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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( October 21, 1983 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
October 21, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00134

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
October 21, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00134

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Defray Beach and Highland Beach
Volumes- Number84
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, October 21,1963
CfredShochel
Price 35 Cents
Robert E. Byrnes Appointed
Chairman Of Jewish Community Center
Are Jews more neurotic than other ethnic and religious groups?
Behind the face of one American Jew stares the enigmatic soul
ofSigmund Freud. In a report below, Arthur J. Magida offers
tome interesting evidence on both sides of the question.
New Studu
Are Jews Really
More KTeurotie?
Marianne Bobick, president of
the South County Jewish Feder-
ation has announced the appoint-
ment of Robert E. Byrnes as
chairman of the Board of Trus-
tees of the Jewish Community
Center of South County.
Byrnes is a member of the Fed-
eration Board of Directors and is
past president of Temple Beth El
of Boca Raton.
He was the chairman of the
Federation planning committee
that conceived and implemented
the establishment of the JCC.
Byrnes is a businessman as
well as a pilot with captain's rank
for Delta Airlines.
The JCC is a social service
agency dedicated to providing
programs for the South County
area. Cultural, educational, rec-
reational and social activities for
all ages will be provided for in the
Robert E. Byrnes
new JCC.
Plans are already being made
to bring in Jewishly oriented cul-
tural programs, holiday work-
shops and athletic activities for
adults. Children will have a
variety of activities to choose
from in the new JCC.
Arts and crafts, athletic
leagues and programs, socializa-
tion and friendship groups are
but a small sampling of what
awaits your child in the JCC of
South County.
This is an agency dedicated to
the preservation of the Jewish
family. The center will place an
emphasis on family oriented
programs and intergenerational
activities. Specialized activities
for senior adults will also be part
of the JCC.
If you would like more infor-
mation or you wish to get in-
volved, call 395-5546.
Endowment Chairman Named
By ARTHUR J. MAGIDA
Copyright Baltimore Jewish Times
Reprint by Special Arrangement
The book jacket
promised that a "com-
plaint" lay within. A clever
bit of marketing. If truth-
in-advertising laws extend-
ed to the creative act,
"complaint" would have
been stronger, harsher
more virulent synonyms,
words such as "whine,"
"whimper," "howl" or
"wail. This book was no
mere "complaint." It was a
diatribe, a fury, a jeremiad.
"These people are incredible!"
moaned the novel's suffering
narrator of his parents. "These
people are unbelievable! These
two are the outstanding
producers and packagers of guilt
for our time! They render it from
Continued on Page 5
Gerson "Gary" Bernstein has
been appointed by the South
County Jewish Federation Presi-
dent Marianne Bobick as the
Chairman of the Endowment
Committee for the Federation.
Splitting time between Hart-
ford, Conn., and Boca Raton,
Bernstein will lead in the devel-
opment of an active and visible
Endowment Committee. As an
important means of providing
funds for special purposes not
covered by normal allocations, he
comes to this position with great
experience. Bernstein chairs the
steering and Investment sub-
committee of the Hartford En-
dowment Committee, and estab-
wmmm
Gerson "Gary" Bernstein
lished a fund of his own.
Knowing the importance oi
Endowment for the community
Sen. Kennedy Warns U.S. Slipping
Into Accommodation With Syria
Sen Kennedy
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Sen. Edward Kennedy (D.,
Mass.) expressed "strong
concern" here that the
Reagan Administration
may be "slipping into a new
policy of political accom-
modation" with Syria as it
seeks to negotiate a
political settlement among
Lebanon's warring fac-
tions.
At the same time, Kennedy an-
nounced that a resolution he,
along with Sen. John Heinz (R.,
Pa.), introduced in the Senate
last February opposing the sale
of sophisticated military
equipment to Jordan and calling
on Jordan to enter Middle East
peace negotiations under the
framework of the Camp David
accords, is now sponsored by 58
Senators.
WHILE acknowledging that
Jordan "has its security needs,"
Kennedy said that what is needed
from the Administration "is not
more sophisticated arms to send
to Jordan, but more sophis-
ticated diplomacy to bring
Jordan to the conference table
Continued oo Page 2
for today and tomorrow, Bern-
stein said, "The establishment of
a Fund today could live on to
perpetuity; a truly beautiful way
to live forever."
Bernstein is examining possi-
ble candidates for various posi-
tions on the Endowment Com-
mittee. He is seeking people who
will be establishing their own
Funds and those who are profes-
sionally active in the areas of
taxes, attorneys, trust officers in
financial institutions, stock
brokers, or other related posi-
tions.
Being active in American
Friends of Boys Town in Jerusa-
lem, Board member of Hartford
Federation, and National Board
Member of the Council of Jewish
Federations, Bernstein is allow-
ing South County Federation to
be the recipient of great skills and
experience. His efforts receive
strong support from his wife
Rose, a new Lion of Judah
member in South County.
President Bobick expressed
great confidence in Gary Bern-
stein when she said, "This year
our Endowment Funds will
increase 10 fold with Gary as
chairman. Knowing him, I know
his committee will be very active,
highly visible, and greatly suc-
cessful!"
New Lease on Life?
Deregulation May Help Hate-Mongering Radio
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(Washington)
Aad KEVIN FREEMAN
(New York)
The move in Congress to
deregulate broadcasting
could result in destroying
e current efforts aimed at
Persuading the Federal
Communications Commis-
sion to deny the renewal of
"e license to the owner of a
Dodge City, Kan., radio
station accused of broad-
casting anti-Semitic and
other racist programs,
according to a Washington
attorney specializing in
communication law.
The attorney. James WsiU-
man, who has spearheaded the
efforts to deny renewal of the
license of Nellie Babbs, owner of
KTTL-FM, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that this is
because the bills now before the
House would eliminate the
comparative renewal process.
This process, which allows a
challenger for a license to
demonstrate why the present
station is unfit to continue
broadcasting, has already been
eliminated in the deregulation bill
adopted by the Senate.
WEITZMAN said that after
Babbs' licence was challenged
last spring, aha dropped the two
hours of nightly snti-Semitic,
anti-Black and anti-minority
taped programs supplied by this
Rev. William Potter Gate and
James Wickstrom, described as
paramilitary evangelists
associated with Posse Comitatus,
the. small extremist right wing
anti-government, anti-tax group
that has been active in the
Midwest and the West, and
believes all government power is
Continued on Page 2


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o^i.-. t~**
.J. m^wirlirwn nf finutk CnuntV
r nuay, o uiy o, iww
Page 2
Tfce Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, October 21,1983
'Changing Pattern'
Kennedy in Warning
U.S. Accommodates to Syria's Demands Britain Reaffirms Refusal
Continued from Page 1
and into the Camp David
process."
Kennedy made his remarks to
more than 600 persons who
attended the annual dinner of the
American Associates of the Ben
Gurion University of the Negev
at the Pierre Hotel. He was
presented with the degree of
Doctor Philosophiae Honoris
Causa in recognition of his
friendship to Israel and in appre-
ciation of his interest and support
for the university.
It marked the first time that an
honorary degree from the
university was presented outside
of Israel. Kennedy has been a
frequent visitor to the campus
and, along with Golda Meir, was from Mo8CQW Uamascu8 ^ the
a guest of honor at the dedication s ian t and surrogates m
ceremony in 1974 of the Medical 1,_____,T2Z
ceremony
School of Ben Gurion University.
THE Massachusetts Senator,
in criticizing the Adminis-
tration "s ongoing efforts in Leba-
non, said that the U.S. is no
longer insisting that Syria and
the Palestine Liberation
Organization leave Lebanon.
"Now the President's emissaries
tell the Lebanese government
that it must be sensitive to
Syrian interests and those of its
allies," Kennedy said.
"In effect, the Administration
is ignoring the insidious Soviet
instigation of Syria," said Ken-
nedy. "You and I both know that
a clear military pipeline extends
Lebanon itself.'
Declaring that the policies of
the Administration raise
questions "about what price they
are ready to pay for the Syrian
agreement to a permanent cease-
fire and a political settlement,"
Kennedy continued, "The United
States must never abandon the
goal of Lebanon for the Lebanese.
"WE MUST never accept the
de facto or de jure partition of
Lebanon, and we must never
participate in any Soviet or
Syrian scheme to carve out a
PLO state from the ancient land
of Lebanon or from any other
land in the Middle East."
New Lease on Life?
Deregulation May Help Radio Bigots
Continued from Page 1-
rooted at the county level.
But now, Weitzman believes,
encouraged by the expected
Congressional action, Babbs
reintroduced the racist tapes on
Sept. 15, this time not just at
night, but labelling them as news
broadcasts airing throughout the
day and aimed entirely at Jews.
The current tapes being aired
are by Wickstrom of Togerton
Dells, Wis., reportedly the
national director of counter-
insurgency for Posse Comitatus.
In Latin, Posse Comitatus means
"power to the county."
WEITZMAN urged that a
strong effort be made by Jewish
organizations and influential
local Jews in various Congres-
sional districts to persuade the
Tele-communications Committee,
where the deregulation bill is now
being considered, and the full
House Committee on Energy and
Commerce, not to eliminate the
comparative renewal process.
The Jewish Community Rela-
tions Committee of Wichita has
also urged Jews to contact
members of the House Commit-
tee.
Failure will not affect just a
small county and western station
in Dodge City. Weitzman
asserted. He said if Babbs wins,
"This is going to telegraph a
message to other broadcasters in
the country who are similarly
inclined toward the fringe" and
similar type of programs may
appear across the country.
In explaining how he became
involved in the KTTL issue,
Weitzman said that earlier this
year he received a letter from
Pluria Marshall, chairman of the
board of the National Black
Media Coalition, who said he had
been receiving complaints from
small towns in Kansas com-
plaining about KTTL's broad-
casts.
WEITZMAN said the station
was playing tapes supplied by
Wickstrom and Gale, the latter
being the founder of the
California-based Ministry of
Christ Church and the virtual
leader of what is known as the
Identity movement.
The Identity movement, which
adopts its name from a quarterly
newsletter published by Gale,
shares an "ideological thread of
bigotry" with extremist groups
including the Christian Defense
League, the Aryan Nations, the
Christian Patriots Defense
League and elements of the Ku
Klux Klan and the Nazi Party,
according to the Anti-Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith.
In a 16-page report released
last summer titled "The "Identity
Churches': A Theology of Hate,"
the ADL described the Identity
"Churches" as a "pseudo-Chris-
tian movement which holds to
the belief that white Anglo-
Saxons, not Jews are God's
chosen people."
THE ADL reported that the
Identity movement espouses the
belief that minority groups are on
the same "spiritual level as
animals and therefore have no
souls." The ADL report added:
"Vicious hostility toward these
non-white races and relentless
vilification of Jews are major
components of this movement's
theology of hate."
Wickstrom and Gale, mean-
while, are not strangers to one
another, and their ties are more
extensive than simply sharing a
common bond of bigotry. They
have appeared together in farm
protest demonstrations in the
Midwest and have worked
together in the Midwest and the
West conducting paramilitary
training exercises. formally
sponsored as "counter-insur-
gency seminars," according to
press reports.
For example, in a three-day
session in Weskan, Kan., it was
reported in The New York Times,
as described by the office of
Kansas Attorney General Robert
Stephan, that 56 participants
were trained us "killer teams in
hand-to-hand combat techniques,
the administration of poisons,
night combat patrol and murder
by ambush."
GALE DRAWS on his past
military career which included
service on Gen. Douglas
McArthur's staff and supervision
in guerrilla operations in the
Philippines in World War II. He
maintained in an interview that
he is not a member of the Posse
Comitatus because he believes
his status as a retired military
man was in conflict with that.
But he did say he supports the
views of the Posse.
Federal officials have noted the
similarities of the extremist
groups but are hesitant to say to
what extent they operate
together. One official was quoted
as saying "there's some overlap
in members and some similarity
of views. But not every member
and every chapter of the Posse
has the same views as the Klan."
Meanwhile, according to the
ADL report on the Identity
movement, in 1983, KTTL
broadcast a taped message by
Gale which stated in part: "Yes,
we're gonna cleanse our land.
We're gonna do it with a sword.
And we're gonna do it with viol-
ence You're damn right I'm
teaching violence. God said
X
you're gonna do it that way, and
it's about time somebody is
telling you to get violent, whitey.
"YOU BETTER start making
dossiers, names, addresses,
phone numbers, car license
numbers, on every damn Jew
rabbi in this land, and every
Anti-Defamation League leader
or JDL (Jewish Defense League)
leader in this land, and you better
start doing it now. And know
where he is. If you have to be told
any more than that, you're too
damn dumb to bother with. You
get these roadblock locations,
where you can set up ambushes,
and get it all working now."
From his experience with the
FCC, Weitzman said he knew it
would not deal with the racist
issue since it would consider this
a First Amendment issue. He
sought to find someone to chal-
lenge the license which was to
expire June 1.
A Jewish resident of Dodge
City, who was sales manager for
a competing radio station, agreed
to try to seek the license, but a
week-and ahalf before his appli-
cation was to have been filed, he
withdrew because his wife was
afraid of the Posse Comitatus,
which has conducted para-
military activities in Kansas,
according to Weitzman.
A LOCAL lawyer had been
obtained, Naomi Kaufman
Gunderson, who along with her
husband, was also one of the few
Jews in Dodge City, and by May
2, the deadline for applications,
she helped organize a committee
of 14 persons, known as Com-
munity Service Broadcasting
Inc. which was willing to
challenge Babbs and have the
KTTL frequency assigned to it,
proposing public interest
progra minings.
In addition, a much larger
group called the Dodge City
Citizens for Better Broadcasting,
Inc., was formed to aid in the
efforts to challenge the license.
Weitzman said that his investi-
gations have uncovered
numerous FCC violations by the
station.
Babbs, in taking a stance com-
mon among Posse adherents, has
repeatedly been in violation of
court injunctions based on her
refusal to pay taxes, send her
children to school and her general
disregard of state and local
regulations, Weitzman said.
HE COMPLAINED that na-
tional Jewish organizations did
not at first demonstrate interest
in his effort. But now he believes
that the National Jewish Com-
munity Relations Advisory
Council has promised its support.
The ADL and the American
Continued on Page 4
To Sell Oil to Israel
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Britain has reaffirmed its refusal
to sell North Sea oil to Israel following a meeting between
Yitzhak Modai, Israel's Energy Minister, and Peter
Walker, his British counterpart.
However, the meeting was the first of its kind for a
number of years at which the Israelis made no formal re-
quest for British oil. This is partly because of the past in-
flexibility of the British authorities on this issue and also
because of a recent decision by Norway to sell Israel half a
million tons of light crude over the next six months, thus
lessening Israel's interest in a deal with Britain.
NEVERTHELESS, the British Energy Ministry said
that the issue had cropped up during the 30-minute meet-
ing between Modai and Walker. Officials said Britain
adhered to its established policy of supplying oil only to
members of the European Economic Community, to
fellow members of the International Energy Agency and
to countries with which it has an established pattern of
supply. This includes Finland but excludes Israel.
Modai said before leaving that despite his failure to
make a formal request for Brithish oil, Israel remained
interested in North Sea crude oil because of the changing
pattern of her oil requirements as she converts her elec-
tricity power stations from oil to coal.
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A vote is to take place at the Jewish
Theological Seminary on October 24,1983
on a proposal that a woman be admitted to
the Rabbinical School for ordination.
We the senior members of the Talmud
department, declare that in our opinion this
is against the Halakhah. Professor Saul
Lieberman, of blessed memory, our revered
teacher and one of the greatest Rabbinic
authorities of our time, rendered a decision
on the subject three years ago. We accept
this decision as binding.
The sages tell us that in the case of
If there is a difference of opinion
between a master and his disciples, it is the
master who is to be heeded. How much
more so in this case when we the disciples
are in complete agreement with the master!
Halm Dimltrovskf
J099 Four
Israel Fnncus
David Halivni
Dov Zlotnlck
Thfr advwtiMnwnt wm paid tor by tha UNION tor TRADITIONAL CONSERVATIVE JUDAS**


^v, October^. 1*3
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3.
Jordan Sam
Ready for Middle East Cooperation
BUT HE *nd th. m. ??<*?*>_ ZT*Z. t*Z
time that the Australian govern-
Palestinian bsue in any future
BY YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
InTAI Jordan has
'dared that it will "co-
Lpgrate with all efforts to
ISieve a comprehensive
E durable just peace" in
C Middle East, provided
Ithe "legitimate rights of
[the people of Palestine" are
|fulfilled.
We shall always accord the
, sliest priority to the salvation
[of the people and the territory
om Israeli occupation," Jor-
Jin's Foreign Minister Marwan
|Kasim said.
Addressing the General As-
Umbly. the Jordanian Minister
Ry attacked *"*
Iment policy, charging that the
Gexation" of the West Bank
Iby Israel was part of a continu-
lous Israeli expansion in the
Irerion. "A decisive and immedi
|e action is needed to stop this
Icoionial policy if we are to arrest
Ithe dangerous escalation in tne
I occupied Arab territories,
iKisimsaid.
I HE ADDED: "Israel's fren-
:ied efforts to change the demo-
graphic, geographic and
| economic structure of the occu-
territories must also be
I baited. The world community
I must deter Israel from imple-
menting the canal project linking
the Dead Sea and the Mediterra-
nean," a project, Kasim said,
I that will damage Jordan's vital
New Diplomatic
Ties For Israel
interests.
Charging that Israel reinforces
its expansionist policy "ignoring
and distorting all peace calls and
signals of moderation emanating
from Arabs and others," Kasim
said Israel rejected the Arab
peace plan after the Fez summit
in 1982 and the Reagan peace
plan of the same year
"As far as Jordan is concerned,
the search for a political solution
to the Arab-Israeli conflict is a
cornerstone in its foreign policy,
and the principal goal of its dip-
lomatic activity at both the Arab
and the international levels,"
Kasim said.
HE SAID that his country has
been engaged in various "politi-
cal initiatives" to break the
impasse in the Mideast. "To this
end we engaged in substantive
consultations and contacts with
several parties who are directly
concerned with the Arab-Israeli
conflict during the recent past.
Though those contacts have ma-
terialized in a manner different
from what we have hoped for,
Jordan will continue to support
and encourage every attempt
which could lead to the salvation
of our people and land from Is-
raeli occupation
The Soviet Ambassador to the
UN briefly referred to the
Mideast in his address to the
General Assembly. Ambassador
Oleg Troyanovsky said that the
United States encourages Israeli
aggression in Lebanon and the
violation of the rights of the Pal-
estinian people. He charged that
"continued pressure" is being
applied on Syria to make it
change its steadfast course in
Mideast affairs.
At an earlier General Assem-
bly session, Australia's Foreign
Ministry, W. G. Hayden, said
that a just and lasting solution to
the Mideast dispute "means the
need to sustain the right of Israe
to exist behind secure and recog-
nized borders."
ment "acknowledges the right of
self-determination for the Pales-
tinian people, including their
right, if they choose, to inde-
pendence and the possibility of
their own independent state."
Hayden said that the "tragedy
of Lebanon" proved the urgent
need for a comprehensive and
just solution of the Mideast con-
flict. He said that his government
Mideast settlement.
"The Australian government
also recognizes that whatever ar-
rangement is finally agreed upon
will evolve from processes in-
volving the people of the immedi-
ate region, including Syria and
Jordan," Hayden declared
adding that the roles and views of
the superpowers "cannot be
ignored in any such nrocess.
front
>Hj>
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4 WEEK TOUR OF LEISURE 1022
WITH LATE DEPARTURES, LfTTLE WALKING A SLOWER PACE
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APRIL 9,1964
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OR OUR OTHER ISRAELI TRIPS, CALL MIRIAM COLLECT AT
JSSa
TRIANGLE TOURS-931-3031
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where shopping is a pleasure 7days o week
In Africa
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Is-
Irael is about to renew its
diplomatic relations with a
number of African states
according to reports in the
French press. Among the
jcountries mentioned as
[about to renew their formal
|ties with Israel are the
[Ivory Coast, Togo and the
IGabon.
The French leftwing daily.
iLiberafion, says that the head of
the Israeli Foreign Ministry's
I African Department, Avi Primor,
I conferred in Paris with several
[African Presidents, including
I ihose of Togo, Liberia and Zaire.
THE PAPER said Primor anc
h delegation of Israeli officials
[were planning to attend the
[franco-African summit now
[meeting in Vittel but gave in to
[f rench requests and remained in
[ ram so as not to embarrass the
[delegations from overwhelmingly
[Moslem African states.
Primor told the Jewish Tele
f^A l1c A8enc>r tn>t no tun.
tea he planned to go to Vittel
and also denied most of these
I meetings. As for the resumption
| diplomatic ties, he said, "We
[*>Pe indeed that moat African
I countries will sooner or later
[resume their relations with us.
I^bviously, we hope that this will
I* sooner and not later and think
I wayl should never have broken
ln then- relation wRh Israel."
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Run&.

im'Wi/in
Friday, July 8,1983
Pte4
The Jewish
Floridian of South County________________________________Frid*y>Octob
21.1888
The Economic Challenge
The original Israeli pound was retired
several years ago in favor of the newly-
minted Shekel in order to deal with the
declining value of the nation's currency and
the prospect of entering upon an era of
fiscal experience reminiscent of post-World
War I Germany, when people went to the
market with wheelbarrows of paper money
to buy a loaf of bread.
Since the pound's retirement, the Shekel
has fared no better. Prime Minister
Shamir's introduction of his new coalition
Monday preceded by hours his decision to
remove government price supports for
food, which instantly skyrocketed by 50
percent, and gasoline, which followed suit
by 25 to 30 percent.
Just as instant was a wave of panic-
buying in the nation's big cities in the wake
of the throngs several days before who
bought up U.S. Dollars as quickly as they
could. The closing of the stockmarket on
Sunday and the precarious position of
many banks, some of them already
teetering on bankruptcy, are all
reminiscent of the American world as
Franklin Delano Roosevelt saw it when he
took office in March, 1932.
Yitzhak Shamir faces similar dilemmas.
They overshadow in staggering proportion
fears about the Israeli role in Lebanon or
the resurgence of Syrian power beefed up
by the latest Soviet supply to President
Assad of missiles capable of striking
targets deep within Israel's territory. These
are dilemmas he will have to solve quickly
or succumb to the pressures upon him
by Opposition leader Shimon Peres to
resign.
Will he pull a rabbit out of the Israeli hat
in the same way that FDR appeared to do
in America in 1932? We fervently hope so.
Test From Within
Only his partisan enemies in Israel wish
new Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir ill.
Surely, the rest of us wish him well. For a
long time now, Western leaders have
secretly longed for the departure of
Menachem Begin, whom they regarded as a
principle stumbling block to peace in the
Middle East.
We are not sure that Shamir will serve
the viewpoint of these leaders to their
satisfaction because bis vow remains that
he will hew to the policies of his friend and
predecessor as these policies pertain to the
West Bank and to Lebanon.
If anything then, perhaps for the first
time in the history of Israel, the major
threat to a political leader and to his
government, no leas than to Israelis
themselves, does not come so much from
without as from within. In a word, the
major danger facing the new Shamir regime
is the economy.
Jewish Floridian
ol Souin County
fruasnocnti
FREDSMOCMET
Editor and PuMianar
SUZANNE SHOCMET
Extculiv* Editor
OERI ROSENBERG
Naw Coordinator
OCA RATON C*FtC6 2200 N. Fdr>i Mary.. Su.lt 20B. Boca Raton. Fla. 3M32 Pnon. 36*2001
Mam Offiea Plant 120 N.E r> St. Miami. Fla. 33101 Phona 1 373-400J "***"
matar. Malawi lam Wt> UmHH Hainan. P.O. tUBl Maw*. Wa. 3>fi
AdwarliaMa; Oajacan. Stad Laaaar, fluma SM-laU
Comtunad Jaanah Appaal South County Jawiaft Fadaration inc.. Ofneara: PmauMnt Marianne hhr.
Traurtr, Saranaaa Schanfcarman, E.acutira Owactor Raotx Bruca S Waranai -.,
Jaw.an Floo*an Oo not ouatantaa Kaahruth ot MarchandiM Advarlitad
SUMCMaFTIOM RATES: Local Araa SO Annual (2 Vaar M.mmum tT). oy mambaratw. South Count,
Jaaaaft Fadaration. 2200 N Fadaral Mwy, Sma 20. Soca Raton. Fia 31432. Rho 3a2T37 ^^
Out ot Town. Upon Run lit
MHESHVAN5744
Number 34
Sad Exit
Varied Record Speaks for Itself
By OIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Menachem Begin won a
stunning upset over the
ruling Labor Party in the
1977 elections to become
the nation's first non-Labor
Premier after having been
in the opposition for 29
years.
Finally, at the age of 64, Begin
felt that his political and social
views had been vindicated and
that, despite the bitter attacks
against him and his colleagues in
the Knesset by the successive
Labor Party governments, the
majority of the people of Israel
were on his side.
Begin felt exhilarated and ex-
uberant, filled with dreams of
putting his Revisionist Zionist
philosophy into practice. Six
years later, at the age of 70, Be-
gin resigned from office, phy-
sically Hi, psychologically de-
pressed and proclaiming that "I
cannot bear the responsibility
any longer."
IN THE interim period Begin
led his country to a peace agree-
ment with Egypt and to a con-
troversial war in Lebanon. He
handed back the entire Sinai to
Egypt but strengthened Israel's
hold on the administered ter-
ritories. Under his Premiership,
Israel annexed the Golan
Heights, but stopped short of an-
nexing the West Bank.
Begin waa a fighter, if not
always a diplomatic one. He took
on President Hafez Assad of
Syria, Chancellor Helmut Sch-
midt of West Germany, Presi-
dent Valery Giscard d'Estaing of
France, Labor Party leader
Shimon Peres, and derided and
rejected President Reagan's
peace initiative.
But at the end of his reign,
Begin seemed to have loot that
combativeness and began to
acquiesce to most American re-
quests, including the latest one
that Israel delay the redeploy-
ment of its troops in Lebanon.
The agreed-to delay came after
the two U.S. marines had been
killed and eight others wounded
in the Beirut area by heavy shell-
ing between Shiite Moslems and
Christian Phalangists. Observers
noted that it would have been
difficult for Israel to reject the re-
quested delay because if any
further American casualties had
occurred after an Israeli refusal,
Israel might be blamed for furth-
er American deaths.
BEGIN LEAVES his office as
a man who had grown weary of
the petty infighting and bicker-
ing among the Cabinet ministers,
especially in the past few weeks,
sparked by the mounting toll of
Israeli soldiers killed and wound-
ed in Lebanon and by an aus-
terity economic package pro-
posed by Finance Minister
Yoram Aridor.
Close associates of Begin said
he was grieved by the deaths of
517 Israel soldiers and the
wounding of more than 2,000. He
termed the war in Lebanon a
"tragedy" and admitted that he
had never anticipated that the
Menachem Begin
Despite Mirny Successes,
He Leaves Israel Divided
war would become a quagmire.
In the past year Begin suffered
two tragedies: his beloved wife
Aliza died last November while
he was in the United States, and
his close friend and political part-
ner, Simcha Ehrlich, died in
June.
BEGIN WAS also reportedly
distressed by the nation's econ-
omic crisis, the complexities of
which were not within his grasp.
He never claimed to understand
economic problems and left all
that work up to the ministers in
charge, first and foremost,
Aridor. At first Aridor's econ-
omic policy enabled the Likud to
win office for the second time in
1981. Those economic policies
created an atmosphere of pros-
perity, with major consumer
goods flooding the market at
prices available even to low in-
come families.
But those policies began to fail.
Inflation ran as high as 140 per-
cent annually and the deficit in
the balance of pay menu mount-
ed. Even Aridor realized this
month that this situation could
not go on, and he waged a des-
perate debate with his colleagues
to cut 55 billion Shekels out of
this year's government budget.
The budget crisis was one of the
key reasons prompting Begin to
resign, although not the main
reason.
furiated with the autonomy I
stalemate and the war in Leb-I
anon, recalled its Ambassador.
BEGIN ALSO leaves behind)
an Israeli society more divided]
than ever: religious against the I
secular, Sephardim against Ash-I
kenazim, Jews against Arabs. [
These divisions have caused vio-l
lence: Sephardic Jews attacking I
Ashkenazic property and daub-1
ing them with slogans reminisl
cent of Nazi Germany: ultra-Or-f
thodox Jews attacking secular I
archaeologists; the murder oil
Peace Now activist Emil Grutu-I
weig during a demonstration fol-,
lowing the report of the Kalian I
Commission on the massacre of I
civilians in the Sabra and Shatilal
refugee camps; the killing and I
wounding of Arab students at the I
Islamic College in Hebron; and!
the attempted assassinations of|
three West Bank Arab mayors.
At the beginning of his Pre-1
miership, Begin seemed to goo*!
of his way to dispel the image oil
him as a hardliner. From his sickI
bed (he suffered from a heart I
condition) Begin called up Labor
ite Moshe Day an and invited him j
to become Foreign Minister.
The move paid off Dayanl
waa instrumental in achieving |
the peace agreement with Egyp
Begin's hardline image concern
ing his views of Israel's Arab!
neighbors was also dispelled
when he and Sadat forged the
historic Camp David accordi
along with President Carter.
BUT AT the same time, Begin I
gave the green light for the rapid I
Other political failures and dis-
appointments dogged Begin. The
peace agreement he signed with
President Anwar Sadat began to
break down and finally stalled al- construction of settlements in tkt
together. The autonomy talks West Bank, creating a situatkn
were deadended because Israel described by many as "irrever-
and Egypt were at odds over the sible," from the point of view ot
degree of autonomy to be granted leaving the door open for faf""
to the Palestinians on the West negotiations with Jordan
Bank. While Begin believed in
autonomy "for the people, not for
the land," Egypt viewed auto-
nomy as a stepping stone toward
a Palestinian state. Egypt,
in-
New Lease on Life?
Friday. October 21,1983
Volumes
Coatianed from Page 2
Jewish Committee have both
urged the FCC not to renew the
license to Babbs. The National
Conference of Christians and
Jews has also urged the FCC to
reject the broadcast license
renewal application to KTTL.
In addition, if the FCC does
hold hearings, there will be costs
to cover. Both Weitzman and
Gunderaon have volunteered
their services up to now but the
FCC hearing will take a great
deal of work, Weitzman said.
Meanwhile, although her license
expired June 1, Babbs can
continue operating the station
until a hearing is held. But if
Begins hardline image also*
emerged when he ordered till
bombing of the nuclear *
Iran and the invasion of L
anon. The invasion, during watf
the massacre at the reWf
camps by Phalangist force* wl
place while Iaraeh troops "
nearby, left Begin with the po*
ical stigma that he headed a ff"
eminent which did not know no*
to prevent auch an atrocity- I
Neither Israel nor W"gJ[
Party and the Likud coaliUonWJ
headed will ever be U* *JJJ
again without Begin. "yJ
years he waa the cenwnt tt* ^
together the building btoj
diverse elements. In ""ft J
--------*-------, than U
Congress ends the procedure she jry * :^SaW '
can hold the license forever, dividual, but gfJ>*5U
11/-:.____________j R;n AnntrUMltSd K^y*!
Weitzman warned
JTA Rtport

Begin contributed
to that history- With
in era has com*


F^, October 21,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
portnoy Recalled
Are Jews Really
More Neurotic?
Ccatiaaed from Pag* 1-A
me like chicken fat!
THE COMPLAINER is a 33-
ytuoti named Portnoy. In the
C19608, novelist Philip Roths
.jjount of his "complaint" hit
the best-seller lists. It also hit the
igjves of millions of American
ijot, who saw in Roth's anti-
hero a warped distortion of the
American Jew, a psychologically
contorted boy of a man.
Portnoy was condemned. Roth
was castigated. Their mutual
complaint" was viewed by
many Jews as a vidous and
slanderous caricature, as fodder
(or the anti-Semitic mill, as the
product of a self-hating Jew
whose visions of American Jewry
was so contemptuous it bordered
on libel-
Portnoy was frenzied, tortured,
mother smothered, sexually frus-
trated, emasculated, emotionally
crippled. He was, also, perhaps
the most enduring and graphic
prototype of the neurotic Jew in
literature. And, since the book
sold well, the phrase, "Portnoy's
complaint," has passed from the
book stalls into the popular
lexicon. In the mass culture,
Portnoy represents the con-
temporary Jewish personality.
This is a culture that tends to see
neurosis as an ailment that
strikes every ethnic group, but
also an ailment which is par-
ticularly and extensively Jewish.
PROBABLY FEW terms from
psychology are as entrenched in
the popular vocabulary as
neurosis." It is the rare person
who has never used it; it is the
rarer iwraua who has never been
called neurotic. But it is the even
rarer person who knows what
neurosis means. Its popular use
has often overshadowed its
clinical meaning.
Generally, neurosis refers to a
chronic anxiety that leads to
irrational behavior that limits
potential. It stems, psychologists
usually maintain, from certain
intrapsychic tensions and
conflicts. It is a much milder
'lines than psychosis, which
usually completely impairs
mental or psychological func-
tions.
Much can be blamed on
Portnoy, but he did not single-
handedly foster the quasimyth of
the modern neurotic Jew. The
piil.tr vision of the muddled,
perplexed, emotionally ham-
pered, psychologically con-
stricted Jew has also been seeded
by the hipster fuming of
comedian Lenny Bruce, the
cerebral whining of Woody Allen.
the self mockery of Mel Brooks.
The public "confessions" of
Jewish comedians and novelists
have indelibly entered the main-
stream culture: they now
symbolize in the popular mind
the sad psychic ways of the
American Jew. These may be a
caricature. These may be a
distortion. But whether credible
J" not, they are signatures for our
times, psychological portraits
that may carry more weight than
reality.
PERHAPS IT is not sur
prising that neuroses are often
perceived as the psychic bailiwick
of Jews. Psychotherapy is
frequently tagged a "Jewiah
profession": a recent study of
Psychotherapists in New York,
Chicago and Los Angeles found
that 52 percent of these cities'
therapists were Jewish. Jews
were so prominent in early
Psychoanalysis that Carl Jung, a
non-Jewish colleague of Freud's,
called the emerging science
Jewish medicine;" Nazis
dubbed it "the pornographic
Jewish specialty."
.If the common wisdom holds
people become therapists
more to sift through their own
woes than to heal others, then it
can be deduced that the "helping
professions" are flooded with
Jews because Jews are flooded
with peychopathologiea. And
since the father of psycho-
analysis, Sigmund Freud, was a
Jew, a facile and erroneous
mind could conclude that Jews
invented neuroses. The father of
the term, though, was not the
mother of invention: neuroses
had been with us long before the
term was coined or Freud
upholstered his first couch.
But aside from Jews' pro-
minence in diagnosing and
treating neuroses, they have also
been diagnosed and treated as
neurotic in numbers vastly
disproportionate to their size in
the general population. Statis-
tical information on the
frequency of psychoses and
neuroses among Jews dates from
the late nineteenth century.
Early data indicated that
disorders were higher among
Jews than Gentiles. In Denmark
in 1863, for instance, 5.8 of every
10,000 Christians were labeled
insane, while 33.4 of every 10,000
Jews had the same diagnosis. In
Italy in 1870, there were 5.63
insane among 10,000 Catholics,
and 26 insane among every
10,000 Jews. In Prussia the next
year, of every 10,000 Catholics
there were 8.8 insane, among
Protestants 8.5 and among Jews
18.8.
NEUROSIS among Jews were
also "much higher" than non-
Jews, according to historian and
unlhropolngist Bar-he *1 Patai
One form of neurosis, hysteria,
wu.s so comi no11 aiiiong male
Jews that an early twentieth
century anthropologist, Maurice
Fishberg, claimed it was "a
characteristic privilege of the
children of Israel."
By the middle of the twentieth
century, more sophisticated
studies in United States con-
cluded that neuroses were more
common among Jews than
Gentiles, while psychoses were
less common. In the early 1950s,
for example, two studies in the
urban northeast pointed toward a
higher incidence of neuroses.
Character disorders and neuroses
were about three times as
common among New Haven Jews
than Catholics and Protestants;
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Hysteria: 'a characteristic
of the children of Israel'
of patients treated in New York
City hospitals for neuroses, twice
aa many were Jewish than
Catholic or Protestant.
The famous Midtown Manhat-
tan study of the mid-1950s
determined that fewer Jews
suffered from psychoses than
Protestants or Catholics, but
about four times as many Jews
than Catholics or Protestants
were treated in out-patient clinics
for neuroses. Another study in
the early 1960s found that twice
as many Jews than either Pro-
testants or Roman Catholics were
admitted to New York State
hospitals with neuroses; similar
figures were discovered in
Canada.
THESE STUDIES have one
glaring flaw: they are based on
figures from hospitals or out-
patient clinics, not from a cross-
section of American Jewry. They
compare neurotic or psychotic
Jews to neurotic or psychotic
Catholics or Protestants or
Roman Catholics. They may
accurately reflect the number of
Jews that have sought psycho-
therapy. But they do not reliably
indicate the mental health of
American Jewry.
They do not overtly consider
that of all American minorities,
Jews most easily accept psycho-
therapy, function best within it
and can most easily afford it.
Statistics on the psychatric
problems of religious groups
might well be reversed if all
approached therapy with the
same acceptance. And the same
affluence.
Psychologists have generally
concluded that Jews' prosperity
and intellectuality have led them
to the Freudian and poet-
Freudian couch "Jews won't
be satisfied with just relieving
their pain. They want to know
why they have it," observed Joe
Giordano, a family therapist and
director of the American Jewish
Committee's Louis Caplan
Center on Group Identity and
Mental Health in New York. The
Talmudic penchant for analyzing,
assessing and debating makes
ma; y Jews comfortable in
therapy; their introspection
indispensable for effective
therapy makes them the
favorites of therapists. It's
rumored that the ideal candidate
for psychotherapy is "Young,
rich, articulate, beautiful and
Jewish."
TO ILLUSTRATE the Jew's
innate enthusiasm for therapy,
Marion Levine, executive
director of a Long Island child
guidance clinic, recalled a mixed
couple who had come for
marriage therapy. When tensions
eased a few months later, the
Irish husband was ready to leave
therapy.
"Not so fast," said the Jewish
wife. "Now let's find out why we
did those things."
MHMMBMgBMMBMMMI
Neurosis Is a Diagnostic Term
For 'Mild' Mental Disorganization
Few of us outside psychology are sure FREUD'S IDEA IS still the founda-
just what "neurosis" means. Generally, tion of the idea of neurosis today. Almost
40 percent of neuroses are marked by
it is a diagnostic term that identifies
someone with a mild personality and
mental disorganization. Unlike
psychosis, this disorganization does not
severely distort reality or the use of
language or lead to a general failure of
functioning.
Originally, Freud thought that
neuroses resulted from disturbances of
the sexual drive, specifically from inade-
quate or abnormal or inadequate dis-
charge of sexual energy, which he tagged
the "libido." In the 1930s, though, he
changed his theory to mesh with his new
severe anxiety prompted by the inability
to resolve intro-psychic anxiety. Other
common neuroses are phobias (irrational
fears), obsessions and compulsions
(recurring irrational thoughts and the
urge to repeatedly perform an irrational
act), and hysterical neurosis (when a
normal physical or psychological func-
tion is lost or impaired for no organic
reason and is accompanied by denial of
anxiety over the loss).
But considering the enormously
understanding that conflict between the popular, common use of the term
ego, id and superego was a regular, nor- "neurotic," perhaps its best vernacular
mal feature of mental life. Mental health, definition is, "Anything you have that
Freud said, hinged on the ego's ability to makes me think you're not as normal aa
acceptably mediate demands between I am." That may not satisfy a
the superego and the id, between man's psychologist, but it sure makes the rest
instinctual and moral sides. of us feel better.
"Jews are given to polemics,"
to discussing their private world
without shame," said
psychologist Victor D. Sanua of
St. John's University, Jamaica,
N.Y. "It is not a sign of weakness
among Jews to have personal
problems. Given their long
history of persecutions, it's
almost the norm to have
problems."
Different ethnic groups enter
therapy with different goals,
Sanua noted: "Jews want to have
their problems solved. Italians
and Irish want to have their
symptoms relieved."
FOR INSTANCE, entering the
innermost chambers of Irish
Catholic life is to encounter a
different psychic world than the
Jews', according to Rutgers
University family therapist
Monica McGoldrick. The world's
greatest talkers, the Irish, keep
their rawer emotions under layers
of silence that even a trained
therapist has difficulty
penetrating. To lapsed Catholics,
especially, therapy may carry
unpleasant overtones of con-
fessional. Rather than allowing
the effusive candor of Jews and
Italians about their emotions,
Irish family life revolves around
incessant teasing, ridicule and, aa
the legend goes, drinking.
Also predisposing Jews toward
psychotherapy is the profession's
harmony with Judaism. "Among
Jews," wrote New Haven
psychologists Bertram Roberts
and Jerome Myers, "it is
generally accepted that there is
no conflict between religious
doctrine and psychoanalytic the-
ory .... Jews exhibit a high level
of acceptance of psychoanalytic
psychiatry with a minimum of
disturbance of their social
values." This relatively com-
fortable acceptance of psychothe-
rapy, concluded Roberts and
Myers, "is an important factor
accounting for the extra-
ordinarily high rate of .
(neuroses) among Jews."
And within the bureaucracy of
religion, the rabbi has a less
important role as a counselor
than do priest, or ministers.
Phis, the cachet of therapy is
more powerful than religion's.
Revelations of a visit to one's
therapist is a guaranteed ice-
breaker at most cocktail parties;
mention of that morning's
davening at shut is often a good
excuse for half the people to leave
the room.
THE THERAPIST has com-
monly replaced the rabbi as the
wise man of the community. The
rabbi is consulted for matters
doctrinal and theological; for
matters personal, it is the shrink
the guy with the PhD on the
wall, the couch in the office, the
therapeutic "third ear" and
Coathwed on Page 12


P*e&.
on.- t~~i-L tf/~W. nf Snath Cnuntv
/VIS ^ a^a^a^i^"^"
Friday, Jury 8,1963
Page 6
The Jewish Fbridian of South County
Friday, October 21.
1963
Leadership Development An Enthusiastic Kickoff
On Sunday, Oct. 2, Leadership
Development '84 began with a
smashing success at the first
meeting held at the Holiday Inn,
Lakeside in Boca Raton. The par-
ticipants were honored to have
Mrs. Marianne Bobick, president
of the South County Jewish Fed-
eration, present. The chairmen
are Dr. Joseph and Marilyn
Zinns.
The program began with a
brunch. Seventeen participants
attended along with 14 of their
children. The topic, "American
Jews or Jewish Americans" was
presented by Rabbi Bruce S.
Warshal, executive director of
the South County Jewish Feder-
ation. Rabbi Warshal gave an in-
spiring and informative lecture,
after which he entertained ques-
Oriole Honors Its
1983 Volunteers
The Villages of Oriole in Delray
Beach will honor its 1983 Cam-
paign volunteers at an Awards
Night celebration, Thursday,
Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m. at the Bonaire
Clubhouse. All residents of Oriole
are invited to attend this very
meaningful occasion. Also in at-
tendance will be Gladys Wein-
shank, General Campaign chair-
man; Ben Buss in, Family Divi-
sion chairman; Milton Kretsky,
Federation vice president; Joe S.
Schenk, Special Events chair-
man; Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal,
Federation executive director.
This event celebrates the
sustained effort by the Oriole
volunteers which culminated in a
66 percent increases in donations
for the 1983 Federation-UJA
drive. Merit certificates will be
handed out by Al Ostrick, 1983
chairman of Villages of Oriole;
Jack M. Levine, 1983 co-
chairman of Oriole; Bob Barnett,
1983 associate chairman of
Camelot; Baron Desnick, 1983
associate chairman of Deauville,
and Dr. Ed Kingsley, 1983 asso-
ciate chairman of Abbey. The
guest speaker will be Harvey
Grossman, Campaign director of
the South County Jewish
Federation. There will be enter-
tainment by the Kings Point Glee
Club, led by Iz Siegel.
"This is a time for all persons
of Villages of Oriole to be proud
of their individual commitments
to the South County Jewish
Federation, Israel, and world-
wide Jewry," commented Al
Ostrick, chairman.
Paskin Plans Year's Activities
For Hebrew University
Bernard S. Paskin. president of
the Greater Boca Raton-Delray
Beach Chapter of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University
announces plans for the 1983-
1984 year.
According to Paskin, "This
year will be a record year for the
Hebrew University and I am
determined to reach new
membership heights in our
Greater Boca Raton-Delray
Beach Chapter which will go
toward scholarships for needy
students at the Hebrew Univer-
sity of Jerusalem."
Paskin continues, "Today we
have a proud membership of
approximately 250 families and I
am hoping by the year's end we
will reach 350 or more. It is vital
to the future of Israel and the
Jewish people around the world
that the Hebrew University be
endowed and allowed to continue
its programs of excellence.
"In our ongoing attempt to
promote new membership, I am
proud to announce our bi-annual
Member-Bring-A-Prospective-
Member cocktail party on Nov. 8
at the Boca Point* Country Club.
If every person in our member-
ship were to bring a new member,
obviously our efforts would
redouble on behalf of the univer-
sity. If there are any community
people interested in joining our
organization and attending this
members' cocktail party please
contact me or the regional office.
"In December Boca Raton will
benefit, once again, from our
Annual Academic Conference,"
promises Paskin. "More in-
formation will shortly be
available on this affair that is
represented by internationally
known educators from Israel's
oldest, largest and finest
university," he says.
According to Paskin, "In
January we will have an open
Chapter meeting featuring a
visiting Hebrew University
academician. All area people are
welcome to attend. This is part of
our continuing effort of education
and information for the com-
munity by the institution we are
endowing."
Paskin announces on Feb. 7,
1984, the Annual Greater Boca
Raton-Delray Beach Gala
Founders Ball at the Boca Pointe
Country Club: "The Greater
Boca Chapter will take over the
club for the evening and it
promises to be an unusuallv
Bernard S. Paskin
beautiful and lavish affair which
will compliment and help our
great University of Jerusalem."
There will be other Chapter
functions during the season as
well as the inauguration of the
first Southeastern News Letter
featuring an article by Paskin.
For more information on the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University please contact the
regional office at 428-2233.
tions. Great enthusiasm was gen-
erated to the extent that those
present stayed after the program
to ask more questions, continue
discussion and socialize.
The next program will be held
on Sunday, Oct. 30. The topic
then will be "Our Local Jewish
Community." Our panel will
include Mrs. Marianne Bobick,
president of the South County
Jewish Federation; Mr. Harold
Cohen, director of the South
County Jewish Community Cen-
ter; Mr. Spencer Gellert, director
of the Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service, and Mr. Burt
Lowlicht, director of the South
County Jewish Community Day Left to Right: Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal, executive director, South
School and Educational director County Jewish Federation; Mrs. Marianne Bobick, Federation
for the South County Jewish president; Dr. Joseph and Mrs. Marilyn Zinns, Leadership Develop.
Federation. ment chairmen.
Leadership Development participants enjoying brunch and guest speaker.
Tannenbaum To Be Guest Speaker
Bernice S. Tannenbaum, past
president of National Hadassah
will be the guest speaker at a
Hadassah Israel Bond Luncheon
to be held on Nov. 15 at the
Hyatt Hotel. Mollie Fraiberg of
Delray Beach will be the co-
honoree of the event.
Mrs. Tannenbaum, a life-long
Zionist, was elected chairman of
the American Section of the
World Zionist Organization at
the World Zionist Congress held
in Jerusalem in December, 1982.
She is a member of the Board of
Governors of the Jewish Agency,
a member of its Assembly, and a
member of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations.
She is national vice president
of AIPAC (American Israel
Public Affairs Committee).
She is a member of the execu-
tive bodies of the National
Conference for Soviet Jewry; the
World Jewish Congress-North
American and American Sec-
tions, and chairman of its
International Affairs Com-
mission; a member of the Board
of Directors of the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency; a member of the
Bernice Tannenbaum
Board of Governors of the I
Hebrew University and of the|
United Israel Appeal. Mrs
Tannenbaum has been an official I
delegate to the Board of (iov-l
eruors of the World Jewish!
Congress at meetings held in]
(ienDva, Amsterdam, Wash-1
blglon, DC, and Jerusalem.
Hadassah Israel Bond Lun-j
c hit in Chairman. Myra Ohren-I
stint staled. "It is indeed aril
honor to the honorees to haveil
women of the stature of Bernictl
Tannenbaum to be the g\i|
speaker at the Bond luncheon."
Ga Oerrazza DZisiorante
DINNER SPECIALS
MONDAY-FRIDAY 5:00-6:30
YOUR CHOICE OF
Chicken Parmigiana
Filet Sole Maitre D'
Veal, Peppers,
Mushrooms
Mussells Posillipo
Filet Sole Francese
Chicken Cacciatore
'7.95
All Entrees Include: Minestrone & Garlic Bread, Garden Fresh Salad
& Side Llnguine Marlnara, Rum Cake, Coffee, Tea or Sanka
2 FOR 1 DRINKS IN THE LOUNGE
Ala carte dinners served 5:00-10:00 Mon.-Sat.
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 368-8094
St. Andrews Blvd.. Village Square, Boca Raton
CLOSED SUNDAY
Temple Sinai
Of Palm Beach County
Delray Beach
Membc U A H C 'Retorrr..
Invites you to attend our
Sabbath Eve Services
Held Each Friday Evening, 815 p.m., at
Cason United Methodist Church
Corner ol Swinton Ave. and N.E. 4th St. (Lake Ida Rd i
Rabbi Samuel Silver, officiating
For Membership Information Call:
NedChodash
272-2827
Samuel Rothstein
President
Sid Bernstein
732-5807
Registration for Religious School
Professional Staff
Special KULANU Young Family Group
For INFORMATION CAL.
Marj Aaron 73/3599 Be.. rsamin 499-040-
Tempie INFORMATION CALL 2/6 6161
P.O. BOX 1901 DELRA Y BEACH, FLA.
New Temple Building Early 1984 Occupancy
Site 2475 W. Atlantic Ave. Delray


priday, October 21,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 7
Men's Campaign Cabinet Kick-Off Meeting On October 5
"The philosophy for the 1984
Campaign will be based on the
creative survival of Judaism. We
will stress the ethics, beauty,
morality and responsibility of the
Jewish people. Our campaign will
emphasize the totality of world-
wide Jewish community and the
significance of We Are One."
With this statement, Dr. Larry
Charme, the Men's Campaign
Chairman kicked off the 1984
UJA-Federation Men's Cam-
paign. The meeting held on
Wednesday, Oct. 5 in the Federa-
tion Board Room was attended
by chairmen of different divi-
sions, areas, and condos from
around South County.
Gladys Wein shank, General
Campaign chairman who was
present, underlined the impor-
tance of helping Jews wherever
they may be, here in South
County, in Israel and around the
world. Gladys stressed that we
must make note to the commu-
nity of the totality of the cam-
paign.
Marianne Bobick, president of
the Federation, underlined the
importance of the meeting and of
the solicitation training seminar
that will be held in the near
future She emphasized that aa
many face-to-face encounters
possible, between Jew and Jew,
will be very important this
coming campaign year.
Each person left the meeting
with a clearer understanding of
the goals at hand this year. We
are not only interested in having
people write their checks," Dr.
Charme said, but "we are also in-
terested in how much time they
will give of themselves to the
campaign." The theme of Dr.
Charme's comments was that of
involvement and participation in
the Jewish community, and in
Jewish life. He also emphasized
the importance of raising the
consicousness and the awareness
of the Jewish people here and
abroad.
A solicitation and training
seminar will be conducted by Dr.
Charme later this month. In ad-
dition similar seminars will be
held throughout the year, in the
individual areas around South
County, so that workers and vol-
unteers may be more knowledge-
able than ever.
In closing, Dr. Charme reiter-
ated that each individual that
was present in the room that eve-
ning had to ask themselves to
what extent they were going to
give of themselves to the cam-
paign, to the Jewish people and
their needs, this year. "Just as
Israel has to fight its own indivi-
dual war," Dr. Charme said, "we
as individual Jews will have to
fight our own battles in order to
make this campaign a rousing
success."
Additional members of the
Campaign Cabinet not appearing
in the accompanying photo are:
Dr. Mitchell Ghen, chairman,
$1,500-3,500 Division; Dr. Jo-
seph Zinns, chairman, New
Floresta; Colman Hanish, chair-
man, Boca Barwood; Geraon
Bernstein, chairman, Boca
Grove; Daniel Freed, chairman
Boca West; Dr. Nathan Hoffeld
chairman, Boca West; Larry
Gottsegen, chairman, Del-Aire
Seymour Rappaport, chairman
Hamlet; Len Turesky, chairman
Loggers Run; Dick Romanoff
chairman, Ocean; Jim Baer
chairman, Project Renewal; Al
Segal, SI8,000+ Event and Sane
tuary Chairman; Phil Zinman
In Attendance at campaign Cabinet Kickoff
meeting: Top Row: Left to Right Elliot Adler,
Escondido; Mayer Weinshank, Chairman Boca
Teeca, Col Jerome Hurwitz, Chairman Boca Del
Mar; Helene Eichler, Assistant Executive Direc-
tor; Richard Siemens, Co-Chairman $6,500 plus
Division; James Nobil, Cc-Chairman $6,500 plus
Division; Dr. Arnold Berliner, Chairman Young
Executive and Professionals Division; Gladys
Weinshank, General Campaign Chairman;
chairman. Project Renewal; Eric
Deckinger, co-chairman, Wood
field Hunt Club; Rudy Lidaky
co-chairman, $3,500-6,500 Divi
sion; Abby Levine, chairman
86,500 Event; Howard Guggen-
heim, chairman, $1,250 Annual
Dinner Dance.
Congress Mounts Drive to Press
Mubarak to Return Israel Envoy
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Members of both
houses of Congress have
mounted a drive to con-
vince President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt to
change his attitude about
returning an Egyptian Am-
bassador in Israel. Mub-
arak left Washington last
week after making it clear
that he will not be sending
back an Ambassador to Is-
rael any time soon.
Sen. Charles Percy (R., 111.),
chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, during the
committee's meeting with Mub-
arak Oct. 3, urged him to have
the Egyptian Ambassador re-
turned to Israel. Mubarak replied
that it was not possible at this
time, according to a Percy aide.
Meanwhile, Sen. Howard Met-
zenbaum (D., Ohio) is circulating
a letter urging Mubarak to send
the envoy back to Israel. An aide
to Metzenbaum said 22 Senators
have signed the letter, and at
least 30 signatures are expected
before the letter will be given to
the Egyptian Embassy here to be
forwarded to Mubarak.
REP. Lawrence Smith (D.,
Fla.), a member of the House
Foreign Affairs Committee,
presented Mubarak with a
similar letter signed by 22 Con-
gressmen during the House Com-
mittee's hearing with the Egyp-
tian President.
ENDOWMENT
FUND
December 31 Is only 71 days away.
Avoid the rush, establish your endowment Fund NOW.
You can help the Jewish community forever!
Telephone the South County Jewleh Federation et
368-2737
Marianne Bobick, President of the Federation;
Dr. Larry Charme, Men's Campaign Chairman;
Harvey Grossman, Campaign Director. Bottom
Row: Left to Right Arthur Halpert, Co-Chairman
and Secretary, Del-Aire; Howard Pittman, Co-
Chairman $1,500-3,500 Division; Arnold Rosen-
thai, Chairman, Boca Logo; Ed Bobick, Missions
Chairman; Al Gortx, Chairman Estancia;
Richard Levy, Chairman $100,000 Event; Rabbi
Bruce Warshal, Executive Director.
Israel Worried'
Egypt Violates Treaty, Rosenne Says
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Ambassador Meir Rosenne
of Israel accused Egypt of
violating its peace treaty
with Israel. "Israel is
worried and concerned over
Egypt's refusal to send
back its Ambassador to Is-
rael," the envoy told the
American Mizrachi
Women's national conven-
tion Saturday night at the
Sheraton Centre.
Egypt recalled its Ambas-
sador, Saad Mortada, after the
massacre by Christian
Phalangists of refugees in the
Sabra and Shatila camps in Leb-
anon. The Egyptians said at the
time that their Ambassador
would return to Israel after Israel
and Lebanon reached an agree-
ment, but has declined to do so to
date.
NOTING THAT Egypt has
declared that it refuses to return
its envoy to Israel because of Is-
rael's settlement policy in the
West Bank, Rosenne said: "The
Egyptians are clearly violating
the peace treaty. If they will not
send back their Ambassador wp
will have to think twice from now
on before we sign any peace
agreement with any other Arab
country."
Rosenne said that Israel made
tremendous concessions for its
peace treaty with Egypt, giving
up the whole Sinai, the oil wells
and the massive infrastructure of
roads and airfields built by Is-
rael. "After all these conces-
sions," he said, "we suddenly
find that Egypt is violating the
agreement."
Turning to the issue of
Lebanon, Rosenne warned that
Lebanon's right to exist inde-
pendently is presently at stake.
4e said that over 60 percent of
/ebanon is occupied by Syria,
>ut Syria refuses to withdraw
rom Lebanon as it was asked to
lo by the Lebanese government.
HE CHARGED that the inter-
national community turns its
back on Syria's continued oc-
cupation of Lebanon, and noted
that the UN Security Council did
not demand Syrian withdrawal
from Lebanon nor has the Euro-
pean Economic Community im-
posed sanctions on Syria, as they
did on Israel after the Lebanon
invasion.
Sen. Alfonse D'Amato (R.,
N.Y.) received in the course of the
meeting last night the American
Mizrachi Women's 1983 Amer-
ican Israel Friendship Award. It
was presented to him by Roselle
Silberstein, the organization's
national president.
In his remarks to the more
than 250 guests attending the
meeting, D'Amato warned of the
massive arms buildup in Syria.
He said that in addition to the
Soviet made SAM-5 missiles in
the hands of the Syrians the very
sophisticated SS-21 Soviet
missiles are "in Syrian hands or
on their way there."
He said the U.S. foreign policy
must not be based on "political
expediency" but on "justice." He
said a strong Israel is in Amer-
ica's interest in the Mideast.
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PaiceS-
/ni.- r~~v.J. Bl~w*Jinn nf Sinuth Cmintv
rnaay, juiyo, ii
Page8
TA* JewisA Floridian of South County
Friday, October 21, m,
Marianne Bobick
Bobick, Byrnes and Baer Appointed
Year-Round Delegates To The
Council Of Jewish Federations
Marianne Bobick, Bob Byrnes
and James Baer have been ap-
pointed year-round delegates
from the South County Jewish
Federation to the Council of
Jewish Federations.
These three individuals will
head the South County dele-
gition that will attend the
eneral Assembly of the Council
of Jewish Federations in Atlanta,
Nov. 16-20.
As year-round delegates, it will
be their responsibility to serve as
the Council's link to the local
South County Jewish Federation,
and to participate in the
governance of the Council of
Jewish Federations at the
General Assembly. As delegates,
they will have the responsibility
to register the three votes that
have been alloted to the Federa-
tion at the plenary sessions.
Marianne Bobick is the presi-
dent of the South County Jewish
Federation, and is past chairman
of the Community Relations
Council of the Federation.
Bob Byrnes is the chairman of
the Board of Trustees for the
Jewish Community Center of
South County and a past presi-
dent of Temple Beth El.
Jim Baer is the founding presi-
dent of the South County Jewish
Federation and is currently the
president of Temple Beth El.
Israel's President Chaim
Herzog, author Elie Wiesel, CJF
President Martin E. Citrin, UJA
General Chairman Robert Loup
and Meir Rosenne, the Israeli
Ambassador to the United
States, will be among featured
speakers addressing major
sessions at the General
Assembly.
The General Assembly brings
together volunteer and profes-
sional leadership from CJF's 200
member Federations in the
United States and Canada and is
the largest gathering held each
year of North American Jewish
community leaders. Registration
is expected to exceed 2,500.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions is the association of 200
Federations, Welfare Funds and
Community' Councils serving
nearly 800 I communities which
embrace over 95 percent of the
Jewish population of the United
States and Canada.
Established in 1932, the Coun-
cil serves as a national in-
strument to strengthen the work
and the impact of Jewish Federa-
tions through leadership in
developing programs to meet
changing needs in the Jewish
community; through the ex-
change of successful experiences
to assure the most effective com-
munity service; through
establishing guidelines for fund
raising and operation; and
through joint national planning
and action on common purposes
dealing with local, regional,
national and international needs.
Elaine Bloom Keynote Speaker At Update '84
The eagerly awaited Update
'84, South County Jewish
Federation Women's Division
Educational Day, will be held on
Monday, Dec. 5 at Temple Beth
El, 333 SW 4 Ave., Boca Raton
The Keynote Speaker of Up-
date '84 will be the Hon. Elaine
Bloom, highly acclaimed former
state legislator who now rep-
resents the Florida Association of
Jewish Federations in Talla-
Israel Bonds
Shows Success
At Kick-off
Appeal
Leo Brink, Delray chairman foi
the Israel Bond Campaign, is
pleased to announce that a very
successful High Holy Day bond
appeal was held in the three Del-
ray Synagogues, selling over
$100,000 worth of Bonds.
This kick-off appeal shows the
"concern our congregants feel for
Israel," said Brink. "It is only
the beginning for Delray in the
83-84 campaign with many more
exciting functions to follow this
winter. '
Mr. Brink extends a special
thank you to Temple Emeth,
Rabbi Silver and Morris Anapol-
sky, president; Temple Anshei
Shalom, Rabbi Kahn and Ed
Dorfman, president; and Temple
Anshei Emuna, Rabbi SacksL
Harry Silver, president, and Sam
Robinson, chairman of the Bond
Campaign.
In addition Brink thanks and
acknowledges all the ushers who
participated in collecting the
pledge cards as the congregants
voted for the people of Israel
hassee.
Through holding many im-
portant positions in Florida, Ms.
Bloom has emerged as one of
South Florida's leading women
over the past decade. She has
served as a member of the Board
of Directors of many community
organizations, and has also
received numerous awards. In
1977, she was the host of a
weekly TV show, followed in
1979-81 by a daily radio talk
show.
Elaine Bloom
She is listed in many national
and international Who's Who
volumes and was recently
profiled in the recent book "Late
Bloomers" by Lois Rich-McCoy,
published by Harper and Row.
This year, we are also privi-
leged to have as a morning guest
speaker, Eli Gurfel, a former
Russian refusenik. Eli is
traveling across the U.S. in-
forming the American Jewish
community of the plight and
needs of Russian Jewry.
Lois Romanoff is co-ordinator
of Update '84 "Images."
Working with her will be
Chairmen: Noni Jontiff, Regis-
tration and Packets; Marcia
Moser. Hostesses; Carol Sclove,
Displays and Decorations; Ann
Slossberg, Invitations. "This
informative day promises to be a
stimulating and exciting ex-
perience for the Jewish women of
South County," Mrs. Romanoff
said.
There will be three workshops
conducted by prominent speakers
during the morning session,
which will be announced shortly.
Invitations will be sent out in late
October at which time workshop
preferences can be made. The
day's program will begin with
coffee at 9 a.m. A luncheon will
be served after the workshops.
The dsy will conclude si appro-
ximately 2 p.m.
FANTASTIC SAVINGS
ON ALL TOURS TO ISRAEL
=
r
Organizations Please Contact Us For
LOWEST BUS TOUR RATES
ALICE'S TRAVEL WORLD
K-Mart Shopping Ctr.
9651 Military Trail
Boynton Beach, FL 33436
Bon Voyage to the participant* in the UJA-South County
Jewish Federation Mission to Israel/ Those pictured above
include (alphabetically) Mr. and Mrs. Ed Bobick, Mr. and Mrs
Saul Bradburd, Ms. Sybil Machson, Dr. and Mrs. Paul Noun,
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Rosenthal, Mr. and Mrs. David Saft, Mr
and Mrs. Abe Shapiro and Mr. and Mrs. Oene Squires. Joining
the South County delegation on the mission, but not pictured
are: Mr. and Mrs. Jim Baer, Mr. and Mrs. Larry Gottsegen and
Mrs. and Mrs. James Singer.
Administration Denies
Iraq Supports Terrorism
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration has re-
iterated that it does not be-
lieve that Iraq should be
considered a country that
supports international
terrorism, even though it
harbors one of the most
virulent of the Palestinian
terrorist groups, The Black
June movement headed by
Abu Nidal.
The Administration removed
Iraq in February, 1982, from the
U. S. government list of countries
which provide support for in-
ternational terrorists. This means
that under the Export Adminis-
tration Act, Congress will no
longer have to be notified of any
military'-related sales to Iraq.
HOWEVER, ever since the
Administration's action, there
have been efforts in Congress to
restore Iraq to the list of
countries that support interna-
tional terrorists. But State
Department deputy spokesman
Alan Romberg said that the
Administration does not consider
there is any "justification to re-
designate" Iraq on this list. He
added that "appropriate"
members of Congress and
Congressional staff have been
advised of the Administration's
view.
"The government of Iraq has
publicly denounced international
terrorism since at least Sep-
tember, 1982," Romberg said-
"Based on the evidence available
to us, we have no reason to
believe that the government of
Iraq has supported acts of in-
ternational terrorism since about
that time."
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0ctob21,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
i
"Airfare to Israel,
a hotel overlooking die sea,
and a car.
How can you do it for ^839?
\bu need friends?
Get a complimentary
Avis Rent A Car.
"You have them.
aEl Al, the Airline of Israel.
"And we've put together a
'Sunsation vacation
good enough for
friends.
"We're going to.
prove it to you from
the U.S. to Ben Gurior
Airport in Israel
and back again.
"El Al is the
only airline that flies
747s nonstop. So you
get to Israeland your vacationhours sooner.
"You'll get to stay at a superior hotel for six days and five nights.
"And to see more of Israel on your own, a complimentary Avis Rent A Car is pan of
the package for five days.
"If you like, you can add $100 to the $839 package
price and stay at the deluxe King David Hotel in Jerusalem,
our city of gold.
"Or you can choose the deluxe Dan Hotel in Tel Aviv.
It's our most modern city right on the Mediterranean.
"To get this much vacation from as low as $839 takes
more than a friend.
"It takes the airline of Israel.
"So call your travel agent. Or El Al at
1-800-223-6700."
w/---------...........
Stay 6 days/5 nights.
For complete tour details, call or write Sunsation Six Tour Desk:
El Al Israel Airlines, 850 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022.
Name
Address
dry
Suit
Zip
Come to Israel.
Come fly with friends.
Price per person/double occupancy effective November 15,1983 to February
29,1984. Offer not valid from 12/15/83 to 1/5/84 One Avis car per double
room; gas, mileage, and insurance charges not included If named hotels
unavailable, comparable accommodations will be substituted.
Package price based on New York-Tel Aviv round-trip only For prices from
your area, contact your travel agent or El Al.
The Airline of Israel.


Page 10
/hi.. r_OT.l> VU*wiAinm nf Onuth Count*
mi t
iruuy.duiy o, iw
TAa Jewish Floridian of South County
Fridy.Octob2l,i
The Academy of Jewish Studies
Sponsored By
South County Jewish Federation in cooperation with South
County Rabbinical Association and all Synagogues in the
area: B'nai Torah Congregation, Congregation Anshei Emuna,
Temple Anshei Shalom of West Delray, Temple Beth-El, Tem-
ple Beth Shalom, Temple Emeth, Temple Sinai.
Program A series of courses and lectures germain to Jewish life and study. Two semesters of
seven consecutive), week sessions each followed by a guest lecturer will be offered at two dif-
ferent locations, one in Boca Raton, the other in Delray Beach.
Purpose To encourage a sophisticated series of study sessions for interested adults, and to
raise the standard of Jewish awareness and scholarship in the community.
Delray Courses at Anshei Emuna
Thurt. Oct. 27, Nov. 3,10,17, Doc. 1,9 (Friday)
Anshei Emuna
16189 Carter Road
Delray Beach, Fl. 33445
499-9229
Qo west on Linton Blvd. to Carter Road. Go south on Carter Rd.
Temple Is on the right hand side.
9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m.
Course I
Instructor. Rabbi Samuel Silver, D.D.
TITLE: Great Jewish Personalities
Another cluster of outstanding personages who enriched
Jewish history will be highlighted in this course. During
various periods of Jewish history and including modern times
many leading individuals have helped to mold our heritage. We
will explore these individual's personalities, as well as their ef-
fects and contributions. Participants need not have partaken
in courses 1 and 2.
Boca Raton Courses at
Temple Beth Shalom
Tuas. Oct 25, Nov. 1,8,15,22,29, Dec. 6
Temple Beth Shalom
Administration Building
Century Village
Boca Raton, Fl. 33432
483-5557
From corner of Glades & Lyons, go north on Lyons to Klmberly.
From Klmberly go east to Century Village gate. From gate to
Administration Bldg. Synagogue on second floor.
9:30a.m. -10:30a.m.
Course II
Instructor Rabbi Louis L. Sacks
10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Title: "Pirke Avof- "Sayings of the Father"
This class will be devoted to an indepth study of "Pirke Avot"-
"Sayings of the Fathers." "Sayings of the Fathers" is the most
widely known of all the 63 tractates of the Mishna. It is unique
in character. The Mishna is primarily a code of laws covering
Jewish life-the contents therefore, is predominately legal. But
this Tractate is almost entirely concerned with moral conduct.
It consists for the greater part of the favorite maxims of the
Talmudic sages and is the epitome of their wisdom and ex-
perience. It extends over a period of nearly 500 years from 330
B.C.E.to200C.E.
Course III
Instructor Tamar Ben-Ami
Title: Ulpan Hebrew Class
11:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
A 1 Vt hour Ulpan Hebrew (Israeli Sepharadit) course will be of-
fered this year. Mastery of basic conversational Hebrew will
serve as the class objective. Basic Hebrew phrases will be ap
plied to situations involving shopping, eating in a restaurant,
holidays, apartment hunting, touring, kibbutz life, etc. Basic
grammatical construction and mastery of idioms, expression
and proverbs will also be covered. The class itself will assist
the teacher through their input as to the exact direction of the
class and the topics to be emphasized.
Course I
Instructor Rabbi Theodore Feldman
Title: Chumash Selections
The course will examine in depth selected portions of the
Torah. Using the inquiry method, the participants will be en-
couraged to discover new meanings and insights into the
Biblical mind. Both narrative and legal sections will be studied
as we search for the values inherent in our most sacred text.
10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.
Course II
Instructor. Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
Title: Basic Jewish Beliefs
The rabbi will outline and discuss what Jewish tradition has to
say about such themes as G-d, sin, suffering, death, life
hereafter, old age, relationship between parents and children,
"why bad things happen to good people," and other related
subjects. Ample opportunity for audience participation will be
afforded. The course will include serious as well as humorous
stories of legends for illustrative purposes.
Course III 11:30 a.m. -1:00 p.m.
Instructor Tamar Ben-Ami
Title: Ulpan Hebrew Class
A1 Va hour Ulpan Hebrew (Israeli Sepharadit) course will be of-
fered this year. Mastery of basic conversational Hebrew will
serve as the class objective. Basic Hebrew phrases will be ap-
plied to situations involving shopping, eating in a restaurant,
holidays, apartment hunting, touring, kibbutz life, etc. Basic
grammatical construction and mastery of idioms, expression
and proverbs will also be covered. The class itself will assist the
teacher through their input as to the exact direction of the
class and the topics to be emphasized.
Academy of Jewish Studies Registration Form
Name:.
Address:.
Phone:_________________________
Center: Boca Raton ? Delray ?
Mail to:
No fa. for members ofa participating synagogue Academy Of Jewish Studies
If you are not a member of a participating synagogue, a S5.00 registration fe C/O Bui*t LOyVMcht
payable to South County Jewish Federation,icoverlng any and all courses should accompany this form. 414 N.W 35th St
Check as may courses as you wish to take! Boca Raton, Fl. 33431
(Tuesday)
Time:
9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m.Lj|
10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.u
11:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. u\
(Thursday)
Time:
9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m.U
10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m.u
11:30 a.m.- 1:00 p.m. u


,v, October 21.1963
The Jewish Floridian of South Comity
Page 11
'Silent no more'
Soviet Jewry update
Odessa Actlvlet Receive.
^usual summoni
ODESSA Thirty-one year-
I Odessa activist Yakov Mesh
jived an unusual summons
> him to appear before
aiury authorities for reserve
- by Sept. 20. The summons,
BJlar to one received by
.jsoner of Conscience Lev
ilbert in April which led to his
onviction for draft evasion in
K,y, is unusual because such
is generally served only by
i ranking officers.
Mesh, like Elbert. completed
Larmy service almost a decade
o. Nevertheless, he was refused
emission to emigrate to Israel
i October. 1977 on the basis of
i military service. The current
appears to be an effort to
Re this refusal stick. It is not
vn whether Mesh will be
ered to report to a secret unit.
hen Klbert appeared at the
a(t office to request that he not
I sent to such a unit, his request
denied and a new summons
Elbert was further denied
ianswer by military authorities
his question concerning the
Dona fin the summons. The
was given under the
vlixt "I stati-security.
Mean has leen a victim of re-
galed harassment. He and his
id. Marina, were most recently
Bunoned to the KGB on June
and interrogated about a
lathering held at their apartment
i May I The KGB advised him
[grant an interview to the local
tiper in "publicly express
pel about his activities and
nounce Zionism, adding that if
did not do so, he would have
chance of leaving the USSR
hd joining his relatives in Israel.
ii'sh refused to answer any
lotions during the interroga-
pn.
Unlerestingly, exit visas have
entry been granted to 11
Pessa refusenika, none of whom
i activists.
Soviets Bar
49 Jewish Books
At Moscow Fair
[MOSCOW Soviet author-
es barred 49 books on Jewish
cts from the exhibit of the
sociation of Jewish Book Pu-
shers (AJBP) of New York at
Fourth Moscow International
k Fair, held Sept. 6-12.
Soviets Claim
Jewish Emigration
hannel"" Of Israeli Espionage
| MOSCOW An article
polished in the August 25 edi-
of Sovetskaya Rossiya
Jed that emigration from the
"is the channel along
uch Israeli intelligence en-
tvors to obtain Soviet
nets." Like the initial "Beware
onism" column which appeared
i April in the Leningrad daily
fningradskaya Prauda, the
characterized Hebrew
nguistic circles" aa "subver-
w services" and mentioned
feral activists by name:
-ADIMIR SLEPAK, A.
'UROV, YU. BERKOVSKY
S. LEVINSON. All were
cribed as acting from "peed"
a desire for "easy profit"
toning which evokes the
tional ar.ii Semitic stereo-
of the moiey-hungry Jew.
tempts to exiwse examples of
w-Semitism in the Soviet
luon, such as vandalism against
cem .-teries and syna-
u,ore passed off as
photomontage" designed to stir
anti-Soviet feehng."
New Book Out
|Anothr anti-Semitic atereo-
is echoed in a new book,
Truth Against Dema-
pu.;ry and Lies." A collection
Mcles published in Russian,
the book includes one parti-
cularly strident piece by V. Gan
entitled "How the Tail Wags the
Dog" which claims that virtually
every major American news-
paper, magazine and television
station "is under the direct
control, or at least influence, of
the Zionists." This allegation is
similar to that promulgated by
the Tsarist "Protocols of the
Elders of Zion," which spoke of
an "international Zionist cons-
piracy."
Senators Raise Issue
Of Soviet Jewry
With Andropov
MOSCOW A delegation of
nine Senators led by Clairborne
Pell (D., R.I.) raised the issue of
Soviet Jewry with Soviet leader
Yuri V. Andropov on August 18.
The Senators presented
Andropov with a letter signed by
86 of their colleagues expressing
"concern" over claims made by
the Anti-Zionist Committee that
the vast majority of Soviet Jews
who wanted to leave have already
gone. "Every member of the
United States Congress," the
letter stated, "is well aware of
many thousands more Soviet
Jews who desire to emigrate but
have so far been prevented from
doing so." An enclosed list of
names running many pages re-
presented but a "small sample"
of those who had applied to
emigrate. The letter also
registered "the strongest objec-
tions" to statements made at a
June 6 news conference held by
the Committee alleging wartime
collaboration between Nazism
and Zionism.
The other members of the dele-
gation included: Senators Dale
Bumpers (D., Ark.),Russell Long
(D., La.), Patrick Leahy (D., Vt.),
Howard Metzenbaum (D., Ohio),
Donald Riegle (D., Mich.), Paul
Sarbanes (D., Md.), Dennis
DeConcini (D., Ariz.), and James
Sasser (D.,Tenn.).
The issue of Soviet Jewish
emigration was raised separately
by Senators Edward Zorinsky
(R., Utah), and by Congressman
William H. Gray III (D.. Pa.) at
the Soviet Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.
Argentine Leaders' Manifesto
Repudiates Anti-Semitism
BUENOS AIRES -
(JTA) Leaders of the
main political parties of
Argentina, including the
Feronists and the opposi-
tion Radical Civic Union,
have signed a manifesto
categorically repudiating
anti-Semitism.
Meanwhile, a leadership dele-
gation of the country's Jewish
community held a private
meeting with President Renaldo
Bignone, during which they ex-
pressed concern at the recent
outbreak of anti-Semitism in the
country, it was reported by the
Latin American branch of the
World Jewish Congress here.
The manifesto, which was
signed by distinguished politi-
cians and intellectuals and pub-
lished in the press, appealed "to
the citizens to repudiate every
anti-Semitic attempt against
basic tenets of the Argentine
Constitition, the basis of national
coexistence." The signers noted a
renewal oi anti-Semitism and
racism "expressed through
various publications, violence
against Jewish schools, and
attacks on cultural institutions
and synagogues."
THE MANIFESTO stressed
that "public opinion should be
aware of the fact that anti-
Semitism, which is deplorable in
itself, is a means of destabilizing
democratic regimes and puts in
motion authoritarian
mechanisms." It further warned
that "in times of crisis anti-
Semitism and other forms of
racist discrimination are used by
elements who oppose pluralism
as a form of life and democratic
tolerance."
Among the political party
leaders who signed the statement
were Deolindo Felipe Bittel (Per-
onists), Raul Alfonsin (Radical
Civic Union), and Oscar Alende
(Intransigent Party).
Mesquite grilled fish Dry aged select shell
steak Stuffed pork chop Lobster tempura
Grouper "in the bag" Rack of lamh
Shrimp Jambalaya Cornish Hen Au Poivre
Kosher Calves Liver
Also serving lunch on the lighter side
Simply American
m
Lunch Umnor
r interstate Plaza -195, 1499 Palmetto Park Rd
Boca Raton. Fla (305) 39.'ri408
Place your bete. lo8u where wW Ihe neit trouble spot in Africa beT
Nalai Mercury
Advanced Weaponry
Claims Public Attention
TEL AVIV (JTA) Advanced weaponry claimed
public attention in Israel last week. A new improved
model of the Israel-made Merkava tank the Mark II
was unveiled at a public ceremony at Latrun, scene of a
bitter battle during Israel's war for independence. And
Israel Television disclosed that an Israel-manned
American Hawk missile downed a Soviet-built MIG-25
figher over Beirut in August, 1982.
THE ORIGINAL version of the Merkava (Chariot)
tank proved itself in action in Lebanon according to Maj.
Gen. (res.) Israel Tal, the man most responsible for the
design and production of the tank. He said the new model
has a 30-50 percent improved capability over the old. It is
more maneuverable, better protected and more accurate in
its fire power, Tal said.
According to Israel Television, modifications and
special tactics worked out by an Israeli technician
manning the Hawk battery were responsible for the MIG-
25 kill.
Delray Beach Condo
New 2 bedroom, 2 bath on intercoastal. Boat
dock available. Tennis courts, swimming
pool, etc. For sale by owner $122,000. for fur-
ther Information
Call:
(215) 368-8656 or (215) 368-2990.
Ask for Pat


*>**.
/hi.. r..;.ii vu^rlinm nf Sinutk Cnuntv
Friday, July 8,1968
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, October 21
SMS ImA AtJ6*UC .
3H V*& HV 2O0L.-
(/*/, V*-y MUCJf.
# LePT Me *o4
THE CtOTAiU 0F-7H*
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HtLLL Pit!
Portnoy Recalled: Are Jews More Neurotic Than Other Ethnics?
Continued from Page 5
imperturbable manner whom
many Jews think of first. Rabbis
and therapists subtly comple-
ment each other: the rabbi is
visited for God, the therapist for
self.
In another world and another
time, perhaps one less self-
conscious, the rabbi was the
diviner of souls, the arbiter oi
Laws. He was each town's
resident sage. The occasional
split between religion and
science, between soul and per-
sonality, between theology and
psychology has also split the
functions of the rabbi. Diviner of
souls he may still be, but it is the
therapist who, intentionally or
not, often upstages him.
In 1935, Freud rejected a
friend's notion that Jews were
more liable to neuroses because
they were looked upon as inferior.
"I am not so sure of that,"
Freud said. "Gentiles have
plenty of neuroses, too. Only, the
Jew is more sensitive, more
critical of himself, more de-
pendent on the judgment of
others. He has far leas self-
confidence than Gentiles .. .
Jews are less sadistic than
Gentiles, and neuroses
(generally) develop at the risk of
sadism; the more reckless a per-
son is, the less neurotic. Besides,
Gentiles drown their neuroses in
alcohol, and the Jew does not
drink."
THAT WAS almost half a
century ago. Since then, Jewish
alcoholism, sadism and reckless-
ness have all remained relatively
negligible. Yet, much is heard of
Jews' hangups and quirks.
Overbearing Jewish mothers,
passive Jewish fathers, com-
pulsive, guilty and perpetually
spoiled Jewish children, high
caloric. Jewish diets, non-stop
psychosomatic freltings have
made many a Catskills comedian
and Park Avenue psychiatric
wealthy.
Some of these are traits, not
neuroticisms. But others are
legitimate, neurotic symptoms
that may hit any ethnic group,
but to which Jews may be
particularly susceptible.
"There are neuroses that are
more likely to affect Jews,"
stated Irving M. Levine, director
of the American Jewish Commit-
tee's Institute on Pluralism and
Group Identity. "This is a
function of Jewish culture and
child-rearing approaches."
AMONG THE symptoms Le-
vine cited that are especially
common among Jews are ex-
cessive guilt, heightened aware-
ness of vocational success and
failure, frequent bodily com-
plaints and, a "classic Jewish
syndrome," male dominance at
work and his passivity at home,
which is still "the woman's
domain."
Much of the style of American
Jewry that reputed to foster
neuroses is either a holdover from
the days of the $kutl or an effort
to compensate for prejudice in
the New World. The infamous
stereotype of a smothering
mother, for instance the over-
bearing Jewish mother stems,
said Marion Levine, from life in
Eastern European ghettoes.
There, "it was functional to be
overprotective," she said. "It's
an historical cultural trait, but
one that has lost most of its
pragmatism."
Also, a fretting counterpoint to
the good things in life again, a
vestige of ghetto days is
common to "a goodly number" of
Jewish clients in Levine's clinic.
"If they say something is good
today," she said, "they'll worry
that it won't be good tomorrow.
Worrying is a more comfortable
style for them."
Many therapists often note a
relentless carping and negativity
among Jewish couples.
Historically, said Irving Levine,
this "is common to many oppres-
sed minority groups. They
cannot lash out at society, so
they lash out at each other."
AND JEW8 are occasionally
criticized for their "oatentatious-
ness." said New York psy-
chologist Stanley Rosenman. But
this materialism and gurishness.
he said, "are meant to fortify
against the put-downs of Gen-
tiles."
Until fairly recently, prejudice
was must commonly blamed for
the high rate of neuroses among
Jews. In the 1920s, for instance,
Dr. Israel S. Wechsler said Jews
were "intensely fearful" and "in a
perpetual state of anxiety." Also,
Jews' efforts to channel their
energies into "socially useful
activities" clashed with their
"strong individualism." In the
battleground between these two
forces, Wechsler said, "rages
eternally conflict."
By the early 1970s, though,
psychologists were looking more
at the inner life of the Jew as
well as the society in which he
lived to explain the source of
his neuroses. Most explanations,
though, still rested on the Jew's
minority status and history of
persecution.
Dr. I.D. Kinder, for example,
suggested that Jews' mental
health was closely linked to their
emphasis on sobriety and con-
trolling hostility and aggression.
Without the freedom, the
security or the cultural per-
mission to be aggressive, often
because of their carefully
mannered, structured life,
American Jews' hostility and
aggression have little chance for
expression. They must be
deflected inward. St. John's
University's Victor Sanua said
that Jews' "tendency to in-
ternalize aggression leads to
many psychosomatic symptons,
such as ulcers."
AND JUST as the Jew has
fewer outlets of behavior than the
Gentile, so too does he have fewer
possibilities of employment.
Coincidentally, the fields which
he has most cultivated lawyer,
teacher, doctor, scholar are the
very sort, according to Raphael
Patai, which may enhance neuro-
ses. All these demand extensive
use of the intellect. "Working
with the brain and not brawn,"
Patai said, "creates a fertile
environment for neuroses. Using
the intellect is not a neurotic
tendency in itself. But concentra-
tion creates a greater sensitivity
than being a bus driver or a
farmer."
One of the more recent theories
of the roots of Jewish neuroses
has come from Berkeley psycho-
logist Judith Weinstein Klein. In
recent years, Klein has used
"ethnotherapy" in her all-Jewish
encounter groups. Her premise is
that there is a strong relationship
between ethnicity and emotional
stability. Comfort or conflict over
ethnic identity can significantly
influence psychological growth.
Klein has generally concluded
that being Jewish in America
breeds a complex hybrid of pride
and shame, and yearnings for
assimilation and ethnic self-
preservation.
Participants in her encounter
groups are led through exercises
involving body image and
sexuality, oppression and
powerlessness, identification
with mythic figures in Jewish
history, and affirmation of their
Jewish identity. Klein discovered
that her encounter groups could:
divest one's ethnic group of
its lo'igic by exploring negative
It-clings and negative stereo-
types;
expose the dominant cul-
ture's influence on shaping at-
titudes and feelings about
oneself;
solve personal problems by
presenting them in a social and
historical context; and,
enhance self-acceptance, ac-
ceptance of Judaism and em-
pathy with other ethnic groups.
"ONLY BY an acceptance of
one's ethnic identity can you feel
better about yourself and
enhance your self-esteem," said
the American Jewish Com-
mittee's Joe Giordano, a family
therapist who has used ethno-
therapy with Italians.
"Every group has an historical
memory of prejudice that is
evident in all immigrant ex-
periences," Giordano added.
"This memory is such that even
second and third generation
members never feel quite com-
fortable with the main group.
And because of their shared
group memory, ethnic minority
members, no matter how much
they achieve, never feel they have
quite made it or feel that they are
not really deserving of it wher
they have."
"Any basic neurosis is a
conflict between two strong
forces. The modern Jew is caught
between two cultures, between
WASPs and the past. To find
some peace, the Jew must come
to grips with his Jewish iden-
tity."
PERHAPS PEACE can come
not just because the conflict
slackens. There is much within
Judaism than can stave off
neuroses. According to a
Belmont, Massachusetts rabbi,
Earl Grollman, Jews "are a much
more cohesive people than others.
They have more social charities:
they are more involved in social
action."
Of the excessive guilt which
Jews are reputed to have,
Grollman, who has written ex-
tensively on psychology and
religion, said, "it can make your
work harder. It can make you
more creative. The Jewigh God is
a demanding God; the Mother
Mary is a forgiving God. Guilt
has a lot to do with demand. We
have a God who does not let us
relax." Of the prejudice real or
feared that can foster Jewish
neuroses, Jews, Grollman said,
must "have a high antenna as an
ego defense. You can't be a Jew
and accept the status quo. Only
Borden's cows are content."
And the Jewish tendency to
live separately from Gentiles can
bolster the ego, binding the
family together and cementing
communal support. The security
and the familiarity of Jewish
family and communal life can be
an antidote to the unknowns ol
life, helping "people cross over
easily to the larger world despite
some initial paranoia and chauvi-
nism," according to Irving
Levine.
Statistics and popular myth
indicate that Jews are especialh
susceptible to neuroses, but then
is some dispute about whether
Jews' neuroses are increasing o
abating. Anthropologist Rapha
Patai is convinced that thei
have been less neuroses amon
Jews over the last decade. "A
the position of Jews in the West
has improved," Patai said,
"tensions that create neuroses
have decreased. Also, the
creation of the Stale of Israel has
increased Jews' self-confidence
and self-assurance; they know
that there is a place in the world
where they are not helpless."
BUT PSYCHIATRIC social
worker Marion Levine took a
more personal, less global view
and concluded that neuroses
among Jews have been rising
recently. Breakdowns
family, high divorce m
"loosened boundaries and
restrictions" have all created i
environment conducive
neuroses, she said.
"There are too many optional
our society," she said, "and I
of fall-out from the economy i
society and the family. Pec
don't know what to do. Mayb,
someday, we'll pull ourselve
together."
In one sense, the Jew is nol
different from the rest off
America: collapsing families, i]
deteriorating economy, vagutl
and transient values have littered!
our national psyche. There havtl
been victims and very few heroes.(
But these are the signs of the I
moment. In the long run, the Jew!
is still someone different,!
someone unique someone apart!
His discreteness lends him an I
identity, one which he can em-|
brace or ignore or eschew. It's I
and society's attitude
toward this historical and sociail
and cultural role that can susUial
mental health. Or undermine it
JEWS AND popular cullurej
must realize that it is not beini
Jewish that produces neuroeat
Neuroses come from a Jew's -I
and society's stance toward
Judaism, toward the freedoms or
the constrictions that Judaism i
America allows. As Grollmu
said, "There is something ver?|
special about being Jews:
something visible and vi
mysterious. Being Jewish
being different. Does this meai
being neurotic?"
After 274 pages of Portnoy'
blistering complaint. Philip Rot
gives his anti-hero's patient aw
previously silent listener three
almost mono-syllabic sentences:
"So," said Portnoy's psy-
chiatrist. "Now vee may perhaps
to begin. Yes?"
To begin to understand tta
Jew and his neuroses is to begMJ
to understand the Jew in m
world, the Jew in America, IN
Jew in his own heart. And that*
to begin to understand the wy
humanity, to grapple with life
its fullest. To do less is to P
petuate the very neuroses w
may hamper us, the very
neuroses which have led to sue*
mutlerings as Portnoy's.
AU Publication RightsIUur*d
vrucfcl
Help Wanted
ASPIRING CAMP DIRECTOR
Top Northeast camp. Minimum age 30. Experienced in
all phases of camping, energetic, personable, willinj
to train and earn a year-round salary. Send resume
Box ACD c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973, Miami.
Florida 33101.
.....


y, October 21. 1963
The Jewish Floridian of South County
13
Organizations In The News
BRANDEIS
n(W, Women of Boca w 01
T^Tnext moating, Monday
24 at 10 a.m. at Temple Both
"333 SW 4 Ave., Boca. The
jpeaker will be Evelyn
. of "Touchstones," who
fijgeuas an innovative techni-
' 0Ued "Life Conversations."
shments will be frved.
, please mark your calendar
"Saturday, Nov. 5 at 8 p.m.,
r the gals western dance to be
,,t the Civic Center, 120 NE
I Ave., Boynton Beach. Casual
social dancing, square
ing and mixers. The caller is
Ep O'Brien. Refreshments will
served. Donation: $3.76.
call Freda Silverman 499-
01or Marj Aaron 737-3699 for
ervations and further informa-
ORT
[Women's American ORT-Del-
Chapter will hold their next
ting on Wednesday, Oct. 26
12 noon in the American
ivings Bank, W. Atlantic Ave.,
ay Beach. The guest speaker
be Mr. Mark Stow,
eminent nutritionist speaking
1 "Proper Nutrition for Health-
1 Living."
Women's American ORT-Del-
f is sponsoring a one day shop-
; spree to the Aventura Shop-
Mall and then lunch at
opernick Restaurant on Mon-
iy, Oct. 31. For further infor-
ition, please call Eva Herman
M179 or Sylvia Breitman 272-
11.
Women's American ORT-Del-
t Chapter will hold their in-
illation of officers Tuesday,
t. 25 at 2 p.m. at Town Center
nmunity Room located in
\am Center Mall, Glades Road,
All members and guests
invited to attend. Refresh-
ents will be served.
Women's American ORT-Boca
Chapter will hold their
nt meeting on Monday, Oct. 23
12 noon at the Boca Greens
Clubhouse. The guest speaker
I be Dr. Andre Flaydell on the
ppic "Nutrition and Related
ubjects." Refreshments will be
kved.
Women's American ORT-Boca
tury Chapter will have a piid-
1 luncheon on Wednesday, Nov.
9 at the Ebbtide Restaurant.
Some of the functions of the or-
ganization will bo depicted
musically in a aeries of skits.
Luncheon and transportation for
$10. Please call Henrietta Gursky
482-6731 for reservations.
PIONEER WOMEN
Pioneer Women-Kinneret
Chapter will hold their Scotch
Bowling Tournament on Sunday,
Oct. 23 at 7 p.m. at the Don
Carter Bowling Lanes in Boca.
The charge is $10 per couple. For
further information, please call
Helen Nathan 498-1441. Also,
please note the next meeting will
be held on Monday, Oct. 24 at 1
p.m. in the Palm Greens Club-
house in Delray. Ms. Jayne
Minton will demonstrate how to
properly apply cosmetics with
the topic "Put Your Best Face
Forward." Coffee hour will start
at 12 noon. Ms. Minton operates
six salons and has written ar-
ticles for Cosmopolitan
Magazine.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women-Boca
Chapter will hold their opening
meeting and paid-up membership
mini-luncheon on Thursday, Oct.
27 at 12 noon at Temp e Beth El,
333 SW 4 Ave., Boca laton. For
reservations, please ct Frieda at
482-4512, Miriam at A )2-3487 or
Esther at 482-8860.
B'NAI TOR Ail
B'nai Torah Congregation,
1401 NW 4 Ave., Boca will be
holding Adult Education Courses
Monday mornings Nov. 14 from
10 a.m. to 12 noon and Thursday
evenings, Oct. 20 and Nov. 17
from 7:30 p.m. to 9:46 p.m.
For further information, costs,
etc., please call the synagogue of-
fice at 392-8566.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Temple Beth Shalom-Sister-
hood will hold their next meeting
on Monday, Oct. 24 at 10:30 a.m.
in the Administration Bldg.. sec-
ond floor, Boca Raton. Come on
time for the boutique and re-
freshments. An interesting pro-
gram is planned. For further in-
formation, please call Tillie 482-
2783 or Sylvia 482-7207.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Temple Beth El-Solos will have
a meeting and lunch featuring
Live Musical Entertainment on
Sunday. Oct. 30 at 11:30 a.m. at
the synagogue located 333 SW 4
50
Automobile And
Homeowners
Policies From
Metropolitan
I J*J ow I can offer you sutomo-
and homeowners Ineor-
** you can got the same MB*
** asrvlee from MetropoMtan
*P"tV and UaMNty Insurance
company that you've enjoyed
w your Mfamourmw Hum teet-
hpomanUfe.
n*be glad to tatk wtth you about
> details and 1
IEORQESCHRBBER
^'Repreaontatlva
BROvVARD 473-1291
'ALM BEACH 483-2101
^WHeeftNAulo/Home/ftattmmanl
Metropolitan
PrPrty and Liability Ins. Go.
Warwick. R[
Ave., Boca Raton. Singles
years old and over are invited.
By rasenaUua only. For infor-
mation and reservations, please
call Esther 499-8325. Ray 499-
1207, Shirley 427-8810, Millie
499-3771. Solo members S3 and
guests $5.
AMERICAN RED MAGEN
DAVID FOR ISRAEL
The Ramat Gen Chapter of
ARMDI, Delray-Boynton is
holding their next meeting on
Tuesday, Oct. 25 at 7:30 p.m. at
the American Savings Bank, At-
lantic Ave., Delray Beach. Re-
freshments will be served and all
are invited to attend. For further
information, please call Mark Sil-
verton 499-4706 or M. Lutzker
499-2471.
TEMPLE SINAI
Temple Sinai Congregation an-
nounces that Rabbi Samuel Sil-
ver's Sabbath evening sermon
will be "The Dawn of Hospital-
ity" for Friday, Oct. 21 at 8:16
p.m. to be held at Cason United
Methodist Church, N. S win ton at
4th St.. Delrav. The discourse
will be based on a portion of the
18th chapter of the Book of
Genesis which the rabbi will read
from the Jonah Scroll and then
translate line by line into
English.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood will
hold their next meeting on Mon-
day, Oct. 24 at 12 noon at the
American Savings Bank, W. At-
lantic Ave., Delray Beach. The
program will feature Rabbi
Samuel Silver, Rabbi Louis
Sacks and Rabbi Bernard Silver.
Friends and guests are welcome,
and refreshments will be served.
Also, please mark your calendar
for the sisterhood Card Party and
Luncheon to be held on Wednes-
day, Oct. 26 at the Waterfalls
Restaurant, 429 N. Federal
Hwy., Deerfield Beach. For res-
ervations, please call Mary Men-
kin 499-5648. Florence Greenberg
498-8762.
HADASSAH
Hadaasah-Sabra, Lighthouse
Point Chapter will hold their next
meeting on Thursday, Oct. 27 at
8 p.m. New members are wel-
come. For reservations and
further information, please call
Carol Stein 482-8128, Alice
Zelinka 3919154 or Rachel
Greenstein 368-7977.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
The National Coaacfl of Jewish
Women-Boca Delray will sponsor
s new member coffee at 8 p.m. on
Monday, Oct. 24 at a member's
home. For details, please call 368-
1266. Alao. on WOBBOSday. Oct.
26 at 8 p.m. the meeting will cele-
brate the 90th anniversary of the
National Council of Jewish
Women. The celebration includes
a slide presentation of NCJW's
achievements through the years
and a fashion show representing
the fashions from each of the nine
decades. A wine and cheese party
will culminate the festivities. For
further information, please call
SM-\2f.
Transportation Now Available
For JCC After School Program
Beginning Monday, Nov. 7,
the South County Jewish Com-
munity Center will provide trans-
portation from your child's
school to the South County Com-
munity Day School (located at
414 NW 35 St., in Boca Raton).
For those of you who are
unfamiliar with the program, the
South County JCC is now of-
fering an After School Program
in cooperation with South
County Community Day School,
for children from three years old
through the sixth grade. This
program is led by staff members
from the Day School. The
program is broken down into
three periods to include super-
vised play, study time and arts
and crafts. Classes are held
Monday through Friday from
3:30-5:30 p.m. Listed below are
the current schedules for bus and
pick-up time: J.C. Mitchell El-
ementary, 2:05; A.D. Henderson
School, 2:20; Temple Beth El.
2:36: Boca Academy, 2:55;
Addison Mizner (Pick-Up time is
questionable, depending on
number of students participating
in program.)
The weekly cost for chfldren
ither than Day School Students
r: $15, 5 days; $13.75, 4 days;
* 0.50. 3 days; $7.00.2 days.
For information call 395-6540.
Community Calendar
October 23
Temple Beth El Book Fair Review 9 a. m.-12 noon Temple Beth
El-Solos 10 a.m. meeting Temple Emeth-Brotherhood 9:30
a.m. breakfast.
October 24
Brandeis Women-Boca Century Village 10 a.m. showcase
meeting Brandeis Women-Boca 10 a.m. showcase meeting
Pioneer Women-Kinneret 12:30 p.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Boca Glades Chapter 12 noon meeting
Temple Beth Shalom-Sisterhood 10:30 a.m. meeting Temple
Sinai Sisterhood 12 noon meeting.
October 25
Pioneer Women-Zipporah 12:30 p.m. meeting
American ORT-Delpointe Chapter meeting 2 p.m.
Women's
October 2*
Hadassah-Aviva 12 noon meeting National Council Jewish
Women-Boca Oelray 8 p.m. meeting Women's American
ORT-Delray 12 noon mooting Women's American ORT-
Sandalfoot 1:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah-Menachem Begin -
9:30 a.m. membership tea.
October 27
B'nai B'rith Genesis Chapter 12 noon meeting Temple Beth
El 8 p.m. Board meeting Women's American ORT-Orioles -
12:30 p.m. meeting Anshei Emuno-Sisterhood 10 a.m. -
Board meeting Hadassah-Sabra 8 p.m. meeting.
^ t0, mwmw*1 coMsoivATive ^
|||4lO"^ in the spirit of Solomon Schechtcr '^W
We are pleased to announce the formation of a new organization in the
Conservative Movement dedicated to the traditional ideas on which the
movement was founded.
IF YOU BELIEVE THAT CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM
SHOULD REMAIN TRUE TO ITS HISTORIC MISSION THAT:
CONSERVATIVE JUDAISM IS TRADITIONAL JUDAISM
e EVOLUTIONARY CHANGE IS IN ORDER, NOT REVOLUTIONARY CHANGE
JEWISH LAW MAY BE DECIDED ONLY BY THE FOREMOST TALMUDIC SCHOLARS
THE FAMILY IS THE CORNERSTONE OF JEWISH LIFE
IUDAISM SANCTIFIES DISTINCT ROLES FOR MEN AND WOMEN IN RITUAL LIFE
SHABBAT AND KASHRUT ARE BASIC FOR MEANINGFUL JEWISH SURVIVAL
THEN YOU ARE NOT ALONE.....)OIN US!
Due to the holydays we were unable to list all the names
that we received. They will appear in our next ad.
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on. oums> ttt^omn
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Q SeWOLC MEMBERSHIP $10
0 FAMILY MEMBERSHIP $18
Q CONTRACTING MEMBERSHIP $------
mmSt&sfo box *m
PO BOX


Pages,
rmt. T~..
.L Vl-iJi- r,f Knuth CntUltV
Friday. July 8.1983
1
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Octobw 2i
A Rabbi
Comments
Rabbi Merle Singer
The following is brought to Floridian readers by the South
County Rabbinical Association. If there are topics you would
Uke our Rabbis to discuss, please submit them to the Floridian.
By RABBI MERLE SINGER
Yitzhak Shamir, age 68, Foreign Minister, long time friend,
intimate confidant, a sharer of life and thought with Menachem
Begin, has become Israel's eighth Prime Minister. That is where
the news has taken us these last few weeks. But the process of
being, of living alongside greatness, expressed through an
admittance to life's fragility, that is what has stirred me, and I
think so many.
This has not been a time in which we lived apart from, but
with the penetrating eyes of human resignation!. It has not been
a time of analysis, of calculating juggling for power, though that
has been there. It has been a time to stand witness to that which
is akin to a father gathering his loved ones together and saying,
"I cannot go on, the burden has become to great, and now before
it is too late, let me hand you the responsibility that is
ultimately greater than any one of us."
There has been sadness, a \ choking;of emotion, end why not,
when you stand in the presence of greatness, greatness that
becomes real, because it admits to and lets shine through a
hnrnammsi within

" The newspapers read Uke obituaries, "Underground fighter
rose to lead Israel ... he signed an historic treaty ... the 70-
year-old leader who signed a peace treaty with Egypt and waged
a controversial war in Lebanon ..." But the newspapers can
never n ipries the full color of the parties. How can they be
expected, in their one dimensional news analysis, to understand
that we have been witness to a deeply Jewish tradition, the
writing of an ethical will, the first chapter of which began to
unfold as we moved from one weak to the next?
An Ethical Will, that document in which a man admits that
his days win not outlive his dreams, dreams which he preserves
in writing to his children, against the day when he will no longer
be there to guide, direct, nudge, sometimes gentry, sometimes
with the force of thunder. An Ethical Will in which will be in-
scribed the dreams, the hopes and ideals that sometimes found
their way into his reality of being, and at others remained but an
open promise, all to be there for his children to discover, nurture
and nourish when the presence is no longer present.
I went to share a feeling for this man that is truly Jewish in
thought and flavor. One that goes beyond the facts that took
place, the judgments that were made, Jewish wisdoms of which
so many of us in the Jewish world take grave or at least cautious
exception to. For it is not the fact nor the judgment wherein lies
the message, but in the willingness to open up and be, to expose
to the light of day, that fire within, sacred in purpose, exciting in
being, to live without fear of being determined. To live with a
memory of what it is to be the captive and conquered, a memory
that comes to haunt when as the conqueror it is easy to forget.
Complex, contradictory? Contrary? Of course, but since when
has life and those who are willing to live it honestly ever not
been complex, contradictory and controversial.
To get the feelings, let's begin with the facts ... of a man who
said of himself: "You call me a terrorist, but I call myself a free-
dom fighter. Everything I did was for the freedom of the Jewish
people, which never had known mercy from any persecutor."
Menachem Begin was of the "generation of Holocaust and
Redemption." One of the last of the founding generation likely
to ascend to the prime minister's office. Though a pioneer of the
State, Begin waited 29 years in opposition, suffering eight
election defeats before the party he formed came to power.
Once in office, Begin acted with breathtaking swiftness. Six
months later he received Egyptian President Anwar Sadat in
Jerusalem, and a stunned world that is more used to rhetoric
rather than action watched as this "Hawk from Israel" opened
the way to peace via Camp David that won the two leaders the
1978 Nobel Peace Prize.
After the triumph, the action continued. Within five years,
Begin declared that Jerusalem is Israel's "eternal and in-
divisible I capital," destroyed Iraq's nuclear reactor in Baghdad,
annexed Syria's Golan Heights, set up more than 140 set-
tlements in occupied Arab land and invaded Lebanon.
Then there was the return of the Sinai to Egypt in accordance
with the Camp David accords, a promise kept, despite the agony
of uprooting 4,000 Jewish settlers in what Begin called the
traumatic price for peace.
The Lebanon campaign scattered the PLO army to eight
nations but ended with a 10-hour bombing of Beirut and a
massacre by Christian Phalangists of Palestinians in the Sabra
and Shatila refugee camps. A panel of inquiry castigated the
Prime Minister, his officials and top generals, adding to the grief
of this war that yet plagues the country. And, so, we ask, from
whence was the fire in this man kindled.
Menachem Begin grew up in Poland where beseemed to
defend his sentiments with his fists. "There were times when I
came home bruised end bloodied, but with the feeling that my
honor waa intact," he said, "I learned that those who hit me
treated me with respect when I hit back ..."
Fund Drive Halted
Dead Sea Canal Now An 'Uncertainty'
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
The international campaign
to raise funds for a pro-
posed Mediterranean-Dead
Sea canal has been halted
amid uncertainty over
whether the $1.3 billion
project should go ahead.
Sources at the European head-
quarters of the State of Israel
Bonds Organization confirmed
here that it had suspended "some
time ago" sales of low interest
shares in the scheme, intended to
generate cheap electricity at a
hydro-electric station on the
Dead Sea.
The Bond Organization has
already raised about $100 million
worldwide to be used as "seed
money" for feasibility studies.
Its decision to drop the canal
from its fund-raising programs
followed fierce disagreeement
over the canal project scheme
between Israel's Finance
Ministry and the Energy
Ministry.
PRIOR TO Premier Menachem
Begin's resignation, the Finance
Ministry had been pressing for a
two-year postponement of the
project because of Israel's
perilous economic situation. This
was resisted by the Energy
Ministry which wanted the feasi-
bility studies to proceed.
During a visit to London last
week, Israeli Energy Minister
New Orthodox
Congregation Forming
In Boca Raton
A recent trend in other parts of
the country has finally reached
Palm Beach County, the
resurgence of Orthodox Judaism
A group of 25 to 30 young Jewish
families will be meeting on Oct.
23, to establish a new Orthodox
synagogue in Boca Raton.
Attending this meeting will be
a representative from Yesbiva
University of New York and
Rabbi Warren Kasztl of Congre-
gation Shaare Telf illah of Kendall
who will advise the attendees of
the organizational requirements
necessary to form a new Ortho
dox Community. All interested
persons are welcome to come. For
more information call 483-8616.
Yitzhak Modai told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he ex-
pected a firm government deci-
sion in 1986 on whether the canal
should be built. The decision
originally was to have been made
next year.
It will depend in part on three
related reports currently being
carried out at the cost of $30
million. They deal with the
canal's effects on Israel's under-
ground fresh water table; on the
geological difficulties of building
a tunnel through the Judean
mountains; and the effect of
diluting the Dead Sea with less
saline water from the Mediterra-
nean.
A FINAL report on the first of
these was almost ready, Modai
.said. He expected it to coney
that the risk of damaging |
sweet water aquifers would
"almost eliminated" if the
water canal followed a route
ferred by the government, in t
region of the Gaza Strip.
The report on the geology
the 81-kilometer route of
tunnel which would carry
water under the Jude,
mountains will be due in anoth
year, Modai said. It would i
dicate whether the tunnellii
coats could be reduced to or*
third of the total capital cost i
key financial condition for ft
construction.
The third, and most ci
report, would examine possit
damage to the Dead Sea's vi
ble potash deposits.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:16 p.m., Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Minyan on Monday and Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEIEMUNA
16189 Carter Road 1 block south of Linton Blvd., Delrav
Beach, Florida 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks
Daily Torah Seminar preceding services at 7:46 a.m. and 5pm.
Sabbath and Festival Services 8:46 em. Sabbath Torah data 5
p.m. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan I
Association Office, West Atlantic, corner Carter Road, Defray
Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m. i
and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 499-6687. Temple I
Office 14600 Cumberland Drive, Debey Beach, Fla. 33446,!
Phone 495-0466. Rabbi Emeritus Jonah J. Kahn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at 8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
Month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, Fla. 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily ServicM !
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m., Sunday 9 a.m. Reuben
Saltzman, President, Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-5557.
TEMPLE EMETH
,77Mi West At bruit- Ave.. Delray Beach, Fla. 33445. tun
servative. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A Silver, Rabbi; Naftaly
A. Linkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m.,
Saturday at 8:45 a.m., Daily Minyans at8:46 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Cason United Methodist Church, 342 N. Swinton Ave. (corner
Lake Ida Rd.. Delray Beach, Fl. Reform. Mailing Address: P.O.
Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi
Samuel Silver, President Samuel Rothstein, 276-6161.
v^^zz^^&^m^mmmimmmmmmmmms!
A
COMMUNITY
NEIGHBOR.
Joseph Rubin is a dedicated man, devoted to his
family, his business, his community. For many years he
has been actively involved in fraternal, civk end temple
organizations helping and supporting people with
sensitivity and integrity, as a community leader, as a
neighbor and as a friend.
He brings these same caring qualities to his position as director and owner of Beth
Israel, bouth Palm Beach County s only Jewish Funeral Home...thoughtfully attend-
ingi to every detail in his own very personal and compassionate manner. Joseph
Kuwn-aiways there as friend of the community... as well as friend in time of need.
JB55K25s: BETH ISRAEL KUBIN
the thoughtful and considerate OWaK CHAPCL
penondoesit Am about the Famty
Protection Plan which provides se-
curity and peace of mmd for you and
your loved ones.
i
hi'in
499.8000/732-3000
3


October 21.1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 15
I"
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4628
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
48.77
^6J.
31
1.67
SIZE
PR*CE
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
31.18
31.94
33.97
36.13
41.98
44.29
F.E.T
1.36
1.23
1.48
1.60
1.84
1.98
4L30
1.79
1 64
1 78
1 93
SMALL TRUCK
SPECIAL
Y45WHITEWALL
600x14
6 PLY
41
2 06 FET
L A I

Y8M > Sttel flstf to HaA
SIZE PRICE F.E.T.
175/70SR13 41.47 1 64
185/70SR13 44.62 1.78
185/70SR14 47.25 1.91
195/70SR14 50.45 209
205/70SR14 57.14 2.40
206
231
247
249
LOW PRICES,
EXPERIENCE
& INTEGRITY
THAT SAVE
YOU MONEY
Since 1924 Norton Tire Co. has
offered quality brands, competitive
pricing, fast & efficient service.
T/A high tech specialist store
managers, certified mechanics,
personal integrity plus guaranteed
satisfaction You pay no extra for our
service and experience.
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1740 E SuncmSVO 4U-75M
PLANTATION
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110JK UnntfMyDf 435-13*3
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4411 W Commwcm Mk) 736-2772
t*TAMARAC
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FO*MANO SEACM
3131 N FtOtfHiHw* 43^200
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22*3* MttoflllM 427-MOO
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3*MJogRd 9M-1014
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532N UMBtvO 42544
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SntMM tOMOntHwy 74S-921S
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4604 Swim 4th SI 4*4*020
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7SS2HISM* 5*7 1174
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907Vohiww 233-7U7
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20*5 E Kiramli 774 4443
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS

* (WlSTTmT^rri


110
Page 16
in.- i-,.;.i. Bt^mtJinm nfKnuth Cntmtv
The Jewish Floridian of South County
r naay, juiy o, iw
Frkiy.Octob
21.
VANTAGE
THE TASTE OF SUCCESS
GreatTaste
with Ultra LowTar.
Thats Success!
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Hearth
0.51
by FTC