The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00139

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Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
lie
Jewish Florid ian
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
,5- Number39
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, November 25.1963
I F rtd SHOclfl
Price 35 Cents
Senator Levin Gives
Life To 'Chai' Dinner

IT.
hnofe Jewish Center Anshei Shalom
Temple Anshei Shalom
A most prestigious evening
will be held on Sunday, Dec. 11
when the South County Jewish
Federation hosts the "Chai"
Division dinner at the Bridge
Restaurant, on the intracoastal
waterway, in Delray Beach. "An
evening like this deserves
something special," said 1984
"Chai" Division Chairman, Al
Segal, "and we are honored to
have as our guest speaker,
Senator Carl Levin (Democrat:
Michigan). Dinner guests, who
include all contributors that give
$18,000 or more, will spend an
intimate evening with this ac-
complished legislator."
I Ground Breaking ceremonies
br the West Delray, Conserva-
Tumple Anshei Shalom,
hole Jewish Center, will be held
onday. Dec. 18, at 1:30 p.m.
~ site of the event is on six
jes of land owned by the Tern-
lie, along West Atlantic Avenue.
L mile east of Exit 32 on the
florida Turnpike, and adjacent
1 the new Palm Beach County
'ublic Library.
President Edward Dorfman
has named Jack. M. Levine,
Ground Breaking planning and
development Chairman, and Ben
Simon as Building Committee
Chairman. National, State,
County, and local dignitaries,
members of the Clergy and busi-
ness leaders have been invited to
grace the Dais. Heads of organ-
izations and respective member-
ships have been invited to attend.
\Hiahest Level
llsrael, Egypt Hold Talks
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The highest level
diplomatic dialogue between Israel and Egypt since the
outbreak of the war in Lebanon in June, 1982, is taking
place in Cairo.
David Kimche, director general of the Foreign
Ministry, is in the Egyptian capital for political talks
which Israeli sources said cover the entire gamut of
liddle East issues and a review of bilateral relations
etween Israel and Egypt.
KIMCHE LEFT for Cairo, and was expected to
eturn soon. He is accompanied by the Ministry s
egal aide, Elyakim Rubinstein. The two Israeli officials
ire scheduled to meet with Egypt's Foreign Minister,
tomal Hassan Ali, and to hold working sessions with top
Mficials of the Egyptian Foreign Ministry. Kimche may
lso call on President Hosni Mubarak, though no meeting
etween them was announced.
The Israeli sources said the visit emerged from
[ Bilateral diplomatic contacts." They conceded, however,
hat the United States has been applying pressure on
rEgypt for some time to thaw the "cold peace' that has
busted since Israel invaded Lebanon. The sources firmly
penied that Kimche's visit was connected in any way with
he current tension in the region involving Syria and the
I.S.
New Orthodox Congregation
To Begin Services
i^iSS?; Sthodox 9yna- Jolh^eSi% WWS wfll
ojrue will hold its first minyan at t03l by the Congrega-
te South County Jewish Com- JjJ'STseudah Shlishit by tk
numty Day School, 414 NW 38 "3iv
K "oca Raton. Ziff family.
it wv The DubUc is invited to join in
Kflbbalat Shabbat will begin at ^^beginning.
'0 P.m. Services will commence tnis new D*8inmn*
Temple Anshei Shalom has
dramatically increased its mem-
bership in three years from five
Jews who originally met as an
Executive Board, to 550. The
Temple meets weekly in the Car-
teret Savings and Loan Building.
Over the years, Vice President
for Religion. Ben Beck and his
committee have developed the
knack of speedily converting the
Carteret Bank's spacious floor
into a Synagogue seating ap-
proxknately 208 worshippers, be-
fore Friday night Services and
then back to a Bank again, at the
conclusion of the Kiddush follow-
ing Saturday morning Services.
On June 17, 1981, Edward
Dorfman was installed as the
Temple's first elected President.
Coincidentally, Rabbi Bruce S.
Warshal, South County Jewish
Federation Executive Director,
was the first Guest Speaker in
the history of Temple Anshei
Shalom to address an audience at
such installation ceremonies.
In March. 1981, Public Rela-
tions Chairman. Jack M. Levine,
founded, edited and published
the Temple newspaper, "The
Sentinel," and gfcve it the
Hebrew name, "Hashomehr."
Compared to 40 worshippers in
1980, High Holy Days Services in
1981, were attended by 300 wor-
shippers. Oriole Homes Corpora-
tion, without charge, granted use
of the Villages of Oriole Sales Of-
fices. Weekday Succoth services
also were held at the Sales
Offices.
A retired successful business-
man, dedicated to playing Golf,
Ed Dorfman asserted that ha
would be one year, one term,
President. Nevertheless, at the
urring of Mary, his wife and con-
fidante during 46 years of mar-
riage, Ed accepted the nomina-
tion in 1982, and was elected to a
second on year term. This year,
with Mary ailing, at her behest,
Ed agreed to run and was elected
President for another one year
term. Mary had expressed the
wish that she wanted to stand
proudly, shoulder to shoulder
with Ed when Temple Anshei
Shalom completed and opened
the portals of its own House of
Worship. Recently, Mary Dorf-
man passed away.
The Temple has hail to we
makeshift accommodations for
its High Holy Day services, yet
608 worshipped with Anshei
Shalom at the last High Holy
Day season.
Delray West, Wandering Wor-
A practicing attorney, Levin
was a special assistant attorney
general for the Defender's Office
in Detroit when he decided to
enter politics in 1969. He won a
seat on the Detroit City Council
for two consecutive terms and
was council president for the last
four years. In 1978 Levin ran for
the U.S. Senate and became the
first Jewish Senator in Michigan
history.
As a U.S. Senator, Levin is
active in the movement to secure
the release of political prisoners
and to facilitate emigration from
the Soviet Union. He secured
Senate passage of a resolution
granting permanent resident
status to two Soviet families who
sought refuge in the United
States because of religious
persecution. In recognition of his
efforts on behalf of the religiously


Sen. Carl Levin
persecuted, The Jewish Theolo-
gical Seminary of America
awarded him its first Herbert H.
Lehman Ethics Medal in 1980
and Christian Solidarity Inter-
national awarded Levin its first
Alexander Solxhenitsyn Award
in the same year.
Levin's wife Barbara is also an
attorney and they have three
teen-aged daughters. Levin is
currently a member of the Armed
Services Committee, the Govern-
ment Affairs Committee and the
Small Business Committee.
Percy Calls W. Bank
Settlements 'Provocative'
Continued on Page 11-
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Sen. Charles Percy (D.,
111.), calling Israel's
"extensive" West Bank
settlements "provocative,"
told a group of Jewish
leaders that the settlements
discouraged Jordan from
entering into peace
negotiations with the Jew-
ish State. He said he had
been assured that King
Hussein wants to enter into
negotiations with Israel.
Percy, chairman of the Foreign
Relations Committee, spoke to a
closed meeting of the Conference
of Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations. The
meeting with the some 100
Jewish leaders was requested by
Percy, who is seeking reelection.
THE SENATOR said he op-
posed the establishment of an
independent Palestinian state
but asserted that the Palestinian
people needed a national
homeland, which he said should
be in some form of confederation
with Jordan. He said he regarded
Yaair Arafat, the Palestine
Liberation Organization's chief,
ae a "relative moderate compared
with George Habash," the leader
of the Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine."
The senior Senator from
Illinois also defended his support
for the 1981 sale of AW ACS
reconnaissance planes and other
advanced weaponry to Saudi
Arabia, which he termed as a
"moderate" Arab state "com-
pared with Libya and Syria" He
said the military balance had not
shifted against Israel as a result

Continued on Page 8


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Friday, November^" fl
Rabbi Denounces Reagan
Schindler Denounces Reagan Policies as 'Unprincipled'
HOUSTON (JTA) -
Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congre-
gation, denounced the
foreign and domestic poli-
cies of the Reagan Ad-
ministration as neither
principled nor pragmatic.
In his address last
Friday to the 3,500
delegates attending the
57th biennial assembly of
the UAHC and the 34th
biennial convention of the
National Federation of
Temple Sisterhoods,
Schindler was especially
critical of the Admin-
istration's policy in Central
America.
THE REFORM leader charged
that President Reagan's foreign
policy is one of "an obsession
with force," imposing "military
solutions on crises that are
political, economic and social in
their essence." Schindler said
that while it is true that the
Cubans and Russians "cynically
exploit" the miseries of the
peoples of Central America.
Reagan's response was "largely
counter-productive" because the
Administration has its eyes
"fixed on the superpower game
while ignoring all the local
pawns."
He said that the Reagan
Administration policies "are
neither principled nor pragmatic.
They sow the wind with guns and
bullets and anti-Communist
rhetoric and have already reaped
the whirlwind of violence, death
and anti-American reactions."
Schindler called for "an end to
U.S.. military intervention in El
Salvador and Honduras" and "an
end to the covert war against
Nicaragua." He proposed,
instead, that the Reagan
Administration "seek a
negotiated solution, proffer
unqualified support" for
neighboring Central American
countries "and make a
permanent commitment" in
foreign policy "to democracy,
economic reform and social
justice."
SCHINDLER was also
sharply critical of the Reagan
Administration policies in the
Middle East. He said Israeli
officials with whom he met
recently, including Premier
Yitzhak Shamir, President
Chaim Herzog and Knesset
members, "were much concerned
about the vagueness and the
vacillations of American
diplomacy." He added that "the
constant and capricious shifts" in
U.S. policy "perplex them."
Commenting on the repeated
changes of Reagan Adminis-
tration policy in regard to Israel's
activities in Lebanon, Schindler
said he feared that the "fragile"
May 17 Israeli-Lebanese agree-
ment on the withdrawal of Israeli
Jewish community Center
of South county
Presents:
WINTER DAY CAMP
When December 26th December 30th, 1983
Where Hebrew Day School
For Children pre-school 6th grade
Time-9:30 A.M.-4:00 P.M.
(Pre camp & after camp care available)
Five exciting fun packed days filled with a puppet show,
trip to Lion Country Safari, Sports and much more!
Don't miss out Fill out the attached form & return to:
Jewish Community Center of South County
3200 North Federal Highway, Suite 226
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
For further information, call Sarah Landa at 395-5546.
APPLICATION FOR WINTER DAY CAMP
Family Name_____________________________________
Home Telephone Number________________________
Address__________________________________________
Business Address.
Business Telephone Number.
Emergency Contact Person__
Telephone Number_________
Child's Name________________
.Age.
Child's Name.
Child's Name.
.Age.
.Age.
.Grade.
.Grade.
.Grade.
Days Attending: Circle Day (days) which your child
(children) will be attending.
Monday
December 26
Thursday
December 29
Tuesday
December 27
Friday
December30
Wednesday
December 28
All Week
December 26-30,
TOTAL FEE ENCLOSED.
ALL APPLICATIONS MUST BE ACCOMPANIED
BY CHECK, DEADLINE DECEMBER 16th, 1983.
forces trom Lebanon and security
arrangements to follow "will be
the price that Israel is asked to
pay for success in the current
Geneva talks" on Lebanon's
national reconciliation.
He declared that the Reagan
Administration "must not broker
agreements one day and on the
next collaborate with one of the
sides to break it," an apparent
reference to Syria.
Focusing on the domestic
policies of the Reagan Adminis-
tration, Schindler noted that at
the UAHC assembly in Boston in
1981, the Reform movement
expressed doubts about the
course the U.S. was following
under Reagan. In his address in
Houston, he observed that "our
apprehensions were fully
justified. Reaganomics has
tightened this nation's belt
around the necks of the poor."
The inflationary cycle "has been
broken, but only by means of a
most severe recession," Schindler
added.
THE REFORM leader also de-
nounced the policy of the Soviet
Union toward its Jewish citizens.
He termed the Soviet regime
"brutal" and "primitive" and
"frightened by the human spirit"
demonstrated by Soviet Jews
enduring persecution and abuse
for seeking to emigrate. He said
Reform Jews must "speak up for
the rights of Russian Jews and
for Ethiopian Jews, too."
Turning to the role of Reform
Judaism in the area of religious
activities, Schindler urged the
delegates to approve a new
Reform Jewish unit to study all
phases of conversion to Reform
Judaism.
He described the goal of the
present UAHC Outreach Task
Force as that of a "positive effort
to come to grips with the reality
of intermarriage, to contain the
loss it threatens to our numerical
strength, and, if at all possible, to
convert that loss into a gain. He
said that the goals of the Out-
reach program were "to make
certain that the majority of inter-
faith marriages will result in the
conversion of the non-Jewish
partner to Judaism, and that the
majority of the children issuing
from such marriages will, in fact,
be raised as Jews."
DECLARING THAT "even
our work with non-affiliated
mixed marriage couples is
encouraging," Schindler said the
effort "established beyond doubt
that they, too, need not be lost to
us, that we can, if we but try,
regain them for our people" He
added that "there is no dilution
of our Jewishness when others
join cur ranks. Quite the
contrary, our Jewishness is
enhanced because of them."
Noting that he had proposed
the Outreach program to the
Reform movement five years ago,
Schindler said a Joint Com-
mission on Outreach had been
created by the UAHC and the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis (CCAR) "to carry
forward" the Outreach program.
But Schindler stressed that the
Reform movement had done very
little research on the aspects of
conversion and he was therefore
proposing the creation of an Ins-
titute for Reform Jewish Public
Policy, jointly undertaken by the
UAHC. the CCAR and the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, the Reform
seminary, "to undertake such a
comprehensive study" of all
elements of mixed marriages and
conversion.
REGARDING ISRAEL,
Schindler declared that American
Reform Jews must do everything
possible to support Israel
"economically and politically and
with every resource at our
command." He said .he was.
making this statement despite
the refusal of the Orthodox-
dominated rabbinate in Israel to
recognize Reform Judaism.
He stressed that he "had
nothing against Orthodox Jews
per se. What I denounce is the
politicized element within
modern Orthodoxy that appeals
to the coercive power of (the
Israeli! State rather than to the
conscience of the individual."
Notmg that the discriminati
by the Orthodox establishm.
against non-Orthodox jZT
"amockery'and'aperveraioj
Schindler said that "th
narrow-minded attitudes
schemes are destructive
Orthodoxy itself." He
Reform Jews would have to I
such conditions in Israel
"we achieve that full equaljl
which is our entitlement
Jews."
Teacher Dismissed
BONN (JTA) Harm
Menken, a 46-year-old teacher at
the government-run navigation
school in Stade, Lower Saxony,
has been ordered dismissed for
disseminating anti-Semitic pro-
paganda in 1979.
Menken claimed that the gas
chambers were a lie and, in ar-
ticles in local newspapers, ac-
cused Jews of preparing a plot to
annihilate the German peopli
Government authorities in LqJ
Saxony took no disciplinary me
sures against Menken ua
famed to by public opinion.
When the matter was
brought to the court, the i
ment asked for was a 10 pert
cut in his salary (or an 18-moB
period. The panel of judges dered him fired. He may appeal]
Are You interested In Forming
a Theatre Croup???
If you enjoy playreading, producing plays and
socializing with people having similar interests,
please contact Marianne Lesser at:
Jewish community center of South county
3200 North Federation Highway
Suite 226
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
395-5546
.%*%%%%3^%%%%%.%%.%'1^%3^%>3^%'%'%.%'%3KX%%>V3
What would you Like to Learn?????
is there some special topic you would like to ex-
plore, some skill that you've been wanting to
develop? if there is a course that you would like
the south county Jewish community center to of-
fer, please complete form below, if you know
someone who has expertise in that area, please in-
dicate.
Course.
Possible
Address.
instructor.
Phone #__________________________.------.
Please contact Marianne Lesser at 395-5546 or send
completed form to:
Jewish community center of South county
3200 North Federal Highway
Suite 226
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
xNSNS's.NXX
^ V N N N \ N.
What would You Like to Teach?????
if you have a hobby or special talent in some area
that you would like to share with other adults, you
might enjoy teaching In the South County Jewish
Community Centers Adult Education program, if
interested, please complete form and return to:
Jewish community Center of South County
Suite 226
3200 North Federal Highway
Boca Raton. Fiordla 33431
or contact
Marianne Lesser
at
wmmm
Thank you for your Interest.
I have a special interest or talent In:_________
Name_______________________________
Address____________
Home Phone #.
Bussiness Phone #.


Ld-yj^^S
1963
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
How Anti-Semitism Infected Writer Belloc's Mind
By ROBERT SEGAL
One tries hard to be ac-
Irurate, but sometimes
|Dods. Thus, in a March,
[l983 column about the
IChosen People, I erred in
attributing to the British
[poet and essayist, Hilaire
Kelloc, the lines, "How odd
[0f GodTo choose the
Lews."
My attention was called to the
I error by Herbert A. Kenny,
I former book editor of The Boston
Globe. Since thus going astray, I
I jjgye ascertained that the lines
(originated with Norman Ewer;
[and I am most grateful to a
I gracious Herb Kenny for helping
| me set the record straight.
HILAIRE BELLOC'S think-
ling about the Jewish people's
history through five millenia and
especially their place in
England'9 history may be found
Jin his book, "The Jews," pu-
blished in 1922. I have a copy of
the third edition (1937) at hand,
together with Robert Speaight's
The Life Of Hilaire BeUoc."
Let me cite an incisive excerpt
|bout the Jews from a letter
Belloc wrote Speaight: "The poor
darlings (the Jews). I'm awfully
fond of them and I'm awfully
sorry for them, but it's their own
ally fault they ought to have
I let God alone."
In a gallant effort to temper
this thrust, which in a sense
shares the spirit of Norman
Ewer's flip jingle, Speaight com-
mented: The defect of Belloc's
discussion of the Jewish problem,
both in public and in private, was
that he could not take the Jews
naturally."
HILAIRE BELLOC, who
worried about the dual loyalty
problem mentioned so often as a
ihulk'ngc to Jews since the birth
of the State of Israel, was himself
a man of two countries. He was
born near Paris of an English
mother and a French father,
married a Californian, and served
in the French army near the turn
of the century.
But his heart belonged to
England where his stirring verse,
oratorical skill, and prolific pro-
duction of literature, along with
his stout championship of his
Catholic faith, brought consider-
able notice and fame.
In his biography, Speaight
makes it clear that the virus of
anti-Semitism that settled early
in Belloc's mind came in part
from his stout defense of the
French military, judicial, and ec-
clesiastic establishment that
helped make life hell for Alfred
. Dreyfus. That defense, in turn,
was nurtured by the anti-Jewish
polemics of Edouard Drumont.
Belloc blamed Dreyfus'
historic retrial and eventual
vindication on "a small minority
in control of the money-power."
And he criticized Emil Zola,
whose ringing call for justice for
Dreyfus fanned the flames of
Belloc's wrath further.
Speaight writes that when
Belloc was at Balliol, one cause of
his unpopularity was his
"strident, exotic anti-Semitism,"
a reputation that was to dog him
throughout his life.
ONE NEEDS much wider lati-
tude than the space of this
limited column to go into detail
about Belloc's book, "The Jews."
In that wide-ranging work, Belloc
returns frequently to his assur-
ance that he wrote to help, not
harm, this enduring and troubled
people. He feared that what he
termed "concealment" would
serve only to spawn more wide-
spread anti-Semitism. He ap-
pealed for mutual recognition of
the danger of the problem and for
the nurturing of mutual respect.
Yet even in 1937, when Hitler
had clearly telegraphed his deter-
mination to make his contempt
for Jews a key weapon in his
drive for world conquest, Belloc
wrote that the Nazi attack (upon
Jews) was sincere.
Hitler, Belloc opined, was busy
fighting "a European Revolu-
tion," that is, Communism. And
also for those who still make
apologies for Belloc's anti-Semit-
ism: the poor fellow's book, in
part, echoes too much of the
forged writings available in the
Protocols of the Elders of Zion.
THE MODERN Communist
movement was inspired by and
directed by Jews, Belloc wrote.
He sees Jews in control of wealth
and the press. He scores them for
being so secretive and for
arrogantly proclaiming their
superiority over others.
His solution: segregation.
It nearly breaks one's heart to
recall these jaundiced views of a
brilliant human. Charity says be
calm and patient. But zealotry
extracts a huge toll at times. And
Belloc's zeal for his faith and for
England spoiled his determina-
tion to befriend the people of a
more ancient faith.
JTA Features Syndicate
Living Cost Up
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
cost of living index rose by 7.2
percent during August, making
for a 71.4 percent increase in the
first eight months of this year. At
the present rate, inflation this
year will amount to about 125
percent, or 25 percent more than
forecast by the Finance Ministry
at the beginning of the year. The
COL index rose by 7.2 percent in
August 1982.
-"%JT*
V
Air
ISRAEL ,.$510.
2 WEEK VACTION ~.$510. ~~
4 WEEK TOUR OF LEISURE '1022
Mm Mr
WTTH LATE DEPARTURES, LITTLE WALKING A SLOWER PACE
3 WEEKS IN NET ANY A 1 WEEK IN JERSALEM
APRIL 9,1984
PASSOVER TOURS
FOR RESERVATIONS A INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS,
OR OUR OTHER ISRAELI TRIPS, CALL MIRIAM COLLECT AT
SSSm TRIANGLETOURS-931-5031 S&^
,o9P^ 18407 W D<< Highway North Miami Baac* "<%)
Florida Division,
American Committee for the
Weizmann Institute of Science
cordially invites you to attend its gala
Dinner-Dance
celebrating a year of major scientific advances
by Israel's primary research center
Saturday evening, December 10, 1983
Fontainebleau Hilton, Miami Beach
Reception 7:00 PM
Fleur-de-Lis Room
Dinner 8:00 PM
Fontaine Room
PROGRAM-GW/ Speakers
TED KOPPEL
Television journalist, of
"Nightline," ABC's award
winning news-and-interview
program; formerly the
network's Chief Diplomatic
Correspondent
PROF.
DAVID SAMUEL
Director, Center for
Neurosciences &
Behavioral Research
Weizmann Institute of Science
Subscription $500 per person
Dietary Laws Observed
Black Tie
Honorary Chairman.
Southeast Region
Ja, Webs
Chairman Dinner Chairman Director
Florida IUf0O Norman Braman Baa
Bhart MMll Dinner Co-chairmen
PHiUp Warren
Florida Division,
Committee for the
Institute of Science
430 Lincoln load / Soft* 509 / Miami Besch 33139 / Fhone: HHW
Israel Liaison
Sunder Cat. Moahe Diakhi


Pral.8-
'r>- Taw.,,'.* WnAin ntSlnt.TTT^-^
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, November 25,1933
Media's Double Standard
The tragic history of the Palestinian
people lies in the fact that when they are
slaughtered by their own people and other
Arabs, the world remains silent. Such as
has been the case clearly demonstrated by
the fierce fighting which has erupted in and
around the coastal Lebanese city of Tripoli,
50 miles north of Beirut.
Palestine Liberation Organization Chief
Yasir Arafat and several thousand of his
supporters engaged in combat with Syrian-
backed dissident members of the PLO. The
outcome is heavy with casualties: more
than a thousand civilians including women
and children are reported to have been
killed and wounded.
Arafat has been having difficult times
with his hold on the leadership of the PLO
since he was ousted from Beirut in the
summer of 1982. From there, he and his
entourage moved to various locations only
to take refuge near Tripoli. This, he did,
while at the same time becoming an in-
ternational media star, flirting with
President Reagan's Middle East peace
initiative and all the while claiming
unqualified victory for the Palestinians. He
was backed into a corner in Beirut and
finally into Tripoli. No matter what the
outcome, the events present a stark lesson
in international diplomacy.
The Arab states, contrary to public
statements, never paid much attention to
the Palestinian people.
The United Nations, which kept
busy last year condemning
Israel over and over again during the Peace
for Galilee operation, has not once called for
a UN session on the fighting in Tripoli.
The double standard applied to Israel
has again been demonstrated. The editorial
writers in Washington and Nv. w York have
been silent, and it takes little recall to
remember the vicious anti-Israel attacks
almost daily in American newspapers. The
movers and shakers in Washington have
been silent for their beloved Palestinian
leader and so have the many people who
organized protest marches last year and
took out full-page advertisements publicly
denouncing Israel. They are all silent now
when women and children are needlessly
killed.
No Specifics
'Common Interests' Were Discussed
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Lawrence Eagle-
burger, the Undersecretary
of State for Political Af-
fairs, during his visit to Is-
rael, discussed "strategic
cooperation" between the
United States and Israel by
looking at the "common
interests" of the two
countries not only in the
Middle East but on a global
scale, according to a senior
State Department official.
The official, briefing reporters
on the Eagleburger visit, refused
to discuss specifically what strat-
egic cooperation involved. He
said it required further discus-
sions which would be carried out
when Israeli Premier Yitzhak
Shamir visits Washington,
perhaps as early as this month.
BUT THE official seemed to
rule out two areas of cooperation.
He said the memorandum of
understanding on strategic co-
operation between the U.S. ind
Israel, which has been gathe ing
mothballs for nearly two ye rs.
was not even discussed.
The official also said there was
no discussion of joint Israeli-U.S.
military action in Lebanon. He
said there was no discussion of
getting Israel "back into the act'"
in Lebanon.
At the same time, the official
stressed that the U.S. stands by
the May 17 Israeli-Lebanese
agreement. "This is not an area
of disagreement between us and
the Israelis," he said. The official
maintained that Lebanese Pres-
ident Amin Gemayel also stands
by the agreement and if he should
decide he wants it renegotiated
he would find that the U.S. dis-
agrees.
HOWEVER, the official did
reveal one specific of Eagle-
burger's visit to Israel. The Is-
raelis were told that the U.S. will
approve using foreign military
aids funds for research and dev-
elopments of the Lavie, the plane
the Israelis want to build.
Strike, Violence Rock E. Jerusalem, W. Bank
By DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORP.FT
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A general strike in south
Lebanon, a shut down of
businesses in East Jeru-
salem and a wave of rock-
throwing incidents on the
West Bank reflected grow-
ing turmoil in the region
rather than political
motives.
The Lebanese who shut down
their shops, markets and banks
in the principal cities in the Is-
rael-occupied south were protest-
ing the closure of the Awali River
bridges, a precautionary measure
taken by the Israel Defense Force
following the truck bomb attack
on military headquarters in Tyre.
NO INCIDENTS were re-
ported apart from tire-burning in
some village streets. The IDF did
not intervene. The Awali bridges
were partially reopened yester-
day for pedestrian and limited
vehicular traffic under tight
security control.
On the West Bank, the popul-
ace was venting frustration and
rage against the Syrian-backed
attack on Palestine Liberation
Organization chief Yasir Arafat
who has been driven from his last
strongholds in the refugee camps
of northern Lebanon to the port
area of Tripoli, Lebanon's second
largest city.
Arafat and his loyalists are
clearly in trouble, outnumbered
m Jewish Floridian
Of South County
fim Snocnar
FBEDSHOCMET SUZANNE SMOCMET GEftl ROSENBERG
Editor and PuMiafiar Eaculiva Editor Na*a Coordinator
ruWWw* Waafcl. Mid-Saptoflibar tlwoun Mid-May. liWWi, balanca ot raar (41 iuumi
tnonrt CUM Poalaga Paid at Boca Raton. Fla US** 660-2(0ISSN 0274 IIM
BOCA RATON OFFICE 2200 N Fadarai May Suita 206. Boca Raton. Fla 3J432 Phona 366-2001
Main OHica Plant t20NE6tnSl Miami. Fla 33101 Phona 1373-4805
rillnmlir Muni Htm M71 to Jawtan FmmMMa. P.O. Sea 01-2673. MMaal. Fla. 13101
AdwttlMng Mraetor. Stad Laaaa>. Phona M* 1642
Comtunad Jawian Appaai-Souin County Jawian Fadoralion. Inc Olticar* Praardant. Mananna Bob*.*
Vica Praardanta. Marion* Baa*. Erie W. Oacmngar. Milton Kratafcy Sacratary. Arnold Roaanth.i
Traaaurar Beranica Schanfcarman. EraculivaOiraclor. RaoDt Bruca S Warahal
Jawiart Floridian doaa not guarantaa Kaahrutn of Marcrtandisa Advatiaad
umsr RIPTrON RATES toeal Araa 13 SO Annual (2 Yaar Minimum $7), by mamoonhip Soutft Count r
jJw^Fadarat>on.2200N FadwM My. Suita 206. Boea Raton. Fia 33432 Phona 36*2737
Out pi Town Upor^Raguaai_^_^_^^_^_i^-^^^>^_^-^^^^^______
19KISLEV5744
Number 39
Friday, November 25,1983
Volume 6
by PLO dissidents armed and
controlled by Syria. But he ap-
parently has the overwhelming
support of Palestinians on the
West Bank. The Organization of
Fiee Professionals in Beir Hanina
and the Federation of Labor
Unions, both important Pales-
tinian bodies on the West Bank,
called for a ceasefire in northern
Lebanon and denounced Syrian
intervention on the side of anti-
Arafat elements.
A Shaab and AI Fajr. the two
largest pro-PLO newspapers in
East Jerusalem, condemned what
they called "Syrian-Libyan ag-
gression" in Tripoli. Another
major Arabic newspaper, the
conservative Al Kuds, compared
the attacks on Arafat to the
Sabra and Shatila refugee camps
massacre in September, 1982.
THE COMMERCIAL strike in
East Jerusalem was nearly total,
and several schools remained
closed. A strike in Nablus was
less successful. Israeli troops
intervened there to curb stone-
throwing youths. Stones also
flew at Beir Zeit University and
at the Daheishe refugee camp
near Bethlehem where the Israeli
authorities imposed a curfew.
Arab affairs experts contended
that the general strike in south
Lebanon was called by El Amal,
the Shiite Moslem organization.
Meanwhile, Israel kept a watch-
ful eye on both Syria which
mobilized its reserves yesterday
and Tripoli where Arafat is under
heavy Syrian artillery, mortar
and rocket fire. Haaretz reported
today that Egypt has plans to
evacuate Arafat by sea and give
him haven, with Israel's tacit
consent.
Beirut was quiet today after
renewed fighting over the week-
end in which one U.S. Marine was
wounded. About 200 Marines left
their headquarters in Beirut and
were ferried to American troop
transports lying offshore. U.S.
sources said they were to be re-
patriated and replaced by a fresh
Marine contingent.
ISRAEL, for its part, has
taken no action likely to add to
the tensions in the region. Milit-
ary authorities insisted that a
call-up of reserves ordered
last week was a limited exercise
to test the efficiency of the mobil-
ization machinery and had no
warlike intentions.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
referred to the Syrian mobilize-
lion during a tour of south Leb-
anon. Israel, he said, threatened
nobody, and nobody need fear Is-
rael unless they have "hostile
designs on us." He said that as
long as there was danger to Israel
from Syria or PLO terrorists, Is-
rael had no alternative but to re-
main in south Lebanon. Terrorist
operations against Israel would
only make the day of departure
more distant, he warned.
Only last week. Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger, at
a Pentagon briefing for the Na-
tional Council of Young Israel,
said the U.S. opposes using the
military aid for this purpose but
would have no objection to econ-
omic aid being used for the Lavie,
Weinberger, who reportedly
has been the chief obstacle to the
needed U.S. approval to the
Lavie, has been opposed to the
efforts by Secretary of Statt
George Shultz for closer ties with
Israel, arguing that it would
harm U.S. relations with the
Arabs.
BUT THE senior State De-
partment official maintained that
this would not happen. He said
Eagleburger discussed U.S. rela-
tions with the Arabs with the Is-
raelis as well as Israels West
Bank settlement policy. Eagle-
burger stressed to the Israelis
that President Reagan's Sep-
tember 1982 Mideast peace ini
tiative "continues to be our
.policy."
The Israelis expressed several
concerns to Eagleburger. accord-
ing to the official. First they were
worried about Syria'*- increas-
ingly hardline" position, its ref-
usal to negotiate in Lebanon and
the "uncertainty as to the conse-
quences" of the continuing Sy-
rian military buildup much of it
with Soviet arms.
Eagleburger was also told of
Israeli concern that if the inter
mediate range nuclear force
(INF) talks in Europe fail the
Soviets might respond by caus-
ing trouble in the Mideast. The
official said the U.S believes that,
the more likely response by the |
Soviets would be in Europe.
THE EAGLEBURGER visit
grew out of a decision by Shamir
and Shultz that there should be
twice yearly meetings between
Eagleburger and David Kimche.
director general of Israel'
Foreign Ministry to discuss is-
sues other than the Middle East
Kimche was in Washington lift
priag, nd Eagleburger returned
the visit last week. But the situa-
tion last week placed the Midea* |
issue high on the agenda.
In addition to Lebanon and
Syria, the official said there *
great deal of talk about the so-1
viet Union, Central America, am
Africa. The official added to*
Grenada was discussed.
"The Israelis, uiuiketfj,
others, demonstrated a gooo*
of understanding of the i**""
for the President's decision to*
into Grenada, and equally unW
some others, demonstrsW'jfl
stantial understanding <*T\
strategic importance w5j
found on the island, the of**
said.


Friday. November 25,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
Mideast File Goes Online Worldwide
Tel Aviv University has just
i.,mched the first international
e database on the subject of
^Middle East: Mideast File,
"Ld and compiled by the
ffah Center for Middle East-
Jf and African Studies. This
Inputerized database, set up by
,he Center in 1979, is now availa-
ble online through Lockheed-
Dialog, the largest international
telecommunications company
nroviding scholars, diplomats,
Jurnalists and businesspeople
irith an instant, comprehensive
source of current information
about the region.
The file, which is also Israel's
first international online data-
base, is produced jointly by the
Shiloah Center and Learned
Information of Oxford, a sub-
sidiary of the Lockheed-Dialog
information network. It contains
some 28.000 items in the form
0f 85 word abstracts in English
_ gleaned from over 900 publica-
tions in seven languages: Arabic,
Hebrew, Persian, Turkish,
English, French and German.
Fourteen countries are
included covering the area
from Iran to Libya and from
Turkey to Sudan. Sources include
newspapers, magazines, journals,
radio and television broadcasts,
books, government publications
and documents, speeches, inter-
views, research reports and
legislation.
Mideast File was the
brainchild of Prof. Haim Snaked,
former head of the Shiloah
Center. Prof. Shaked, who is
currently serving as the director
of Middle Eastern Studies at the
University of Miami, foresaw the
growing demand for fast access
to specific data on this turbulent
area. It covers developments in
commerce, defense, economics,
education, foreign policy, law,
marketing, oil politics,
demography, science and
technology, agriculture, and a
variety of other subjects.
The f ile is updated monthly by
a team of 12 resource analysts at
the Shiloah Center's
Documentation Center, and some
12,000 new items are added to the
survey annually. Mideast File is
also available on magnetic tape,
on microfiche, and as a printed
quarterly journal. The quarterly
is priced at $60 a year for indivi-
^teaAj^i{l
HI IMtiJfl
SOUI
CRE
JASTI
duals, $150 for public institu-
tions, and $160 for private busi-
ness firms.
Tel Aviv University, the larg-
est institution of higher educa-
tion in Israel, is working on many
innovative projects. For further
information on the University,
please call the local office ol
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University in Boca Raton at 392
9186.
"**
. ,,
.*
"

hadore Herman
Herman Appointed
Chairman Of
Rainberry Bay
Isadore Herman has been ap-
pointed by Benjamin Bussin,
Family Division chairman, as the
chairman of the 1984 Federation
UJA Campaign in Rainberry
Bay. He returns in this capacity
having served as co-chairman of
Rainberry in both the 1982 and
1983 campaigns.
Herman has a Bachelor of
Commercial Science degree from
New York University and a
Master's and Law degree from
St. John's University in New
York City. In Brooklyn, N.Y., he
was an executive of the John
Hancock Life Insurance Co. and
a UJA campaign leader.
Before moving to Delray
Beach, Herman was involved in
Mallandale, Fla., on the con-
dominium campaign committees.
As chairman of Rainberry Bay,
Iz Herman has announced that
there will be a cocktail party
sponsored in Rainberry as an
educational, fundraising and so-
cial event. All Rainberry resi-
dents should watch for details of
this get-together to be held in the
beginning months of 1984.
Upon his appointment,
Herman Mid, "I look forward to
the moat successful campaign
year that Rainberry Bay has ever
had. With the restructuring ol
the Family Division and the
cooperation of all Jews in Rain-
berry Bay, the fruits of our ef-
forts wul be reaiisjad."
525*11 CREAMY f&!Z
If Sam Breakstone hadrrt been so
meshuggah about his sour cream
and cottage cheese in 1882, they wouldn't
taste so good today
100 yean ago, Sam Bwafctane had a lepuution for bemg a deni^^
A very demanding man.
Good wasn't good enough for Sam. His sour cream and cottage cheese had to
be as fresh, as natural, and as defiooos at they could potsfcly be.
And because Sam was so demanding then, his sour cream and cottage cheese
tastes so debcious now.
Right now, you can demand 10* off both Breakstone s scajr cream and cottage
cheese by redeeming these coupons.
CERTIFIED KOSHER
9HTEE2 00EHT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft, Inc. will reim-
burse you for the lace value of this
coupon plus It handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10< ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONES COTTAGE CHEESE
me&
COUPON
UK
.1
or wnere taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value 1/20* Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft, Inc.
Dairy Group. P.O. Box 1799. Clin-
ton. Iowa 52734.
143Q0 23214ft
SbEi22 OOEhT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft. Inc. will reim-
burse you for the face value of this
coupon plus It handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales Of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemr>>
ttons. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10* ON ANY SIZE
BMAKSTONESK)UR CREAM.
0 Kraft. ^1987
ioc!
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law. and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value 1/20*. Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft. Inc.
Dairy Group, P.O. Bos 1799. Clin-
ton. Iowa 52734.
14300 E2731S


. p*3-
'I'J.- U'.ArUJMBJL.LJL..-
Pw
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Novemh^r 9. JUy
i4f Villages of Oriole, the room is filled to capacity
the Hatikvah and the Star Spangled Banner.
as friends and relatives of honorees stand to sing
Orioles Celebrates 1983 Victory
Jack M. he vine, receiving his award from Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal,
executive director. South County Jewish Federation.
Left to right: Benjamin Bussin, Family Division chairman; and Al
Ostrich, chairman of Villages of Oriole.
Proud leadership was in
abundance as the Villages of
Oriole held its Awards Night
ceremonies on Thursday evening,
Oct. 27. Attending were 300
residents of Orioles, and key lay
leadership of the South County
Jewish Federation. All were
proud of the 70 volunteers who
were to receive awards.
The Orioles Campaign Chair-
man, Al Ostrick; Co-Chairman
Jack M. Levine and Associate
Chairmen, Bob Barnett of
Camelot, Baron Desnick of
Deauville and Dr. Ed Kingsley of
Abbey, all spoke highly of the
dedicated and tireless effort by
their fellow volunteers, which
resulted in a 66 percent increase
in contributions.
Gladys Weinshank, General
Campaign chairman of Federa-
tion, told the audience, "Orioles
has done an outstanding job and
is an example to all other com-
munities trying to improve their
campaigns."
Benjamin Bussin, 1984 Family
Division chairman, spoke of how
proud he was to be chairing a
Family Division of such com-
mitted and hard-working people.
"This year, the Family Division
of South County Jewish Federa-
tion will make a bigger impact on
the campaign than ever before,"
said Bussin.
Key speaker for the evening
was Harvey Grossman, Cam-
paign director of the South
County Jewish Federation, who
stirred up the audience with his
inspirational talk. Iz Siegel and
the Kings Point Glee Club then
provided soothing melodies to
Every Sunday
^sk
TOURLITE TO TEL AVIV
Lowest fares from Miami to Israel!
$T49* round tripone way from $449
via Arista International Airlines
Flying Arista on our quality scheduled charter flights from
Miami to Tel Aviv is inexpensive and convenient. Fly direct
from New Yorkb JFK to Tel Aviv. Your return trip allows you
a night in New York to visit family or friends or sightsee
until your connecting flight to Miami the following day.
And Tburlite International, one of New Yorks biggest and
most dependable tour operators, also offers scheduled club
charter flights between Miami and New York every
Wednesday and Sunday. Our fares are as low as $79
one way, slightly higher during the holidays.
Tel Aviv $749* round trip! New York as low as $79 one way!
'Fare applicable to all teals, all departure*, except Dec. 18th and 26th. Phis taxet
See your travel agent or
call Tburlite for the
lowest fares to Israel!
NYC (212) 599-2727
Toll-free (800) 223-7605
Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal, executive director. South County jeiBJ
Federation gives award to Al Ostrich, w'
entertain the group.
The Villages of Oriole is
gearing up for a successful 1964
campaign. All those interested i
helping should call the Fe
tion office at 368-2737.
AMERICA'S PLUMPEST PITTED PRUNES
\^
FAVORITE FIGS
AMERICA'S RAISIN CHOICE
They're Americo's favorite noshes. When you "&
one, you'll know why. Sunsweet*Prunes. Blue Ribbon rigs
ond Sun-Maid* Raisins each have a fresh, naturally
sweet taste you won't find anywhere else. Add them to
your holiday redpes for more flavor ond nutrition
Or nosh them whenever you hove the notion. They re
certified kosher!
Qy*yOamon6(MownalCo*oino 1960
. .
.... .


November**, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Paa7
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Page*.
Tfc..rcfc VlnrUinr, nlSin.tl i '-----1-1
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, November
Organizations in the News
HADASSAH
Hadassah Sabra, Boca-Light
houae Chapter invites you to
attend their second annual Cha-
nukah Party and gift boutique on
Monday, Nov. 28 at 6:30 p.m. in
the Community Room at Town
Center Mall. Loads of fun with
games, food and prizes. $5
donation per family. RSVP
Kathy 391-8998, Marsha 392-
1916 or Rachel 368-7977.
Hadassah Ben Gorton will hold
a Chanukah Party Lunch at
Stonewall "s Restaurant, Boca
Teeca on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at
12:30 p.m. The coat will be$6.60.
Members of Hadassah study
groups, their husbands and asso-
ciates are invited. After lunch,
there will be an open education
meeting chaired by Sylvia Lap-
pin. Her topic will be "Will Rus-
sia benefit by nuclear freeze?".
This luncheon meeting will take
the place of the usual Monday,
Dec. 6 meeting. For reservations,
please call 499-5972.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emetb-Sieterhood
presents "The Habimah Players"
on Saturday, Dec 3 at 8 p.m. at
the synagogue, 5790 W. Atlantic
Ave., Delray. This is a new
musicaUnarrative which presents
in song and dance the hopes and
aspirations of the Jewish people
through the centuries. All seats
are reserved and the cost is Mann
Sanctuary, $5, Winkk Hall (rows
1-5) $4, remaining rows $3. They
will also hold their next meeting
on Thursday, Dec. 1 at 12 noon
which will include a coffee hour
and Chanukah Program. A three
day trip. Dec. 6, 7, 8, to Epcot
Center is being planned. For in-
formation, call Rita Lewitas 499-
1769.
Temple Kmeth rWigioua
School is having a fun-filled Cha-
nukah Party on Sunday, Dec. 4.
Students, parents, grandparents,
teachers and guests are all wel-
come. For additional information
about Temple Kmeth Religious
School, please contact Joe Klein
499-8250.
TEMPLE SINAI
Temple Sinai-Sisterhood will
hold their next meeting on Mon-
day, Nov. 28 at 12 noon at the
American Savings Bank, Atlan-
tic Ave., Delray. The program
will feature a Panel Discussion
Automobile And
Homeowners
Policies From
Metropolitan
Yaa, now I can ofler you i
Ineur-
And you can gat the i
tent service from
KropafTy aoo
Company mat you've enjoyed
on your IHe Insurance from Met-
ropolitan Life.
Ill ba glad to talk with you about
QEORQE SCHREIBER
Sales Representative
BROWARD 473-1291
PALM BEACH 483-2101
fb Metropolitan
Ula'HeaKtv Auto, Home Retirement
Metropolitan
Property and Liability Ins Co.
Warwick, R. I.
led by Clara HUt, program chair-
person. Friends and guests are
invited. Refreshments will be
served.
Temple Sinai will have their
Thanksgiving Service on Friday,
Nov. 26 at 8:16 p.m. "Thanks-
giving Plus One" will be the topic
of Rabbi Samuel Silver's sermon.
The following Friday, Dec. 2,
8:IS p.m. the congregation will
celebrate the Feast of Dedication
with special prayers and the
blessing of candles in the candel-
abaum. Children of the religious
school, guided by Mrs. Marjorie
Aaron, Bernard Etish and Jack
Mandel will join in the conduct of
the ritual. These services will be
held at Cason United Methodist
Church, N. Swinton Ave., Del-
ray.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Temple Beth Shalom-Sister
hood will hold their next meeting
on Monday, Nov. 28 at 10 a.m. in
the Administration Bldg., second
floor, Century Village. The guest
speaker will be Professor David
Demko of FAU who will discuss
the "Process of Aging." The
meeting will start promptly at
10:00 and refreshments will be
served. For further information
please call Tillie 482-2783 or Syl-
via 482-7207.
ZOA I
Zionist Organization of Ameri-
ca will hold their next meeting on
Tuesday, Nov. 29 at 7:30 p.m. at
the American Savings Bank, At-
lantic Ave., Delray. The guest
speaker will be Ms. Bess Appel
who has BS and MS in science
and chemistry and education.
Her topic will be "Contributions
of Ancient Israel to our Modern
Society. Refreshments and
prizes.
ANSHEI EMUNA
Anahei Emtma announces the
subject of Rabbi Dr. Louis Sacks'
sermon to be delivered at the
Shabbat morning service on Sat-
urday, Nov. 26 commencing at
8:45 a.m. wll be "Success-A Bib-
lical Definition." The Sabbath
"Dialogue with the Rabbi" and
afternoon Sabbath Services begin
at 6 p.m.
Anahei Emona-Sisterhood will
hold a Chanukah Luncheon on
Sunday, Dec. 4 12:30 p.m.
Tickets are $5.50 each and can be
purchased by calling Rose Stam-
ler 499-1128, Bea Kleiner 499-
1339 or Helen Lasky 499-1964.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Boca Teeca Lodge
No. 3119 will hold their breakfast
meeting in the activities building
on Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 9:30 a.m.
Mr. Henry Goldfeld. Attorney at
Law will speak on "What Every
Florida Resident Should Know
About Wills."
B'nai B'rith Shomer Lodge No.
3122 will host a Chanukah Latke
Party on Sunday. Dec. 4 at 10
a.m. in the Administration
Building, upper level. The cost is
82.50 per person. Goldie Sussman
will be the guest entertainer
known for her Yiddish, Hebrew
and operatic repertoire. Latkes
will be served after the program.
Wives and friends are invited.
For further information, please
call 483-1120. 482-5856 or 482-
8017.
B'nai B'rith-Ruth Chapter will
feature a Day at Aventura on
Wednesday, Nov. 30. For details,
please call 499-4627. Yvette.
B'NAI ZION
B'nai Zion Harry Matinsky
and Simcha Chapters will hold
their monthly dance at Luigi's
Danceworld, 4850 W. Oakland
Park Blvd., Fort Lauderdale at
7:30 p.m. Coffee and Cake,
prizes, mixers, exhibition. Con-
tribution is $3.50.
JWV
Jewish War Veterans-Snyder
Tokson Post No. 459 Ladies
Auxiliary will host a paid-up
membership party in the club-
house party room on Sunday,
Dec. 4, 7:45 p.m. Purchase your
dance tickets, sign thern and a,
them to Rose Lewin 482-400?
Millie Newberger 483^
later than Nov. 28. No i
tions after that date. Ht
invited.
ORT
Women's American ORTr
ray will be holding a flea ra,
on Sunday, Dec. 4 at the Can
Bank, Atlantic Ave., MOj
Trail starting at 8 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El-StngW.
dially invites all Jewish Sii
to participate in this 5p
creative Chanukah ShL
Service at Temple Beth El
SW 4th Ave., Boca Raton at
p.m. on Friday, Dec. 2.
Percy
Continued from Page 1
of the U.S. arms sale to
Saudis.
On other topics, Percy ,
reported to have appeared
comfortable with a que
about why the U.S. did not in
its Embassy to Jerusalem.
said "the time was not ripe"
such a move and that he
not seek to push the Hra
Administration into such a <
it this time.
Ham
man
gnu
to your whole family
from thepeopk at Pubh.
_ May the spirit of the season bless
O you with peace, joy and love.
Publlx


Friday. November26, 1963
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
left to right: Marion .Merzer. staff associate;
Helene Eichler, assistant executive director; Al
Ostrick; Frances Sacks; Betty Stone, chairman;
Shirley Moskowitz; Harold Cohen, Jewish Com-
munity Center director; Harvey Grossman, Cam-
paign director. Members of Speaker's Bureau not
shown are: Marianne Bobick, Leo Brink, Shirley
Enselberg Freda Jaffe. Rose Rifkin, Gloria
Kosenthal and Rabbi Sam Silver.
Speaker's Bureau Starts 2nd Successful Year
me u.N.fouNP*TrON
The first organizational meet-
ing of the 1984 South County
Jewish Federation Speaker's
Bureau, was held on Monday,
Oct. 24. Betty Stone, 1984 chair-
>.ian of the Speaker's Bureau,
welcomed the enthusiastic group
of volunteers. The speakers are
extremely excited that this year
they will be! able to spread the
news about the new Jewish Com-
munity Center being opened by
the Federation.
Butty discussed this year's
philosophy by explaining, "We
are volunteers speaking for Fed-
eration because of the good work
it dues in the local community
and worldwide. We must keep
alive the true spirit of Judaism
l>y speaking about the beauty,
moral and ethics of the Jewish
Local Delegates
Attend ORT
Convention
Loral delegates, representing
ilu South Palm Beach County
Itegion, have just returned from
Women's American OUT's 27th
Biennial National Convention,
hild in l/)s Angeles. Calif.
Under a theme of "People Need
Technology Technology Needs
People," the delegates attended
commissions, workshops, com-
mit u-e meetings in an effort to
deliberate and focus on possible
methods of resolving the crises in
U.S. public education. The
convention highlighted the im-
portance and close interconnec-
tion between scientific advance
and vocational and technical
education.
The delegates had the oppor-
tunity of hearing first hand re-
ports from the ORT world from a
distinguished roster of guests in-
cluding Joseph Harmatz,
director-general, World ORT
Union; Joshua Flidel. director,
World ORT Union for Latin
America; Israel Goralnik. direc-
tor general ORT Israel; and Jules
Bloch, director-general, ORT
France.
Plans were discussed for Wom-
en's American ORT's moat
ambitious projects to date the
establishment of a major ORT
vocational and technical facility
on the West Coast, to be known
as LAOTI Los Angeles ORT
Technical Institute.
Members of the South Palm
Beach County Region delegation
included: Norma Heit, president
of the Region; Anita Kessler,
chairman of the executive com-
mittee; Natalie Berman. vice
president of Expansion; Kay
Freedman, vice president of Pub-
he Relations and Publicity.
Chapter presidents attending
were Evelyn Savino, Boca
Clades; Dorothy Kirschner, Del-
ray; Jill Kind, Boca-Delray Eve-
ning, and Frances Pinter, Deb-ay
Chapter member.
culture."
The Speaker's Bureau is a
service offered to the community
by the South County Jewish
Federation. Volunteer speakers
will talk to any community
organization about Jewish re-
lated subjects such as: Israel;
Federation and the local com-
munity; History of Jewish Mu-
sic, etc. If your organization or
group is interested in having a
Federation sponsored speaker,
?'lease contact the Federation of-
ice at 368-2737.
-%/TA
^ where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
ALL PUBLIX BAKERIES OPEN AT 0 AM
Sandwich
Rye or
Pumpernickel
Cinnamon
Raisin Rolls
B.*1"
Great for breakfast toast,
Plain English Muffins
Topped with creamy chocolate icing
Eclairs...................................3
Serve a delightful treat to your guests during the Holiday Season. Try our
frozen, ready to bake Gourmet Hors d'Oeuvres. All you do is bake and
serve. Six delicious varieties. Ask for information at your Bakery Dept A
great time saver for Thanksgiving.
Prices Effective
November 25th thru 26th, 1983
I


flaw a.
Page 10. .
TAe Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, WPVr2S. l^
Association for Welfare of Soldiers in Israel
On a windswept mountaintop
on the northernmost border of Is-
rael there is a watchtower. In it
several soldiers continuously
scan the horizon with binoculars.
Hour after hour they endure the
cold, the boredom and the isola-
tion to guard their country
against any surprise attack from
hostile neighbors.
Suddenly, a truck pulling a
generator appears on the road to
their tower. It is bright orange
and on its side it bears the words
"The Association for Welfare of
Soldiers in Israel." The young
soldiers put down their bino-
culars and shout: "The Associa-
tion is here!" Smiles appear on
their faces as they rush outdoors
to greet the vehicle.
From it emerges a driver and a
white haired woman, greetings
and good wishes for a happy
Hannukah are exchanged. The
Association volunteers bring out
brightly wrapped gift packages
and platters heaped with jelly
donuts, Israel's traditional
pastry for Hannukah. The sides
of the truck are opened to reveal a
television screen for watching
videotapes or a live broadcast;
there are stacks of books and
games which can be selected to
help pass the lonely hours. After
the gifts have been opened and
the coffee and donuts served,
pleasant conversation takes
place. The volunteers of A.W.S.I,
tell the soldiers how much the
people of the country and Jews
everywhere appreciate what they
are doing and how proud they are
of them. They also tell them how
aware they are of the difficulties
of duty in this isolated spot.
After an hour or so, they leave to
reach the next outpost before
dark.
Day after day, whether in the
cities or the far flung borders, the
Code Started Mobilization
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel Radio repeatedly
broadcast 14 code words Nov. 9 ordering military
reservists to report to predetermined assembly points.
The mobilization exercise for service personnel and
vehicles was planned some time ago, and military
spokesmen stressed it was not hostile in intent or a
response to the mobilization of Syria's reserves ordered
last week.
TH \T MESSAGE was directed especially toward
Damascus in an effort to reduce the tension which
escalated after the truck bomb attack on Israeli military
headquarters in Tyre. The Israelis held Syria responsible,
at least indirectly, but insisted that Israel was not
threatening any country.
Military spokesmen said the mobilization drill would
be of short duration.
"A Happy Chanuka
to All!"
FIDELITY'S) FEDERAL
SAVINGS BANK OF FLORIDA
659-9900
218 DATURA STREET
WEST PALM BEACH, FL 33401
ATTENTION ALL HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
If you are interested in working in the JCC Winter Day
Camp, December 26th through December 30th, please
contact Sarah Landa at 395-5546, or send in the attached
application.
Name_
-Age.
Phone Number,
Organizations or Clubs of which you are a member.
Association for Welfare of
Soldiers in Israel helps in dozens
of ways to make the life of Is-
rael's brave, young soldiers a
little easier. More importantly, it
is the presence and link with
civilian life that shows the
soldiers that they are appreciated
and loved by the Jewish people
everywhere.
The Association, now consist-
ing of over 13,000 volunteers in
Israel and supported by Jews and
non-Jews around the world, was
created forty years ago. It began
its work when Jews, in what was
then Palestine, organized the
Jewish Brigade to fight the Nazis
alongside the British Forces.
Since then, the Association has
with the blessing of the govern-
ment of Israel provided the sup-
port system that helps sustain
the high morale and splendid
spirit that has been the hallmark
of the Israel Defence Forces.
Clubhouses, rest and recrea-
tion centers, books and gift
parcels, religious articles, low
cost hotels in cities, roadside
shelters and canteens are but
part of the vast program the As-
sociation finances and admin-
isters to benefit Israel's young
men and women while they serve
their country.
Recently, the Association
embarked on its largest project to
date: namely, to provide an
educational program specially
suited for those from the less
developed countries. Ground has
been broken in the Upper Galilee
tor the AUon Educational Center.
Here, before basic training and
while they are in service, classes
will be held in basic skills such as
reading and writing, Jewish
history and the meaning of Israel
to the Jewish people. In addition,
those qualified will receive special
attention to prepare them for
entrance into the university
system. This latter program will
A Holiday package delivered by an AW SI volunteer.
help close the social and cultural
gap that now exists in Israel. As
part of its world wide effort a
third of the funds for the first
building, estimated at nine
million dollars, has already been
achieved. Some of Israel's best
young instructors volunteered to
teach there with no compensa-
tion. The Association with this
project, exemplifies the care and
concern that has won the appre-
ciation of all those who have
served in the Israel Defence
Forces.
If you would like to share your
Hannukah spirit this year with
these modern Maccabees, contri
butions may be sent to: The
American Friends of the Associa-
tion for Welfare of Soldiers in Is-
rael or the American Friends of
AWSI, 15 East 26th Street, New
York. N.Y. 10010. (Contributions
are tax deductible.) The Associa
(ion staff will also be pleased to
send literature or answer any re-
quest for additional information.
40 JtcvwUb Jftobke*- JLafowrt
582-1786
Edie
Nauen
Steve
Greenseid
Under North & South County Rabbinical Supervision
5801 Parker A ve W.P.B., FL 33405
NTY -^
^a\
OUTM'
COUNTY
J**"** I BOCA RATON
FfDOIATION I OELRAV BEACH
THERE!
1 HIGHLAND BEACH
a i
FLORIDA
V?^
The community Relations council
of
The South county Jewish Federation
in cooperation with
the sisterhoods of Temple Beth El A Temple Sinai
Present
ABRAHAM J. BAYER
Director, international commission, njcrac
providing an in-depth analysis
of the current situation regarding
Soviet Jewry
and
THE EPSTEIN BROTHERS, KLEZMOORIM
performing a musical ensemble of
Yiddish Melodies
DATi: Monday, December 12,1983
THAI: 7:30 p.m.
place: Temple Beth El
333 s.w. 4th Avenue. Boca Raton
Admission is free and open to
the entire community


Ifufrv. Novnbgr26'1968
T* Jews* Ploridian of South County
11
Temple Anshei Shalom
I Seated from left to right: Mildred Levine, Salome
\Noun, Marianne Bobick, president of South
County Jewish Federation; Joan Oottsegen,
Phyllis Squires, hostess; Sylvia Bradburd,
Marion Soft, Elinor RosenthaL Standing from left
to right: Sybil Mackson, Ed Bobick, Mission
chairman; Paul Noun, Jim Boer, Larry Oott-
segen, Abby Levine, Eugene Squires, host;
Margie Boer, James Singer, Rose Singer, David
Saft, Saul Bradburd, Arnold RosenthaL
A Gala Reunion Cocktail Buffet
The participant* of the Oct-
ober Mission to Israel from South
County Jewish Federation were
recently treated to a Gala Re-
union at the home of Eugene and
Phyllis Squires of Del Aire. A highlight of the evening was
. t -1 u..m a film taken by Arnold Rosenthal
A superb cocktail buffetwas durin the tri' whkh aUowed the
served to the Pjests who enjoyed h entinj
viewing their photographs of the Jjr
trip and reminiscing.
Yiddish TheaterA Joy Forever
By DAVID S. LIPSON
AT LAST after more years
I than I care to remember the
I Yiddish theater has come alive,
land WOW! The indefatigable
land magnificent Ben Bonus, ex-
luberantly supported by a stellar,
I enchanting cast of beautiful peo-
I pie, gives his all to an enthus-
iastic audience at the Norman
Thomas Theater in his "Ah Freil-
lichs" ("Let There Be Joy").
His amazingly inexhaustible
range covers nostalgic cantorial
I solos, clever ensemble spoofs of
I grand opera, to the sentimental
I staples of musical comedy. It is
I all done with irrepressible humor,
I exuberance, inventiveness, and
] infectious Yiddishkeit.
From the arousing, delightful
I overture brilliantly conceived by
William Gunther with klezmer
I highlights to a grand finale paen
Ito nationalism in Israel (I hasten
I to say it is done at the Western
I Wall without any corny banal-
Jity), the audience is completely
I enraptured. Even the original
backdrops are cleverly evocative
I by sensitive suggestion of a lov-
able era in Yiddish theater dom-
inated by the divine Kessler and
I Adler.
THE ZESTFUL opening
dance with inventive choreo-
graphy and an ensemble of charm
I and talent reveals how far Ben
Bonus has escaped from the
dismal routines of traditional
ghetto shund by having the stage
explode with modern Jewish
[youth rooted in undying trad-
' ition. In this production "youth"
is not limited to the unusually
good-looking, professionally
expert chorines and the gifted
dynamism of the male chorus,
but also to the excitement gen-
erated by the ageless team of Ben
Bonus and Mina Bern.
His medley of Yiddish songs
and characterizations has
"heimischeh" lilt that makes one
melt in nostalgia. A wooing scene
from Sholem Alekhem's "The
Big Winner" (music by Secunda)
reveals not only the refreshing
vtvaciouaness of Eleanor Reisse,
the endearing juvenile hero qual-
ity of Bernardo Hitter, but alerts
one to the thrilling revelation of
David Rogow's hitherto hidden
versatility as comedian, uperb
singer, and eccentric dancer
for he's previously played the
elf-effacing, maladroit shnook.
Again, thank you Ben Bonus for
the exhibition of Rogow's many
talents.
The entire production is
redolent with the delicious sweet-
ness of "momma loschen" so that
the audience spontaneously
entered into an occasional sing-
along. The "Blessing of the
Candles" rises above the tradi-
tional "bubbetchkeh" schmaltz
because of the angelic voices of
Jerri Ann Frank and Eleanor
Reissa as well as Tony Masulo's
choreography of the beautiful
dancers in an unobtrusive
obbligato. The scene would
convert the most rabid
"apakoerus." Like the entire
production, the scene rose above
banal, maudlin melodrama.
In an "Ideal Wife," a comedy
murder mystery, starting with
but avoiding the dreary battle of
the sexes, the pungent wit and
inspired acting of Mina Bern and
the uninhibited bravura perfor-
mance of Ben Bonus and the in-
spired David Rogow, the surprise
ending is hilarious. But one must
underscore that the most or-
dinary plot becomes a vehicle for
the most zany inspiration that
never loses the verisimilitude of
authenticity.
PART OF Yiddish theater-
going is the encounter with a
robust audience. At the Norman
Thomas, the audience is com-
posed of the best devotees
("Pattrioten") of the Yiddish
Theater. But at intermission one
is buffetted by a barrage or bar
rier of bumping, buxom bosoms
bless them!
ously provided in happily apt
rhyme by the ever-amazing and
gifted Miriam Kressyn. If not the
Nobel or Pulitzer Prize, surely
there must be the equivalent of
the Tony awards for Miriam
Kressyn and Ben Bonus!
It is likely that Ben Bonus will
take his troupe on tour through-
out America. If it reaches your
city, you'd best get your reserva-
tions well in advance.
JTA Feature
Continued from Page 1
shippers now are beginning to
sense the feeling of the beginning
semblance of a permanent home
a Temple of their own the
prospect of terminating the trials
and tribulations of
"Banidbar the blessings of
no longer wandering in the
Desert of Delray.
Quite understandable was the
apprehension of Temple Board
members, when Leadership pro-
posed purchasing the six acre
land parcel for $200,000. It was
just over a year ago that the
Temple Board voted approval of
the land purchase. August 18,
1983 is recorded as the "Chai"
date when the last and final pay-
ment for the land was made.
With another 18th, this one in
December, for Ground Breaking,
it become two times "chai"
double "Mazeldick."
In the beginning, there was s
membership of 5. Temple mem-
bership has grown to 550. A
Sisterhood and Brotherhood,
organized in the interim, boast of
360 and 128 members, respec-
tively. Temple membership is not
a prerequisite for joining either
the Sisterhood or Brotherhood.
The roots of Anshei Shalom
have spread far beyond the
original Oriole oriented organiza-
tional oligarchy. Residents of
Condo communities near and far
are joining the Temple at an ac-
celerated pace. They are from
Kings Point, High Point, Palm
Greens, Leisureville, Crosswinds,
Pines of Delray, Rainberry Bay
and further north, from Lake
Worth. West of the Temple site,
between Florida Turnpike and
441, residential developments are
known to be projected. West,
North, East and South of the
Ground Breaking site, Anshei
Shalom is now serving a
burgeoning Jewish population.
JORDAN MARSH
WISHES YOU
A HAPPY CHANUKAH
In the tradition of the holiday season, Jordan Marsh
extends to you our sincerest wishes for a truly grand
eight-day Chanukah celebration.
FLORIDA
####&####
The second act is happily dom-
inated by Ben Bonus and the
ever-lovable Mina Bern. Their
first number, "The Blue Ker-
chief," is sn unsbashed, trscly
piece of schmaltz, but in such
sensitive and loving taste that I
joined the audience's cheers. And
in their "Tevye in America,
David Rogow is the flamboyant
Menachim Mendel luftmensch.
while Ben Bonus is Tevyeh and
Mina Bern is Goldeh.
Indeed, how would the original
Teveyeh and Goldeh react to
Broadway's version of the
Sholem Ateichem classic? With
authentically clever insight into
the originsl characters, Ben
Bonus provides a aide-splitting
comedy sketch.
THE CONTINUITY is felidt-

A $1,000,000 buDding is
planned with landscaping and
adequate parking facilities. The
dominant feature of the building
will highlight the Sanctuary. It is
planned as a 470 seat, all purpose
facility in one section, and an ad-
joining 250 seat Kiddush area in
the other section. Seven hundred
twenty seats for worshippers is
the total. There will be a fully
furnished Chapel, seating 75, for
daily, weekday, "Minyonim."
The fund raising campaign to
garner the $1,000,000, has been
launched. Construction must
begin as quickly ss possible.
A "Chai" weekend has been
designated to coincide with the
Sunday, Dec. 18 Ground Break-
ing, where an attendance of 1,000
is anticipated.
At 8 p.m. Friday, Dec 16, ser-
vices will begin et the W.
Atlantic Avenue and Carter Road
Branch of the Carteret Bank.
Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal, Execu-
tive Director of the South County
Jewish Federation will officiate.
It will be sponsored, with an
Oneg Shabbat following services,
by the Temple Sisterhood. Satur-
day, Dec. 17, will have services
begin at 9 a.m. The Temple
Brotherhood will sponsor the
Kiddish.
Please bring your own chairs to
the 1:30 p.m. Ground Breaking
on Dec. 18. Ushers will be availa-
ble to arrange seating. Guides
will be stationed at strategic
points to direct traffic to desig-
nated parking spots.
The public is invited to part-
icipate in all phases of the Simcha
each day.
The Temple administrative of-
fice is located at 14600 Cumber-
land Drive, .across from the Ten-
nis Courts, and adjacent to the
Oriole Golf Course. The phone
number is 495-0466.


v
Use your Jordon Marsh charge cord, AmerkSnExprw. Dtnrt Club. W wtcom* thm oil!


PmR
4 -
"mxZKTA
-.V

Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, November liny, N
Emeth Israel Bonds
Temple Emeth's Israel Bond
Campaign is honoring on Jan. 11,
1984 Arthur Lucker, President of
the Brotherhood, Anne Katz,
representing the Temple, and
Adeline Kamen, of Sisterhood,
for their dedication and services
to the Temple.
Dear Counselor
Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Boca Raton is an
agency operated and funded by
South County Jewish Federation.
Counseling is provided for indivi-
duals, couples, families, and
groups.
Jewish Family and Children's
Service has received many letters
from persons who are having dif-
ficulty coping with situations in
their lives.
Jewish Family and Children's
Service will present a representa-
tion of these letters with identify-
ing information changed to
protect the privacy of the corre-
spondents. This column will ap-
pear from time to time on these
pages.
Write to: Jewish Family and
Children's Service, 3200 TV. Fed-
eral Highway, Boca Raton, Flor-
ida 33431, or Call: 395-3640.
Dear Counselor:
I have been suffering with
herpes for two years now. I am
having a lot of trouble coping,
and find it hard to get myself to
go out on dates. I am so afraid
I'll be rejected that I find I am
isolating myself. Is there any-
where I can get help with my
problem?
Sincerely,
o. I .
Dear S.T.
I can understand how difficult
the past two years must have
been for you. Isolating yourself
has not been helpful to you and
has only left you more alone with
your problem.
Although herpes is not life-
threatening, people often react in
negative ways when they contact
the disease. This anxiety often
inhibits their ability to cope. If
you are constantly worrying
about the disease, thinking of
yourself as less worthy, expe-
riencing depression, withdrawing
from others, and searching
frantically for a cure, then you're
suffering from the herpes stress
reaction. This stress reaction ag-
gravates painful feelings and
adds to self-defeating behavior.
It is most helpful for people
suffering from herpes to be able
to talk about their feelings, and
find more productive ways of
coping. Perhaps this would be a
good time for you to explore your
feelings.
Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Boca Raton is current-
ly offering a support group for
herpes sufferers, that meets twice
a month. The group is opened to
new members and you can obtain
more information by calling 395-
3640.
Sincerely,
NANCY A. FELDMAN,
ACSW
Are You A Teenager
Between The
Ages of 14-18?
Are you Jewish? Do you like to
have fun? If you can answer 'yes'
to these three questions then the
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
(BBYO)isforyou!
BBYO is an international Jew-
ish youth organization with
members in the United States,
Canada, Israel, South Africa,
France, and Russia. BBYO is
sponsored by the International
Order of B'nai B'rith, along with
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Found-
ations on college campuses, and
the men's lodges of B'nai B'rith,
the women's chapters of B'nai
B'rith Women, and the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Boys are members of the Aleph
Zadik (AZA). while girls belong
to B'nai B'rith Girls (BBG), In-
dividual members form chapters
with other members who live
nearby, planning and holding
activities with the assistance of a
volunteer advisor. Typical chap-
ter programs could include a
dance, trip to a beach or state
park, house party, visit to a nurs-
ing home, or playing in a sports
league.
Summer programs are
sponsored on an international
level, including trips to Israel and
leadership training seminars held
in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.
A new chapter is forming in
Boca Raton come, be a part of
the excitement! The first meeting
of this new chapter took place on
Sunday evening, Nov. 13. For
further information, please
contact: Bennett Lorman, assis-
tant regional director, 581-0218.
MAZEL TOV
you just started thinking about establishing an En-
dowment Fund Legacy, and/or Trust. The South
County Jewish Federation is available to assist and
to explain In the philanthropic, estate, and other
tax advantages of endowing your own fund.
*******
SOUTH
COUNTY -i*i
JEWISH BOCA RATON
FEDERATION I DELRAY BEACH
368-2737
. HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
Endowments: A special tool for special purposes
Arthur Lucker was in the retail
furniture business for 50 years.
He retired as store director from
Saks in New York.
Arthur received his bachelors
degree in Accounting and
Economics from City College of
New York. He then earned an
advanced degree in Business
Management, Sales and
Decorating.
Arthur and his wife Gerry
retired to Delray Beach six years
ago. They have been married for
49 years.
Arthur has been involved in
community life both in New York
and in Delray Beach. In New
York he was president of Foster
Parents Committee of Jewish
Child Care, Association. He
originated this committee and
through this committee the
adoption of foster children was
drafted into legislation in New
York State. He was a
commissioner for the Boy ScoutH
in New York, arbitrator for the
Better Business Bureau in the
Furniture Division, and received
the John F. Kennedy Medal as an
award for outstanding citizen-
ship.
Arthur is the President of the
Brotherhood of Temple Emeth
(also a life member) and on the
Temple's Board of Directors. He
was the 1984 Chairman for the
UJ A drive at Temple Emeth.
Anne Katz was introduced to
singing for audiences by her
father. All through school
singing was a large part of her
life. She met her husband Ben at
a choral society and he
encouraged her to continue with
private lessons.
Anne won the Arthur Godfrey
Talent Show and was asked to fly
to Boston to audition for Boris
Goldofsky to sing and study at
Tanglewood. Personal problems
kept Anne from accepting.
Anne became a soloist at
various temples and also sang on
Radio Station WEVD. She
remained with the ratio station
for 22 years and then became the
Comptroller to their Finance
Department.
Anne moved to Delray in 1976
tnd became involved with
Temple Emeth. Under Anne's
eadership Temple Emeth
leveloped an outstanding choir
well known not only to the temple
jut to the community at large.
Anne feels that music has
helped to make life more
beautiful.
Adeline Kamen is a native of
Brooklyn, New York. After
graduating from Brooklyn Col-
lege she worked full time for Fed-
eration of Jewish Charities at the
hospital for Joint Diseases in
their Social Service Department.
Adeline married her husband
Leon in 1940 and had four
children. She became involved in
PTA, Cub Scouts and Brownies.
She also became active in B'nai
B'rith and held numerous
positions with them.
Both Adeline and Leon have
always been concerned with the
Jewish people and Israel. During
Israel's Silver Jubilee they were
honored by B'nai B'rith for their
endeavors on behalf of the State
of Israel. They have for many
years dedicated themselves to
Israel Bond Drives.
When Adeline's youngest child
was 10 she returned to the
business world and worked in
Marketing Research for 15 years
where she became Field Super-
visor.
Adeline is President of the
Sisterhood of Temple Emeth,
Board Member of the Royal Palm
Audubon Society, and one of the
founders of the Loxahatchee
Natural History Association.
Temple Emeth Bond Chair-
man, Leo. E. Brink, stated: "It is
with great pleasure that we pay
tribute to three such deserving
members of our Temple."
Arthur Lucker, center; Adeline Kamen, left; and Anne Katz, right
*****
**
II
CALCALIM
II
Sponsored by the Jewish community center
of South county
December 6,1983 7:30 P.M. fau Theatre
Tickets: $ 8.00 ODen Seatlnq
$50.00-Patron Ticket
(to include reserved seats
and ca tered cock tail party
with performers)
Croup Rates Available
For Further information and Tickets, Please contact
Marianne Lesser at 395-5546

From the directors,
officers and staff
of
Flaglei;
National
Bank
Hphone
659-2265
Thomas E. Roeein
President
Mtmbtr P D I C


L,y, November 25, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 13
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***.
Th..lnimU VUr,A,nr,lKnt\, ) >______
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Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of South County
-*
Friday, November26. 19J
A Rabbi
Comments
The following is brought to
Floridian readers by the South
County Rabbinical Association.
If there are topics you would like
our Rabbis to discuss, please
submit them to the Floridian.
Rabbi Samuel Silver
TAKE A QUIZ
By RABBI
SAMUEL M. SILVER
A rabbi once said to his congregation, "If you were arrested
for being Jewish would there be enough evidence to convict you?
To stab at that question and to provide you with a little
refresher in Judaism, try these questions:
1. Identify: a) Rashi b) The Rambam, c) The Besht
2. What is the significance of each of these dates in Jewish
history? a) 586 before the Christian Era, b) 70 of this era, and 3)
1492 of this era.
3. Where in the Bible would you find: a) The Ten Command-
ments, b) "Love thy neighbor as thyself," c) "Love the Lord
with all your heart and strength and might."
4. Who had the vision of the Valley of Dry Bones?
5. Name the presidents of the modern State of Israel? Name
the prime ministers.
6. Hebrew names are words which have meanings. What do
the following word-names mean: a) Moses (Moshe), b) Joseph
(Yosef), c) Daniel?
7. Explain: a) Shmoneh Esreh, b) Haftarah, c) Havdalah
8. What's the difference between Kiddush, Kaddish, Kdusha,
Kiddushin?
9. Describe: a) Lag b'Omer, b) Tu Bishvat, c) Simchat Torah
10. Who told someone the gist of Judaism while he stood on
one foot?
How did you do? Are you convicted? To check up, see your
nearest rabbi.
Yiddish Nite At B'nai Torah
Congregation B'nai Torah,
1401 NW 4th Ave., Boca, will
present a night of Yiddish en-
tertainment on Saturday, Dec. 3
at 8:15 p.m. Headlining the
evening of Yiddish music and
comedy will be the very funny
Charlotte Cooper.
Ms. Cooper has appeared on
the Yiddish stage from the Cat-
skills to Miami Beach. The
evening is designed to appeal to
the Yiddish speaking audience,
but it will be an evening that all
can enjoy.
Tickets are now available at
the synagogue office at $7.50.
Tickets will be $10 at the door.
For additional information or to
order tickets call the synagogue
at 392-8566.
Charlotte Cooper
The 1983 Covenant of Peace Awards of the Synagogue Council
of America, representing the congregational and rabbinic
bodies of Conservative. Orthodox, and Reform Judaism serving
4 million congregants and rabbis, were presented last week
at a gala at the New York Hilton Hotel to J. Morton Davis,
president of D. H. Blair A Co., Lawrence, N. Y.; Ambassador C.
Habib, San Francisco; Lane Kirkland, president, AFL-CIO,
Washington; and philanthropist Max. M. Fisher, Detroit.
Shown here are Rabbi Herbert Baumgard, first vice president,
SCA, who delivered the invocation. Ambassador Habib, and
Rabbi Mordecai Waxman, SCA president
Hartford's Project Renewal Partner City
Delivers Torah to Temple Hit By Arson
Four months ago, several
Torahs of the Emanuel Syna-
gogue in West Hartford, Conn.,
were reduced to ashes when the
ark and the synagogue's chapel
were set on fire. It was one of a
series of arson attacks on area
synagogues and homes of Jews.
There is a $50,600 reward for
information leading to an arrest
of the arsonist or arsonists. The
money was donated by the State
of Connecticut and by many
community organizations.
And now in the true spirit of
the partnership that has been de-
veloped between Jewish Federa-
tions and their "twin" Project
Renewal cities, the congregation
of Emanuel Synagogue received a
Torah from their twin city, Afula,
a city of 21,000 southeast of
Haifa that had its beginnings
in 1924 as a refugee village.
Later, like the neighborhoods of
Kfar Saba, the twinned Project
Renewal city of the Jewish Fed-
eration of Greater Fort Lauder-
dale, the city housed survivors of
the Holocaust and still later
Jewish immigrants from Asia
and Africa.
The presentation of the Torah
was made by the Mayor of Afula,
Ovadia Eli, at a ceremony Sun-
day Nov. 13 at the synagogue.
Susan Chira, in a special report to
The New York Times, wrote:
The congregation of the
Emanuel Synagogue rose as the
Mayor of Afula walked down the
aisle to the ark, holding the
Torah to his chest as he would a
child. The synagogue's rabbi
placed the 100-year-old scroll a
gift of the people of Afula to the
people of the Hartford area in
the ark.
The walls and floor of chapel
were still charred black and the
smell of smoke hung in the room,
but in the main sanctuary of the
synagogue there were tears of re-
birth and joy on the faces of
congregants.
When the citizens of Afula
Bat Mitzvah
heard about the arson attacks,
they decided to give up one of
their Torahs, according to Mayor
Eli. Speaking through an inter-
preter, Marilyn Grant, who lives
in Afula and coordinates Project
Renewal, Mayor Eli said: "It was
a very traumatic thing for them.
They were very afraid for their
brothers and sisters in Hartford.
We're one family and one body,
and when there's a sore on the
arm or leg, the whole body
hurts."
Facing the standing congrega-
tion after the Torah was placed in
the ark, the Mayor told them:
Rikki Spinner
RIKKI SPINNER
On Saturday, Nov. 26, Rikki
Spinner, daughter of Felice and
Glenn Spinner, will be called to
the Torah of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton as a Bat Mitzvah.
Rikki is a student at Boca
Raton Academy and attends the
Temple Beth El Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
Simcha are sister. Carrie, and
brother, Ivan; grandparents
Corinne and Arthur Burstein of
Boca Raton, Mrs. Phoebe Spin-
ner of Lauderhill, and great-
grandmothers. Mrs. Lena Bur-
stein of West Palm Beach and
Mrs. Anna Dreierof New York.
Also present will be Mr. and
Mrs. I. Lerner and Mr. and Mrs
M. Sobel of New York, Mr. and
Mrs. I. Brucker of Memphis,
Tenn., Heidi, Amy, Michelle and
Paul Lerner, ad Elaine and Sena
Lynn Brucker. Rikki's hobby is
tennis. Mr. and Mrs. Spinner will
host a Kiddush in Rikki's honor
following Shabbat morning serv-
ices.
"The Torah was the greatest H
any people ever received. As nl
expression of love or concern and
of true fellowship, we, yo^l
family in Afula, present to you I
the people of Hartford thai
Torah. May we be bound J
closer by it."
Emanuel's Rabbi Gerald Zel J
myer said: "The matches T
aimed at the root of Judaism
Torah. But we have proven ou
ability to take it (the ana
attacks |. The people will lK-eon
will endure."
Community Calendar
November 28
Temple Beth Shalom, 10 a.m.
Sisterhood, 12 noon meeting
meeting Temple Sinai-
November 30
Women's American ORT-Sandalfoot, 1:30 p.m. meeting South
County Jewish Federation Board meeting, 8 p.m.
December 1
Jewish We Veterans-Snyder Tokson Post 459, 10 a.m meeting'
Hadassoh-Sabra, 8 p.m. meeting South County Jewish
Community Day School Chanukah Family Night, 7:30 p.m.
December 4
B'nai B'rith North Pines Lodge meeting B'nai B'rith Shomer
Lodge No. 3122 meeting and Chanukah Party, 10 a.m.
Hadassah-Delray Bonds Drive, 1:30 p.m. at Temple Emelh
Candlelighting Time
0 '.
A
Friday, Nov. 25-5:11 p.m.
Light Chanukah candles before
' *S*~X Shabbat Candles are lit.
4$' ][ ]{ Friday, Dec. 2-5:11 p.m.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
11401 NW. 4th Ave., Boca Raton. Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday it
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
I Minyan on Monday and Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEIEMUNA
116189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd.. Delray
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks.
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:46 a.m. Sabbath Torah claw 5
I p.m. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan
Association Office, West Atlantic, corner Carter Road, Delny
Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m.
and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman. President 499-6687. Temple
Office 14600 Cumberland Drive, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446,
Phone 495-0466. Rabbi Emeritus Jonah J. Kahn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
1383 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton. Fla. 33432. Reform
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler. Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
I Month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015. Boca Raton. Fla. 33434
Conservative. Located in Century- ViuagerBeca..Dailv Serv**
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m. and 5:15 p.m., Sunday
8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Reuben Saltzman. President. Joseph M
Pollack, Cantor, 483-5557.
tmmurUL EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Fla. 33445. U
servatiye. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A Silver. Rabbi; Nafttly
A. Linkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 pm,
Saturday at8:45 a.m.. Daily Minyans at8:46a.m. and5pm
TEMPLE 8INAJ
Cason United Methodist Church. 342 N. Swinton Ave. (con*
Lake Ida Rd.|. Delray Beach. FL Reform. Mailing Address: PXJ
Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m. R*1*1
Samuel Silver^ President Samuel Rothstein, 276-6161.


Friday. November 25^ 1963
Judd Hirsch
1 he Jewish Floridian of South County
Pagel5
Doing a CJmnukah Narration
By ROBERTA REBOLD
And SARA WURTZEL
JERUSALEM -
Actors are storytellers,
and I can't help but be one.
I especially enjoy narrat-
ing, because I can shape the
whole story." Tanned and
bearded, his easy-going
manner punctuated with
outrageous imitations and
touching anecdotes, Judd
Hirsch was relaxing with a
cigarette in a Jerusalem re-
cording studio.
Having completed work on the
film version of Herb Gardener's
The Goodbye People," he had
flown to Israel for a few days to
record the narration of "Lights,"
a Chanukah TV special being
produced by Gesher's Jerusalem
Productions.
WE WONDERED what
moved him to doing an animated
fantasy adventure, something
very different from what are
probably his best-known roles as
(he less than whimsical Dr.
Berger in "Ordinary People," or
a* (he sardonic Alex of prime
time sit com "Taxi."
What struck me about this
script is that it leaves you with a
thought. I was interested by the
film s theme the right to be
different." continued Hirsch, who
was pleasantly surprised that the
miiiml track for the 30-minute
hIiuu would be taped in Israel.
There's something to say for
lining this particular film here.
Sure, a I! recording studios are
basically the same, but I know
that outside that door," he
gestured toward the soundproof-
ed, bolted entrance, "out there
it's not New York or L.A. Some-
thing completely different is
going on out there, and it affects
me."
The recording of the "Lights"
narration brought the star on his
second visit to Israel. He first
came here two years ago to film a
series on the history of
civilization. In taking part in
that project, Hirsch said he
learned more than he'd ever
known about Jewish history, and
came to feel that he would some-
how visit Israel again. "I always
knew I would come to Israel be-
cause of my birth and 'family'
even though I have no relatives
here."
WITH A warm and straight-
forward yet streetwise manner,
Hirsch could be anyone's uncle
from the Bronx. His life story is
familiar: the son of poor immi-
grant parents who "made good."
Born "a while back" to a Russian
mother and Dutch-English fath-
er, Hirsch went the route of many
New York Jewish youngsters.
He reminisced about his own
Jewish education. Although he
attended Hebrew school, the only
Hebrew he remembers are the
words his teacher barked on his
daily entrance: Shvu Yashar! (Sit
up straight).
Like other Jewish American
families, the Hirsch's observed
only the most basic aspects of
Judaism. Judd Hirsch remem-
Ikts Passover seders as a time of
levity, humor, and family togeth-
erness. "It wasn't until recently
that my 80-year-old father has
caught up with the seriousness of
being a Jew," said Hirsch.
HIS MOTHER, whom Hirsch
described as being "much more in
the Jewish idiom," conducted
what appeared to be a mysterious
ritual. Every Friday afternoon,
she'd temporarily retreat from
the family bustle. Leaving ques-
tions of "What's for dinner,
Mom?" unanswered, she'd rise to
light candles and silently mouth
a prayer. Then, without a word
of explanation, without missing a
beat, she'd resume her role
"pot roast tonight."
Easily imaginable as a class
clown, Hirsch didn't embark on
his acting career until the age of
25. Although he has a degree in
physics from New York's City
College, he admits that he just
wasn't satisfied with his first job.
"I started to work as an engineer,
but I knew I was kidding myself.
Then I took a small acting calas,
and all of a sudden, things came
together," he smiled.
Hirsch clearly delights in
telling about his professional
debut as an actor. His job was to
entertain the tourists in a Rocky
Mountain park by staging a kind
of wild west street theater. "Mel-
lerdramas," he chuckled. "That's
what they called them. I was
JUDD HIRSCH: 'actors are storytellers'
always the villain. My entire
costume consisted of a pair of
sneakers and a cape." With more
than a touch of pride he added,
"Two-gun showdowns were our
specialty."
Dr. Mordecai Kaplan
Passes Away at Age 102
Arabs Bilked U.S.
Customers of Billions
NEW YORK (JTA)-
Dr. Mordecai Kaplan, the
founder of the Reconstruc-
tionist movement and con-
sidered one of the most in-
fluential scholars in the his-
tory of Judaism, died Nov.
8 at the Hebrew Home for
the Aged in Riverdale, N.Y.
He was 102 years old.
Many of the key developments
in Jewish life today are based on
concepts Kaplan developed
during his long career
concepts like the organic Jewish
community, Judaism as a
religious civilization with its
spiritual center in Israel, the syn-
agogue center and summer camp
movements, Jewish community
centers, the public celebration of
Rat Mitzvah, and an American
version ol the European self-gov-
erning Jewish community
Ikehilla).
KAPLAN'S ideological history
was one of a struggle between the
Orthodox beliefs he was taught
and by which he lived, until he
decided that such a Jewish out-
look was incompatible with the
outlook of Jews born and raised
in the unique freedom of Ameri-
can life. Out of that struggle, the
Reconstructionist philosophy
emerged. He was denounced by
the Orthodox who put him in
herem (excommunication), a
somewhat less than drastic ban
in an open society.
Kaplan originally developed
Reconstructioniam not as
another branch of Judaism but as
a stimulation to thinking in non-
Orthodox forums. His ideas pro-
foundly influenced Reform and
Conservative Judaism. But the
pressures for change which his
teachings generated led to the
crystallization of the movement
in its own institutions.
One was the Society for the
Advancement of Judaism (SAJ),
the pilot Reconstructionist con-
gregation in Manhattan, which
Kaplan founded and served as
rabbi even while continuing his
teaching duties at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America
and his busy schedule of writing
and lecturing.
KAPLAN ALSO founded the
Reconstructionist Rabbinical
College in Philadelphia and
taught in it. The Reconstruction-
ist movement also has a network
of congregations in many parts of
the United States and Canada, in
addition to the Mevakshei
Deruch synagogue in Jerusalem,
and i> own journal, "The Recon-
structionist."
With the publication in the
1930s of his major work. "Juda-
ism as a Civilization," Kaplan
delineated the basic structure of
his outlook, in which he defined
the elements of an "evolving reli-
gious civilization." This was to
be developed in his prolific
writing over many decades. A
bibliography of his printed works
on the occasion of his 100th
birthday included over 700 items.
Born in Lithuania, Kaplan
came to the U.S. with his parents
at the age of eight. A student at
the JTS from the age of 12,
Kaplan was ordained in 1902 and
began to serve as "minister" of
Congregation Kehilath Jeshurun
in New York. Later be became
the rabbi there after receiving his
ordination on a trip to Europe in
1908.
Kaplan was considered an in-
tellectual giant and was one of
the key figures, along, with Judah
Magnes, Israel Fnedlander and
Season Benderly. ^e^l.
opment of vanous intellectual
circles in New York before World
War I. One of his earliest acts
was the founding of Young
Israel.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Rep. Clarence
Long (D., Md.), who has
been the target of a radio
commercial by an Arab
group for his leadership in
providing U.S. aid to Is-
rael, has charged that the
Arab oil-producing
countries have "extorted"
billions from the U.S.
"Isn't it ironic that Arab-af-
filiated organizations are com-
plaining when the OPEC nations
have extorted $335 billion in ad-
ditional revenues from American
consumers as a result of the oil
price increases begun in 1973,"
Long said as he received the
Emunah Women of America's
Man of the Year award in New
York last Wednesday night.
"That's almost twice as much as
the current U.S. deficit."
LONG SAID the radio com-
mercial, sponsored by the Na-
tional Association of Arab Amer-
icans (NAAA) which attacks
U.S. aid for Israel and Long for
supporting this aid, "is hate
campaign."
The 74-year-old chairman of
the House Appropriations Com-
mittee's subcommittee on foreign
operations has been a leading
proponent in Congress of provid-
ing aid to Israel. "Our support of
Israel is not only baaed on moral
and democratic grounds, but also
on the fact that Israel is our key
strategic asset in the Middle
East, Long told the Emunah
Women.
The NAAA commercial was
refused by radio stations in
Baltimore where Long's Con-
gressional district is located, but
was played by WTOP-AM in
Washington, D.C.
"AT A TIME when there's less
for all Americans, when unem-
ployment affects millions, when
we are suffering the tragic effects
of Israel's invasion of Lebanon, is
it fair for Congress to give $2.6
billion to Israel?" the commercial
asks.
It answers its own question:
"This is not fair; this is out-
rageous. Congressman Clarence
Long is at the forefront of this
more for Israel' campaign." The
commercial asks listeners to
protest to Long.
A spokesman for Long said he
was concerned about the com-
mercial. He said there were re-
ports that it will be played
throughout the country and was
thus being heavily financed. Re-
districting in 1982 removed most
of the Jewish-populated areas
from Long's district.
SOME YEARS and many fOm
and television roles later, Hirsch
has never abandoned the stage.
"I tend to think my acting will
somehow deteriorate if I'm not
involved in live performance," he
said. In 1980, Hirsch was critical-
ly acclaimed for his leading role
in the award-winning Broadway
play, "Tally's Folly." He
compared film acting to acting
onstage.
1 Making films is gruelling, but
once they're over you're on to
something else. Plays go on and
on. But you can't really repeat a
performance, because each time
you do it it's new, and your
thoughts are different. The
audience is different. After all,
they've never experienced the
play, even if it's almost routine to
the performers. When I keep that
in mind, I never feel like I'm
growing old in a part."
Judd Hirsch's contribution to
"Lights" will be anything but
routine. With his versatile, au-
thoritative voice and natural feel
for language, his narration adds a
special touch to a unique project.
"Lights" promises to be a re-
freshing change from the usual
television fare, and seems to have
meant something special to its
narrator as well.
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i^i
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Friday, November25,]
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