The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00142

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
tie
Jewish Floridian
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
^5-Number 42
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, December 16,1983
frt) Shochit
Price 35 Cents
LL1'
Federation Subsidizes
Teen Pilgrimage to Israel
For the fourth year, the South
County Jewish Federation an-
nounces that it will subsidize
South County Teenagers parti-
cipating in the forthcoming Israel
Teen Pilgrimage. Each youth will
receive a $600 stipend toward the
cost of $2,000 for the almost six
week intensive Israeli experience.
Twenty stipends will be
awarded to students entering the
tenth through twelfth grades of
high school. If there are more
than 20 applicants, the older
students will be given preference.
Within grade levels, choice will
be made by drawing lots.
The group will leave on Thurs-
day, July 5 and return 40 days
later on Aug. 13.
The program is a 40-day excur-
sion into the life of a nation. It is
a stimulating adventure that in-
cludes three weeks of extensive
touring of Israel, 10 days in Jeru-
salem, five days in a Nature
Study Center and five days shar-
ing the unique Gadna experience
with Israeli youth. In addition,
an optional free weekend is
devoted to visiting family and
friends or home hospitality with
an Israeli family. To gain a great-
er understanding of the sites, the
student will participate in special
seminars and lectures which are
Continued on Page 6
'*.V
fines Kreger
*ar-
Young Artists. Series
'Sunday At Three'
I The Fourth Annual Season of
Young Artists Series "Sun-
ky at Three" at Temple Beth El
I proudly presented with the fol-
ding schedule:
| Sunday, Jan. 15, 1984
nes Kreger, Cellist Winner
the prestigious Piatigorsky
hze at the age of 18, received his
chelor's and Master's degrees
tmi the Juillard School. He
udied with Leonard Rose and
kblo Casals.
I He has given concert tours in
United States, Europe and
Soviet Union, and has been
kloist at numerous festivals, in-
iing the Casals. Marlboro,
ngU'wood and Saratoga. In ed-
ition, he has been soloist with
le Brooklyn Philharmonic, the
idianapolis, Louisville, and
enver Symphony Orchestras.
Sunday, Feb. 12 Jonathan
Feldman, Pianist A graduate
of the Juillard School, he studied
under the late Irwin Freundlich
and has been a pupil of Andre
Watts. He was piano accompan-
ist to Nathan Milstein in Decem-
ber, 1981 for the Distinguished
Artists Series.
Mr. Feldman has performed in
recital with such artists as Nath-
aniel Rosen, Yo Yo Ma, and El-
mar Oliveira. He is presently the
pianist of the New Jersey Sym-
phony. Amona his recordings are
those for Columbia Masterworks
and RCA Red Seal.
Sunday, March 4 The Men-
delssohn String Quartet The
Mendelssohn String Quartet,
winner of the 1981 Young Artists
Continued on Page 14-A
Israel Debates
Meaning of Accord
Public Fears Escalation Of New Risks
Erna Rubinstein to Speak
At B'nai Torah, Dec. 18
A Memoir of the Holocaust
The world of Holocaust litera-
jire is constantly expanding.
[ear after year, as the tragic
>ys of the 40s recede in time,
ople are sharing their experi-
ces and hopes. One wonders
fry those who lived the horrors
houki need to wait almost 40
w to tell the story. What is
ere about the passage of time
it makes the retelling so much
are compelling?
| After all, it would seem, the
taviest impact of the event
.ould be closer to the event it-
Mf. Perhaps what we are learn-
K now is that time does not al-
[y s heal wounds and that with
> cycle of life, constant remind-
of those experiences seam td
> anew the painful wounds.
Erna Rubinstein, a member of
nai Torah. has just published
the latest contribution to Holo-
caust literature. "The Survivor
In Us All: A Memoir Of The Hol-
ocaust" is her recollection of the
events that shaped her hie.
Tracing events from the German
invasion of Poland in September
1939, the author takes the reader
through the fears, the confronta-
tions, the despair, the pain the
sense of toss all mixed with the
urge to survive. Through the long
years of Auschwitz period,
through exposure to all degrees
of suffering, that spark of human
life which cries "Survive per-
meates this book.
Mrs. Rubinstein tells of these
events in a clear, flowing lan-
guage whkh highlights the sin-
cerity and depths of presentation.
Continuedoa Page*
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
has flatly denied in the
Knesset that Israel made
any military commitments
to the U.S. during his and
Defense Minister Moshe
Arens' talks with President
Reagan and top Adminis-
tration officials in Wash-
ington last week.
There was no secret agreement
reached in Washington, and
reports to that effect are "erron-
eous rumors and baseless inter-
pretations," Shamir declared in a
statement to the Knesset ex-
plaining the substance of his
agreements with the U.S. with
emphasis on their economic as
well as military benefits to Israel.
SHAMIR AND other Israeli
officials have rejected sugges-
tions in foreign media and from
some opposition quarters in
Israel that the American air
strike against Syrian positions in
Lebanon Sunday, on the heels of
an Israel air strike a day earlier,
indicated collusion between the
two governmenta to make war on
Syria.
Shamir told the Knesset that
the US-Israel joint political-
military committee scheduled to
hold its first masting in Wash-
ington next month, will discuss
combined military maneuvers
and the storage of American mili-
tary equipment in Israel. He con-
tended that the military coopera-
tion between the two countries
would have a deterrent effect.
Storing military equipment
would also make a significant
contribution to Israel's economy.
The Premier explained that the
Americans also would buy some
equipment in Israel for their
armed forces. In addition, the
U.S. agreed to provide the
greater proportion of its military
assistance to Israel in the form of
grants rather than loans.
HE NOTED that whereas in
the past Israel received $1.7 bil-
lion, half in grants and half in
loans, it will now receive $1.4 bil-
lion as a grant. Aid funds will be
exchanged for shekels in the
amount of $260 million. Israel
will also be able to sell material to
the American air and naval
forces.
Shamir maintained that this
cooperation beteen the two coun-
tries will focus on deterring
Syria's "aggressiveness" and on
reaching a solution in Lebanon.
He called on King Hussein of
Jordan to join the peace process
and on President Hosni Mubarak
of Egypt to resume the autonomy
talks.
Shamir's statement was fol-
lowed by a general debate.
Former Foreign Minister Abba
Eban of the Labor Alignment
stressed that Israel's only inter-
est in Lebanon is to secure its
northern border. Peace for Galilee
can be guaranteed by a strategy
of deterrence from within Israel.
Continued on Page 11










*.
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Decent 16J
Cappu Warns Syrians
Says We'll Bomb Again If They Shoot At Our Planes
News Briefs
By JTA Services
PARIS U.S. Defense Sec-
retary Caspar Weinberger has
warned Syria that the United
States will continue to hit Syrian
positions in Lebanon if they
shoot at American reconnais-
sance flights.
Weinberger, who was in Paris
for talks with French Defense
Minister Charles Hernu, con-
firmed that two American planes
were lost in Sunday morning's air
strike over Lebanon. The U.S.
Defense Secretary said that one
of the downed pilots has been re-
covered and is aboard an Amer-
ican vessel and that two others
were "in Syrian hands."
Weinberger told newsmen after
a four-hour meeting with Hernu
that diplomatic contacts would
start "immediately" to obtain
the release of the two American
airmen. He said daily reconnais-
sance flights over Lebanon were
essential for the safety of the en-
tire multinational force which
consists of American, French,
Italian and British contingents.
Haig Hits Reagan
News Treatment
*
MONTREAL Former Sec-
retary of State Alexander Haig
has denounced the Middle East
policy carried on by the Reagan
Administration since his abrupt
resignation last year.
He told a press conference,
after speaking here at a dinner
honoring Montreal business
leader Thomas Hecht. that the
United States "should have
learned" to deal with Israel, as a
democracy, "through quiet
diplomacy and not by rushing to
the front pages of the newspapers
or on prime-time TV to condemn
an allied nation."
Haig charged that this is what
"our administration did through
thoughtless statements by the
Secretary of Defense," whom he
did not name, "by faceless White
House staffers and a host of
others in what remains as yet an
uncoordinated structure" of gov-
ernment.
Israel Objects To
UN's Arafat-Rescue
JERUSALEM Israel has
registered strong objections to a
United Nations plan to evacuate
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion chief Yasir Arafat and his
supporters from Tripoli in north-
ern Lebanon where they are
under siege by Syrian-backed
PLO dissidents.
The plan to rescue Arafat by
sea, aboard a vessel flying the
UN flag, was approved unanim-
ously by the Security Council.
The matter was discussed at
Sunday'8 Cabinet meeting here,
but no formal decision was made
to officially challenge the Secur-
ity Council resolution.
Nevertheless, Cabinet Secret-
ary Dan Meridor told reporters
later that "It is not the UN's role
to' transfer a band of terrorists
from one place to which they
have brought death and destruc-
tion to another place from which
they intend to continue to sow
death and destruction.
i EEC Tells Israel
. To Change Policy
PARIS The European
S Economic Community (EECI has
drafted a joint document calling
on Israel to abandon its West
Bank settlement policy and to re-
cognize "the right of the Pales-
tinian people to self-determina-
tion, with all that this implies."
The heads of the 10 member-
states now meeting in Athens for
their annual summit conference
were due to approve the docu-
ment this week and issue it then.
The draft document prepared
by the 10 EEC Foreign Min-
isters expresses Europe's "deep
preoccupation" with the Middle
East situation and says that the
hopes raised by the Fez declara-
tion of 1982 and President
Reagan's peace plan have come
to nothing. The document says a
new initiative is needed and im-
plies the 10 might at one of their
future conferences issue a new
joint policy statement.
Offer to Hussein
Discounted in Israel
JERUSALEM Israeli offi-
cials said they were not con-
cerned by President Reagan's
letter to King Hussein of Jordan
promising U.S. support if Jordan
joins in peace talks based on
Reagan's September 1, 1982 ini-
tiative.
Hussein revealed the letter in
an interview published in The
New York Times. He said it out-
lined steps the U.S. would take if
Jordan decided to enter the nego-
tiations. But Israeli officials
insisted that Washington is
"skeptical" of the prospects of
Hussein joining in negotiations
with Israel.
Soviet Envoy Meets
With Mexican Jews
MEXICO CITY A delega-
tion of Mexican Jewish leaders
was received by Soviet Ambas-
sador Rotislav Sergeiev and First
Secretary Yuri Mishin for wide-
ranging discussions in a two-hour
meeting.
The meeting has caused a sen-
sation in Jewish circles through-
out Latin America.
The delegation of the Comite
Central Israelita de Mexico, the
representative body of Mexican
Jewry and the World Jewish
Congress affiliate, protested
against discrimination suffered
by Soviet Jews, particularly the
treatment of activist and Hebrew
teacher Iosif Begun who was re-
cently sentenced to 12 years in
prison and internal exile.
Court Asked to Rule
On Britain's Refusal
LONDON The European
Court of Justice will be asked to
pronounce on the legality of
Britain's refusal to sell oil to Is-
rael.
This was decided in the
English High Court Friday
despite opposition by the British
government. Lawyers expect the
case to come to the European
Economic Community's tribunal
in the latter part of next year,
barring a successful last minute
appeal by the British govern-
ment's attorney general.
The case stems from a dispute
between two oil companies fol-
lowing a refusal to load an Israel-
bound cargo at the British North
Sea oil terminal in the Shetland
Islands.
A Swiss subsidiary of the Bulk
Oil had purchased the oil on be-
half of the Israeli Delek Co. from
the American owned Sun Oil, the
world's 12th biggest oil concern.
Hlstadrut Approves
Advance Allowance
JERUSALEM Histadrut
has announced that it will pay an
interim cost-of-living allowance
of close to 18 percent to all em-
ployes of Histadurt-owned com-
panies despite the refusal by
private employers to do the same.
Histadrut Secretary General
Yeruham Meshel said the interim
payment would be made later
this month. The next regular
COL allowance is due by Feb. 1,
1984. The trade union federation
has so far failed to reach agree-
ment with private sector em-
ployees.
The Manufacturers Associa-
tion, according to Meshel, is
seeking unacceptable cuts in the
February 1 increments in ex-
change for an 18 percent advance
payment. This constitutes a
breach of the long-standing COL
agreement between labor,
management and the govern-
ment, Meshel said and Histadrut
will fight it.
Trudeau Tells Israel
To Leave W. Bank
MONTREAL Prime Min-
ister Pierre Elliott Trudeau said
in Kuwait, where he is visiting as
part of his worldwide trip to
promote peace, that Israel should
leave the territory "it captured
during the Six-Day war and allow
the Palestinians there to elect
their own leaders, even if it
means the election of PLO chief
Yasir Arafat.
"The Palestinian people should
be given their rights and a home-
land in the West Bank and Gaza
Strip," Trudeau told reporters in
Kuwait City. "Consequently, we
ask that Israel withdraw and its
settlement policy be stopped and
reversed." He added that the
Palestinian people "should be at
the center of any settlement to
the Israel-Arab wars."
Meanwhile, a staff member of
the Canadian Television Network
(CTV) covering Trudeau s tour of
the Persian Gulf countries, was
recalled to Canada for biased
reporting from Abu Dhabi.
Security Tightens
After Ambush
JERUSALEM Israeli forces
tightened security measures on
the Awali River bridges over the
weekend following the bazooka
rocket attack on an Israeli army
HoU
out!
vehicle in Nabatiy, *
non Friday in which oTi
gtpj Aharon Yanovl*
taUad and one soldier 2'
local residents were *o
Yanovsky was buried in.
The attack was carried
masked terrorists who
Israeli military officer, m
regional leaders todav^
them that terrorisT**
nmg to infiltrate boobv-L
cars into the region. t2
plained that the elaborate in.
tion procedures at the 2
checkpoints were as much for'
protection of the local
as for Israeli forces.
The Israelis denied claim, I
representatives of the south 1
anese that goods from south I
anon bound for the north
deliberately being delayed
Hille I House Vandalized
one in the building at the tin
student who arrived at the 1
building for Shabat ser
discovered the damage and t
the police and Hillel Rabbi S
Sniderman.
CHICAGO (JTA) -
Unidentified vandals smashed all
the windows at Hillel House at
the University of Illinois in
Champaign but caused ho other
damage. No one has claimed
responsibility. The damage to the
windows was estimated at close
to $7,000.
According to Barry Mehler, a
student in the university, the
vandals also overturned a
dumpster "which weighs more
than a car, leading us to suspect
that more than one person was
involved." He said there was no
Mehler said that there
been other, minor incident*at
past directed against the Je
student population on
campus. In addition, Artbt"
the campus stage demon
periodically against Zion
Mehler said there are an
mated 8,000-10,000 J
students at the university <
total student body of 52,000.
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You'll find the sweet harmony
of this city's great culinary styles
in our nine restaurants, including
Winston's 4-star cuisine, Kabby's
for fresh seafood the
way we like it down yon-
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for Sunday Jazz Brunch,
Italian Festa lots of
other good times. Try a
little night music in
Rainforest for dancing,
or Pete Fountain's for
truly hot jazz.
Play it a whole other way in
Rivercenter Tennis and Racquetball
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gym, whirlpools
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And once out-
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Nobody else plays it
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New Orleans Hilton
Riverside & Towers
and you: We're going to
make beautiful music
together.
For information and reservations call you'
Hilton Reservation Service listed in the
white panes of your telephone book.


day, December 16,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South bounty
foher Second Thoughts
6 POWs Suddenly Seem 'Shameful'
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Some of Israel's leading
riters, editors and mili-
commentators are
ng sober second
[houghts over the euphoria
hat swept the country last
teek when six prisoners of
ar captured by the Pales-
tine Liberation Organiza-
tion in Lebanon 14 months
to, returned home in
xchange for some 4,500
Palestinians and Lebanese
^ld prisoner by Israel in
ebanon and in Israel.
These observers of the national
ene. writing in major dailies,
ive expressed serious concern
i two counts: first, the frenzied
eroes' welcome given the re-
omed POWs was not warranted
hv the circumstances and could
jiave long-range deleterious ef-
ts on the morale and fighting
feint of the Israel Defense Force;
cond, Israel seems to have
bandoned its long-standing
olicy of never surrendering to
irisi blackmail."
The prisoner exchange, given
vast disparity in numbers
jturned by each side, was clearly
moral and political victory for
the PLO. Israel released men the
lPLO wanted released, among
Jthem many hard-core terrorists,
[and the long-range meaning of
this acquiescence is yet to be
Idi'termined.
"The practical damage of the
[repatriation extravaganza is that
|we ourselves encourage the other
[side, the PLO or whoever, to raise
[the ante, the price to be paid for
[the release of prisoners" in the
[future, according to veteran jour-
inalist Shalom Cohen writing in
[The Jerusalem Post.
MILITARY correspondent
iF.itan Haber, writing in Yediot
lAihronot Sunday, measured the
[extent of the erosion of Israel's
Inn surrender policy. The govern-
lim-nt's rationale for the POW
[exchange was that the lives of the
six soldiers were in immediate
[danger due to the warfare in
[northern Lebanon between PLO
(dissidents challenging Yasir
[Arafat's leadership and Arafat
[loyalists who were holding the
IIsraelis prisoner.
Haber pointed out that lives
have been sacrificed time and
again in the past to uphold the
principle of no-surrender to
blackmail. He recalled the mas-
sacre of children in Maalot when
Israeli troops charged the school-
house where they were being held
hostage by PLO gunmen rather
than accede to terrorist demands;
the similar incident when terror-
ists seized the Savoy Hotel in Tel
Aviv; and the 1972 massacre of
the Israeli Olympics team in
Munich.
In 1976, Israel carried out the
long distance raid to rescue
hostages held by terrorists at
Entebbe airport in Uganda,
despite the appreciable risk to the
lives of the hostages and
members of the rescue team, one
of the leaders of which, Yoni Net-
anyahu, was killed.
HABER SUGGESTED, not
without irony, that the policy
turnabout began under the Likud
government which has consist-
ently taken a harder line toward
terrorism and the Palestinians
than its predecessor Labor
regimes. The "threshold of suf-
fering" of the nation has "dan-
gerously declined" over recent
years. "The government and the
army must carefully think about
what they have done," Haber
wrote.
Other commentators stressed
the anomaly of the public
reaction to the POW exchange.
They pointed out that the
capture of the six soldiers was
hardly a glorious or edifying
episode. The full details of how
they were surrounded by a PLO
unit on the front line in Lebanon
in September, 1982 have never
been released. But one fact is
clear they were not captured
during a fight. No shots were
fired.
Retired Brig. Gen. Yaacov
Hasdai summed up the feelings
of many observers in a newspaper
column titled "Joy But Not
Honor." He urged the nation to
make a careful distinction be-
tween the return of heroes and
that of ordinary soldiers who had
the misfortune of falling into
enemy hands.
HAARETZ columnist Natan
Dunevitz noted bitterly that the
country paid far less attention to
tales of glory and heroism in
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Kosher Calves Liver*
Also serving lunch on the lighter side
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battle tor which the highest
orders of bravery were awarded,
often posthumously. The army
publishes accounts, but there is
no national frenzy of excitement
as there was when these six
young men came home, he wrote.
"Champagne was poured on
their heads as though they were
some winning basketball team,"
Dunevitz continued. He recalled
the far more modest celebrations
that greeted the return of Yom
Kippur War POWs. He disclosed
that the late former Chief of
Staff, Gen. Haim Laskov, had
bitterly criticized even those cele-
brations as damaging to the very
fibre of the army's courage.
Laskov said at the time, ac-
cording to Dunevitz: "Soldiers
who lost their limbs because they
fought back harder than these
prisoners were not accorded such
a welcome Can you imagine
what warping effect this can have
on youngsters who might have to
stand and fight sometime in the
future."
INEVITABLY, critics seek
scapegoats, and the Israeli
media, particularly radio and tel-
evision, have become the target
of charges that it whipped up the
popular adulation bestowed on
the six returned POWs. Shalom
Cohen's piece in The Jerusalem
Post, headlined "Sorry Spec-
tacle," denounced "the wild cele-
bration which was semi-
organized and which verged on
infantilism."
According to Cohen, "the ef-
fects on the national psyche, the
exaggeration, synthetic self-
gratification and the make-
believe seen in the celebration did
incalculable harm. The double-
think of turning an unavoidable
surrender to blackmail into a
victory to be celebrated leads to
dishonest obscurantism. A
habitual refusal to face hard facts
is not an asset for this
beleaguered island. We descend
to a level of a TV serial like
'Dallas', that of canned myth."
"Unfortunately," wrote Cohen,
"an accusing finger must be
pointed at the media which un-
leashed their professional effici-
ency as impresarios of pathos .
the original culprit was the
Broadcasting Authority ."
Haaretz faulted the media, es-
pecially Kol Israel Radio, for
setting the tone. The State-
owned radio decided Nov.
24 to cancel its regular
programs for day-long coverage
of the POW return. Yosef Lapid,
director general of the Broad-
casting Authority, rejected the
criticism. Radio and television
merely covered the events, they
did not create or magnify them,
he said.
IDF Frees
Palestinian
POWs
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israel Defense Force patrol near
the town of Jezzine in south Leb-
anon freed a group of seven
Palestinians who had been seized
by Christian Phalangist forces.
The seven, who had been
freed from the Ansar prison
camp as part of the general
prisoner exchange for six Israeli
POWs. were trying to cross the
Awali River over a bridge near
the town, on their way home to
villages in the Shouf mountains.
The Phalangists detained the
seven Palestinians, claiming they
were terrorists: The IDF patrol
intervened and freed the seven,
who then crossed the bridge and
continued on to their homes.
Charlotte Jacobson, recently reelected president of the Jewish
National Fund, is seen during a meeting with I**} f"
Minister Yitzhak Shamir in early November at which they
discussed issues concerning Soviet Jewry, U.S.-lsrael relations
and the state of the economy.
I Keep TeLUMS
DctfT Me RAmesHAKe /
YoO.... YoO
WITH A
1SRJED
Wednesday
December 21
10:30 PM
See Stanley Rosenblatt's
penetrating interview with
the President of the State
of Israel Chaim Herzog
The interview took place in
Jerusalem shortly after
Herzog met with President
Reagan last month.
Don't miss the inside
story!
wpbt2
m town Moaoa



. innnuin nf SnuifT
Tt r
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, December 16, iggg
Frustrated by Failure
Administration Turns from Courting Arabs
To Establishing Closer Ties With Troubled Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
The Reagan Administra-
tion, frustrated by its
failure to get Syria to even
talk about withdrawing its
forces from Lebanon and to
persuade Jordan to join the
Middle East peace talks
based on President
Reagan's Sept. 1, 1982 ini-
tiative, came out of the
closet last week in its rela-
tions with Israel and
publicly announced that
the two countries were al
lies.
This was how many here
viewed the announcement by
Reagan and Israeli Premier
Yitzhak Shamir following their
White House meeting Nov. 29, of
the creation of a joint U.S.-Israeli
political-military group as well as
several economic benefits for Is-
rael.
The Administration made it no
secret that the new closer ties
with Israel were aimed at sending
a message. It was a message tc
Syria and the Soviet Union, an
Administration official said.
"And frankly to those that are
listening in the region," he ad
ded.
"IT IS NOT a message of
threat of a military axis against
the Arabs," the official stressed.
"But we are both very concerned
about the great buildup of Soviet
weapons in Syria."
Another part of the message
came two days later, aftei
Reagan met with Lebanese Pres-
ident Amin Gemayel and reaf-
firmed the U.S. commitment to
the May 17 Lebanese-Israeli
agreement for Israel's withdraw-
al from Lebanon. The President
rejected Gemayel's request foi
changes in the agreement to ap
pease Syrian-backed groups to.
Lebanon.
An official of the American Is-
rael Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC) which has been pres-
sing for U.S.-Israeli strategic co-
operation for the past 18 months,
said that the agreement would
also convince the Syrians that
their aggression in Lebanon will
not succeed and convince the
various factions in Lebanon that
the Syrians will not give them
control of Lebanon "on a silver
platter."
THIS NEW approach of close
public strategic cooperation
between the U.S. and Israel was
opposed by the Arabists in the
State Department, by Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
and others in the Defense De-
partment on the grounds that
such an open alliance would en-
danger U.S. relations with the
Arab countries. An AIPAC offi-
cial noted that up to now the
policy seemed to be to "work
with anyone but Jews."
The day after Reagan and
Shamir made their announce-
ment, Prince Bandar, the Saudi
Arabian Ambassador to Wash-
ington, brought Reagan a letter
from King Fahd and told re-
porters that "Israel is a strategic
liability to America."
Clovis Maksoud. the Arab
League representative here, was
quoted as saying, the Arabs will
have to make "a painful reassess-
ment of Arab-U.S. relations" and
*
TIM
Jewish Floridian
Of South County
ffOSnuCti
FREDSMOCMET
Editor and Publianar
IWaakryMMV
SUZANNE SHOCHET GERl ROSENBERG
Eaaculix Editor N*i Coordinate"
r throw** Mid-May. St-Waakry aaNNKa at yaar (41 kuw
. PaM at Boca Ratan. Fla U*PS*42*0 t*N 02744134
BOCA RATON OFFICE 2200 N Fadaral Hwy Su.la 206. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Ptiona 366-2001
Main OMica Plant 20 N E 6th St Mtami. Fla 33101 Phona 1 37 J 4605
I WattM IB. P.O. Bo. 01 2673. MiM. Fla 33101
j Daman. Steal Limr. vtmm MO-ita
Cornomad Jawiah Appaai South County Jawiah Fadaration. inc Otficara Praardmt. Marianna BotMck
Vica PiaiUanU, Maraxla Baar Eric W Oacfcinoar. Milton Krataky. Sacratary Arnold Hoaantrui
Traaaorar Soanlca SchanHarman. Enacutnra GVaetor. Rabbi Bruca S Warahal
JaajlaH Florxfcan doaa not ouarantaa Kaahruth of Marchandiaa Advartiaad
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Araa S3 SO Annual (2 Yaar Minimum 17). by mambararwp South Couni,
jjjur Fadaration. 2200 N Fodoral Hwy Suita 206 Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phona 36*2737
laiTaam,
.21.
OponRaquaat
Friday. December 16,1963
Volume 5
10TEVETH6744
Number 42
they could no longer consider the
U.S. as "a mediator or a broker."
King Hussein of Jordan, in an
interview in Amman with Amer-
ican reporters, said he found the
agreement "totally dismaying."
HOWEVER, a senior Admin-
istration official told reporters
last week he "senses less an-
xiety" among the Arabs than
when the U.S. and Israel signed
the aborted Memorandum of
Understanding on strategic co-
operation in 1981.
U.S. officials also emphasized
that Shamir was told that the
U.S. has to have friends in the
Arab world. They gave as
examples, Saudi Arabia, Jordan
and Egypt and explained that
from time to time it is necessary
to supply them with arms. Also
stressed by the Administration
was that both Reagan and Sec-
retary of State George Shufcz re-
peatedly told Shamir that Is-
rael's policy of establishing
settlements on the West Bank is
an obstacle to the peace process.
An Administration official said
the Israelis made no secret that
they will not change this policy.
Shamir himself told the National
Press Club last Wednesday that
Israel has never given a commit-
ment not to build villages and
cities in Judaea and Samaria.
THE ADMINISTRATION of-
ficial made a telling point on this
subject. "The Israeli position is
only going to be changed by the
arrival at the negotiating table of
another Arab" such as Hussein,
he said. While Shamir did not
confirm this, he did stress at the
National Press Club, that "We
are committed to negotiate about
the political future of the politic"
status of these t*rttoriTj
Samaria, Judaea and Gaza anri
we are faithful to this commit
ment." He added that he believes
once negotiations resume and if
they are not interrupted airain
"we will be successful."
I
Last week's events have not
left Israel or its supporters in the
U.S. in a state of euphoria Ac
cording to the agreement out
lined by Reagan, combined plan.
ning, joint exercises and stock
piling U.S. equipment in Israel
are among the subjects to be
considered by the joint group
which will have its first meeting
in January in Washington.
Thomas Dine. AIPAC's Exe-
cutive Director, said last week
that the Reagan-Shamir meeting
was an "important step forward
but it produced "a bottle half
full." Whether the results will be
"durable" depends on whether
the agreements reached are
implemented, he said. But he
warned that the actual imple-
mentation will be left to some of-
ficials "who oppose any visible
dealings with Israel."
ANOTHER AIPAC official
noted that the incident after the
terrorist bombing of the U.S.
Marine headquarters in Beirut in
which the U.S. refused to send
wounded to nearby Israeli hos
pitals has convinced many in the
Administration that this policy
of refusing visible alliances with
Israel hurts the U.S.
AIPAC officials stress that
they have been told that Reagan
is determined to see this new al-
liance carried through. The nen
few months will be critical as the
groundwork is begun.
The Administration admitted
last week that strategic coopera-
tion with Israel was necessary
because it was in the interests of
the U.S.. in addition to whatever
benefits Israel receives from it.
"If we are supported by the
United States it is because by our
existence, by our activities in the
Middle East we are supporting
also American interests." Shamir
told the National Press Club.
But if there is no movement in
Lebanon, if the Syrians continue
to refuse to leave, if Gemayel
makes no gains toward national
reconciliation, will the Admin-
istration then scrap the long term
benefits of strategic cooperation
because there are no immediate
short term results? This is the ,.|
real test of last week's White
House announcement.
JTA Service


Friday, December 16,1983
Doris Cantor To Chair
Boca Lago Women's Division
Margaret Kottler, South County
Jewish Federation Women's
Division Campaign Chairman,
proudly announces that Doris
Cantor will once again be the
chairman of the Boca Lago Wo-
men's Division, UJA Federation
Campaign for 1984.
Last year," Margaret Kottler
said, "Doris did a superb job and
I know that this year under her
leadershiD we will be even more
successful."
The elegant Bridge Hotel has
been chosen for the Fund Raising
Luncheon which is scheduled for
Monday, Feb. 13,1984.
This summer Mrs. Cantor at-
tended a three day seminar of the
Council of Jewish Federations at
the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in
New York.
Mrs. Cantor, relocating to
Boca Raton from New York City
four years ago, has brought with
her extensive experience from her
many years of dedication to Jew-
ish life.
Her past activities include
working for the Israel Tennis
Center and American Friends of
Israel Museum.
Doris Cantor
She was also involved for
several years with the Manhattan
Women's Division of Federation
Art Auction Committee for the
annual art auction at Parke
Bernet.
Mrs. Cantor dedicated much of
her time to "Fight for Sight,"
Hadassah, ORT and Brandeis,
and was on the Board at the
Westchester Cardiac League in
Scarsdale, NY. Having gone on
two missions to Israel, she even
further reinforced her commit-
ment to the Jewish people.
She is the niece of Hon.
Herbert Tenzer, former New
York Congressman, who is an
important leader in the New York
Jewish Community and is an
inspiration to her.
Her family is very involved
with UJA in New York. When
she is not doing what she can for
Israel she is active in Women's
Health Network (Long Island
Division) while she summers in
Westhampton Beach, NY.
Mrs. Cantor is a graduate of
New York University where she
received a BA and Masters
degree.
Anyone interested in attending
the Boca Lago Women's Division
luncheon please call the Women's
Division Federation office at 368-
2737.
Mufson Named Chairman of $50041500 Division
Dr. Larry S. Charme, Men's
Division Chairman of the South
County Jewish Federation-UJA
Campaign, is pleased to an-
nounce the appointment of
Robert Eugene Mufson as Chair-
man of the $500-11,600 Division.
This Division, a first in the
history of the Federation, will be
responsible for overseeing many
gifts from 1600-11,500 come into
the Men's Campaign, as well as
to see increased involvement of
those men giving at that level.
Mufson is married and has
three children. He is a colllege
graduate and is in the
manu fa curing business. He is
originally from New York but
moved to Miami Beach 36 years
ago. Currently, Mufson is living
in Boca Raton in Estancia West.
Mufson is affiliated with
Temple Beth El in Boca Raton.
He has been involved in Jewish
Federation activities in the
Estancia West campaign by
working on its committee in 1983.
This year, Mufson will continue
to work on the Estancia com-
mittee in addition to his Chair-
manship. He plans to work in
conjunction with four or five
Associate Chairmen and a
committee for the $500$ 1,500
Division.
Upon his appointment Mufson
commented, "I hope to see the
greatest commitment and in-
volvement in our 1964 campaign.
Through my appointment, I
believe we will see this happen."
Century Village
Campaign Expanding
tion volunteering neighbor.
Ben Bussin, first Family Divi-
sion Chairman, exclaimed. "The
Village is really becoming sophis-
ticated in their approach. Their
organization has never been to
this depth. It is this type of cam-
paign that is allowing Family
Division to stand on its own."
The Area Captains meeting at-
tendees will be addressed by Ben
Bussin and Marianne Bobick,
President, South County Jewish
Federation.
Robert Mufson
TrwcamoYOUJwiy>waiitgdtogoto
Hy Henhin
Dr. Hy Henkin, chairman for
Century Village, has announced
Dec. 16, as the kickoff meeting
for Area Captains. "At the
present time, last year's 50
percent coverage has turned into
80 percent and the preliminary
planning is still active," said
Henkin.
The meeting will provide the
core leadership of Century Vil-
lage with an update of Jewish is-
sues relevant to the 1984 Cam-
paign. This includes UJA over-
seas, the annual Century Village
luncheon, and the orchestration
of Century Village Campaign.
Other than greater participa-
tion by Century Village res-
idents, the greatest difference in
this year's campaign will be its
compressed nature. January wui
be UJA month in Century Viltage
and the bulk of the <^P*j*Jin*
will be from Jan. 6 thru Feb. 6.
1984. Thia way the residents
know when to look forward to be-
ing visited by their UJA-Fedsra-
in the Beautiful Shenandoah Mountains otWKtVkgkm
0.C
Cod -* cmp cn,i*o grtdM l-0
Co-d 4-wMk (noon K
cr*l Co-d 4-o* MM'O" lo
lntgrt 7th- <0W SW

10 OW Court Ro*d
Baltimore. Md 21J0S
(301) 4(4-2233
Fred Qreenberp,
4834972
1
Left to right: Comptroller Gerald Lewis, and Israeli Consul General
Yehoshua Trigor.
Lewis-Trigor Luncheon
The newly appointed Consul-
ate General of Israel, Yehoshua
Trigor, met with top state of-
ficials Nov. 1% at a luncheon
hosted by Florida Comptroller
Gerald Lewis in the Capitol.
Lewis arranged the luncheon to
introduce Trigor and his Econ-
omic Attache Avihai Harpaz to
high-ranking state officials,
including Lt. Governor Wayne
Mixaon, Attorney General Jim
Smith, Insurance Commissioner
Bill Gunter and Supreme Court
Justices James Alderman, Joe
Boyd, Parker Lee McDonald and
Raymond Ehrlich.
Trigor recently became Consul
General in Miami, replacing Joel
Arnon who is being assigned to
other duties in the Israel Foreign
Ministry. Trigor is a career
diplomat and has held posts in
India, Malta, Africa, the Nether-
lands and South Korea. Trigor is
no stranger to Miami, he
frequently visited Miami 18 years
ago when he was Israel's vice-
consul in Atlanta.
Lewis is a member of Temple
Israel in Tallahassee.
1984 ESCORTED
MORRISON TRAVEL EXCLUSIVES
1. S/S Oceanic New Yea r' s Crulse 7 days, group rates
2. Israel May 3-19 $1799
3. Spain May 13-2714 days $1999
4. China M/S Pearl of Scandinavia Sept. 1-15
Don't tnvtl alone.
Connect with
The SimaeR Conm-ctam
Mcxnson Travel
2401 N. FEDERAL HIGHWAY
BOCA RATON, FLORIDA 324*1
PHONE: BOCA-POSSSI-SMi
TOLL FREE-1-WXM32-20M
*+.*.*.
Temple Sinai
Of Palm Beach County
Delray Beach
Member U.A.H C (Reform)
Invites you to attend our
Sabbath Eve Services
Held Each Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m., at
Cason United Methodist Church
Corner of Swinton Ave. and N.E. 4th St. (Lake Ida Rd.)
Rabbi Samuel Silver, officiating
For Membership Information Call:
NedChodash
272-2827
Samuel Rothstein
President
Sid Bernstein
732 5807
Outstanding Computer Program At AN Levels
Camp Reunion For old New Campers-December 28
7 to S-.30 pan. Temple Beth Shalom. 1400 N. 46 Ava, rtoMy
t '', .. *) wail
Registration for Religious School
Professional Staff
Special KULANU Young Family Group
For INFORMATION CALL
'37 5599 Beverly Kam.n 499-0404
Temple INFORMATION CALL 2/6-6161
P.O. BOX 1901 DELRAYBEACH. FLA.
New Temple Building Early 1984 Occupancy
Site-2475 W.Atlantic Ave. Delray

. .. -
.. .



><**-
Mil
fit.
Page 6

The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, December 16
19631
Dorothy Wilken Addresses
National Council of Jewish Women
On Nov. 18, 1983, Dorothy
Wilken, County Commissioner
for Palm Beach County, spoke
before the Boca-Delray Branch of
the National Council of Jewish
Women, at the Boca Teeca
Auditorium. Her remarks were
largely informal in tone, in-
cluding some biographical back-
ground; an account of how she
became involved in politics; her
position on such vital questions
as the environment, area
development, and school prayer;
and some advice to women aimed
at dispelling any doubts and
fears regarding their ability to
achieve and function effectively
in public office.
Ms. Wilken stated that every
effort was being made to have
land use consistent with the
beneficial objection of long range
planning and environmental
protection.
On the question of school
Dorothy Wilken
prayer, Ms. Wilken voiced strong
objection to any school prayer
slanted in favor of any particular
religion or denomination,
although she felt that there could
be nothing really objectionable
with prayer in general or in
seeking Divine guidance before
undertaking any activity.
Finally, in an inspirational
admonition to those women who
feared to become involved in
political activity or to seek public
office, Ms. Wilken pointed to
herself as an example of how
anyone who can manage a house-
hold budget can apply the same
principles to managing a munici-
pal budget and how anyone who
can manage all of the activities of
a family can be equally capable of
administering a city government.
The presentation ended with a
brief question period in which the
members of the audience showed
a keen awareness of the problems
facing them as residents of Palm
Beach County.
Federation Subsidizes
Teen Pilgrimage To Israel
Continued from Page 1
planned throughout the program.
The Nature Study Center is a
new concept which integrates a
study of nature, geography and
history in a unique project of the
Society for the Protection of Na-
ture in Israel. The Society
presently runs 12 centers all over
Israel which are under the super-
vision of the Israel Ministry.
Locations of these Nature Study
Centers are chosen for their
scenic beauty, their historical
significance and their geo-
graphical location.
Each Nature Study Center is
situated in the area and among
the scenery specific to the parti-
cular region on which its acti-
vities concentrate. The aim is to
get thoroughly acquainted with
the area and most touring and
study is done on foot.
Because the itinerary is
crowded and demanding, parti-
cipants rise at dawn, or some-
times even before dawn. Each
excursion includes on-the-spot
observation of characteristics of
the area wild life, plant life,
geomorphological structures and
digging into the past in the form
of visits to archaeological sites.
The program includes a great
deal of hiking and climbing under
the supervision of expert guides.
Participants in the Israel Teen
Pilgrimage will have the op-
portunity to experience Gadna,
which is perhaps the most
unusual program of its kind for
high school students. The prog-
ram combines physical activity
with lectures and discussion
Tel Aviv University
Researching Alternative
Energy Sources
Israel is overly dependent on
imported crude oil and must
diversify both its energy sources
and its suppliers, according to
Dr. Jacob Zahavi, director of the
Israel Institute of Business Re-
search at Tel Aviv University's
Faculty of Management-Leon
Recanati Graduate School of
Business Administration.
Almost 98 percent of Israel's
energy needs are met by im-
ported petroleum, and the cost
of oil as a percentage of GNP in-
creased eightfold between 1970
and 1980, Dr. Zahavi said. He
was speaking at the inauguration
of the Abe Carmel and Bernard
H. Barnett Chair in Energy Re-
search, which took place Oct. 24
at Tel Aviv University.
The Chair was endowed by Abe
Carmel, chairman of Oilfields
System Corporation, in tribute to
his long-standing friendship with
Washington attorney Charles
Barnett. Carmel was born in Iraq
and lived in Israel aa a child. He
now resides in New York and
Munich, and is a member of
TAU e Board of Governors.
The Carmel and Barnett Chair
will sponsor research on new and
alternative energy sources-
including nuclear, geothermal,
wind, solar, and hydroelectric
energy. It will also focus on
conservation and proper manage-
ment of existing energy supplies.
Tel Aviv University has be-
come increasingly involved in
energy research, with a number
of projects focusing on national
needs. Among them are: A
national model for planning
investment in energy over the
medium term; and an economic
feasibility study of s hydro-
electric station for the Medit-
erranean-Dead Sea Canal Project.
The American Friends of Tel
Aviv University is presently
forming a chapter in South Coun-
ty. For information contact Lori
Azoulai at 392-9186.
Footprints
In The
Sand
mw
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION
groups that provide an accurate
understanding as to the contrib-
ution made by Israeli youth to
their homeland. Every attempt is
made to give American teen-
agers insight into the lives of
their Israeli peers who are learn-
ing the importance of shouldering
their responsibility as citizens to
the national defense.
Five days are spent at a Gadna
encampment. Qualified Gadna
instructors will guide particip-
ants through a rigorous program
of obstacle courses, practical
ports, fieldcraft, campcraft, and
other skills that will foster
physical fitness and self-reliance.
In short, Gadna is a school of
Israeli reality a school for the
pioneer spirit and for under-
standing Israel's special prob-
lems.
The students will also visit
kibbutzim and moshavim in an
attempt to give them a greater
understanding of these agricul-
tural settlements, their commun-
al way of life and the people who
live and work there.
All students on the Israeli
Teen Pilgrimage will be required
to participate in study programs
meeting once a week in prepara-
tion for the trip. Students will
study Israeli history and current
events under the direction of
Rabbi Bruce Warshal and guest
lectures and rabbis.
Application forms for the Is-
rael Teen Pilgrimage can be ob-
tained at the Jewish Community
Center office, 3200 N. Federal
Hwy., Suite 226, Bocs Raton, Fl.
33432, 396-5546.
Does this describe you?
Your footprints and your
presence could become
permanent. An En-
dowment Fund with the
South County Jewish
Federation will continue*
your existence forever.
Telephone today to request
assistance.
368-2737
BOCA RATON
DELRAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
Dr. And Mrs. Leib To Chad
B'nai Torah Bond Drive
Mr. Martin Grossman, chair-
man of the Boca Raton State of
Israel Bonds, is pleased to an-
nounce the appointment of Dr.
and Mrs. Sidney Leib as chair-
man of the upcoming B'nai Torah
Congregation Israel Bond Cam-
paign. "Dr. and Mrs. Leib are
devoted to bonds, Israel and the
Jewish community and we are
very enthusiastic that they have
assumed this chairmanship."
Dr. Leib, former president of
the Detroit District of the Zionist
Organization of America, was ac-
corded national recognition for
his labors in Zionism at a recep-
tion in Boca Raton. In Florida
Dr. Leib continues his Zionist
and community activities. He is
on the Board of the B'nai Torah
Congregation Men's Club in Boca
Raton, and is activating Flori-
dians in the Zionist movement.
Among his other activities, Dr.
Leib is a member of Perfection
Lodge of the Masons, a 32nd
degree Mason, a Shriner, past
president of the Maurice Zeiger
Lodge of B'nai B'rith, and is a
charter member of Boca Teeca
B'nai B'rith Lodge in Boca
Raton. Dr. Leib and his wife,
Marion, are on the administrative
A 4
Dr. and Mrs. Sidney Leib
committee of the Jewish Natioml
Fund in Michigan and the Lei-
endowed a forest of 10,000 trees
in the American Bicentenniil
Forest in Jerusalem.
Mrs. Leib holds mer_,
in Hadassah, JNF, Sisterhoods
in Shaare Zedek Synagogue in
Southfield. Michigan, and B'mj
Torah Congregation in Boa
Raton. She attended WiyM
State University in Detroit.
B'nai Torah is planning a very
exciting bond campaign to be
centered around their upcoming
trip to Israel.
Erna Rubinstein to Speak
At B'nai Torah, Dec. 18
Continued from Page 1
The happenings of 40 years ago
are fresh and clear bearing the
message that we as Jews always
have the obligation to remember.
Erna Rubinstein's trail to surviv-
al tells us also of the preciousness
of life and love and thus reminds
us that the human being's search
for meaning is a constant and
deepening journey.
Erna Rubinstein will be speak
ing at B'nai Torah Congregation
on Sunday, Dec. 18 at 8 p.m,
1401 NW 4th Ave.. Boca Raton.
ACADEMY OF JEWISH STUDIES
GUEST SPEAKER SERIES
1st SEMESTER 1983
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20th
1040-11:30 AM.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Administration Building
Century Village, Boca Raton, FL.
( From corner of Glades and Lyons, go north on Lyons to
Kimberly. From Kimberly go east to Century Village
gate. From gate to Administration Building, Synagogue
on 2nd Floor}
GUEST LECTURER Dr. Milton J. Greenberg
Dr. Greenberg was a full adjunct professor of Sociology
at Nassau Community College; New York University;
Queens College; Dartmouth.
Dr. Greenberg worked at the Creedmore Psychiatric Cen-
ter in Queens as the Behavorial Psychologist.
TOPIC Biblical Personalities and Psychology
The focus will be on Abraham, Moses and David their
unique personalities, strength and towering courage. Dr.
Greenberg will take a behavioral approach to analysis of
each personality.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 22nd 104011:30 A.M.
CONGREGATION ANSHEIEMUNA
16189 Carter Road
Delray Beach, Fl.
< Go west on Linton Blvd. to Carter Road. Go south on
Carter Road. Temple is on the right hand side)
GUEST LECTURER Rabbi Schmaryahu T. Swiraky
Rabbi Swiraky was ordained from the Hebrew Theological
College. Chicago. Ha is a distinguished professor of
Global Studies at the Miami/Dads Communty College. In
1975 Rabbi Swiraky waa selected aa the outstanding
educator in America in the field of History by the Oat-
standing Educators of America a National Collegiate
Organization. He is listed in the Cambridge Edition of
"Who's Who" in Religion.
TOPIC A Blueprint for Jewish Education Today
Both For the Kinder and the Zayd*
m&atmmMMMmMMMMmm&Kgumimm


December 16,1963
The Jewish Floridian of South County




Israel has been a close ally of the United
States since 1948.
In fact, last year Israel sided with us in the
United Nations mote often than any othernation-
including Great Britain, France and WfcstGennany.
Yet there are those who are working to dis-
credit Israel in the eyes of Congress, the media
and die American public.
The Arab lobby has created ainew;.P?**al
organization calledl^*c~^$ddk>*f
Policy and Research Corporation. MEIARC is
-educating- American corporate f*""*""-"!*-
cially those doing business m the Middle East,
as to where their political contributionsthrough
corporate PACa (politkal action committeea)
should be ap**^
brad wont be the only country that will
suffer a a result of this. ^+**^.
Nothuw would do more damage to the strate-
gkinteWof the United Slates in the Middle East
Ck*a>.z*_
than the abandonment or even the slightest weak- [^^g^itmm ** eo^i*to*copywiaftdenEhca
ening of our ties with farad. u*.lte*^ta^s^cteki-Mainc-fcr_
\re. the members of The National PAC
(NatPAC for short) are seeing to it that this impor-
tant ally is helped by our political system. Not hin-
dered by it. ,
NatPAC does this by helping to elect officials
in all 50 states who realize that Israel* survival is
vital to our own.
But this lakes a lot more than hard work.
It takes money. Money to counter the arly
$30 million spent by corporate fACs in the 1982
election.
Important organizations like the UJA, the
ADL. The Anierfcan Jewish Committee and
ABAC nw make political contributions,
tbONCam. ...
So please join us. You'll not only be helping
one of our most important allies, youTl aiao he
helping another nation as well. America.

OcafMkm__________________, -------
PtaK Mil: Tte National *C. M> io 370SO ^fttaMacK*-
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, December lfi
Organizations in the News
ANSHEI EMUNA
Anahei Emuni announces the
theme of the sermonic message to
be delivered by Rabbi Dr. Louis
Sacks at the Sabbath morning
service on Saturday, Dec. 17
commencing at 8:45 a.m. will be
"Hands." The "Sabbath
Dialogue with the Rabbi" and
afternoon services begin at 5 p.m.
BETH SHALOM
Temple Beth Shalom-Sister-
hood will hold their next meeting
on Monday, Dec. 26 at 10 am in
the Administration building. An
interesting program is planned.
Refreshments and boutique as
usual will be enjoyed. The
monthly card party and luncheon
will be on the first Monday of
each month. Contact office for
name of committee ladies to
make reservations. 483-5567. For
further information, call Tillie
482-2783 or Sylvia 482-7207.
ANSHEI SHALOM
Anahei Shalom-Sisterhood
Oriole Jewish Center will hold
their next meeting on Monday,
Dec. 19 at 9:30 am in the Amer-
ican Savings Bank, Atlantic
Ave., Delray. The program is
"Getting to Know You." Re-
freshments will be served.
PIONEER WOMEN
Pioneer Women Kinneret
Chapter, Palm Greens, will hold
their next meeting on Monday,
Dec. 26 at 1 p.m. in the club-
house. Coffee hour will start at 12
noon. Lillian Silver will host a
discussion on Women's Plea for
Human Rights.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth-Sisterhood is
holding their Fifth Annual
Melaveh Malkah (Accompanying
the Sabbath Queen) on Saturday,
Dec. 24 at 7 p.m. Rabbi Bernard
Silver and Cantor Naftaly Lin-
kovsky will officiate at the
services. This will be followed by
a dairy supper and a Sholem
Aleufhem movie.
ORT
Women's American ORT-Boca
Century Chapter will sponsor a
Jewish Heritage Tour to North
Miami. Sam Brown will conduct
the proceedings, featuring visits
to several temples and museums.
The cost is $11 per person. Lunch
is not included. Reservations are
going quickly, so call Jo Lieber-
man 482-9662 to make your res-
ervations.
Women's American ORT Boca
Delray Evening Chapter will hold
their next meeting on Tuesday,
Dec. 20 at 8 p.m. The program for
the evening is Ms. Rosella call a
psychic. For additional informa-
tion, please call 483-3339.
B'NAI BRITH
B'nai B'rith Olympic XI Lodge
will hold their breakfast meeting
on Sunday, Dec. 18 at 9:30 a.m.
at B'nai Torah, 1401 NW 4 Ave.,
Boca. Psychologist Dr. Ruth
Bockner will speak on "How to
Live with Your Wife in Retire-
ment." Members, prospective
members, their wives and guests
are welcome. Congressman
Claude Pepper will be the
featured speaker in March so
please keep the date open. For
further information, call 391-
7595.
B'nai B'rith Genesis Chapter
will hold their next meeting on
Thursday, Dec. 22 at 12:30 p.m.
in the Century Village Adminis-
tration Building. An interesting
program will be presented by a
representative from the Miami
Herald. Make your reservations
for New Year's Eve on the Jungle
Queen by calling Molly 482-5044.
B'nai B'rith Women-Naomi
Chapter will hold their next
'meeting op Monday, Dec. 19 at
IjL&fjp.m. at Temple Emeth,
' .SO W. Atlantic Ave., Delray.
Hear an unusual instrument,
"Melodica" played by Lottie
am
m
rtiW
L*%
:/

"Every Del Monte' canned fruit
and vegetable has now been
certified kosher. Soon, all their
labels will reflect this fact. But
until they do, please accept the
Del Monte' shield of quality
as your assurance of kosher
Del montc
certification.''
C 1M3 CM Mont* CorpKw
... Rabbi Jacob Cohen
Bieferman. Also an interesting
dental program will be presented
by Ruth Sanders. Bagel's and
cream cheese will be nerved.
B'nai B'rith Women-Roth
Chapter will hold their next
meeting on Monday, Dec. 19 at 1
p.m. at Anshei Emuna, 16189
Carter Rd., Delray. Mr. Harry
Egelman will present a program
on Israel in narrative form with
slides.
HADASSAH
Hadassah-Boca Maariv Chap-
ter of Century Village West will
hold their next meeting on
Wednesday, Dec. 21 at 12:30
p.m. in the Administration
Building. A distinguished repre-
sentative from Israeli Consulate
will be their guest speaker. Re-
freshments will be served and the
boutique will be as attractive as
ever. For further
please call Selma
Nettie 482-9085.
'nfornnti
483-3253
Hadaasah-Aviva will hold,
next meeting on WaaWa
Dec. 28 at 12 noon TS
Torah, 1401 NW 4 Ave R
Raton. Rose Rifkin will'L,
guest speaker and her
wiU be "Laughter of Israel..
Hadaesah-Shira Deha,
ter will hold their next ami,
on Wednesday, Dec. 21 fro?
a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Adult!,
reation Center located 801 Nv t
St., Delray. The theme of ii
will be an education prognm i
honor of Henrietta Szold's bii
day. Husbands and friendj
invited. Please bring your
lunch.
Delaire Leads Federati
on
The Delaire committee of the
Men's Division of the South
County Jewish Federation has
decided to be in the vanguard for
Men's campaigning in the South
County Jewish Federation by
holding the first Local Mission.
On Dec. 13, 16 men filled the
Federation's van and viewed all
services provided locally. These
leaders of Delaire commenced the
day's activities by joining the 130
students in the morning flag
raising and participate in the
morning minyon at the South
County Jewish Community Day
School.
The activities had this first
Men's group view the new Baer
Jewish Campus, meet with a
chaplain, visit Jewish Family and
Children's Service, meet with a
staff person from the new Jewish
Community Center of South
County, lunch at the Kosher
Connection, and meet the Hillel
Director at Florida Atlantic Uni-
versity. The purpose of the Mis-
sion was to provide first-hand ex-
perience to leadership, and future
leadership, with what is happen-
ing in the South County Jewish
Federation.
I
i. /
Larry Gottsegen
Larry Gottsegen. (. hairmanefj
the Delaire Men's Camp
said, "This is the perfect op
tunity to acquaint contribu
to the Federation as to wh*ij
done locally."
Endowment Committee
Makes Federation History
On Dec. 16, the South County
Jewish Federation will establish
yet another milestone in its brief
four years, when the Endowment
Committee meets for the first
time. This year, Marianne Bobick
appointed Gerson Bernstein
Chairman of the newly-created
Endowment Committee of the
Federation.
Bernstein has chosen the Vault
at the Bankers Club as the first
meeting place for the Endowment
Committee. The meeting objecti-
ves are to establish committee
directions for the year and to lay
ground work for Endowment
policies.
The purpose of the Endowment
Fund are to offer a vehicle in
which the donor's unique needs
will be satisfied and for special
/
Gary Bernstein
ized needs of the South County]
Jewish Federation.
JF&CS Offers
Parenting Workshop
The Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Boca Raton
is pleased to announce an ex-
citing parenting workshop being
offered to those interested in
improving communications with
their children This workshop will
enable parents to identify their
children's goals of misbehavior,
to increase communication
through the use of relfective
listening and I messages, and to
explore the alternative* 1
natural consequences.
The group will begin Mjog
Jan. 23 and will *5|
consecutive Mondays J
11 a.m. at Jewish Fam* JI
Children's Service. 3*J.j
FeAolHwy.. Suite 226. b
ment is limited, for
information, please cali.
Feldroan.ACSWat395-3W


Lay. December 16,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
Meet Aharon Abraham
Editor's Note: These stories
libout Yoseftal and Kaplan, two
neighborhoods in Kfar Saba
Lhich the South County Jewish
I Federation has been paired with
lander Israel's Project Renewal
[program will appear throughout
I the upcoming year. Project Re-
I newal is a joint effort between the
I Jews of the Diaspora and the Is-
Irteli Government to help less
Ifortunate Jews in Israeli society.
By ANDREW POLIN
, Walking Kfar Saba, Yoseftal
Lnd Kaplan neighborhoods with
I Aharon Abraham offers a dif-
Ifaent perspective on what is
niPPenin8 here With A"*"*1 the
difference between what was,
Lhat has been done and what
Leeds to be done comes alive.
This is our work. We made it
I nice. The security doors, from
outside and inside ... We made
many changes," Aharon said as
we walked by one apartment
building in Yoseftal. The security
I door, added Aharon, is because
[these neighborhoods lie just one
I and a half miles from an Arab vil-
lage in the West Bank.
"Here they live near the Arabs.
I it's better when they have secur-
I fry doors," he said matter of fact-
I ty. Aharon, 29. is the contact per-
son between the Project Renewal
office and the community. He
helps the residents who want
and need to have their homes
or apartments expanded or
[ renovated. And we walked.
Despite the fact that some
I areas are what Americans would
call "eyesores," there is a fresh-
ness, an open feeling in these
neighborhoods. Aharon took me
to an apartment where a family
with three children lived in 54
meters (177 feet). "The 54 meters
is very small," Aharon added, al-
though it didn't need to be said.
Two brothers lived in one small
bedroom while their sister slept
in another small bedroom. With
the expansion, the family has ad-
ded two bedrooms and one and a
half bathrooms. The apartment
has nearly doubled in size._______
-^Family Area Tool
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH
A %
o
m
o
z
As we walked the neighbor-
hood, it was a bright sunny day.
Life looks better when the sun
shines strong. But for five
children life must have been
cramped since they slept in the
same bedroom until their apart-
ment was expanded. "If you
come here at night, you see only
beds and children," said Yehuda
the father of the five children.
With Aharon translating,
Yehuda said it was "very dif-
ficult" living in such a small
apartment with five children.
Now, because of the housing
programs, Yehuda's family has a
"penthouse" on top of their
apartment.
The apartment was on the top
floor of the building so another
level was built on top of it, hence
the "penthouse" as Aharon
called it. A staircase inside the
apartment was built to connect
the two floors. Yehuda is
"happy" with the penthouse.
Aharon said Yehuda, who left
Morocco 22 years ago, was one of
the first residents to want help.
"You come from the sky,"
Yehuda told Aharon when he
first approached him about ex-
panding the apartment. But it
was not free. Yehuda pays
monthly bills on his loan. "The
government didn't give him a
gift," Aharon said. "Only cheap
money." Yet the government
money was not enough. Yehuda
still had to borrow more money to
do the entire construction pro-
ject. Now the construction of the
"penthouse" is basically com-
plete, except for some finishing
touches.
"If you come back next year,"
Aharon told me, "You'll not only
see one "penthouse," but you'll
see many more." That is a far cry
from when Aharon first started
talking to the people in Yoseftal
and Kaplan. "People didn't be-
lieve we could make it better," he
said. "It took me many times to
convince them that we could
make it better and not make it
bad," he said, adding that it took
him six months before he won the
trust of the community. "I went
to every apartment in the neigh-

Aharon checking security door.
borhood and tell them what I'm
doing here," he said. "Many peo-
ple dose the door in my face," he
added. "People now come to me."
That's because they now can
see the results of Project Renew-
al's labor. Fact: 170 apartments
have been fixed. Fact: 20 homes
have been expanded because of
the program. Fact: 200 homes
have been expanded by the res-
idents of Kaplan, who paid for
the work themselves without
government financial assistance.
There now are plans to add
rooms to another 50 homes in
Yoseftal. The benefits of the
renovation and building projects
are not just aesthetics. "I have
here many people," Aharon said.
"I see on their faces that they
thank God everyday for the
project." They are very happy.
All their lives are changed from
the day their project begins," he
added.
1964 CAMPAIGN
The Family Division cabinet,
lead by Ben Bussin. has adopted
the slogan "We give to life" as
the rallying point for the 1964
campaign in Family Division
areas. The decal pictured will be
distributed in Family Division
areas to households as a pledge is
made.
Readers Write
EDITOR, TheJtwish Floridian:
I hope you can give us a boost
as we are trying to start an Or-
thodox Temple in Boca Raton,
Century Village West. We invite
all interested people to join a new
Orthodox Temple which we hope
to establish in the near future.
Mease call 482-0206 for further
information and to register your
name SKARALITZ
Boca Raton
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Individual fruit topped
Danish Rolls
4*1


Decorated for the Holiday
Cup Cakes............................o
$179 ( ^
|Frozen, reedy to beke and servel
Donuts km* Gourmet Hors
D' Oeuvres
$1Q95

Prices Effective
December 15th thru 18th. 1983
Dolphinmania Tickets are Getting Scarce,
But There's Still Time to Win!
Afl Winning Tickets Must be Claimed
by December 22, 1983.________________


*>*-
age *\J
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, December
W.W83
**
*<*
*
&
&&
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
of
SOUTH COUNTY
395-5546
ADULT PROGRAMS
WINTER 1984
PARTICIPATE
...ART...
PAINTING-BEGINNERS
Fundamentals ol painting for beginners. Emphasis will be
on compositon. color and proper care of materials.
Instructor: Renee Friedman
Dates: January 18,25
Feb 1.8.15. 22 (Wednesdays)
Time: 7:30-8:30 P.M.
Cost: $30.00 plus materials
Location: Renee Friedman's House
(Information on directions and how to
obtain materials will be provided upon
registration)
Class Limit: 8
PAINTINGINTERMEDIATE
Painting for the student who has mastered basic skills;
Empasis on composition, color and form.
Instructor: Renee Friedman
Dates: January 19,26
Feb. 2,9,16,23 (Thursdays)
Time: 7:30-8:30 P.M.
Cost: $30.00 plus materials
Location: Renee Friedman's House (Information
on directions and how to obtain
materials will be provided
upon registration)
Class Limit 8
...RECREATION-
bridge FOR BEGINNERS
Bridge is unquestionably the greatest card game ever in-
vented, and an activity you will cherish for the rest of your
life. Mabel will teach you the Fundamentals and start you
on your way. Join the bridge crowd.
Instructor:
Dates:
Time:
Cost:
Location:
Class Limit:
Mabel Pavlicek
January 10,17,24,31,
February 7,14 (Tuesdays)
8 00 10 OOP M
$40.00
South County Jewish Community
Day School
414 N w 35th Street, Boca Raton
24
..COOKING...
CHALLAH BAKING DEMONSTRATION
Learn how to make challah; Instructor will demonstrate and
students will participate!!Learn how to work with yeast.
Students are provided with written recipe.
Instructor: Diane Markov,tz
Dates: January 31 (Tuesday) Session I
February 7 (Tuesday) Session ll
Tlma: 7:00 9:30 P.M.
Cost: $3.00 per person
Location: Diane Markovltz's house
Directions will be sent to you
upon registration.
Class Limit: 12 par session
CHINESE KOSHER COOKING DEMONSTRATION
Explore the wonders of the WOK; A dlsh-a-lesson where you
will learn about utensils used for WOK cooking. All food
prepared by Instructor, with students assisting Authentic
Chinese dishes will be adapted to kosher cooking.
Instructor: Hy Folkman
Dates: January 16 and 23 (Monday) Session 1
February 7 and 14 (Tuesday) Session II
Tims: 7:00- 9:00 P.M.
Cost: $8.00 per session
Location: Marianne Lessor's house in Boca Raton
Directions will be sent to you upon
registration.
Clsss Limit: 8 per session
...HEALTH...
HOW TO STAY HEALTHY WITH HOLISTIC HEALTH
AND BIO-FEEDBACK
A presentation on holistic health and medicine. Emphasis
on the necessity to look at the whole person, including
analysis of physical, nutritional, environmental, emotional,
spiritual and life style values; Bio-Feedback demonstration.
Instructor: Dr. Alan Leavitt, Chiropractic Physician
Dr. Willard Dean, M.D.
Date: February 16 (Thursday)
Time: 7:30-8:30 P.M.
Cost: $2.00
Location: B'nai Torah Congregation
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue
Boca Raton
...LANGUAGES...
BEGINNING YIDDISH
A mini-course In Yiddish conversation; Emphasis on
dialogue, learning the alphabet, vocabulary study, etc.
Some reading Instruction.
Instructor: Sol Moskowltz
Dates January 30,
February 6,13,20,27
March 5,12,19 (Mondays)
Time: 7:00-8:15 P.M.
Coat: $16.00 for 8 sessions
Location: Tiburon II Clubhouse
Boca Dal Mar
(Directions will be provided upon
registration)
Class Limit: 15
ULPAN HEBREW CLASS
An Ulpan Hebrew (Israeli Sepharadit) course will be co-
sponsored by the JCC and B'nai Torah Congregation.
Mastery of basic converstional Hebrew will serve as the
class objective. Basic grammatical construction and
mastery of idioms, expression and proverbs will also be
covered.*
PREREQUISITE: Able to read Hebrew.
Instructor: Tamar Ben-Ami
Dates: January 10,17,24,31
February 7 (Tuesdays)
Time: 7:00-9:00 P.M.
Cost: $10.00 for 5 sessions
Location: B'nai Torah Congregation
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue, Boca Raton
Class Limit: 30
REGISTRATION
Class registration will be accepted only with payment of
fees.
Refunds you will be notified if we are unable to offer a
class. Full refund will be given if the JCC cancels any ac-
tivity because of insufficient enrollment.
Esrly enrollment will assure full classes and avoid many
cancellations.
Name.
REGISTRATION FORM
-------------------CLASS_
Address.
SESSION
CLASS,
Phone (Home).
(Work)_________
SESSION.
Amt. Encloasd
MAKFJLH !CK PAY*BLE TO THE JCC AND MAIL TO
Jewish ComnHinMy Center of South County
Suite 226
3200 North Federal Highway
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
Attn: Marianne Lesser
...EXCERCISE...
AEROBIC DANCE DEMONSTRATION
A dance exercise demonstration participation class; come
ready to join in for s-t-r-e-t-c-hing, yoga, strengthening and
toning exercises. Bring a towel and wear comfortable
clothes.
Instructor:
Dates:
Time:
Cost:
Location:
Class Limit:
Cheryl Lents
January 19 (Thursday)
7:30-8:30 P.M.
$3.00
South County Jewish Community
Day School
414 N.W. 35th Street, Boca Raton
30
BE SOME BODY! 11
Aerobic exercise and dance program performed completely
to music. Co-sponsored by the JCC of South County and
Cheryl Lents Exercise Dance, Inc. Classes available include
light aerobic exercise and dance, strenuous aerobic exer-
cise and dance, and coed heavy aerobics and mom and tot
exercise-dance class.
Instructor: Cheryl Lents and staff
Dates: Winter Session January 29 April 7
Time: Call JCC for details
Cost: $30.00 /10 sessions
Location: Oaks Plaza
661 Glades Road (Across from F.A.U.)
Boca Raton
...SELF-HELP...
BUT YOU DON'T LOOK JEWISH:
THE DILEMMA OF THE CONVERT
Despite conversion having taken place, the convert can still
experience feelings of pressure, alienation and loss. This
workshop will focus on such issues as the Jewish com-
munity's response to converts, family acceptance or lack of
dealing with holidays, and how one's sense of identity is af-
fected.
Group
Facilitator:
DATES:
Time:
Cost:
Location:
Class Limit:
Dena Feldman, M.S.W.
January 1U through Feb. 22
6:30 8:00 P.M. (Wednesday)
$30.00 for 6 sessions
Jewish Family & Children's Service
3200 N. Federal Highway
Suite 226
Boca Raton
10
SYSTEMATIC TRAINING FOR EFFECTIVE PARENTING
(S.T.E.P.)
If you're not getting through what can you do?? A paren-
ting group for parents who want better communication wit"
their children. Co-sponsored by the JCC & Jewish Family
and Children's Service.
Instructor:
Dates:
Tims:
Cost:
Location:
Class Limit:
Nancy A. Fsldman, ACS w
January 23, and 30
February 6 and 13 (Mondays)
930 11:00AM
$20.00 for 4 sessions
Jewish Family & Children's Service
of Boca Raton
3200 N. Fsdsral Highway, Suite 226
10
TILL DEATH DO US PART: COPING WITH WIDOWHOOD
How doss one pick up the pieces and continue?? This suf>
port group Is for both widows and widowers. Discussion
will focus on coping and finding one's way as a singlP*
son.
Group
Facilitator:
Date*:
Tims:
Cost:
Location:
Registration:
Dena Feldman M.S.W.
Ongoing
Thursdays (10:30-12:00 Noon)
Sliding Fss Seals
Jewish Family 6 Children's Service
3200 N. Federal Highway
Suite 226
Boca Raton _^ mMt.
Contact Dena FsWmsn, M.S.W. 39536*


jay, December 16,1968
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
Israel Debates Accord
[public Fears Escalation of New War Risks
r
Continued from Page 1
,said and "There are no Israeli
-rests that dictate an Israeli
l to drive the Syrians out of
n0n by force."
40 ISRAELI interest will be
omoted by an extended stay of
Israel Defense Force along
Awali River," he said. "No
,ieli interest dictates continued
ployment in Lebanon as long
the Syrian army does not
ithdraw." The Knesset debate
rts to be resumed Wednesday on
[motion of no-confidence by the
idash (Communist) Party.
[ Shamir, who expressed deep
Lrow in the Knesset over the
Laths of American Marines in
ebanon eight were killed in
bombardment which
owed Sunday's air strike
'Those soldiers were sent to
.erve peace and they are being
illed by the enemies of peace."
Earlier, at a meeting with
ner U.S. Secretary of State
tus Vance, Shamir said the
Tians had dared provoke the
L'.S because they had Soviet
eking and the Soviets supply
em with sophisticated weapon-
He endorsed the air strike by
._. carrier-based aircraft, two of
hich wre shot down by the Syr-
$. He said the American ae-
ons was a reasonable and proper
sponse to Syrian attacks on
reconnaissance flights over
ebanon in recent days.
VANCE, who served in the
Administration, also ap-
oved of the American air
krikes. 'I think they (the Ma-
es) were the targets of attack
nd they have to defend them-
jlves." he said. But Vance ob-
erved that while he favored good
stations between the U.S. and
there was no need for
itrategic consensus between
hem. He also stressed the need
i revive the peace process. "Un-
brtunately almost nothing
as happened for many, many
nonths," he said.
But the prospects for reviving
Ihe peace process seemed to dim
light of recent events and
various interpretations of thein.
bnly Sunday, Israeli officials
jrere taking pains to deny reports
the foreign media that the
back to-back U.S. Israeli air
packs on the Syrians in Leba-
non were evidence of collusion.
The officials insisted that the
\merican bombing raid was not
unlimited in advance with Is-
ael and did not represent or
eflect collaboration in a joint op-
eration.
[The officials hinted, however,
hat the U.S. did inform Israel
hortly before its aerial strike,
only because it wanted to
void a "mishap" which might
ve occurred if Israeli planes
ere in the skies over Lebanon at
! same time as U.S. aircraft.
They affirmed that Israel
emains determined to hit at Pal-
stinian terrorists in Lebanon
nd that the U.S. is on record
at it will hit back if its forces in
ebanon are attacked.
Both the American air strike
d the newly concluded U.S. Is
ael agreements were denounced
Business Saved
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
VTA textile complex, one of the
arger enterprises in Israel with a
humber of factories in Haifa and
[he Galilee and providing liveli-
hoods for some 6,000 families,
as been saved from closure by
pew financial support but at the
ost of dismissing some 600
workers.
vigorously throughout the Arab
world. Egyptian President Mub-
arak warned in Cairo that the
agreement for "strategic cooper-
ation" with Israel would spell
disaster for America's friends in
the Arab world. Mubarak,
speaking to reporters, said that
he had not received official con-
firmation of the American attack
on the Syrians and could only
"hope that these reports are
practically "a declaration of war"
against the Arabs. Amman radio
deplored the attack, warning that
it would" only make matters
worse and provoke new tension in
the area" The raid was
vigorously proteatad by the
Sudan government. Saudi Arabia
and the Arab Otttf states con-
demned it as "part of Israel's war
on the Arab nations."
iddish conversation Group
$ Du-Redzt Yiddish????
Join others In a Yiddish conversation group.
Call the Jewish community Center at
395-5546
For Details.
false."
The official Algerian news
agency said the

SINGLES 50 +
if you are single, 50+ and would like to
form a travel group, Please call the Jewls"
community center at:
395-5546
air strike was
*****50+ SINGLES*****
WE'RE HAVING A DANCE AFFAIR.........
FEBRUARY 12,1984
HorsD'oeuvres** "Big Band Music
FOR DETAILS CALL THE JCC AT 395-5546
Jewish community center
of South county
Presents:
WINTER DAY CAMP
\SN\N\NV*.VN,
WaWaWaWeWaWaW
What would you Uke to Teach?????
if you have a hobby or special talent in some area
that you would like to share with other adults, you
might enjoy teaching in the South county Jewish
community centers Adult Education Program, if
interested, please complete form and return to:
Jewish community center of South county
Suite 226
3200 North Federal Highway
Boca Raton, Flordia 33431
or contact
Marianne Lesser
at
395-5546
Thank you for your interest.
I have a special interest or talent in:-------------------
Name__---------.-------------------------------------------
Address-------------------------------------------------------
WHO: For Children Preschool ages 3 through 6th grade
WHAT: Five Days Consisting of.....
Monday Magic Day
Tuesday -Trip to Lion Country Safari
Wednesday Sports Day
Thursday Puppet Day
Friday Israeli Day
AND MUCH MORE!
WHERE: South County Jewish WHEN: December 26th -
- .. ~ December 30tn
Community Day School
414 N.W. 35th Street C08T: 5 "&
Boca Raton, Florida
TIME: 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
$36.00
$28.00
$19.00
Home Phone #------
Bussiness Phone #.
4 Days
3 Days
2 Days
For More Information, Please Contact
Sarah Lands at 395-5546.
Please fill out the attached form and return to:
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF SOUTH COUNTY
3200 N. Federal Highway Suite 226
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
APPLICATION FOR WINTER DAY CAMP
Family Name.
V N V V X N \
iitnnr,1't-,l*,l*,**>MnoB
What would you Uke to Learn?????
is there some special topic you would like to ex-
ircnmp skill that you've been wanting to
Sevree.bp?TthSekre isTco'urse thati youwould. Ike
the south county Jewish community Center to of-
2? oiease complete form below, if you know
somePon1 who has expertise in that area, please in-
dicate.
Home Telephone Number.
Address-----------------------
Business Address-----------
course-
possible
Address.
Business Telephone Number.
Emergency Contact Person_
Telephone Number-----------
Child's Name_____________
_Age_
.Grade.
Child's Name_____________
Child's Name______________
Days Attending: Circle Day
(children) will be attending.
-Age.
.Grade.
Jiga-
.Grade.
(days) which your child
instructor.
Phone l__---------------------------------------"~~
Please contact Marianne Lesser at 395-5546 or send
completed form to:
Jewish community center of South county
3200 North Federal Highway
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
Monday
December 26
Thursday
December 29
Tuesday
December 27
Wednesday
December 2$
All Weak
December tt-fth]
TOTAL FEE ENCLOSED.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE ACCOMPAttWtt)
BY CHECK, DEADLINE DECEMBER 16th, 1*88
BYCHBi
i 111


Kagea-
v// ouui/l COUftty
_Fridy. December
16,
Jewish Day School Initiates Middle School Dep't.
A 6-7 Grade initiating a new
Middle School Department fur
the South County Jewish Com-
munity Day School has been
designed and a faculty chosen.
The school is in the process of de-
veloping an extensive and so-
phisticated educational supply
and material list for 1983-84 pur-
chases.
Some of the special aspects of
the 6-7 Middle School grade:
Secular
1. A computer-science program
where each child will have his
own computer for a total of six
hours programming work during
the week.
2. An enriched and individual-
ized mathematics program.
3. An additional Physical
Education swimming period as
well as an expanded Physical
Education program on the new
Jewish Community Center
campus.
Secular Staff includes:
Stove Blinder known to
all of us this year as a master
teacher. A rare combination of
Secular-Judaic educator who
motivates, challenges and in-
spires youth. A graduate of
Florida Atlantic University with
a broad Judaic background.
Steve is both an asset to the
school and to the general Jewish
community.
Barbara Gin tin will .be our
computer-science math specialist.
She will set up a computer-scien-
ce program and work with each
child on an individualized basis.
Her background in math spans
the entire Middle School-
Secondary spectrum. Having
taught math for seven years at
North Miami Beach Senior High
School, Barbara has the distinc-
tion of being the only teacher who
taught every math subject of-
fered courses that ranged from
basic math to advanced calculus.
Barbara has been working with
our students this year at the Day
School and has already opened
manv young eyes to the possi-
bilities and challenges of
computer-science.
Judaic: The Judaic curriculum
will emphasize Hebrew language,
literature, and the study of
Judaic textual material. Aspects
of Judaic curriculum such as
history, culture and ethics will be
integrated into the secular
program in the areas of World
History, Sociology, and Philoso-
phy. Steve Blinder will cover
these areas while Tamar Ben Ami
the former.
Judaic Staff:
Tamar Ben Ami will be our
Hebraic-Judaic instructor. She is
a certified and experienced
Hebraist having taught on all
Middle and Secondary levels
both in Israel and the United
States from 1968 to present. She
is committed to Hebraic-Judaic
education and will bring to our
school a background that will
enrich end enliven the Hebrew
language and culture.
Specialist Staff: To round out
this team, Barry Stephen, the
school's Physical Education
teacher, will work with Bill
Hance, presently employed in the
Pre-School. Together, with access
to the sports facilities of the JCC,
they will present a diversified
Phys Ed program.
Susan Zeev the school's
Fine Arts Teacher, will also work
with the new department ex-
panding her already well defined
art program.
Burt Lowlicht, Principal of the
Day School said, "What cannot
be explained as easily as the pur-
chase of equipment or the
delineation of a teacher's profes-
sionaJ background j,
tangible known as the Vh-
of a teaching team Tk*
try of this team St^eeRc
Barbara Gintis, and tL
Arm is as important as^v
else described* this trfi
"I predict that this ha.
create one of the mce^l
and exciting programs an?'
or seventh grader col
penence in any school, w.
lucky to have them and
that it has fallen into pC,
of the most exciting dev
ments at the school iT
concluded.
The enriched secular pro
with its emphasis on coron
science and math, coupled
an integrated secular-J^
program, will address thenJ
Middle School student has toy
the relevance of his-her studies]
well as its purpose and i
Our Film FolkMarkowicz
By HERBERT G. LUFT
BUDAPEST (delayed)
Halina Markowicz, an inter-
nationally recognized producer of
documentary films, who has
worked in the film studios of
Israel and Poland, at the Film
Institute in Belgium and received
her master degree at Columbia
University, is making a 16mm
picture, "To Remember." It deals
with the bebind-the-scene efforts
during production of Jack
Eisner's 'The Children's War."
The filming began in Hungary
and continued at the site of the
former Auschwitz camp in
Poland.
Her film about the film goes to
the background of the story and
to the period of 40 years ago,
opening with old newsreel shots
of the Warsaw Ghetto and stills
of Jewish youth who formed a
smuggling and fighting ring.
Most of them didn't survive and
their short lives were filled with
v great intensity. They were boys
and girls between the ages of 13
and 16; yet, they knew the taste
of love and death and the need for
survival.
THE STORY of their lives is
told by one who survived, Jacek,
today the mature Jack Eisner.
We pause at a faded still
presenting Jacek at age 13.
Ms. Markowicz s camera
shows contemporary Warsaw
and its Jewish monument con-
trasted by old newsreel footage of
the Ghetto during the Nazi occu-
pation. We follow the footsteps of
Jacek 40 years later and visit
with him the cemetery in
Warsaw, the rebuilt synagogue,
and stop at the memorial site for
the Ghetto fighters.
Through a quick montage of
stills showing Jacek s childhood
friends who vanished in the
Holocaust, the screen reveals the
survivors commemorating the
anniversary of the Ghetto
uprising, to end with the faces of
Israeli youth who are at hand at
the commemoration services.
Ms. Markowicz tolls us that
her film juxtaposes the faces of
American youths who were in
Budapest portraying some of the
survivors when they were
teenagers. We will see them
talking to Eisner about his own
experience during the tragic past
and the characters they are
portraying on the screen. The
American boys and girls were
hardly aware of the immensity of
the crime committed against the
Jews of Europe before and during
WWII by the German army and
its security forces.
The documentary "To
Remember," reflecting the pro-
gression of the feature fihn,
"The Children's War," shows
Israeli director Moehe Mizrahi at
work on location in the
Hungarian capital, revealing his
sensitive handling of the young
actors and his relationship with
them while they establish them-
selves before the cameras.
WE SEE Eisner talking to the
young actress, 18-year-old Kyra
Sedgwick (a native of New York),
who is playing the part of the
heroine, telling her about his own
youth and the girl he loved and
saw dying. Against the back-
ground of the battle within the
walls of the Warsaw Ghetto of 40
years ago, their innocent love
evolved into the precious ex-
perience of their young lives.
Ms. Markowicz, in her docu-
mentary film, interviews the
individual crew members, such as
Israeli's ace cinematographer
Adam Greenberg, craftsmen
from Poland, Hungary and the
U.S., to delve into their personal
reasons for being connected with
this unique movie. Many left
higher paying film assignments
to come to Budapest and parti-
ANN FREEDMAN, D.M.D.
DENTISTRY TOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENCE
ROBERT SPOONT, D.M.D.
GENERAL DENTISTRY
wish to announce the opening
of their new office for the
practice of
DENTISTRY
Grove Centre _
21301 Poweriine Road Smt 208
Boca Raton 482-8000
[between Glades Rd. & by appointment
Palmetto Park Rd)' only
cipato in the tribute to the heroes
of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising.
"To Remember" takes us back
to New York and shows Eisner in
his offices in the Empire State
Building, with the observation
tower looming over the city. Ms.
Markowicz talks with him about
his life as a businessman, philan-
thropist, and subsequently as a
novelist, theatrical and film
producer.
JTA Featurt Service
Rosalyn Berger
T htrapcutic
.
assage
House Calts
(305)426-8307
ADVERTISEMENT
REGIONAL ARTS PRESENTS
A THREE COURSE FEAST
FOR THE HOLIDAY SEASON
by Clyde Fyfe
west palm BEACH-Take one of
the finest young String Quartets
combine them with the eminent
German pianist, CLAUDE FRANK,
on the evening of Decem ber 14th at
the West Palm Beach Auditorium:
Add two different programs, one in
the afternoon of the 16th, the other
in the evening of the 17th: Have
the exciting EMANUEL AX.
pianist, the outstanding YOUNG
UCK KIM, violinist, and the dy-
namic YO-YO MA. cellist, perform
them; You have a virtual feast of
music presented by REGIONAL
ARTS during the Holidays as
part of the MUSIC "At Eight" and
"At Two"series.
Jfc The EMERSON
fp STRING QUAR
/"ytf '^ TET.comprised of
te. tv'.* sflh. Eugene Drucker
and Philip Setzer
(who alternate
first violin posi-
tions), along with
violist Lawrence
Dutton and cellist David Finckel,
have moved swiftly up the ladder
of well-known quartets. Following
their 1983 Euro-
pean debut,
Munich's Sud-
deutsche Zeitung
ranked them at
the top: "Four \ \
Stars in the J
Quartet Heaven." CLAUDE
FRANK is a pianist who uses hit
instrument as a means to express
different moods in an always musi-
cal manner. After a recent per-
formance in Jerusalem, the POST
critic said, "Frank is a revelation
in interpretive approach and
performance."
This "winning combination "of
pianist Claude Frank and the
Emerson Quartet will perform
Mozart's Piano Quartet in E flat
Major, K. 493, the Mendelssohn
String Quartet in E minor and the
Piano Quartet in F minor by
Johannes Brahms on Thursday
evening, December 14 at the
Auditorium.
Long time
favorites in the rc v>
Palm Beaches as ^?'^
stellar individual >w ^
performers on *'.**".
various Regional .
Arts series
through the past
nine years,
EMANUEL AX.
pianist, YOUNG
UCK KIM, violin-
ist, and YO YO yar-j
MA, cellist, a f> <**
couple of years
ago joined together to form a TRIO.
Since then these grade-A artists
have received only the finest of
accolades: "They combine instru-
mental finesse without being face-
less and emotional abandon with-
out vulgarity their perform-
ances together can hardly do more
or soar higher."
This All-Star ensemble will per-
form Mozart's Sonata in B-flat
Major, K. 454, Mendelssohn's Trio
No. 2 in C minor. Op. 66, and
Brahms' magnificent Trio in B
Major for their matinee perform-
ance at the Auditorium on Friday,
December 16th. On Saturday
night, December 17, they will re-
turn to play the Haydn Trio in D
Major, the Brahms Sonata in E
minor and the glorious Trio in F
minor by Antonin Dvorak.
All individual tickets for this
Regional Arto Music "At Two "and
"At Eight "seasonal celebration of
three performances of some of the
world's greatest chamber music
are now on sale at the West Palm
Beach Auditorium. The Box Office
is open weekdays from 10 AM to 6
PM. Phone 683-6012 for reserva-
tions.


December 16,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 13
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And a complimentary Avis Rent A Car, yours for
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Throw in an extra $100, and you 11 get our deluxe
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And if six days just aren't enough, and you want to
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** Sea travel agent, or call El Al at 1-800-223-6700
and ask about our exclusive Sunsation Six Tour. But
hurry, this offer ends in February
Quickly go the days.
For complete tour details, call or write Sunsation Six Tour Desk:
El Al Israel Airlines, 850 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022.






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Name
Address
City
State
Zip
Price per person/double occupancy effective November 15.1983 to February
29,1984 Offer not valid from 12/15/83 to 1/5/84 One Avis car per double
room; gas, mileage, and insurance charges not included. If named hotels
unavailable, comparable accommodations will be substituted.
Package price based on Miami-Tel Aviv round-trip only. For prices from
your area, contact a travel agent or El Al.

Hie Airline of Israel


P*f8,
n.L..,i.l,VLU.nJ*lltUL.....
Til
/ ne Jewish floricTian of South County
Friday, December
16,
A Rabbi
Comments
The following is brought to'
Floridian waders by the South
County Rabbinical Association
If then- are topics you would like
our Rabbis to discuss, pleast
submit them to the Floridian.
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
By RABBI NATHAN ZELIZER
\\ now read on the Sabbath about the conflict between
Joseph and his brothers. When Jacob died, even though the
conflict took place many years prior to Jacob's death, it sud-
denly reappeared, because of the deep scars that it left.
Stivngel) enough, the scars were left, not on Joseph the victim,
but on his brothers. Hut Joseph felt that now. that his father
was dead, the whole chapter which had hardly been mentioned in
IT years, would come up again. During Jacob's life when the
family was reunited in Kgypt. the bitterness was kept under
wraps. The Torah points to this concern "Vayiru Achei
Yoseph" "Joseph's brothers were afraid."
We can all learn a lesson for our time from this from the
tragedy that happened to Joseph at the age of 17.
The first lesson is that great is the agony by those who are
weighed down by a guih feeling. True Joseph suffered much by
his brothers' hatred and suspicion. But Joseph forgave his
suffering came to an end. But his brothers lived under the
shadow of that incident, even after so many years had passed.
We all expariance betrayals and heartaches in life, but these are
to be preferred over causing others to be hurt, especially when
hurt others unjustly That is what the Psalmist meant when he
said: "May I be pursued all my life by goodness and kindness"
not by hate and suspicion. It is the hurts, the hurts that we
unjustly inflict upon others that pursue ua ail our lives and leave
permanent scars
Another let son we may learn is that whan we hurt others, we
pay the additional price of anticipating like treatment
retaliation and vengeance. The brothers plead with Joseph to
forgive for the sake of their father, even though Joseph did not
think of vengeance Yes. the innocent do not suspect. Those who
are wighed down by the scars of the past do. It was Joseph who
wept because to be suspected hurt him deeply. Of course Joseph
could have anticipated their fears and eased their mind in ad-
vance. Then, of course, we would learn the second lesson.
Finally, we can also learn a lesson from what he said to his
brothers "Hatachas FJokim Ani" "Am I God?"
Vengeance is very sweet especially when our cause is just. To
resist the temptation retaliation is very possible only for him
who fears God.
When he said the words "I am not God" he implied that
the wrong will be punished but is God will mete out the punish-
ment. He also meant to say that God undid the plan of his
brothers and that there is reason to thank God who wrought
good out of evU. This idea that man is not to act instead of God
is a cardinal principle of our religion. It is the cornerstone of the
belief that only with His help can mankind be redeemed from
slavery to freedom, from war to peace, from hate to love.
Community Calendar
December 11
e >-alo"<-Giiole
Ce-e o- aa- I 30p
22
Ykj*"*- i 0*T-0
too****'-3e~* *
ie>W 1230 .m
"2 .-j- -ee- -<3
25
"#c -*?';*?-'-"- -"
Efnvtfe-S^tQies
9 Xom Boom
*ov ""eetmg 10 o
'i
J*ish Center Ground Breoking
f If
-*- i A 12 noon BoO'd meei'ig
anahe < ood Or>ote Jewish Center 9 30 o m
mee'^g A.ens league for Israel 10 a m n^ee" ng
,v s Asaw car CRT North Pines 12 30 o rn meeting
.\. .or OST-Bota G lodes 12 30 p m meeting
B no* I J~3pe' 12 30 p m mee* ng
December 20
Hfosee)*) s *~e- ::n ORT-AII Points 12 noon "^ee'^g p'C~ee'
See-i-ecxi 12 30 p m Boot] meeting *om- j
American ORT-Boca Delray evening chopfe* -8pm - Women s Amtncon CRT-Reg Orgc'ia^c o*A 'co-8pm meetmg Zionist C*gonition
of Americo 7 30 p m Boord meeting Pioneer Women-
Ztppcoh 10 a m Board mseting *c-e- s + e- c- OR'
Sartdotfoot 1 30 p. m Boord mee*mg B no. B 'n-ftoco 'ee lodge 9 30 a m Boord meeting
Pf.CIBn.Br 21
Hodosso** A..o 12
m mee*>ng V*
p.m -f*' ~g
s Amoncoo 0T-Oelc : X
ee- -g B no* 6 r#fi
~ *empi#
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
MOISES ESQUEN AZI
On Saturday, Dec. 17, Moises
Esquenazi, son of Flory Anzellini
and Edmundo Esquenazi, will be
called to the Torah of Temple
Beth-El of Boca Raton as a Bar
Mitzvah.
Moises is a student at Boca
Raton Academy and attends the
Temple Beth-El Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
Simcha are sister, Carolina;
brother. Eduardo; grandparents.
Victor Shaio of New York City,
and Maruja Shaio of Bogota,
Columbia. Moises' hobby is
computers.
Stacty Stem
ST ACE Y STEIN
On Saturday. Dec. 17, Stacey
Lynn Stein, daughter of Ranee
and Sheldon Stem, win be called
to the Torah of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton as a Bat Mitzvah.
Stacey is a student at AD
Henderson University School
and attends Temple Beth El Reli-
gious School. Family members
sharing in the Simcha are sister.
Lisa: grandparents. Mr. and
Mrs Lawrence Schwartz of Tam
arac and Frances Romaine of
Pompano Beach: and great-
grandparents. Mr. and Mrs
Julius Schwartz.
Also present will be David
Stein. Scott Stein. Annette
Schreider and Mr. and Mrs
Manny Sobel. all from Philadel
phia. and Thelma Schwartz. Rae
Schwartz and Lillian Sherman,
all from Miami Beach.
Stacey s hobbies include
trumpet, school choir and dance.
Mr. and Mrs. Stein will host a
Kiddush in Stacey's honor fol
lowing Shabbat morning serv-
ices.
Young Artists Series
Continued from Pace 1
International Auditions, are
graduates of the Juillard School.
Cleveland Institute of Music and
the Curtis Institute.
They have performed at the
Kennedy Center in the Young
Artists Series in Washington.
DC. and gave concerts at the
University of California, and also
at the Cleveland Museum of .Art
They have appeared with the
most prestigious chamber music
series in the United States, in-
cluding The Mostly Mozart Fes-
tival at Lincoln Center and the
Chamber Musk Society of Lin-
coln Center.
Sunday. April 1 Barbara
Martin. Soprano Mas Martin
has a Master s Degree from the
Juillard School and is a winner of
the 19612 Concert Artats Guild
Aard. At her debut with the
New York Philharmonic under
Zubin Mehta. she was acclaimed
and favorably competed to Joan
Sutherland
Miss Martin has performed at
many fasuvab in this country
Musks Pro in Asstsi. Hah
TKkets are available by
senpuoa ooiy for the few con-
certs at 825 per parson from the
Concert office at Temple Beth El.
333 SW 4 Ave.. Boca Raton For
>caB391-8S0ft.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservativ.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donu
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturdav,,
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month
Minyan on Monday and Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m. "
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd., DeU,
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p m
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:45 am. Sabbath Torah class
5 p.m. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan Ass
ciation Office. West Atlantic, corner Carter Road, Delray Beach
Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m. and
Kiddush. Edward Dorfman. President 499-6687. Temple
Office 14600 Cumberland Drive, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446
Phone 495-0466. Rabbi Emeritus Jonah J. Kahn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 SW. Fourth Avenue. Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler. Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services it
8 p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of each
month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015. Boca Raton. Fla. 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village. Boca. Daily Servica
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday
8:30 ajn. and 5 p.m. Reuben Saltzman, President, Joseph M.
Pollack, Cantor. Phone 483-5557.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach. Fla. 33445. Coir
servative. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A. Silver, Rabbi: Naftaly
A. Linkovsky. Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 pm.,
Saturday at 8:45 a.m.. Dairy Minyansat8:45 a.m. and 5p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Cason United Methodist Church. 342 N. Swinton Ave. Icorne
Lake Ida Rd). Delray Beach, Fla. Reform. Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 1901. Delray Beach. Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Samuel Silver. President Samuel Rothstein, Phone 276-
6161.
BOCA RATON SYNAGOGUE
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 273866, Boca Raton. Fla 33427.
Orthodox services held at South County Jewish Community
Day School. 414 N.W. 35th St.. Boca Raton, every Friday, fm
minutes after candlelighting, Saturday morning 9 am Minch
Maariv. President, Dr. Israel Bruk. Phone: 483-8616
''Dedicated to Serving our Jewish Community"
BETH ISRAEL -RUBIN
5808 W ATLANTIC AVENUE DELRAY BEACH. FL 33445
DELRAY (305) 4994000 WEST PALM (305) 732 3000
JOSEPH RUBIN. OWNER
If your Funeral
and Cemetery
Arrangements are
"Back Home"
eee
Mcnorah Gardens & Funeral Chapels will work
directly with the funeral home of your choice
anywhere in the U.S. or Canada to earn, out
>our funeral and cemetery arrangements quickly.
efficiently and in the Jewish tradition.
FOR NATIONWIDE ARRANGEMENTS.
CALL W WEST PALM BEACH
Cemetery & Chapel 627-22/ /
Planning Center 686*772*
Gardens and Funeral Chapels


Priday, December 16,1963

The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 15

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SIZE
|P155/80813
'165/80B13
>175/80B13
M85/80B13
>175/75B14
'185/75B14
PRICE
31.97
33.81
35.75
37.93
38.79
39.88
FE.T.
SIZE
152
158
170
179
170
P215/75814
P225/75814
186
P195/75B14 41.82
5/75B14 42.92
200
211
P155/80B15
P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
PMCE
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
245
167
SAFETY
SERVICE
EVERY STORE HAS
CERTIFIED
MECHANICS
TO SERVE YOU
Most of our mechanics have
been TESTED and CER-
TIFIED by the National In-
stitute tor Service Excel-
lence They are available at
any of our stores listed be-
low with a star (*)
WE DO QUALIFIED,
EXPERT WORK ON
AUGMMEMT
WHEEL BALANCE
HI SPEED or COMPUTER
COMPLETE FRONT
Rrw^WV *Wj tf% tW5 tfv i
NORTON TIRE COt. LIMITED WARRANTY
30 DAY MONEY
BACK GUARANTEE
It lor ny reason you re not completely Mlulied wit* tny t*t
passenger car tire you Ouy trom Norton Tire Co return it
along wrtl-i your original invoice within 30 days ol tie dill ol
purchase and your money will be relunded in hill no ques
lions itted' Road hltirds and commercial vehicles ei
MM
MICHELI
QUALITY VALUE PERFORMANCI
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALL
SIZE
PMCE
145x13
38.39
155x13
40.84
165x13
46.20
175x14
45.60
P235/75B15
47.78
50.10
2 37
252
2 72
185x14
165x15
165/70-13
185/70-13
185/70-14
MXL
56.30
57.74
54.39
47.40
55.51
62.40
1 63
1 42 !
1 55
208
215
1 72
1 55
1 78
1 99
P-METRIC TUBELESS
X* WHITEWALL
SIZE
PRICE I FE.T
AIR CONDITIONING
CHECK-UP
Kepp your unit performing
in top condition Available at
stores listed below withal )
TOR
illFQoodrieh P%**>
LIFESAVER XLM \r%
O (Wit
SPECIAL
i|--a|Pl55/80Rl3 41.46[' &0
|P165/80R13 46.54' 1 6*
TUBELESS
BLACKWALL
t i i
;P185/80R13 58.16 1 90
195/70-14 205/70-14 P185/75RU 62.011 2
83.69 92.46 |P195/75ri4|65.1T,213
FET?4 !DonK,7<;ntd 70.73 234
STEEL BELTED RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
P155
F80R13j
SIZE
IP165/80R13
>175/80R13
PRICE
43.46 he.
45.02
IP185/80R13
46.28
P195/70R13
47.11
|P205/70R14
|P175/75R14
52.76
46.39
IP185/75R14
1 83
190
SIZE
P205/75R14
PRICE
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
195
2 24
P195/75R15
187
48.57
2 00
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
|P195/75R14|52.76
|PREMUM4
POLYESTER C0R0 WHITE
Install new disc pads Re-
surface rotors Install new
Plus 1 501 seals Repack bearings
FE T I Check calipers Check
system Inspect master
cylinder Add fluid as re-
quired Ad|ust and bleed
as required Check and ad-
just rear brakes Road test
30.000 Mile Limited Warranty
THE NEW GENERATION RADIAL
BLACKWALL
iP205/75R14
P215/75R14 73.66 249
SIZE
165*70 365
180 65-390
FET
55.06 1*34
56J0h
59.97 ^ 67
55.37
57.25
2 21
2 44
220/55390
WHIT!
PRICE
77.08
90.30
107.49
EeTP205/75R15:71.95|2 44
P?15/75R15 74.98! 259
94 P225/75R15I77.48 27A
>37 P235/75R15|86.45|296
185 14~
IMPORT TRUCK
Xb I 5979
s> ion
OUh
FhlCtS
ON C
TRUO '111"
59.45
259
61.63
P235/75R15 66.13
2 74
OIL CHANGE
FILTER & LUBE
UP TO 5
QTS0F
PREMIUM
OIL (Bulk)
NEW FILTER
COUP LUBE
YOKOHAMA
40,000 MILE LIMITED
WARRANTY
Y865 STEELBELTED Y885 Steel Belt* Natel |
RADIALS
SIZE
FOR MOST FOREIGN 4 DOMESTIC .175/70SR13
SMALL INTERMEDIATE CARS i185/70SR13
PRICE IF.ET
41.47! 1641
SIZE
PRICE
155SR12 31.18
145SR13 | 31.94
F.E.T
I 36
155SR13 ,33.97
165SR13 36.13
296
(IJRMOST
US">SStNOCS
NOHGMI TRUCKS
[175SR14 41.98
185SR14 44.29
1 23
1 48
44.621 H
185/70SR14 47.25
195/70SR14|5Q.4tS
2O5/70SR14 57.14
1 91
209
2 40
1 60
1 84
SIZE
A78x13
C78x13
C78x14
E78x14
F78x14
PMCE
25.26
160
28.20
28.83
30.03
31.48
G78x14
H78x14
G78x15
H78x15
L78x15
33.18
34.74
33.26
34.98
1.77
MAXI-TRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL WHITE
165SR15
i 79
SMALL TRUCK
SPECIAL
Y45 WHTTEWALL
413
600 14
6 PLY
SIZE
P165/80R13 35.62
1 89
205
216
228
36.94 2.80
P175/80R13
PRICE
FE.T
38.39
P185/80R13 40.09
167
164
1 78
P185/75R14 41.25
P195/75R14
42.62
P205/75R14 43.90
P215/75R14
[AriDion'yjriLpJy_
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
206
2 31
45.89
46.28
48.77
53.61
193
SHOCK
| ABSORBER?
MonrO-MaMc'
ftadW-Matlc-
IRELLI
P3/70
LOW COST MOM MKiAGE
MOW. MAC*WALL
! UHTB ,
MST SCLLMG Ml*
0UAI STEEL KLTS
_ss_
155SR12
145SR13
|0FF
Most Amncn Car*
289
8 POINT SAFETY
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
i2JQ.
49.87
1 19
1 53
181
SIZE
165/70SR13
175/70SR13
185/70SR13
185/70SR14
PWCE
41.68
55,02
195/70SR14,59.84
FE.T
1 26
1 32
1 57
165
1 88
2 11
1 71
8POJNTSAFETY sizes to fit host AMU
SERVICE CHECK p"***"
WE ALSO CARRY
P5, P6, P7 and P8
TAMERKAN 4
r stores
-___ RCVOLUTWNAm AU
P77 SEASON NAOMI. MSN
PERFORMANCE. STEEL NELT IN
SKXWALL FOR AD0E0 STRtNSTH
195/70HR1
205/70HRK
2 19
NORTON
SIMCE '9?*-
SAHTT
ami
MidM Car4 i.ii)iw|WRMw mhos Ni>tW.w.. t!.!.? tamarac .teoumta
SS -SS-'-liSS^^ ,;;rSn, *5ss& ~z&&?
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS

^



&**
Tl.- r
l he Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Decemb
er 16,1983
c*
,> ng OmiI Md Beac- f-.m I iiHwmHlli<|illi'l Mil Worth- Ma>gai*>No>ih Boca Raton Pair- Ba. Palm Paen Pa"- Beech Garden!.Paim SpnngsiPieniation oc^
*,

I
1

r
i
-
i
i
i
!
Rate Yourself!
HIGH YIELD CERTIFICATES THAT
GIVE YOU MANY WAYS TO INVEST
ON YOUR OWN TERMS!
Put your money to work earning high
interest today... at City!
City's Certificate program is tailor made for you... terms are available from
3 months all the way up to 30 years... you decide! Even an 18 month variable
rate certificate is available-Plus you can arrange to defer interest earned on
3 to 12 month CD's.. .a real advantage for tax planning purposes.
Interest on City's Certificates is compounded and credited monthly. There is a
substantial interest penalty for early withdrawal on certificate accounts
(
r.
0
s
\
For more details and current rates
call our CITY Information Desk
Toll Free 1-800-492-4141


CHOICE OF $20 CASH OR A FREE GIFT FOR DEPOSIT OF $10,000 OR MORE TO CITY'S 6 MONTH !
OR 12 MONTH CERTIFICATE OR $5,000 OR MORE TO CITY'S LONG TERM CERTIFICATES. I
$20
CASH
G E Can Opener
Kii| Sharpener
; -
Emerson
Doc* Radio
2 Cannon Blankets
100. Acrykc
Twm &/e Tan
'iono"
un,e>ia<
B*"*" Bjq
Ham iiton" Beach
Stand Mil*'
Firsl Alert
E Metric
Proqramaoie
light Control
( "#.isor*
AC DC
'JO? Re< ii'ilf'
AnscC OiSC
C*Tl*'i
" :'.'M~
.\
Black a Decker
Taoietop
Workmate

Hamilton Beach
' Speed Blender
w
Presto
Deep Fryer
T
^0^
Proctor Siiei
4 slice
Toaste'
Black Decker
Spot liter
G E Steam Spray
Von
Biack Decker
Siep Siooi
Spartus Ouart/
Wa ClOCk
gag'1, '.sa
Comic let
Nylon Acrylic
Blend Twin Sue
Tan
Rivai
C'OCkpol
2P
^^"P1^ Universal
Universal Wtender
Women s Toie Baq Bag
Hamilton Beach
I? Cup
Cot'ee Maker
16 14 Kl
Gow Necklace
m Pouch
Regem Shell id
CulWry
Panasonic AMjFM
AC DC Po>ta(M
Red*
Gifts will be cttrvsrsd by UPS.
Regulations prohibit a grft for
transfer of funds alrsody on
deposit with the association.
One gift per depositor. Gifts
are not available for IRA or
Ksogh Accounts
3
5
*
5
?
I
I
I
a
I

3
o
o
i
X
City Federal Savings One of America's Largest Financial Services Companies
120 Offices throughout Florida and New Jersey Deposits Insured by FSUC
**/Mofriatownrteoofealown/MrddhMowfi/***> Parti/Nation/ Manafcewt.n/ linden, Laureiton /Lake Hwwe**/ leMwood/i
J
lUn.heo.ih/ HoweH /Mrttetoroufh/M^nland Park iHtmi
/Oat*"


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