also
predicted the assassination of
Hussein, with Arafat's taking
over Jordan. All that was in 1982.
What did he foresee for 1983?
Contrary to general expecta-
tions, he said, this would be a
good year for Israel's economy.
Despite inflation, good times
would continue. As we now know,
he could not have been more
wrong.
Lipshitz also saw national elec-
tions being held in 1983, with the
Likud emerging as winner. This
year would see the political
collapse of Shimon Peres. Well,
there were no national elections. '
Dan Talmor, another popular
crystal gazer, also found elections
in the stars this year. He and
Lipshitz apparently looked at the
same stare. Talmor warned that
war would break out in the north
ui September or October. As for
Menachem Begin, he would get
through 1983 without any
problems, but after March 1984
his health would begin to deterio-
rate and he would resign from the
premiership. Reality came
quicker than Talmor had anti-
cipated.
STILL IN the political field, he
saw Yitzhak Rabin ousting Peres
from leadership of the Labor
Party, but then falling victim to
health problems himself, with
Yitzhak Navon taking over the
leadership.
Danny Harman erred in his
predictions on Begin in the other
direction. He declared that
Begin s health would cause him
to resign in March of this year.
This was to be followed by
national elections in May or
June. Ariel Sharon's popularity
would increase enormously.
Economic conditions would get
even better during the summer.
If the astrologists invested in the
Tel Aviv stock exchange on the
basis of their own predictions
they must all be broke by now.
Yehudit Gabai expected open
conflict between Egypt and
Israel this year, based on
Mubarak's extremism and stub-
bornness.
On a global basis, Israel's
expatriate Uri Geller also had
some predictions for the year
1963. He foresaw Reagan's with-
drawing from the Presidency
because of illness before the end
of 1983, with Vice President Bush
succeeding him. Ayatollah
Khomeini would die before the
end of the year, and in November
a devastating earthquake would
destroy parts of southern Cali-
fornia.
IF THE "experts" can get
away with these predictions, why
can't I try my own hand, and
without reference to Mars,
Jupiter, Venus or Uranus.
Personally. I am a Taurus.
Oracle Alpert proclaims that in
1984 there will be a violent con-
frontation between secularists
and religious extremists in
Israel; economic conditions will
improve, despite a wave of
strikes called by the Histadrut
against the government; a major
technological breakthrough by
Israeli scientists will make head-
lines everywhere; there will be a
marked upturn in immigration to
Israel from the free West; no Is-
raeli will win a Nobel Prize this
year; Yitzhak Navon will not
take over the leadership of the
Labor Party; commercial tele-
vision will be on the verge of
making its debut here.
Just check me next year!
Yale Univ. Given
$1.6 Million to Spur
Judaic Studies Program
NEW HAVEN (JTA)
Yale University has
received an "extra-
ordinary" gift of $1.6 mil-
lion to establish two new
endowed professorships in
its Judaic studies program,
according to the current
issue of the Newsletter for
that program.
The Newsletter, in reporting on
the gift, said such endowed
scholarships "enable Yale to
attract and encourage the finest
faculty members, at work on the
frontiers of knowledge and
dedicated to the university's
intellectual life."
The Newsletter reported that
the gift would be used to create a
senior professorship in Hebrew
language and literature, and a
visiting professor in the humani-
J!fS; .IheJ Newsl*ter reported
that the donors indicated they
wanted not to be named publicly
THE NEWSLETTER
declared that "the university's
tradition to excellence in the
study of language and literature
a vital part of undergraduate
education, will be enhanced by
the appointment of a distin-
guished senior teacher and
S^,Hebrew languae and
The Newsletter added that the
appointment also "will do much
to strengthen the Judaic studies
program, for the comprehensive
understanding of the subtleties
and nuances of Jewish culture
depends fundamentally on
adequate knowedge of its
language and literature."
The visiting professorship,
whose incumbent will be ap-
pointed each year from various
areas in the humanities, in-
cluding philosophy, art and
music, "will complement and
enrich the teaching and scholarly
activity of the university's
permanent senior faculty in
Judaic Studies," the Newsletter
reported.
THE NEWSLETTER also
reported a "generous gift," the
size of which was not indicated,
in memory of Jacob Perlow, an
immigrant who settled in New
York City and prospered in real
estate, to create the Jacob Perlow
Fellow in Judaic Studies and the
Humanities. Perlow's niece, Toni
Greenberg, a co-executor of the
Perlow estate, was instrumental
in the gift, the Newsletter
reported.
The Newsletter said the Jacob
Perlow Fellow will be appointed
by the University from nominees
proposed by the Hebrew Uni-
versity in Jerusalem to encourage
fruitful exchanges between Yale
and Israeli scholars."
MM
M
Pv^k,


ZF.SS'WirRimW .'*/
wo%
i ruf .YtwtxrfrTnraaan or aourn i-ounrv
Pamfl
Friday, January 13s 1984
ThiVtetsKFtortdia* 6fS6uthC6&kifT
Page 5'

I

'Infirmary for Children,' by Karel Fleischmann, drawn in charcoal in 1942 in the
Concentration Camp of Theresienstadt. Karel Fleischmann was born in 1897 in
Czechoslovakia. He was trained as a physician and painted as a nobby, borne
No isms... styles... schools
700 paintings he produced in Theresienstadt survived the war. In October, 1944
Fleischmann and his wife were transported to Auschwitz and were gassed on
arrival.
, ......
Artists recorded agonies in poignant dimensions
By RALPH LISTER
JERUSALEM This is
definitely art for art's sake.
No isms, no styles or
schools. No well-known
names. Often the artists
risked their lives by record-
ing their surroundings. If
discovered, the price was
death, but thy were driven
to draw, to paint to sculpt,
so that the world would
know.
Yad Vashem, Israel's exten-
sive memorial to the Holocaust
on Jerusalem's Mount Herzl, has
recently opened an art museum
to exhibit works produced by in-
mates of the concentration camps
during World War II.
YAD VASHEM "a place
and a name ... an everlasting
name, that shall not be cut off"
(Isaiah 56:5) is visited by
virtually every tourist to Israel.
The impressive layout of the
memorial complex and the
permanent exhibit leave a lasting
impression. The new art museum
adds a poignant dimension. It
converts the documentary and
photographic evidence of the
Holocaust into a stunning series
of personal artistic testimony
which leaves the visitor stunned
and drained.
At Theresienstadt, the Nazis
"model" ghetto, Jewish artists
were compelled to produce re-
presentations of the camps for
propaganda purposes. This gave
the artists access to paper and
drawing instruments with which
to produce their own testimony.
"I still hear voices" remembers a
painter who survived. "You will
live. Paint us, so at least we'll live
on paper."
Survival on paper was. for
most of the artist-inmates, the
only life granted them. For us. a
glimpse into these years, reveals
dormitories crowded with bunks,
inmates in their striped uni-
forms; exhausted, emaciated.
Yet, in spite of the despair and
horror, here and there, a note of
humor.
IN ADDITION to
Theresienstadt, sections of the
museum are devoted to art prod-
uced by inmates of Auschwitz,
Bergen-Belsen, Dachau, the
Warsaw. Lodz and Vilna
Ghettoes. as well as dozens of
smaller concentration and intern-
ment camps.
Since Yad Vashem was found-
ed 30 years ago, the documents,
objects, relics and bequests it has
collected include over two thous-
and works of art, 300 of which are
exhibited in the new museum.
Curator Irit Salmon-Livne points
out that this collection is without
precedent considering the death
sentence threatening the artists if
discovered. After the war, some
of the works were recovered by
the artists themselves returning
to the camps, or by others who by
chance found work hidden in
cans, behind walls, under floors.
Some art appears on envelope
backs, tiny scraps of paper
some on real canvas. Many of the
artists who survived stopped
creating after the war. Many who
did not survive displayed excep-
tional talent, and would no doubt
have found their niche as artists
after the war.
A SPECIAL area of the
museum is devoted to art done by
children in the camps. After the
pervasive greyness of the adult
works, here is an explosion of
color; an optimistic world as only
children could conceive it. This
section of the museum is to
many, the most poignant. A
searing memorial to the 1.5 mil-
lion Jewish children murdered by
the Nazis.
Assistant curator liana Guri
reports that most visitors to Yad
Vashem find the art museum as
impressive as the documentary
exhibition. The museum has pub-
lished a catalogue in Hebrew,
English, French and German.
A
Deportation,' by Joseph Richter, drawn m
pencil in 1943 in the extermination camp at
Sobibor. Joseph Richter made 18 drawings of
Sobibor, which were found after the war m
the town ofChelm. Almost nothing is known
of the artist except that he is believed to
have taken part in the revolt against the
Nazis mounted by Sobibor prisoners, that he
escaped and joined the partisans, and died
during subsequent fighting.
Yad Vashem Collection
Highlights Life In
Concentration Camps


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, January 13,1984
Left to right: Norman Stone, Irwin Fields, Larry Schact, LesterEntin, Joseph Waters,
Marvin Kirsner, Steve Meltzer, Arnold Rosenthal, Property Sub-Committee Chairman;
Helene Eichler, Assistant Executive Director; Marshall Sigel, Steven Kay, Leonard
Jaffee, Baron Coleman, Marketing Sub-Committee Chairman; Henry Janus, Dr. Stuart
Schulman. Present but not pictured are: Henry Brenner, Howard Guggenheim,
Marianne Bobick, President, South County Jewish Federation; Gerson Bernstein,
Endowment Committee Chairman; Rabbi Bruce Warshal, Executive Director; Dr
Mark Drucker, Endowment Coordinator.
Endowment Committee Starts

"We are moving now!" pro-
claimed Gerson "Gary" Bern-
stein, Chairman of the newly
created Endowment Committee
of the South County Jewish Fed-
eration.
On Dec. 16, 1983, Bernstein
called the first meeting in the his-
tory of the South County Jewish
Federation to order. Twenty-one
people gathered to share infor-
mation and set directions for this
year.
As a result of this meeting, the
committee has been divided into
four working Sub-committees.
Baron Coleman has accepted
the chairmanship of the
Marketing Sub-committee. It is
the responsibility of these people
to decide on the media devices to
be used by the total committee.
Eric Deckinger has accepted
the chairmanship of the invest-
ment Sub-committee which is
charged with'the responsibility of
investing the monies held by this
committee.
Cafe Fire
Raises Queries
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Jewish or-
ganizations in France are differ-
ing over who might have been re-
sponsible for a fire which caused
extensive damage to a Jewish-
owned cafe in a Paris suburb and
the motives behind the arson.
One group, the Union of Sub-
urban Jewish Communities, is
claiming that the arson was the
work of anti-Semitic elements.
But another organization, Jewish
Revival, is cautioning against
drawing conclusions before police
end their investigation.
Police investigators said the
fire was started by criminal ele-
ments but refused to ascribe a
possible motive. The cafe owner,
Joseph Attia, is the vice presi-
dent of the Pavillon-Sous-Bois
Jewish community. The area is
rife with criminal elements and
police say that racketeers are
known to be active in most Paris
suburbs.
The fire broke out when the
cafe was closed and the Attia
family, which resides in the same
building, was not at home. Police
investigators said they found
empty gasoline cans on the site
and nearby a daubing of a
swastika and an anti-Semitic
slogan.
Police, acting on the orders of
Interior Minister Gaston Def-
ferre. have preventively rein-
forced their patrols in suburbs
with larger Jewish populations
and have stationed radio cars
near most local synagogues and
communal centers.
Al Gortz has accepted the Arnold Rosenthal has accepted Endowments and Philanthropic Committee has been established
chairmanship of the Legal Sub- the chairmanship of the Pro Funds. to assist the Federation with far
committee which is charged with specting Sub-committee which is reaching goals and to assist Fed-
advising the Endowment Com- charged with locating potential Marianne Bobick, President of eration members who have
mittee regarding current legal clients for the establishment of the South County Jewish Feder- special needs. We are now doing
issues. ation said, "The Endowment both of these."
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
All Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Baked in its Own Pan,
Chocolate
Pi
Fudge Cake
$189
each
Danish
Apple Strip
$189
each
[Everyone's Favorite
Chocolate ,
Chip Cookies
1299
Prices Effective
January 12th thru 14th.1984
Chocolate Iced
Boston
Cream Cake
$099
Freeh and Delicioua
Kaiser Rolls


Friday, January 13,1984
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 7
MeetMargolitNavonPart II
Editor's note: These stories
about Yoseftal and Kaplan, two
neighborhoods in Kfar Saba
which the South County Jewish
Federation has been paired with
under Israel's Project Renewal
Program will appear throughout
the upcoming year. Project
Renewal is a joint effort between
the Jews of the Diaspora and the
Israeli Government to help less
fortunate Jews in Israeli society.
By ANDREW POLIN
Years of neglect cannot be
undone overnight. Unfortuna-
tely, in the interim casualties
occur.
One family in Kfar Saba is
paying for the years of neglect.
One boy is condemned to special
education class because years of
mistrust and cultural rules
prevented his parents from
taking him for help.
"He was like a two and a half
year old boy when he was five. He
didn't know how to play. He
didn't speak properly," said
Margolit Navon, an occupational
i la-rapist who works-in Yoseftal
and Kaplan. Navon tried to help
tiir child, but the mother was
suspicious. "She said there is no
um' liecause she was better than
i lie nurw at the kindergarten anH
she can give much more, and she
w'ui." Navon suiu. When the
In a went into special education
t lux* ihr mother realized that the
>:..^.tam could iiave helped her
,im. her sun. but it was too late
l'i I*iiii I ( was not Um late for the
i wo younger children. "'We
i ,n i-d taking care of the girl and
! In ii.ib> ." tilt*1 said The girl in
tin beginning >iiowed the same
^i^ii- .is tun brother. Also very
late in development. Also the
baby was very late in develop-
ment," she said.
"The baby lifted his head when
he was six months old. He's
supposed to do it when he's one
month old," she added. "So the
mother realized that we can
help," Navon said, "and she
came for help." The girl and baby
are in perfect health today. "The
mother sent her girl to the
kindergarten. She went to work.
Her other child is in a day care
center. She's happy. She's
suddenly happy. "She's not as
nervous as she used to be. She
used to hit us here. She used to
lift her hands and say, "If you
touch my girls, I'll hit you,"
Navon recalled. "And now she s
okay. She's happy. She loves us.
And she brings us cakes. That's a
change," Navon added.
The older boy, however, is
sentenced to special education.
"We couldn't help him. She
wouldn't let us. We could have,
but it was too late," she said. "If
you find it really early you can
solve the problems," she added.
Navon works with two psycho-
logists and a speech therapist in
the treatment center which
serves the residents of Yoseftal
and Kaplan. They work for
change but there have been
obstacles. Ten years ago when
someone said a person lived in
Yoseftal it was as if that person
lived in the <\rab village just l'/i
miles away in the West Bank.
It used to be them and us,"
Navon said They used to tell me,
"You're Irom there. You don't
belong to us......foday there isn't
such a thing like them and U3,"
Sheinfeld Named Honoree
For Century Village
Bond Breakfast
lufonurd Slu-infeld is a native
of Boston and attended Suffolk
University Law School, receiving
a I.LB and .11). His background
includes both business and legal
experience having been in real es-
tate and auctioneering.
Sheinfeld has been the past
president of Temple B'nai Moshe,
the largest Conservative Temple
in Boston, and of its Brother-
hood lie was president of Mas-
s "-I'.u. v'.'.: Xui'twineen Associa-
tion. Ohavi Sedeck Cemetery
Corporation and Professional
Men s Club. He has served as
chairman of Israel Bonds and the
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Shemleld is a : 112 degree Mason
and past officer of Aleppo Shrine.
He was legal consultant to the
Massachusetts State Police, and
for 15 years was an unpaid chair-
man of the Selective Service
Board of Boston by presidential
if >|iollll lUfllt
Sheinfeld served as an advisor
to two governors of Massachu-
setts, John Volpe and Francis
Sargent. He was privileged to
make the nominating speeches
for Governors Sargent, Volpe and
Frank Perry at the Massachu-
setts State Conventions.
Four years ago Sheinfeld and
his wife, Sally, moved to Century
Village, Boca Raton. He became
chairman of the charter commit-
tee which formulated the Century
of Boca Raton Umbrella Associa-
tion COBRUA. He served as
first vice-president and now has
assumed the role of president.
Sheinfeld is active in many or-
ganizations in the Boca area. He
is a past president of the Massa-
chusetts Club and its parliamen-
tarian. He is a director and par-
liamentarian of Beth Shalom
she said. "It's us, altogether."
Navon also said the residents
new feel a part of the country.
"They feel like they belong. That
the government gave them
something. The Jews around the
world care about them," she
added.
Their work also has started
showing results. In the past, the
birth rate was about 200 babies,
annually in the area. In the last
two years, the birth rate has
dropped to about 120 to 150
babies, a year, down approxi-
mately 25 percent. "Now they see
they are not in a race with their
mothers. If the mother had 12
children the gi-1, who is 24, also
wanted to have 12 children,"
Navon added. "Now
they don't have four children
in five years. They will have two
in five years, and the mothers are
going to work," she said.
Before, Navon said, six people
used to live in 40 square meters.
"Do you know what 40 square
meters are? It's like 40 square
yards. It's maybe your bedroom
at home and a kitchen," she
added. With the change and
progress has come a sense of
accomplishment for Navon, who
when she first came here four
years ago had not realized the
severity of the situation. "In the
first year we were so depressed
here. We didn't believe it was
Israel," she said. "And that's
what gave us courage, to change
it," she said. "It was a challenge
in the beginning. And I like it
now and I like the people now,"
she said. "No one thought it
would survive here," Navon said,
referring to the program. But the
program has survived, and
because of the program the
people are living a better life, not
just surviving.
Leonard Sheinfeld
Brotherhood and Temple,
member of the Boca Raton Shrine
Club, member of Century Square
Club, director and charter
member of Shomer Lodge B'nai
B'rith, and a Governor of the
Century Village Men's Club.
Sheinfeld was an officer of the
Boston branch of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America.
He was awarded a citation by
the National Federation of
Jewish Men's Clubs, Inc. in ap-
preciation of his loyal and effi-
cient service.
He also received the award of
Carnation from the Jewish Ad-
vocate, leading English-Jewish
paper in New England.
The Boca Raton Century Vil-
lage Israel Bond breakfast will be
held on March 4 at Boca Teeca at
9:30 a.m.
Lester Entin Joins
TAU's Board of Governors
/
Jack Cummings, the Chairman
of the Board of Governors of Tel
Aviv University, last week an-
nounced the appointment of Les-
ter M. Entin to the Board of
Governors. Mr. Entin and his
wife Sally, of Boca Raton and
Verona, N.J., are long time sup-
porters of Tel Aviv University
and its School of Education.
Most recently the Entins estab-
lished a Fund for the research,
advancement and education of
the Hearing Impaired and Disad-
vantage! Youth. Mr. Cummings
stated that it is a privilege for the
university to have on its Board of
Governors a person such as Les-
ter Entin who has served as a
community leader in so many
aspects of Jewish life.
Sally and Lester Entin are also
among the founding members of
the Boca Raton Chapter of
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University which recently estab-
lished an office at 2200 North
Federal Hwy. in Boca Raton.
Anyone wanting further informa-
tion about Tel Aviv University
Lester Entin
should call Lauren Azoulai at
392-9186.
/. R. WE1NRAUB & Co., Inc.
//mwaw//'w S/n&ti lance
Insurance Agents
& Consultants
Insurance Exchange of the America's
245 Southeast First Street, Suite 319
Miami, Florida 33131 (305) 381-9877
N.J. (201)666-4900N.Y. (212)564-3070
Telex 642184
Cool Weather Recipes
CRISPY SUGAR COOKIES
Kasha granules give these tender
cookies a special crunch
3/4 cup butter or margarine
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla
2-1/2 cups all purpose Hour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup uncooked Wolffs Kasha
(line or medium)
In mixer bowl, cream margarine
and sugar; beat in eggs and vanilla.
Stir or silt Hour and baking powder
then add along with kasha to lorm
a fairly firm dough. Chill for one
hour or more until dough is stiff
enough to roll. On lightly floured
board, roll dough 1/4-inch or
thinner. Cut with holiday cookie
cutters. Place on ungreased bak-
ing sheets. Bake at 375F. for 6-8
minutes or until very lightly
browned around edges. Decorate
or leave plain.
Makes about 8 dozen
(Roasted Buckwheat Kernels)
Kasha is the heart of the buckwheat kernel which has
been roasted to bring out its nutty flavor Buckwheat is
the highest in balanced protein of any food in the plant
kingdom almost as high as eggs yet no cholesterol
problems
One of nature's near perfect toods. use Wolff's Kasha
instead of nee or potatoes at your next meal or use it
in baked goods and side dishes.
You'll find Wolff's Kasha in the Gourmet, Kosher or
specialty food section of your favorite supermarket.
For your cool weather recipes, send a stamped
self-addressed envelope to: Box JP2
THE BIRKETT MILLS, PENN YAN, N.Y. 14527
and SAVE 15*
with this Store Coupon
!"l5c
OFF
! 9
154 OFF
on any one package of
, BUCKWHEAT PRODUCTS
Limit one coupon per purchase
15G
OFF
TO THE DEALER; Thi coupon
will be redeemed only at follows:
For amount specified plus 7e for
handling, provided coupon it
received from customer on pur
chate of listed merchandise. Proof
transferable and void if use is
Ciohibitcd, taxed, restricted or
cense b required. Customer must
pay any sales tax. Cash rcdemp
tion value 1/100 FOR RF
DEMOTION. PRESENT TO
of purchase of sufficient stock of OUR SALESMANI OR.MAILTO
merchandise to cover coupon, sub
mitted mutt be shown on request.
(Failure to comply may void all
coupons submitted for redemp
tion.) Redemptions not honored
through brokers or other outside
agencies. Coupons are non
THE BIRKETT MILLS, PENN
VAN, NEW YORK US27.
LIMIT ONLY ONE COUPON
MAY BE REDEEMED PER
UNIT OF PRODUCTS
PURCHASED.
IP2
THE BIRKETT MILLS, PENN YAN, NEW YORK 14527
15< OFF *Coupo" *'*m Dk" "'19M 15 OFF


The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. JWuary 13.1964
On This and That
Rosenbergs Reconsidered
ByRABBI
BRUCE S. WARSHAL
Executive Director
South County
Jewish Federation
The following article that I
pass along for your perusal
appeared in the Fall 1983 issue of
Reform Judaism. It intrigued me
because I grew up in the same left
of center political milieu des-
cribed in the article by Sol Stern,
a freelance writer.
The article challenges a sacred
cow for me as well as for the
political left. I have in my per-
sonal library, books written that
have purported to prove beyond a
shadow of a doubt that the
Rosenbergs were innocent vic-
tims of a right wing American
conspiracy.
Now the whole case is being re-
considered in a series of books
that challenge that assumption.
What is even more interesting to
me is not the guilt or innocence of
the Rosenbergs, but of how
people like me react this chal-
Robbi Bruce S. Warshal
lenge of our political icons.
It's tough getting older, but it
is even tougher to confront our
Our Readers Write
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian: and to Arabs.
I was pleased with the article
written by Rabbi Louis Sachs,
which appeared in the column "A
Rabbi Comments" in The Jewish
Floridian dated Friday, Dec. 23,
1983. However, I am perplexed in
that this rabbi and two other
rabbis have failed to give me an
answer to a question which I
posed to them.
Christians believe that there is
only one God, but he may be
reached only through Jesus.
Mohammedans believe that there
is o^y*oTte*Cb8,""Dut"'he may be
reached only through Moham-
med. Confucianists believe that
there is only one God, but he may
be reached only through Confu-
cius. Jews have always
proclaimed that there is only one
God. Hence, since we all agree
that there is only one God, it
must be the same deity, we are all
his children, and, theoretically at
least, we must all be brothers and
sisters. Religious bigotry, hatred
and murder all stemming only
from the fact that we seek com-
munion with God by diverse
avenues must surely be
distasteful to Him.
The question which I posed to
the three rabbis is, "Since we all
agree that there is only one God,
what difference does it make
whether we seek to commune
with God by way of. the front
door, the back door or the side
door?"
It would be very enlightening
for a rabbi, a priest or a minister
to answer this question.
MAX LEVIN
Deb-ay Beach
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
If the governmentj of Israel is
guilty of anything questionable
you'll read about it mighty quick
in the New York Times or the
Washington Post.
If the government of Israel
does something admirable, you'll
possibly see a report about it in
one of those papers, but the
praise may be faint or modified
by ifs, anas and bulls.
Similarly, Israel is given short
shrift by the three1 TV networks.'
This lamentable truth was
dramatized in the days when the
world was registering shock over
the massacres in Lebanon.
Sadly, massacres occur often
these days, but NBC, CBS, and
ABC did not train then* cameras
on them with the same intensity
given to anything involving
Israel. But it must be borne in
mind that Israel was not guilty of
those massacres. They were by
Is it a coincidence that some of
these media have in high
positions people of the Jewish
faith? Do you think there's any
truth in the hunch that these
Jews lean over backward to avoid
being charged with favoring "the
Jewish side?"
A recent New York Times
front-page story is headlined:
"Jews and Arabs of Israel:
Worlds that Don't Mingle."
Reporter Dvid Shipler piles
incident upon incident to prove
that Jews in Israel look down on
the Arabs, don't trust them and
have been guilty of taking Arab
lands by force.
That article does not report; it
distorts. It's another example of
the "anecdotal" way of proving a
point. The truth is that Jews and
Arabs get along very well. They
get along well in Israel and they
got along well in Arab lands until
the Arab leaders suspected that
Zionism threatened their control
and then brain-washed their
people into thinking that Jews
are hostile to them. And what,
pray tell, is Zionism? It's Ameri-
can-style democracy, which the
Arab leaders ardently dislike.
Mr. Shipler could have cited
anecdotes to show that in Israel
the Arab masses are better off
than in any Arab country. In
Israel, they get good wages, can
join unions; their women are free;
religious liberty is granted:
health care is provided; they can
vote; they are given free educa-
tion, etc., etc. The readers who
learn for the first time about Is-
rael's treatment of Arabs would
never know these things from the
Shipler piece.
And the Times could do a
series to show that Arabs often
dislike other Arabs. Witness the
war between Iraq and Iran.
Witness the Syrian slaughter of
Syrians. Witness Lebanon, etc.,
etc.
RABBI SAMUEL SILVER
Boca Raton
own assumptions and commit-
ments of a lifetime.
But if Sol Stern is correct, then
that is precisely what we must do
to protect our own intellectual
honesty. This is not only true in
reference to this particular case,
but to all our political assum-
ptions from another era. As the
world becomes more complex, the
simple verities of the fifties
become difficult questions for me.
Sometimes I accuse myself of
abandoning the political left.
Other times I tell myself that I
have been consistently liberal,
but it is the left that has moved
beyond me into impossible
positions. Who knows?
1 do hope that the following
article is of interest to you .
By Sol Stern, Freelance Writer
Thirty years ago, on the
evening of June 19, 1953, I stood
on a New York City street with
10,000 people in silent vigil as
Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were
executed by the U.S. govern-
ment. I was a seventeen-year-old
high school senior who had come
with friends to protest a judicial
murder. I knew the Rosenbergs
were innocent, knew that as
progressives and Jews they had
been singled out by a reactionary
government to heat up the cold
war and silence domestic political
opposition.
How did I know all this? Not
by studying the facts of the case.
I had neither followed the news
accounts of the espionage trial,
nor became acquainted with the
legal and factual issues raised by
the Rosenberg appeals. Like
most seventeen-year-olds, what I
knew about the defendants and
atomic espionage (and politics in
general) I absorbed from the
political culture I had grown up
in. In my case, it was the culture
of Yiddish speaking Com-
munists.
I attended a Jewish school and
spent summers at a Jewish camp
run by popular front organiza-
tions miked to the Communist
party. We studied Yiddish, the
national language of the Jewish
people, and were taught that
anti-Semitism existed only in
right-wing and capitalist
countries like the United States.
It had been eliminated, we were
told, from the Soviet Union and
the rest of the socialist world.
Though not hostile to the
emerging State of Israel, we were
somewhat indifferent. On the
other hand we were very con-
cerned with the affairs of Jews in
the Soviet Union's so-called
autonomous Jewish Republic of
Birobidzhan which we extolled in
song as a paradise for Jewish
workers.
My view of the world was also
largely influenced by the personal
example and testimony of one
revered man the great black
singer and activist, Paul
Robeson. A charismatic,
physically imposing figure who
frequently visited our summer
camp, Robeson brought us
personal greetings from the Jews
of the Soviet Union and assured
us of their well being. This great
friend of the Jewish people
became a pillar in the struggle to
save the Rosenbergs and a
ADULT ATHLETICS.....
The Jewish Community Center of South County plans
to begin sports leagues in February, 1984. For those in
terested in Tennis, Softball, Swimming, Volleyball, etc.
Please contact Marianne Lesser at
395-5546
symbol of the possibilities of
Black-Jewish unity.
By the time I was through my
first year in college, I ceased
believing in political fairy tales. I
remained committed to radical
politics but with few illusions
about the Soviet Union or Com-
munism. As I became involved in
the New Left activism of the
1960s, however, one cherished
belief remained constant the
innocence of the Rosenbergs. For
the New Left, the Rosenberg case
provided an emotional and
symbolic link with the issues and
causes of the 1950s. To leftist
revisionist historians trying to
prove that American political
leaders had used myths about
"Communist espionage'' to
manipulate the country into a
destructive ideological crusade
against the Soviet Union, the
Rosenbergs' innocence was
doctrine. Their vindication, even
decades later, would be a signifi-
cant step in the necessary break-
up of the cold war consensus that
had misled America for decades.
Twenty-five years after
knowing with certainty that the
Rosenbergs had been framed, I
started investigating the case
records. Together with historian
Ronald Radosh, 1 spent six
months reading through 200,000
pages of FBI files released
through the Freedom of Informa-
tion Act. After interviewing
scores of witnesses, including
several who knew the Rosenbergs
as members of the Communist
party, we published our findings
in The New Republic (June 23,
1979), and, later. Radosh am-
plified them in his book, The
Rosenberg File (Holt, Rhinehart,
and Winston). We concluded that
the government had indeed com-
mitted numerous improprieties,
even illegalities, in its conduct of
the trial (including the use of
false testimony against Ethel
Rosenberg), but that credible
evidence did exist linking Julius
Rosenberg with an espionage
network of former members of
the Communist Party.
Although we expected to be
attacked by those who still firmly
believed in the Rosenbergs' inno-
cence, we did not anticipate so
many colleagues telling us that
we should not have published the
article, regardless of its truth. We
did not expect to be told that the
article played into the hands of
the right-wing, making it much
more difficult for the left to attri-
bute sole responsibility for the
cold war to the reactionary U.S.
leadership.
Another persistent myth that
friends on the left found difficult
to give up was the notion that the
Rosenbergs were "Jewish
martyrs." For all these years, the
line of the defense committee was
that they had been persecuted as
Jews and went to their deaths
because they courageously
refused to turn in other innocents
also Jews. According to the
movement that defended them,
they were the "first victims of
American Fascism."
With the cooperation of the
Rosenbergs, the theme of
American anti-Semitism was
played to great effect around the
world. In retrospect it is easy to
see why this was so important to
the Communists and their
popular front allies running the
defense committees. While anti-
Semitic purge trials were taking
place in Czechoslovakia and
leading Jewish writers and
cultural figures were disap- -
peering in the Soviet Union, the
worldwide propaganda campaign
in support of the Rosenbergs
served to deflect attention from
those persecutions. In Western
Europe, massive demonstrations
in nearly every capital city
denounced the "anti-Semitic
frame-up" engineered by the U.S.
government, yet almost no one
protested the show trials in
Czechoslovakia or the murder of
Jewish writers by Stalin.
This ought to be disturbing
even to those who continue to
believe in the Rosenbergs' total
innocence. But if one believes
that one or both of them were
guilty of espionage, one cannot
escape the ironic conclusion that
the Rosenbergs allowed them-
selves to be used in a propaganda
campaign which covered up
crimes against the Jewish people.
Paul Robeson was wilfully
complicit in the same cover-up.
In a little noticed article publish-
ed in Jewish Currents (1981),
Robeson's son, Paul Jr., revealed
that his father had learned of
Stalin's purge of Jewish writers
as early as 1949. During that
year, while visiting the Soviet
Union, Robeson heard disturbing
rumors about the fate of Jewish
cultural figures and asked for a
meeting with his war-time friend,
writer Itzik Feffer. Brought to
Robeson's hotel room in Moscow,
Feffer, using sign language (he
knew the hotel room was
bugged), revealed that other
Jewish writers including Perets^
Markish had been murdered by
Stalin and that his own days were
numbered. Despite much torment
over the fate of his Jewish
friends, Robeson remained loyal
to the Soviet regime and kept his
silence. He returned to the
United States, participated in the
Communist propaganda blitz in
support of the Rosenbergs, and
used his formidable prestige to
reassure the Jews in the
"progressive" movement that all
was well with their brothers in
the Soviet Union.
The Rosenbergs and Robeson,
the "Jewish martyrs" and the
"great friend of the Jews,'' had in >'
fact been instrumental in betray-
ing the Jewish people. Yet today
they remain icons of the Left.
Thirty years later, duplicity
keeps marching on.
...SELF-HELP...
But You Don't Look Jewish:
The Dilemma of the Convert
Despite conversion having taken place, the convert
can still experience feelings of pressure, alienation,
and loss. This workshop will focus on such issues as
the Jewish Community's response to converts, family
acceptance or lack of, dealing with holidays, and how
one's sense of identity is affected.
Group Facilitator, Dena Feldman, M.S.W.
January 18 through February 22
6:30-8:00 p.m. (Wednesday)
$30.00 for 8 sessions
Jewish Family & Children's Service
(An Agency of the South
County Jewish Federation)
3200 N. Federal Highway
Suite 226
395-3640
Boc* Raton
Dates:
Time:
Coat:
Location:
*<
Claaa Limit
10


mam
BHIBVh
4i

V
/
\ry Village Israel Bond Committee: Left to
(First Row) Robert Rugoff, Rubin SaU-
[Lenny Sheinfeld, Pearl Levine, Irv Levine.
Row) John Lowe, Rose Yesgar, Charlie
Siebel, Hy Henkin. (Third Row) Al Greenfield,
Elsie Wagner, Margit RubniU, Marion Sragg,
Teddy Blendes.
Century Village Begins Israel Bond Campaign
a recent meeting of the Cen-
[ Village Boca Raton Israel
committee Dr. Hyman
tin. Chairman, announced
[the plans for the March 4,"
Israel Bond breakfast are
ider way. The large, enthu-
ic committee of Century Vil-
residents is confident that
year will be the most suc-
cessful ever in their sale of Israel
bonds.
The committee has decided to
have a breakfast at the Boca
Teeca Lodge at 9:30 a.m. The
National Bond organization has
confirmed that the group will be
addressed by Israel Amitai,
leading television producer, and
director, and specialist in the
field of public affairs and educa-
tion in Israel.
The committee is honoring
Leonard Sheinfeld for his devoted
work for bonds in the past years.
Co-chairing the committee are
Dr. John Lowe and Margit Rub-
nit z.

^X


'.TfiWssaSa
\
iai B'rith Israel Bond Committee: Left to
\ht Bob Rugoff, Dr. Ron Rubin, Col. AriBen-
Speaker, Julie Jackson, Bond Director,
Ethel Custage, Dave Custage, Steve Rubin,
Lenny Sheinfeld, and Jon Klasfeld.
Boca Raton B'nai B'rith To Hold Bond Breakfast
fn March 11, the Boca Raton
ai B'rith lodges and chapters
host a breakfast for its
lual Israel Bond Campaign.
Martin Grossman, Boca Raton
area bond chairman, is pleased to
announce that the campaign is
being chaired by the enthusiastic
and capable Dr. Ron Rubin.
Plans have not been finalized,
but the committee has exciting
ideas and surprises to announce
at a future date.
B'Shevat
Kids to Boost JNF Trees Effort
EW YORK More than a
er of a million students in
fsh day schools and religious
bs throughout the country
| participate in the Jewish Na-
il Fund's Tu B'Shevat cam-
celebrating the traditional
Year of the Trees on Jan. 19.
|ccording to Dr. Solomon
ian, director of JNF's Edu-
)n Department, which is fea-
sible for the annual drive, the
its of the program should
Mss even those of last vear.
jucational activities involving
t he JNF," Dr. Goldman said,
Id pronounced the unprece-
_ed amount of $250,000 for
^iional trees in the Jerusalem
Children's Forest and other JNF
woodlands in Israel.'
Theme of this year's campaign
is Vahavta Cartzeha Yisrael
kamoha ("You shall love the land
of Israel as yourself"). It focuses
on the distinctively Israeli ap-
proach to reinvigorating the land
manifested in its unique types of
settlements.
"The JNF is engaged in a very
wide variety of ecological endea-
vors," Dr. Goldman said, "and
yet. the tree is the very image of
the restoration of life to the
depleted soil of the Jewish home-
land.
"It evokes a spontaneous re-
sponse through which students
are then able to develop wider ap-
preciation for the wonder of a
whole country brought back from
desolation by the efforts of Jews
just like themselves."
Student materials for Tu
B'Shevat include a workbook and
a "My Map of Israel" poster. To
fill the needs of Day Schools, a
Hebrew version of the workbook
will be available for the first
time; and to enhance the celebra-
tion of Tu B'Shevat even further,
a manual is being prepared for
use by the entire family and in
other community settings.
Conn. Asked to Reject 'Get'
Requirement for Divorce
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Congress
has asked the Connecticut
state legislature to reject
proposed legislation that
would require a Jewish
spouse to grant a religious
divorce or "get"
before a civil divorce can be
obtained.
Testifying before the judiciary
committee of the state's House
and Senate on Dec. 9, Marc
Stern, assistant director of
A J Congress' Commission on
Law and Social Action, said that
while his organization is sym-
pathetic to the problem of
"agunot" women who cannot
remarry because they have not
received a Jewish divorce it
believes the legislation under
consideration violates the consti-
tutional requirement of
separation of church and state.
STERN SAID his organization
views the "agunot" issue not as a
civil matter but as an internal
problem of the Jewish religion.
He offered assistance to Con-
necticut legislators in devising
statutes legalizing pre-nuptial
agreements that would contain
provisions designed to minimize
"get" problems without violating
constitutional principles.
The proposed legislation would
amend ^Connecticut's, existing
^procedures for conciliation in
divorce cases. Currently, either
party to a divorce action can ask
for appointment of a mediator
who attempts to reconcile the
parties without divorce or resolve
potential conflicts that may arise
after a divorce.
In his testimony, Stern noted
that under the existing concilia-
tory process, the mediator can
informally work to remove
barriers to intermarriage such as
the denial of a "get."
"WE SEE no constitutional
difficulty if the mediator raises
problems concerning the giving
of the 'get' along with any other
problems which might affect
post-divorce relations between
the parties," he said. But under
the proposed amendment, Stern
added, the mediator would be
required to inquire into the reli-
gious beliefs and practices of the
parties since the state could not
grant a civil divorce unless a
"get" were granted as well.
"The bill would condition a
civil remedy a divorce on
compliance with a religious act,"
Stern declared. Consequently,
AJCongress belices the legis-
lation to be in violation of the
constitutional principle of
church-state separation, he said.
SOUTH FLORIDA
INUKSING SERVICES
HOME ... HOSPITAL ... NURSING HOME
RN't ... ipn s
Nurses Aides
9 Lear Jet Ambulance
Live-in/Companions
Male Attendants
Insurance Accepted
Penonalued Service 24 hour* a day
Palm Beaches (305) 5828302 Boca-Delray (305) 2780109
Screened loaded tawed itoly Owed t Operated
CAMP WOHELO forg,r,s
CAMP COMET for boys
Florida Reunion & Open House
Present, Past, Prospective Campers Welcome
Don Carter's Kendall Lanes
January 21,1984....1:30 p.m. 4:30 p.m.
Contact: Owner-Director. Morgan I. Levy, C.C.D.
1531 SW 82nd Court, Miami, Fla. 33144. 261-1500
A Well Balanced Sarrmrer Program...
SPORTSNATUREARTSSCIENCECOMPUTERS
Large Florida Area Enrollment 70 Miles From Washington
Mesquite grilled fish Dry aged select shell
steak Stuffed pork chop Lobster tempura
Grouper "in the bag" Rack of lamb .
Shrimp Jambalaya Cornish Hen Au Poivre
Kosher Calves Liver
Also serving lunch on the lighter side
Entertainment and Dancing
Wednesday thiu Saturday Evenings.
Simply American
1
Lunch Dinnrr
it-Interstate Plaza 195. 1499 Palrm-tto Park Rd.
Boca Raton, Fla (305) 39j 6408


i age iu
A 1*9*/ IWMIt A UI lM' I// OWU*# \s>Jl**J
Organizations In The News

BNAI TORAH
B'nai Torah Congregation an-
nouncee the Adult Education
Courses will be held Monday
morning, Feb. 6 and Thursday
evening Feb. 9 from 7:30-9:45
p.m. and on Tuesday evening,
Feb. 7 Hebrew Ulpan Co., spon-
sored by B'nai Torah and Jewish
Community Center of South
County. They will be held at the
synagogue, 1401 NW 4th Ave.,
Boca. For further information as
to the courses and fees, phone the
synagogue office at 392-8566.
B'nai Torah Adult Education is
holding a One Night Lecture
Series, Thursday, Jan. 19 at 8:45
p.m. at the synagogue. Abe Git-
tleson of Central Agency for
Jewish Education in Miami, will
speak on "The Portrait of the
Hero in American Jewish Litera-
ture. Call the synagogue office for
the course fee snd further infor-
mation at 392-8566.
B'nai Torah Sisterhood and
Men's Club will hold a joint
meeting on Wednesday, Jan. 18
at 7:30 p.m. at the synagogue,
1401 NW 4th Ave., Boca. The
speaker for the evening will be
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, Executive
Director of the South County
Jewish Federation, whose subject
will be "Woody Allen God and
Jewish Philosophy. This will be
an open meeting, and everyone is
invited to attend. The Judaica
Shop will be open at 7 p.m.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Roth Chapter will
attend an exhibit on Wednesday,
Jan. 25 at Bass Museum in
Miami Beach. The display being
shown is "The Precious Legacy
Judaic Treasures from the
Czechoslovak State Collections."
For details call Yvette, 499-4627
or Anne 498-3424.
B'nai B'rith Naomi Chapter
will hold their next meeting on
Monday, Jan. 16 at 12:30 p.m. in
Temple Emeth. Fun and musical
program, with audience partici-
pation. Prizes by the Aronson's
of AmeriFirst Bank.
B'nai B'rith Women Boca
Chapter is conducting their third
mini-course session at the Palm
Beach Public Library, 8221
Glades Road on Monday, Jan. 16
at 10:30 a.m. The guest speaker
will be Doris Abromowitz and the
subject is "Similarities and Dif-
ferences Between Judaic-Chris-
tian Philosophies." Non-
registrants please call Bertha at
482-5232. Also on Jan. 18, B'nai
B'rith Women are sponsoring a
Bridge and Canasta Tournament
on Wednesday, Jan. 18 at 10:30
a.m. at the Boca Teeca Recrea-
tion Room, NW 2nd Ave., Boca.
The fee is $4.95. The public is
invited. There will be first and
second prizes in both canasta and
bridge and the players are asked
to bring their lunch. Coffee and
cake will be provided. Reserva-
tions must be made. Call Frieda
at 994-0337 or Paulette 482-0290.
ANSHEI EMUNA
Anahei Emuna announces the
sermonic theme of the message
given by Rabbi Dr. Louis Sacks
at the Sabbath morning service
on Saturday, Jan. 14, commenc-
ing at 7:45 a.m. will be "Forward
and Onward." "The Sabbath
dialogue with the Rabbi" and af-
ternoon services begin at 5 p.m.
PIONEER WOMEN
Pioneer Women-Kinneret
Chapter in Palm Greens is plan-
ning a weekend in Sarasota and
Lido Beach leaving Thursday,
Jan. 19 and returning, Saturday,
Jan. 21. For complete details, call
Goldie Cohen 498-9293 or Shirley
Fayne, 498-1969. Also their next
meeting will be held on Monday,
Jan. 23 at 1 p.m. at the Palm
Greens Clubhouse. The coffee
hour will be at 12 noon. Ruth
Petchar will show her creative
applique and demonstrate her
artistic work.
ORT
Women's American ORT-Boca
Glades Chapter will hold their
next meeting on Monday, Jan. 16
at 12:30 p.m. in the Boca Greens
Clubhouse. The featured speaker
will be Rabbi Samuel Silver
whose topic is "Observations of
an Astonished Rabbi." Refresh-
ments will be served. Also make
your reservations to see "They're
Playing Our Song" at the Stage
Company: of Palm Beach on
Saturday, Jan. 28. The cost is S12
per person. For tickets, call 482-
2098 or 994-0251.
Women's American ORT-Boca
Chapter will have their paid-up
membership luncheon on Mon-
day, Jan. 16, at their new
meeting place West Boca
Community Center in the Coral
Gables Bank Building (where the
library used to be) in Sandalfoot
Temple Sinai
Of Palm Beach County
Delray Beach
Membc U.A hi C (Relormi
Invites you to attend our
Sabbath Eve Services
Held Each Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m., at
Cason United Methodist Church
Corner of Swinton Ave. and N.E. 4th St. (Lake Ida Rd.)
Rabbi Samuel Silver, officiating
For Membership Information Call:
Ned Chodash Samuel Rothstein Sid Bernstein
272-2827 President 732 5807
Registration for Religious School
Professional Staff
Special KULANU Young Family Group
For INFORMATION CALL
Man A.uon-73/3599 Bevo- ,
Temple INFORMATION CALL 2/6 6 >61
P.O. BOX 1901 DELRAY BEACH, FLA.
New Temple Building Early 1984 Occupancy
Site 2475 W. Atlantic Ave Delray
Cove. Dues will be accepted at
the door and there will be enter-
tainment. Make a note of the new
meeting place mentioned above
and the new day for their general
meetings will be on Monday, 1
p.m., the 3rd Monday of the
month.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El-Solos will hold
a brunch on Sunday, Jan. 15 at
11 a.m., at the synagogue, 333
SW 4th Ave., Boca. The guest
will Hypnotist, Louis Pershan,
with audience participation. Sin-
gles 50 plus are invited. By reser-
vation only. Please call for your
reservations, Shirley 427-8810,
Pauline 499-3627, Millie 499-3771
or Esther 499-8325. The cost for
Solos members is $1, guests S3.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth Sisterhood will
go to the matinee movie at Del-
ray Square on Tuesday, Jan. 24.
The cost is $1. For tickets call
Eve Herman 499-4179 or the
Temple Office 498-3536.
Temple Emeth Brotherhood
will sponsor a Jewish Heritage
Tour on Wednesday, Jan. 25 to
the Bass Museum in Miami
Beach. Dr. Sam Brown will be the
guide on the tour of viewing the
precious "Legacy" Judaic
treasures from the Czechoslovak
State Collection of 500 years of
Jewish art and life. The tour will
cost $13 per person. Lunch will be
on your own. The bus will leave'
at 8:30 a.m. from Temple Emeth.
For further information, please
call Julius Daroe, chairman 498-
7422.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
FOR ISRAEL
Women's League for Israel-
Mitzvah Chapter will hold their
next meeting on Monday, Jan. 16
at 10 a.m. in the administration
building of Century Village West.
There will be entertainment and
refreshments will be served. All
are welcome.
NCJW
National Council of Jewish
Women-Boca, Delray Branch wil
have a "Bargainada." on Jan. 18,
to 20 and 22, from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. The new and nearly new
merchandise will be shown at the
Colony Shoppes, 74th St., and
Federal Hwy., Boca. The public
is invited. For further informa-
tion, call 483-4344. Also on
Friday, Jan. 20, at 9:30 a.m. Na-
tional Council will hold their next
meeting at Boca Teeca Meeting
Room, featuring Pearl Siegel, a
noted nutritionist. Pearl's topic
will be "Natures Way to
Beauty." Guests are invited.
HADASSAH
Hadasaah-Ben Gurion will hold
their next meeting on Thursday,
Jan. 19 at 12:30 p.m. at which
time humor will be the theme of
the program. Refreshments will
be served.
Benefit Art Auction
Temple Sinai of Delray Beach
will sponsor an art auction, Sun-
day, Feb. 5 at 7:30 p.m.
Featured will be works of
Agam, Hibel, Dali, Calder, Vas-
arery, Miro, Boulanger, Neiman,
Delacrois, Simbari and other fine
artists.
World renown Kinetic artist
Len Janklow will be present.
Champagne and hors d'oeuvres
preview begins at 6:30 p.m.
Boca's Orthodox
Synagogue
The Boca Raton Synagogue,
South County's newest Orthodox
congregation has reached a major
step in its development. It's
members are currently interview-
ing prospective candidates for
the position of Rabbi.
Services are at 5:15 p.m. Fri-
day followed by Oneg Shabbat
and Shabbat morning at 9 a.m.
followed by a festive kiddush.
Children's service begin at 10:15
a.m. The community is invited to
join at the temporary place of
worship, 414 NW 36th St., Boca
Raton. For further information
call 483-8616.
Hadassah-Shira will celebrate
Youth Aliyah's 50th anniversary
with a luncheon and card party
on Wednesday, Jan. 18 at the
Adult Recreation Center of Del-
ray, located Wl NE 1st St., Del-
ray, at 11:30 a.m. Please bring
cards. Mah Jongg or Scrabble
seta. For reservations, call Helen
Berger 495-2023.
ADL
Anti-Defamation League
Council of B'nai B'rith Lodeea
and Chapters of Palm Beach
County will have Rabbi Joel
Chazin, President of the Palm
Beach County Board of Rabbis
address their group on Tuesday,
Jan. 17 at the Senior Citizen
Center, 2nd Ave. and N. Dixie
Hwy., Lake Worth. The theme of
the talk will be, "The Contribu-
tion of the Palm Beach County
Board of Rabbis to Inter-Faith
Understanding." Members of the
public may receive an invitation
to attend by calling 842-3107.
Community Calendar
January 15
Temple Beth El-Solos, 10 a.m. meeting
January 16
Women's American ORT-AII Points, 12 noon Board meeting
Anshei Shalom-Sisterhood-Oriole Jewish Center, 9:30 a.m.
meeting Pioneer Women-Zipporah, 10 a.m. Board meeting
Women's league for Israel, 10 a.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Boca Glades, 12:30 p.m. meeting B'nai B'rith
Naomi, 12:30p.m. meeting
January 17
Women's American ORT-AII Points, 12 noon meeting Pioneer
Women-Beersheba, 12:30 p.m. Board meeting B'nai B'rith
Boca Teeca Lodge, 9:30 a.m. Board meeting Women's
American ORT-Boca Delray evening meeting, 8 p.m. Zionist
Organization of America, 8 p.m. meeting Zionist Organization
of America, 7:30 p.m. Board meeting Temple Beth El Young
Artist Series, 3 p.m. Women's American ORT-Sandalfoot, 1:30
p.m. Board meeting
January 18
Hadassah-Boca Maariv, 12:30 p.m. meeting B'nai Torah
Sisterhood and Men's Club Joint meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Hadassoh-Menachem Begin, 12 noon meeting Women's
American ORT-Region Board meeting, 10a.m.
January 19
Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 12:30 p.m. Board meeting Temple
Beth El, 8 p. m. Board meeting Women's American ORT-Oriole,
1 p.m. Board meeting Hadassah-Ben-Gurion, 12:30 p.m.
meeting Community Relations Council meeting at Federation
office, 12 noon B'nai Torah Congregation, 8:45 p.m. Adult
Education
January 20
B'nai Torah Sisterhood Shabbat, 8:15 p.m. National Council of
Jewish Women-Boca, Delray, 9:30 a.m. meeting
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at
9:30 ajn. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Minyan on Monday and Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd., Delray
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks.
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:46 aan. Sabbath Torah class
5 p.m. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation Office, West Atlantic, corner Carter Road, Delray Beach.
Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m. and
Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 499-6687. Temple
Office 14600 Cumberland Drive, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446
Phone 495-0466. Rabbi Emeritus Jonah J. Kahn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 SW. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at
8 p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, Fla 33434
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services
8 am. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday
8:30 aml and 5 pm. Reuben Saltzman, President, Joseph M
Pollack, Cantor. Phone 483-5557. F
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Con-
servative. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A. Silver, Rabbi; NaftaJy
A. Lmkovsky Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 Vnf
Saturday at 8:45 a.m., Daily Minyans at8:46 a.m. and 6 p.m
TEMPLE 8INAI
f^^V^iMr??odi8tDCh,?rch' ^ N' Swin* Ave. (comer
PO rl So!' Rf* Er^' 3* Refom Mamn Ad*~?
'; P.x 1901, Dou'ay Beach, Fla. 33444 Fridav at 8 15 nm
Rabbi Samuel Silver. President SamuelTRolnSem'pnone27*
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Or?lSiLAilre?M,: u?i BojL273866. Boca Raton. Fla. 33427.
-


iday, January 13.1984
Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
rafat Again
U.S.-Israel Relations Strained Anew Over Palestinians
Continued from Page 1
|ng a breakthrough, Reagan
, reporters.
iut I do think this: We are
Imistic about this because .
jarak is the head of state of
[one country in the Arab world
has gone forward and has a
be treaty with Israel. .
piously, a part of the process
pnds on a fair and just settle-
of the Palestinian ques-
. and Arafat... in the
was the one who has refused
sgnize Israel's right to exist
[nation.
low I think that what Presi-
Mubarak is doing is talking
lim about returning to .
negotiations (with Israel),
eace proposal," the Preei-
[said. He added that he could
band Israel's discomfiture
[the Cairo meeting, but he
it the Israelis need to "look
\b a little more clearly. They
lee that Mubarak, based on
existence of Egypt and its
less to go forward for
b. is simply trying to per-
others to change their
ting," Reagan said, referring
gently to Arafat.
IAMIR EXPRESSED the
Bite view strongly to visiting
Christopher Dodd (D.,
). He maintained that the
ak-A rafat reconciliation
I only encourage Palestinian
femists at a time when
erates might have come
ard in the wake of Arafat's
kter in Lebanon. Shamir
the same argument in an
.iew published in Yediot
onot. He made it clear that
el still opposes Reagan's
plan and that he so in-
fat Mitzvah
Davit
BETH DAVIS
Feth Merrill Davis will be
to the Torah in celebration
ker Bat Mitzvah on Saturday,
\- 21, at 9:30 a.m. B'nai Torah
regation, Boca Raton.
feth Davis was born 13 years
in North Miami Beach, Fla.
is the daughter of Dr. and
Jordan Davis. Her father
Ian practices Neuro-iurgery
Joca Raton, and bar mother
is a women's clothes
ier for her own company
in Florida. Beth has an older
ther Randy and a younger
ur Julie.
In addition to her busy sched-
[ at Boca Raton Academy, she
sys ballet and gymnastics,
looks forward to continuing
hobbies after her Bat Mitz-
|Becoming a Bat Mitzvah is a
'ilege. It is special, because
I really feel aa if I am
ring up. It is great to know
my religion has played a big
in my life and I promise that
IwayswiM."
formed Reagan at their White
House meetings in November.
However, according to Shamir,
these differences would not
hinder cooperation between
Israel and the U.S. He said it was
wrong to speak of tension bet-
ween the two countries but,
nevertheless, in further talks
Israeli officials will do their
utmost to persuade the Adminis-
tration that Israel's assessment
of the Mubarak-Arafat meeting is
the correct one.
American Jewish leaders have
already undertaken that task. In
a telegram to Reagan, Julius
Berman, chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations
expressed "shock and dismay at
the apparent reversal" of U.S.
policy toward Arafat.
"BETTING ON Arafat is a
grim mistake," Berman's
message said. He has failed the
Palestinian Arabs. He will fail
the White House. To believe that
Arafat can be persuaded to follow
the path of peaceful reconciliation
is to doom the Middle East to
continued strife, for only if new
and indigenous Palestinian Arab
leaders come forward with
courage to negotiate with Israel
under the terms of the Camp
David accords can there be the
possibility of peace in the Middle
East."
But such spokesmen, Berman
added, "dare not and will not
speak out as long as Arafat is
supported in his claim to be the
voice of Palestinian Arabs."
Kenneth Bialkin, national
chairman of the Anti- Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, said in a
statement Friday that it was
"wrong and counterproductive"
for Mubarak to have met with the
PLO chief and for the U.S. to
have supported their meeting.
Charging that the Camp David
agreements "are not being fully
lived up to by Egypt which has
kept its relations with Israel at
the lowest level," Bialkin claimed
that "the U.S. has now further
encouraged Egypt to abuse the
treatv hv welcoming the man
who symbolizes everything in
opposition to it."
HOWARD FRIEDMAN,
president of the American Jewish
Committee, said that Mubarak's
"embrace of Arafat, while
presumably intended to induce
the PLO to join the peace
process, puts the cart before the
horse. Logic and human decency
require that Arafat must first un-
equivocally renounce terrorism
and agree to peaceful coexistence
with Israel. Egypt, as the first
and most important Arab
country to sign a peace treaty
with Israel, has served aa an
important example of the
benefits of peace to those Arabs
who persist in their hostility to
Israel.
"It is all the more distressing
then, that Egypt now appears to
be sending die wrong signal by,
in addition to its continued
refusal to return its Ambassador
to Israel, giving public ex-
pression of support for the PLO's
leader."
ALLECK RESNICK. presi-
dent of the Zionist Organization
of America, sent a telegram to
Reagan declaring that it is "a
travesty of justice for any
civilized nation to suggest a role
for Arafat in the Mideast peace
process when new non-violent
and non-PLO Palestinian Arab
leadership and King Hussein of
Jordan should be asked to step
forward."
He added: "Mr. President, we
must as well express our grave
misgivings over U.S. expressions
of support for the Arafat-
Mubarak meeting as a harrowing
contradiction of your stated
concern to put an end to the
scourge of terrorism currently
threatening democratic forces
around the world."
Israeli opposition leader Peres
told reporters in Jerusalem that
while he "could not give the
(Mubarak-Arafat) meeting my
blessing," it did demonstrate
that the Palestinians now know
they cap make no moves without
Egypt, regardless of Egypt's
peace treaty with Israel.
PERES STRESSED that he
does not regard the PLO or
Arafat as partners in peace talks
"yesterday, today or maybe even
tomorrow." But Israel's aim
should be to coordinate its
strategy on the Palestinian issue
with the U.S., not with Egypt.
This, he said, should be Israel's
immediate goal now that there is
a possibility that Reagan's peace
initiative may be revived.
"The burning issue today is
not whether the U.S. will store its
medical supplies here," Peres
said in a reference to the new
U.S.-Israel cooperation agree-
ment. "Rather, the central
problem is the continuation of the
peace process. And on this we
have no common strategy with
Washington," he said.
Meanwhile, the official
Egyptian news agency, Mena,
reported that Arafat, now in
North Yemen, has promised
radical changes in the Palestinian
approach to the Middle East
conflict.
"There will be new trends for
Palestinian action, details of
which will be announced as soon
as possible," the PLO chief was
quoted as saying. He also
charged that there was a con-
spiracy between Israel and the
unnamed Arab "parties" to
divide the Middle East into
spheres of influence favoring Is-
rael.
Leo Frank Case
Georgia's New Rebuff Angers U.S. Jews
Continued from Page 1
had also presented hundreds of
pages of documentation to prove
that Frank was innocent.
Theodore Ellenoff, chairman of
the American Jewish Commit-
tee's Board of Governors, said
the parole board's decision "is a
second miscarriage of justice in
this tragic case. If there is any
serious doubt about Frank's guilt
and the statement last year of
surviving witness Alonzo Mann
at the very least creates a serious
doubt Frank should have been
exonerated."
The AJCommittee, Ellenoff
said, is now calling on the
Georgia Legislature to rectify
this injustice.
JACQUELINE LEVINE,
chairperson of the National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council, said the
board's decision "is more than a
commentary on this specific case.
By its action, the Pardons and
Paroles Board did not remove the
lingering dark cloud that has
continued to cast its shadow, for
the past 70 years, over an open
and pluralistic. American soci-
ety."
Nathan Perlmutter, national
director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, declared:
"If a corpse 70 years moldering
can cry, Leo Frank's is weeping
today. Not for himself death is
immutable but for justice,
freshly lynched, and not by
Klansmen but by bureaucratic
in sensitivity."
Dale Schwartz, the leading at-
torney for those seeking the
pardon, said: "I can't understand
why, when every historian who
has studied the case, and the
main players including the trial
judge and the governor who com-
muted his (Frank's) sentence felt
he was innocent, how the pardons
and paroles board can call this in-
conclusive."
IN A SWORN affidavit, Mann
told two investigative reporters
for the newspaper, Nashville
Tennessean, that he had been too
frightened in 1913 to testify that
he had seen Conely hold the limp
body of Phagan. Mann said that
Conley, who was convicted of.
being an accessory to the crime
and given a year in prison, had
warned him that he would kill
him if he ever mentioned what he
had seen. Mann told a news conv
ference, "I know deep down in
my heart and what I saw, that
Frank did not do this." Frank
was convicted of murder on the
testimony of Conley, who was the
chief prosecution witness. He
said he had disposed of Phagan's
body for Frank, taking it to the
factory basement.
When then Gov. John Slaton
commuted Frank's death sen-
tence after conducting a separate
investigation of the crime, a mob
kidnapped Frank from prison,
took him to a tree near the
Phagan home and hanged him.
Armed mobs roamed the streets,
forcing Jewish business firms to
close their doors. About 1,500 of
the 3,000 Jews in Georgia fled,
and others were targets of a boy-
cott.
Charles Wittenstein, Southern
counsel for the ADL, said of the
parole and pardon board: "The
state ul ueorgia was badly com-
promised by the conviction and
the lynching. They had a chance
to do something about that and
they failed, and the whole coun-
try will know they failed."
Israeli Public Disillusioned With
Lebanon War, Analysis Concludes
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA* The
Israeli public is increasingly dis-
illusioned with the war in Leban-
on and the government's hand-
ling of developments since then,
according to a comparison of opi-
nion polls taken by the Dahaf
organization from July, 1982
through November, 1983.
The analysis, by the weekly
newspaper Koteret Rashit, noted
that 51 percent of the respond-
ents in the latest poll, last month,
thought the government was
wrong to invade Lebanon in the
first place in light of subsequent
events and Israeli casualties.
Support for the war has de-
clined precipitously since July,
1982 when 84 percent of the pub-
lic believed the invasion of Leb-
anon was the "rightdecision." In
December, 1982, support was
down to 64 percent and in May,
1983, a bare 51 percent majority
supported the decision. Last
month it was down to 43 percent.
Opposition to the war rose
from 13 percent in July, 1982 to
32 percent in December, 44 per-
cent in May, 1983 and 51 percent
now.
Last month's poll found that
44 percent of the public thought
Israel should make whatever
security arrangements are neces-
sary and pull out of Lebanon
within the next few weeks. A
longer stay for better security
arrangements was supported by
25 percent and another 25 percent
thought Israel should remain in
Lebanon until the Syrians pull
out.
'Dedicated to Serving our Jewish Community"
BETH ISMEb RUBIN
5608 W. ATLANTIC AVENUE DELRAY BEACH, FL 33445
OELRAY (306) 4994000 WEST PALM (305) 732-3000
JOSEPH RUBIN. OWNER


.. .. ....X.U u) Liuut.it uuunty
Friday, January 13,1984
THE BEST PRICES IN TOWN
T
NORTON
IRE CO.
SAM1Y
CiNTIR
T LOWER PRICES, EXPERIENCE AND
fr *j INTEGRITY THAT SAVE YOU MONEY
sfcf NOBODY UNDERSELLS NORTON!
^V~ Coach Howard Schnellenberqer
SAFETY
SERVICE
EVERY STORE HAS
CERTIFIED
BECAUSE SO MUCH IS RIDING ON YOUR TIRES.
P-METRIC TUBELESS
T WHITEWALL
SIZE_________! PRICE
P155/80R13 41.46
P165/80R13 ; 46.54
P185/80R13 58.16
/fn/fflBwiv
P185/75R14 62.01
P195/75R14 65.11
P205/75R14 70.731
P215/75R14 73.66J
P205/75R15 71^95
P215/75R15 74.98
k
A
xzx
TUBELESS
BLACKWALL
TO SERVE YOU
Most of our mechanics have
been TESTED and CER-
TIFIED by the National In-
stitute tor Service Excel-
lence They are available at
any ot our stores listed be-
low with a star (*)
P225/75R15 77.48
P235/75R15 86.45
TUBELESS BLACKWALL
195 70-14 | 205 70-14
83.69 92.46
BLACKWALL
SIZE
PRICE
165/70-365
77.08
SIZE
145 13
155- 13
165 13
175 14
185 14
165 15
165'70-13
185/70-13
185/70-14
MXL
PRICE
38.39
40.84
46.20
56.30
57.74
54.39
47.40
55.51
62.40
|180/65-390 90.30,
220/55-390 in7 4Q ASK FOR OUR PRICE
white U/.t,ONXCA TRUCK TIRES
YOKOHAMA
40,000 MILE LIMITED
WARRANTY
55 STEELBELTED
RADIALS
| FOR MOST FOREIGN a DOMESTIC
SMALL INTERMEDIATE CARS
SIZE
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
PRICE
31.18
31.94
33.97
36.13
41.98
44.29
41.30
Y885 Steel Belted Radial
SIZE
175/70SR13
185/70SR13
185/70SR14
195/70SR14
205/70SR14
PRICE
41.47
44.62
47.25
50.45
57.14
SMALL TRUCK
SPECIAL
Y45 WHITE WALL
600 x 14 A A 28
6 Ply *H
I PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITE
SIZE
'A78x13
C78x13
C78x14
E78x14
F78x14
G78x14
H78x14
G78x15
H78x15
L78x15
PRICE
25.26
28.20
28.83
30.03
31.48
33.18
34.74
33.26
34.98
36.94
Ava4ableonryin2Pty
MAXI-TRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL WHITE
SIZE
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
PRICE
35.99
38.78
40.49
41.67
43.06
44.36
4637
46.76
49.29
54.17
AT NORTON TIRE THERE'S
NEVER A CHARGE
TO CHECK YOUR
ALIGNMENT
BALANCE
BRAKES
WE ALWAYS OFFER A
8 POINT SAFETY
SERVICE CHECK
^ use
x BRAKE
SPECIAL
Install new disc pads Re-
surface rotors Install new
seals Repack bearings
Check calipers Check
system Inspect master
cylinder Add fluid as re-
quired Adjust and bleed
as required Check and ad-
just rear brakes Road test
30.000 Mile Limited Warranty
OIL CHANGE
FILTER & LUBE
UPT0 50TS OF ~
PREMIUM OIL
RERNED FOR GAS |
OR DIESEL ENG
NEW FILTER
. COMP LUBE
'OK MO IT BULK
USMSSfNGCRCAXS
ANOtlOHT 1 BUCKS
TOXIROET
SHOCK
ABSORBERS
I STRUTS
IVIKAIUTI
FITS MIST COS
AIR CONDITIONING
CHECK-UP
Keep your unrt performing
m lop condition Available at
stores ksted below with a (')
EXPERT WORK ON
NORTON TJRE CO LIMITED WARRANTY*
30 DAY MONEY
BACK GUARANTEE
H lor any reason you are no) completely satisfied nh am,..
E lonowrt* yc onoiaalHWHc, .,,, 30 days ol mXI1,
rWW$*K?3?$^^M
WE WILL MEET ANY LEGITIMATE ADVERTISED
TIRE PRICE AND HONOR ANY COMPETITOR S COU-
PONS ON ANY SAME TIRES WE LIST IN THIS AD.
LBIFGoodrich
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC, POLYESTER
CORD, FIBERGLASS BELT
WHITEWALLS
P155
80B12I
mm
'?*M^
SIZE
PRICE
SIZE
P155/80B13 31.97 P215/75B14
P165/80B13 33.81 P225/75B14
P175/80B13 35.75 P155/80B15
P185/80B13 37.93 !P165/80B15
P175/75B14 38.7^9 P205/75B15
P185/75B14 39.88 P215/75B15
P195/75B14 4"| .82 i P225/75B15
P205/75B14J 42.92
P235/75B15
PRICE
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
45.60
47.78
50.10
HfFGoodrich
LIFESAVER XLM
STEEL BELTED RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
P155
80R13I
SIZE
PRICE
SIZE
P165/80R13! 43.46 'P205/75R14
P175/80R13'45.02
P185/80R13
P195/70R13
P205/70R14
P175/V5R14
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
46.28
47.11
52.76
46.39
48.57
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
52.76) P235/75R15
PRICE
55.06
56.10
59.97
55.37
57.25
59.45
61.63
66.13
IRELLI
yawa
mi
, 1M*ra ,
MLOW COST. HtCH MLEA8C BQ /Wl
RADIAL MACIWAU KO/fU
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
PRICE
MM
all
1x1
m
*3fe;
?
WE ALSO CARRY
PS, P. P7 and PS
sues to rn most aiaemcan 4
iWHI CARS AT HOST STORES
MSI SHUNG I
DUAL STIR HITS
SIZE
165/70SR13
17S/70SR13
185/70SR13
185/70SR14
195/70SR14
PRICE
M7 *VOLUTK*ArTt AU
rfi SEASON AAOIAL. HMM
nnromtma. steel belt m
StOIWALl FOR AOOCO STRENGTH
SIZE
195/70HR14
NORTON
SUNJOfc 1S?< -
ALL STORES OPEN 7:30 AM
205/70HR14
SAFETY
ami
""------------ oCONAL GAM.ES oCUTLfft RDOf
Master Cari oo~*MMa*w mosoiiiiw
M.. .NcmTHiMAMi .mtLiMvnum in11 wi
"** iiMta* miwt mhm> im Am Exartss '. mumbcach .mawam^oat
lJ7rfc* "Mm HVS" WIW HaltSl 4 Hum Drj SO f
UMtfSUM i*HUHiaCACN .WEST MIAMI
lMmM _^____ ni4MiMr?uw eiij.....Mi WW
T.^Tt^ OOTM OAOf .UNUI MMUTt tOUAM
nn**u* wots omh^ tu nn mns tans< o ** HOMEtTfAO
mm* m tuna
W MOLIYWOOO .TAMARAC .lUIMMlN M1HIOCH
ttrs SiwiM 'I'MO iiriM.V|M nsii.7 mj wm m?v<
OAVJE TAaURAC TIOUCSTA
Si IJM [*. >, /HWH
*n*m pommiio MACM PLANTATION ??* s.,th ?; twu 'WMShmwiih
."'iSaSLf.^VmM '.r,?*1!"*^*" OAVTONAatACN
ilfc) lM~*v*0- 4JMM3 .WESTNkLMMACH MMHM
_______________________ffltWUlMimill MllbMnl- "4tui
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


Full Text
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, January 13,1984
Left to right: Norman Stone, Irwin Fields, Larry Schact, Lester Entin, Joseph Waters,
Marvin Kirsner, Steve Meltzer, Arnold RosenthaL Property Sub-Committee Chairman;
Helene Eichler, Assistant Executive Director; Marshall Sigel, Steven Kay, Leonard
Jaffee, Baron Coleman, Marketing Sub-Committee Chairman; Henry Janus, Dr. Stuart
Schulman. Present but not pictured are: Henry Brenner, Howard Guggenheim,
Marianne Bobick, President, South County Jewish Federation; Gerson Bernstein,
Endowment Committee Chairman; Rabbi Bruce Warshal, Executive Director; Dr
Mark Drucker, Endowment Coordinator.
Endowment Committee Starts
"We are moving now!" pro-
claimed Gerson "Gary" Bern-
stein, Chairman of the newly
created Endowment Committee
of the South County Jewish Fed-
eration.
On Dec. 16, 1983, Bernstein
called the first meeting in the his-
tory of the South County Jewish
Federation to order. Twenty-one
people gathered to share infor-
mation and set directions for this
year.
As a result of this meeting, the
committee has been divided into
four working Sub-committees.
Baron Coleman has accepted
the chairmanship of the
Marketing Sub-committee. It is
the responsibility of these people
to decide on the media devices to
be used by the total committee.
Eric Deckinger has accepted
the chairmanship of the Invee.t-
ment Sub-comhiittee which is
charged with the responsibility of
investing the monies held by this
committee.
Cafe Fire
Raises Queries
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Jewish or-
ganizations in France are differ-
ing over who might have been re-
sponsible for a fire which caused
extensive damage to a Jewish-
owned cafe in a Paris suburb and
the motives behind the arson.
One group, the Union of Sub-
urban Jewish Communities, is
claiming that the arson was the
work of anti-Semitic elements.
But another organization, Jewish
Revival, is cautioning against
drawing conclusions before police
end their investigation.
Police investigators said the
fire was started by criminal ele-
ments but refused to ascribe a
possible motive. The cafe owner,
Joseph Attia, is the vice presi-
dent of the Pavillon-Sous-Bois
Jewish community. The area is
rife with criminal elements and
police say that racketeers are
known to be active in most Paris
suburbs.
The fire broke out when the
cafe was closed and the Attia
family, which resides in the same
building, was not at home. Police
investigators said they found
empty gasoline cans on the site
and nearby a daubing of a
swastika and an anti-Semitic
slogan.
Police, acting on the orders of
Interior Minister Gaston Def-
ferre, have preventively rein-
forced their patrols in suburbs
with larger Jewish populations
and have stationed radio cars
near most local synagogues and
communal centers.
Al Gortz has accepted the Arnold Rosenthal has accepted Endowments and Philanthropic Committee has been established
chairmanship of the Legal Sub- the chairmanship of the Pro- Funds U) assist the Federation with far
committee which is charged with specting Sub-committee which is _, reaching goals and to assist Fed-
advising the Endowment Com- charged with locating potential Marianne Bobick, President of eratior. members who have
mittee regarding current legal clients for the establishment of the South County Jewish Feder- special needs. We are now doing
issues. ation said, "The Endowment both of these.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
DANISH
BAKERY
Publix
r
All Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Baked in its Own Pan,
Chocolate
Pecan
Fudge Cake
$189
each |
s.
Everyone's Favorite
Chocolate ,
Chip Cookies
1299
o
Prices Effective
January 12th thru 14th. 1984
Chocolate Iced
Boston
Cream Cake
$2
Fresh and Delicious
Kaiser Rolls


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EH70NOCA2_EVUEZA INGEST_TIME 2013-06-06T01:36:24Z PACKAGE AA00014304_00146
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES


Friday, January 13,1984
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 7
MeetMargolitNavonPart II
Kditor's note: These stories
about Yoseftal and Kaplan, two
neighborhoods in Kfar Saba
which the South County Jewish
Federation has been paired with
under Israel's Project Renewal
Program will appear throughout
the upcoming year. Project
Renewal is a joint effort between
the Jews of the Diaspora and the
Israeli Government to help less
.fortunate Jews in Israeli society.
By ANDREW POLIN
Years of neglect cannot be
undone overnight. Unfortuna-
tely, in the interim casualties
occur.
One family in Kfar Saba is
paying for the years of neglect.
One boy is condemned to special
education class because years of
mistrust and cultural rules
prevented his parents from
taking him for help.
"He was like a two and a half
year old boy when he was five. He
didn't know how to play. He
didn't speak properly," said
Margolit Navon, an occupational
therapist, who works-in Yoseftal
and Kaplan. Navon tried to help
I In- child, but the mother was
suspicious. "She said there is no
ust- liecauae she was better than
'1m- nurw at the kindergarten and
she can give much more, and she
c.Hi'i." Navon said. When the
li-.\ wont into special education
il.i-- the mother realized that the
'ji.'.^ruin could nave helped her
am. her son. but it was too late
let iiiin 11 was not loo late for the
t\vu j nuuger children. "We
tailed lal.iiigcaruof the girl and
tin ImiIm ." alto1 said. The girl in
tin- In-ginning showed the same
sign* as lu-i lifuibar. Also verv
late in development. Also the
baby was very late in develop-
ment," she said.
"The baby lifted his head when
he was six months old. He's
supposed to do it when he's one
month old," she added. "So the
mother realized that we can
help," Navon said, "and she
came for help." The girl and baby
are in perfect health today. "The
mother sent her girl to the
kindergarten. She went to work.
Her other child is in a day care
center. She's happy. She's
suddenly happy. "She's not as
nervous as she used to be. She
used to hit us here. She used to
lift her hands and say, "If you
touch my girls, I'll hit you,"
Navon recalled. "And now she s
okay. She's happy. She loves us.
And she brings us cakes. That's a
change," Navon added.
The older boy, however, is
sentenced to special education.
"We couldn't help him. She
wouldn't let us. We could have,
but it was too late," she said. "If
you find it really early you can
solve the problems," she added.
Navon works with two psycho-
logists and a speech therapist in
the treatment center which
serves the residents of Yoseftal
and Kaplan. They work for
change but there have been
obstacles. Ten years ago when
someone said a person lived in
Yoseftal it was as if that person
lived in the Arab village just l'/i
miles away in the West Bank.
"It used to be them and us,"
Nuvon said They used to tell me,
"You're from there. You don't
lH-long to us." "Today there isn't
such a thing like them and us,"
Sheinf eld Named Honoree
For Century Village
Bond Breakfast
Ianhi.ihI Sin inteld is a native
of Huston and attended Suffolk
University Law School, receiving
a I.1.IJ and .11). His background
includes Ixith business and legal
experience having been in real es-
tate and auctioneering.
Sheinfekl has ljeen the past
^ president of Temple B'nai Moshe,
the largest Conservative Temple
in lloston. and of its Brother-
hood He was president of Mas-
""'hubvLUi Vuetimwen Associn-
tion. Ohavi Sedeck Cemetery
Corporation and Professional
Men s Club. He has served as
chairman of Israel Bonds and the
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Shcinleld is a 32 degree Mason
^ and past officer of Aleppo Shrine.
-IJ/L' was legal consultant to the
Massachusetts State Police, and
for 15 years was an unpaid chair-
man of the Selective Service
Hoard of Boston by presidential
appointment
Sheinfeld served as an advisor
to two governors of Massachu-
setts, John Volpe and Francis
Sargent. He was privileged to
make the nominating speeches
for Governors Sargent, Volpe and
Frank Perry at the Massachu-
setts State Conventions.
Four years ago Sheinfeld and
his wife, Sally, moved to Century
Village, Boca Raton. He became
chairman of the charter commit-
"^ee which formulated the Century
oT Boca Raton Umbrella Associa-
tion COBRUA. He served aa
first vice-president and now has
assumed the role of president.
Sheinfeld is active in many or-
ganizations in the Boca area. He
is a past president of the Massa-
chusetts Club and its parliamen-
tarian. He is a director and par-
liamentarian of Beth Shalom
she said. "It's us, altogether."
Navon also said the residents
new feel a part of the country.
"They feel like they belong. That
the government gave them
something. The Jews around the
world care about them," she
added.
Their work also has started
showing results. In the past, the
birth rate was about 200 babies,
annually in the area. In the last
two years, the birth rate has
dropped to about 120 to 150
babies, a year, down approxi-
mately 25 percent. "Now they see
they are not in a race with their
mothers. If the mother had 12
children the gi-1, who is 24, also
wanted to have 12 children,"
Navon added. "Now
they don't have four children
in five years. They will have two
in five years, and the mothers are
going to work," she said.
Before, Navon said, six people
used to live in 40 square meters.
"Do you know what 40 square
meters are? It's like 40 square
yards. It's maybe your bedroom
at home and a kitchen," she
added. With the change and
progress has come a sense of
accomplishment for Navon, who
when she first came here four
years ago had not realized the
severity of the situation. "In the
first year we were so depressed
here. We didn't believe it was
Israel," she said. "And that's
what gave us courage, to change
it," she said. "It was a challenge
in the beginning. And I like it
now and I like the people now,"
she said. "No one thought it
would survive here," Navon said,
referring to the program. But the
Crogram has survived, and
(cause of the program the
people are living a better life, not
just surviving.
Leonard Sheinfeld
Brotherhood and Temple,
member of the Boca Raton Shrine
Club, member of Century Square
Club, director and charter
member of Shomer Lodge B'nai
B'rith. and a Governor of the
Century Village Men's Club.
Sheinfeld was an officer of the
Boston branch of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America.
He was awarded a citation by
the National Federation of
Jewish Men's Clubs, Inc. in ap-
preciation of his loyal and effi-
cient service.
He also received the award of
Carnation from the Jewish Ad-
vocate, leading English-Jewish
paper in New England.
The Boca Raton Century Vil-
lage Israel Bond breakfast will be
held on March 4 at Boca Teeca at
9:30a.m.
Lester Entin Joins
TAU's Board of Governors
/
Jack Cummings, the Chairman
of the Board of Governors of Tel
Aviv University, last week an-
nounced the appointment of Les-
ter M. Entin to the Board of
Governors. Mr. Entin and his
wife Sally, of Boca Raton and
Verona, N.J., are long time sup-
porters of Tel Aviv University
and its School of Education.
Most recently the Entins estab-
lished a Fund for the research,
advancement and education of
the Hearing Impaired and Disad-
vantaged Youth. Mr. Cummings
stated that it is a privilege for the
university to have on its Board of
Governors a person such as Les-
ter Entin who has served as a
community leader in so many
aspects of Jewish life.
Sally and Lester Entin are also
among the founding members of
the Boca Raton Chapter of
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University which recently estab-
lished an office at 2200 North
Federal Hwy. in Boca Raton.
Anyone wanting further informa-
tion about Tel Aviv University

Lester Entin
should call Lauren Azoulai at
392-9186.
/. R. WE1NRAUB & Co., Inc.
Insurance Agents
& Consultants
Insurance Exchange of the America's
245 Southeast First Street, Suite 319
Miami, Florida 33131 (305) 381-9877
N.J. (201)666-490r>N.Y. (212)564-3070
Telex 642184

Cool Weather Recipes
CRISPY SUGAR COOKIES
Kasha granules give these tender
cookies a special crunch
3/4 cup butter or margarine
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla
2-1/2 cups all purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup uncooked Wolff's Kasha
(fine or medium)
In mixer bowl, cream margarine
and sugar, beat in eggs and vanilla.
Stir or sift flour and baking powder
then add along with kasha to form
a fairly firm dough. Chill for one
hour or more until dough is stiff
enough to roll. On lightly floured
board, roll dough 1/4-inch or
thinner. Cut with holiday cookie
cutters. Place on ungreased bak-
ing sheets. Bake at 375F. lor 6-8
minutes or until very lightly
browned around edges. Decorate
or leave plain.
Makes about 8 dozen
(Roasted Buckwheat Kernels)
Kasha is the heart of the buckwheat kernel which has
been roasted to bring out its nutty flavor Buckwheat is
the highest in balanced protein of any food in the plant
kingdom almost as high as eggs yet no cholesterol
problems
One of nature's near perfect foods, use Wolff's Kasha
instead of rice or potatoes at your next meal or use it
in baked goods and side dishes.
You'll find Wolff's Kasha in the Gourmet, Kosher or
specialty food section of your favorite supermarket.
For your cool weather recipes, send a stamped
self-addressed envelope to: Box JP2
THE BIRKETT MILLS, PENN YAN, N.Y. 14527
and SAVE 15*
with this Store Coupon
154 OFF
, on any one package of
WflvtflrA.' BUCKWHEAT PRODUCTS
15C
OFF
TO THE DEALER: Thi coupon
will be redeemed only as follow*:
For amount specified ptui 7 for
handling, provided coupon i
received from cuiiomer on pur
chuc of luted merchandise Proof
of purchase of sufficient stock of
merchandise to cover coupons sub
mitted must be shown on request
(Failure to comply may void all
coupons submitted for redemp
lion.) Redemptions not honored
through broken or other outside
agencies. Coupons are non
Limit one coupon per purchase
transferable and void if use u
prohibited, taxed, restricted or
bcenac it reouired. Customer mutt
pay any sales tax. Cash redemr>
tion value l/lOO*. FOR RE
DEMPTION, PRESENT TO
OUR SALESMAN OR MAIL TO
THE BIRKETT MILLS, PENN
TAN, NEW YORK 14527
LIMIT ONUf ONE COUPON
MAY BE REDEEMED PER
UNIT OF PRODUCTS
PURCHASED.
IT2
THE BIRKETT MILLS, PENN YAN, NEW YORK 14527
15< OFF Coup" **~ ~ *WM 15* OFF