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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( August 19, 1983 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
August 19, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00127

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
August 19, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00127

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
[^5- Number2
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, August 19,1983
FrmdSfiocft
Price 35 Cents
ihultz: Settlers Have
'Right' to Remain
rDAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
\fi) Secretary of State
orge Shultz reiterated
lited States opposition to
Israeli settlements
; built on the West
ak, but stressed that
vs who live there now
pe the "right" to remain
Judaea and Samaria.
I think that the principle that
|s have the right to live on the
.. Bank to the Israelis is an
ortant principle and I agree."
aid in an appearance on NBC-
'M.ft the Press."
Shultz's comment was made in
response to a question about the
State Department statement that
it would be "impractical" to
dismantle the settlements now
there. The statement followed the
U.S. veto of an Arab-sponsored
resolution in the United Nations
Security Council calling for the
international community not to
provide Israel any assistance
that could be used for the settle-
ments.
IN EXPLAINING the veto,
the U.S. Ambassador, Charles
Lichenstein, said it would be
neither "practical or even appro-
priate to call for the dismantling
of the existing settlements" as
the resolution urged.
Shultz said that the U.S. posi-
tion was "perfectly consistent"
with what President Reagan said
in his Sept. 1 peace initiative.
"Insofar as the settlements on
the West Bank are concerned,
one could foresee them staying
right where they are, but the resi-
dents of those settlements would
live under the legal jurisdiction of
whatever legal jurisdiction
resulted from the negotiations,"
the Secretary said.
"That is distinct from what
happened in the Sinai," Shultz
added. In the Sinai all Jewish
settlements were dismantled as
part of the Eygptian-Israeli peace
Continued on Page 6
mat Holocaust Did Not Exist
Janada's Anglican Church Rejects
lAnti-Semitism and Statements
By BEN KAYFETZ
rORONTO (JTA) -
series of resolutions
|>pted by the General
nod of the Anglican
ireh of Canada calls on
church members to re-
expressions of anti-
Semitism and to acknowl-
edge "the reality that the
Nazi regime executed mil-
lions of Jewish people and
members of other racial
groups from 1937 to 1945
on account of race.''
The General Synod also urged
that "courses of study on World
Dutch Daily Called
singer 'Frustrated Jewboy*
AMSTERDAM (JTA) Letters have been
iging the leading Dutch daily, NRC Handelsblad, in
test against a cartoon of former U.S. Secretary of
jte Henry Kissinger which carried a caption,
Kistrated Jewboy Responsible for United States
[tral American Policy."
The cartoon, by Frits Mueller, appeared after
sident Reagan named Kissinger to chair the National
tisan Commission on Central America. In an earlier
son, Mueller depicted Kissinger as a very ugly Jew.
Several letter writers, both Jews and non-Jews,
tested against the description of Kissinger as a
istrated Jewboy." The newspaper has so far refused
ji/.e, nor has Mueller apologized or reacted in any
Ipologia
War II in all school systems in-
clude reference to the acts of gen-
ocide by the Nazi regime" and
that copies of this resolution be
sent to the Premiers and leaders
of opposition parties in all 10 pro-
vinces of Canada as well as to the
ministers of education in the pro-
vinces and territories.
THIS RESOLUTION was
seen by some observers as an al-
lusion to what has become known
as the Keegstra affair in Eckville,
Alberta. James Keegstra, a
teacher in the town of Eckville, of
which he is also Mayor, has been
instructing his students that the
mass extermination of Jews
during the war was a highly
exaggerated story part of an
international Jewish conspiracy.
The Anglican's commitment to
combat anti-Semitism was em-
phasized in a letter to Rabbi
Robert Sternberg, director of the
national religious department of
the Canadian Jewish Congress,
by the Rev. Brian Prideax, ecu-
menical officer of the Anglican
Church. Prideaux wrote:
"It is shameful that such
statements (the resolutions)
should still be necessary, but we
want to assure the Jewish com-
munity in Canada of our whole-
hearted support against bigotry
and racism in our society."
:C Intiates 'Opinion Molders' Program
** Community Relations
K'l of the South County
Federation, comprised of
[>ver 55 Jewish organizations
outh County, is the instru-
' adoption on issues rele-
to quality Jewish life at
' and abroad. One of its goals
build bridges between the
sn community and the non-
Bn community.
[w*rd this end the CRC,
v the Chairmanship of
on Kretsky, will be institu-
[what is referred to as the
N>n Molders" program. A
list of prominent, non-Jewish
individuals in the South County
area has been compiled, which
includes elected public officials,
clergymen, high school princi-
pals, bankers, presidents of
universities-colleges and
members of the media. A letter
will be sent to each identified
person, stating that he-she is
considered a leader in the com-
munity, and requesting their
participation in the program. A
response will be requested; each
person responding affirmatively
will then receive a free sub-
scription to the Near East
Report, phis other documents
regarding the situation in the
Middle East.
"As the Jewish voice in South
County, I feel it is our responsi-
bility (the CRC) to not only raise
Jewish consciousness in our com-
munity, but also to provide
accurate information regarding
events in the Middle East to local
influential people. The program
will certainly foster positive
inter-faith relations and provide a
broader understanding of the
facts concerning Israel's activi-
ties." commented Mr. Kretsky.
Joe Zinns
Marilyn Zinns
Leadership Development
Chairmen Named
Marianne Bobick, President of
the South County Jewish
Federation, is pleased to an-
nounce the appointment of Dr.
Joseph and Marilyn Zinns as
Chairmen of Leadership
Development for 1984.
Leadership Development is a
very specialized program on Jew-
ish awareness and identity which
has a goal of creating leaders in
our local community. Candidates
who have demonstrated leader-
ship qualities are asked to parti-
cipate in an exciting and in-
novative set of five Sunday after-
noon sessions which include a
brunch, socializing, speakers,
discussions, and questions and
answers. This year's program will
focus on topics such as Jewish
identity, our local Jewish com-
munity, politics AIPAC, the
Holocaust and Jewish Education.
Dr. and Mrs. Zinns relocated to
Florida two and a half years ago.
They are members of B'nai Torah
Congregation and were parti-
cipants in Leadership Develop-
ment in 1983.
Mrs. Zinns is a member of the
B'nai Torah Sisterhood and was
on the Membership Committee of
B'nai Torah. She has been an
active member of ORT in New
York and is presently a member
in Florida. She worked on the
Women's Division Pioneer
Luncheon (Keynoters) in 1982,
Pacesetters Luncheon in 1983
and will work again in '84 on the
Pacesetters Luncheon.
Dr. Zinns, a general surgeon in
Boca Raton and Delray Beach, is
a member of the Noah Lodge of
B'nai B'rith. He has worked on
the Israel Bonds Campaign, and
will also be working in the 1984
Men's Division Campaign.
"I am very pleased that Joe
and Marilyn have accepted this
position as Leadership Develop-
ment Chairmen for 1984. I feel
that their leadership will generate
the enthusiasm necessary for a
productive year," commented
Mrs. Bobick.
Orthodox Leader Sees
New Cooperation
For Lutherans, Jews
An Orthodox Jewish
leader predicted a new era
in Jewish-Lutheran co-
operation as a result of a
recently-adopted Lutheran
Church statement rejecting
Luther's anti-Semitic
teachings.
Recently returned from a
conference, "Luther, Luther-
anism, and Jews," held in Stock-
holm, Sweden, Rabbi Walter
Wurzburger, representing the
Synagogue Council of America,
stated, "It is most gratifying
that Lutheran religious leaders
and scholars urged their co-
religionists all over the world to
disavow all anti-Jewish state-
ments which were contained in
Luther's writings.
"These writings had been
exploited by Nazis to justify anti-
Jewish policies which ultimately
led to the Holocaust," he added.
"It is hoped that as a result of
this encounter between Jews and
Lutherans a new climate of co-
operation will emerge which will
enable the two groups to labor
together for the advancement of
justice, dignity, and sanctity of
life that make a world of peace
possible."
Rabbi Wurzburger, immediate
past president of the Synagogue
Council, attended the meeting as
a delegate of the International
Jewish Committee on Inter-
religious Consultations.


' nm li.ah *7nnWi ~* V-...- I '
Page 2
7% Jewish Floridian of South County
Frid*y.Augu,tlfl,
Bank Fined $108fO00lor
Participation in Arab Bow*
handled eight letter, of .
issued in banks in Midi,
countries which boycott ,
Federal law bans S3L5J
African firms in the b?;Sj
A letter of credit is a b^.
ument which guaranij
exporter payment for
shipped. Officials said
At the signing of an agreement establishing
a cooperative program of nursing education
between Yeshiva University and Columbia
University are (seated, left to right) Dr.
Karen Bacon, dean of Stern College for
Women of Yeshiva University, and Susan
Alexion, assistant dean, Columbia
University School of Nursing; and (stan-
ding, left to right) Norman Rosenfeld, dean
of Yeshiva College; Dr. Egon Brenner,
executive vice president, Yeshiva Univer-
sity; Dr. Robert I. Levy, vice president for
health sciences, Columbia University; Dr.
Israel Miller, senior vice president, Yeshiva
University; and Dr. Sheldon E. SocoL, vice
president for business affairs, Yeshiva
University. Under the new agreement,
qualified students at Yeshiva University will
take their first two years of pre-nursing
studies there and the remaining work for the
BS in Nursing at Columbia's School of
Nursing.
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Commerce
Department announced
that the Bank America
Corp., one of the nation's
largest banks, agreed,
without admitting any
wrongdoing, to pay a
$108,000 fine stemming tetter could help the anuL
from Charges that it vio- boycott by requiring 5J1
lated federal regulations XdffSiZ.S.N
banning aid to the Arab EttSTSSX*
boycott of Israel.
The Department said the fine
was the largest ever imposed on
an American bank and the ninth
penalty imposed for such an
offense in the past 10 months.
The Department said that, since
October, 1981, 12 other banks
have paid a total of $535,000 in
fines, including $24,500 paid
Monday by the Bank of New
York.
THE COMMERCE Depart-
ment had charged that the Bank
America International subsidiary
had not stopped at an I,
port.
The incidents charged
the Bank America occur
January, 1980 through
1982. A bank spokesmaT
that "considering the vol
letters of credit that were 1
during the period, it a
inadvertent and unfa
processing errors could L,
made." The spokesman MkH
bank would comply with h
regulations on the boycott i
future.
JNF Official Predicts Israel
As Mideast's 'Granary' in Year 2000
DAVID STERN
JEWELER-GEMO LOG I ST
EUROPEAN DESIGNER
EST. 1909
NOW OPEN
IN DELRAY BEACH I
NEW YORK (JTA) A
vision of Israel in the year 2000
as the granary of the Middle
East, thanks to the revolutionary
use of desert conditions and
extensive land reclamation for
agriculture, was projected here
by Dr. Samuel Cohen, executive
vice president of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund of America.
In a report issued to more than
100 JNF national and regional
executives attending an annual
fundraising conference here,
Cohen stated that by 2000, Israel
will be well on its way to
becoming an "economically inde-
pendent oasis of peace."
Citing the extensive land-
reclamation achievements of the
JN F, which will be 99 years old in
the year 2000, Cohen based
himself on current statistics and
trends. He predicted that by 2000
over 235 million trees throughout
Israel will have been planted,
adding to the cover of green and
network of forests now dotting
the country. JNF's afforestation
program has until now been
responsible for the planting of
160 million trees. Planting conti-
nues apace at the rate of almost
five million trees a year, Cohen
said.
He pointed out that the JNF
land reclamation programs,
which prepare desert and rocky
terrain for agricultural and
settlement use, as well as con-
serve woodlands and wilderness
areas, have as of this year
reclaimed 40,000 acres. Cohen
projected that an additional
100,000 acres will be reclaimed in
the next 17 years.
Stating that JNF is now in-
volved in Israel in more projects
and programs than at any other
time in its eight-decade history,
Cohen said that in addition to
afforestation and land
reclamation, JNF continues to
clear the way for access roads
linking settlements in Galilee, the
Negev, and Arava. As of 1983, he
said, more than 6,000 kilometers
of roads have been paved by JNF
engineers. An additional 2,000
kilometers of roads will be
completed by 2000.
"A key aspect of JNF work,"
Cohen told the JNF fundraisers,
representing 40 regional offices of
the nationwide organization, "is
settlement site preparation. This
includes leveling and grading soil
and'creating the infrastructure
for construction. As of 1983, JNF
has prepared the land for almost
1.000 communities and popula-
tion centers throughout Israel.
Tht accelerated pace in the next
17 years will achieve an addi-
tional 1,600 sites prepared for
new communities."
In recent years, Cohen noted,
JNF has, in cooperation with
other government agencies, been
responsible for developing new
recreation and camping areas. In
the next decade and a half, some
60 new parks and 200 camping
grounds will be developed by
JNF, many of them adjacent to
existing JNF forests.
"Perhaps no area," Cohen
concluded, "holds greater
promise for Israel's future
development and growth than
the vast Negev desert."
There, he continued, "JNF is
involved in agricultural and
environmental research projects
that utilize desert characteristics,
such as abundant sunlight and
geo-thermal water, and economic
irrigation methods to improve
agricultural yield and the quality
of life in this region of severe
climactic conditions."
The JNF, Cohen said, is
working with other scientists in
following up advancements made
in solar energy, preparing ponds
for growing sea food, perfecting
hot houses and using saline water
for plants and crops exported
abroad.
"JNF has created the basis for
a Negev that is becoming the
winter vegetable basket of Euro-
pe," Cohen declared. "JNF's
involvement in all these
promising advances should help
Israel become the granary of the
Mideast and a viable, econo-
mically independent oasis of
peace by the year 2000."
Bond Leaders
Attend Confab
NEW YORK (JTA) More
than 500 Israel Bond leaders,
representing one of the largest
groups of Bond campaign partic-
ipants to come to Israel, are
taking part in a nine-day confer-
ence celebrating Israel's 35 years
of economic achievement. The
Conference began Tuesday and
continues through Wednesday
evening, Aug. 17. Some 60 com-
munities in the United States,
Canada, Latin America and Eu-
rope are represented.
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f, August 19, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
ami Head Sentenced
For Fraud, Theft
By GIL SEDAN
Jerusalem (JTA)
The Supreme Court
enced the former
,ster of Labor, Social
[(fare and Absorption,
on Abu-Hatzeira, to
months in prison.
, was a more severe
fence than the Tel Aviv
jict court handed down
tpril, 1982.
district court convicted
on charges of fraud, theft
breech of public trust but
ended a four-and-a-half
. jail term. The Supreme
. held that the lower court
[been too lenient.
.j charges against Abu-Hat-
i stemmed from his adminis-
jon of a State-supported
ritable fund established in the
. of his late father, former
J Rabbi of Morocco, Yitzhak
j-Hatzeira, when he was the
for of Ramie in 1976. The
frame Court justices denoun-
Abu Hatzeira's practice of
sferring funds, while he was
Minister, to public in-
Utions.
LpTER HIS conviction by the
I Aviv district court, Abu-Hat-
said he would not resign
his Knesset seat, as the
of the Tami faction, which
|ormed in 1981 after defecting
the National Religious
Jty, pending the outcome of
|appeal to the Supreme Court
st his conviction.
law, the Knesset cannot
I him to give up his seat but
Knesset House Committee
I suspend him for the period
ng which he serves his
ence. At the request of his
attorney, Shlomo
piah-Cohen, implementation
pe prison term will not begin
lOct. 2. The Tami secretariat
executive are scheduled to
I to discuss the verdict.
Iter the Supreme Court
Bed down the jail sentence.
police closed off the area around
the court building. Members of
Abu-Hatzeira's family expressed
their displeasure at the verdict
and denounced the media.
Tussiah-Cohen expressed sur-
prise at the ruling. The former
minister said he was not
"shaken" by the decision.
Tami leaders held a meeting
here and made two decisions:
one, to rally behind Abu-Hatzeira
as the party chairman, pledging
to have him lead the movement
for the municipal elections three
months away; and two, that
Tami would demand an indepen-
dent inquiry into the conduct of
the police throughout the entire
investigation of Abu-Hatzeira's
activities in office which led to
the indictments. Abu-Hatzeira
charged at the time he was
treated unfairly by the police.
BENZION RUBIN, Deputy
Minister of Labor and Welfare,
warned Menachem Begins coali-
tion government that unless it
started such an investigation
within two weeks, Tami could
withdraw from the coalition, nar-
rowing its Knesset majority to a
hari-thin 61 majority. Rubin told
Israel Radio: "Ours are not
empty threats."
Although Abu-Hatzeira is not
obligated by the sentence to
resign from the Knesset, some
Knesset members urged him to
resign voluntarily. Shinui Knes-
set member Mordechai Vir-
shubsky said, "It is inconceivable
that a Knesset member should go
to jail on corruption charges and
then resume his seat as though
nothing had happened."
An Alignment Knesset
member, Yossi Sarid, took the
same position, but the Labor
Party, as a party, has not yet
taken an official stand on
whether Abu-Hatzeira should
resign. Labor party sources
admitted it would be unwise to
antagonize Tami which, under
existing circumstances, might
shorten the term of the Likud
government.
hite House Hopefuls Will
Present Their Views To
IConf erence of Presidents
andidates for the 1984 Presidential nomination will present their
N on subjects of particular interest to the organized Jewish com-
ity at a series of special meetings with the Conference of Presi-
a of Major American Jewish Organizations, it was announced by
us Berman, chairman.
he first Presidential contender to meet with representatives of the
national religious and secular organizations that make up the
Kerence was Senator Ernest F. HoUings. The South Carolina
bocrat addressed the group last week.
SNATOR ALAN Cranston, California Democrat, will appear
the Conference of Presidents on Aug. 29, and former Vice
ent Walter F. Mondale will speak Sept. 20.
Mogan David Adorn, Israel's Red Cross
Society, recently honored 13 Israel Defense
Force units for their "outstanding" contri-
butions to Israel's blood banks in 1982.
Forty-five percent of all blood donations
were made by IDF soldiers. Shown above at
the awards ceremony at Mogan David
Adom's Tel Aviv headquarters are, from left,
Ml)A President Ariel Horeu\ who congratu-
lates an IDF representative; Surgeon-
General Brig. Gen. Dr. Moshe Revach; and
Brig. Gen. Amizur Kfir, director-general of
MDA. Bob Schwartz serves as Southeast
District director of American Red Mogan
David for Israel, the American fundraising
arm for MDA.
U.S. Charges that PLO is 'Active Ally'
Of Central American Revolutionaries
By RIFKA ROSENWEIN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Reagan Administration has
charged that the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization "is an active
ally of Communist revolution-
aries throughout Central
America." This charge was
contained in an issue of the White
House Digest, a service provided
by the White House Office of
Media Relations and Planning.
According to the Digest, the
PLO is supplying training and
material to the Sandinista
government in Nicaragua and to
the anti-government guerrillas in
El Salvador. The report noted
that, "since being introduced to
the region by (Cuban President
Fidel) Castro, the PLO has
developed ties with revolutionary
groups in nearly half the coun-
tries in the region."
At the same time, the San-
dinistas were fighting alongside
the PLO in the Middle East as
early as 1970, according to the
report. The Digest emphasized
that neither side has denied the
link between them, and it cited
statements issued by Latin
American and PLO leaders.
"There is longstanding blood
unity between us and the Pales-
tinians," Sandinista press
spokesman Jorge Mandi said in
June, 1979, shortly before the
Sandinistas came to power.
"Many of the units belonging to
the Sandinista movements were
at Palestinian revolutionary
bases in Jordan.
"In the early 1970's, Nicaraguan
and Palestinian blood was spilled
together in Amman and in other
places during the Black Septem-
ber battles. It is natural,
therefore, that in our war against
(President Anastasio) Somoza,
we received Palestinian aid for
our revolution in various forms."
Mandi also made it clear that
the Sandinistas had participated
in PLO terrorist acts such as
hijackings, according to the
Digest. In 1980, PLO Chief Yasir
Arafat told the Sandinistas while
he was in Managua: "The links
between us are not new; your
comrades did not come to our
country just to train, but to fight.
Your enemies are our enemies,"
the Digest reported.
The Digest explained that the
PLO was introduced to the region
in 1966, when Castro sponsored
the First Conference of the
Organization of Solidarity of the
Peoples of Asia, Africa, and
Latin America. PLO representa-
tives attended the conference,
according to the report, and
Castro "began efforts to make
the PLO a part of international
revolutionary activities,
especially in Latin America."
By the late 1960's, Cuban and
PLO officers were training
together in the Soviet Union and
assisting each other with military
and intelligence personnel. In
1972, Castro met with PLO
leaders in Algeria, and the two
sides agreed to step up their joint
activities, the Digest said. In
1973, Cuba broke relations with
Israel and in 1974, the PLO
opened its first Latin American
office in Havana.
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Days or Sejhtasaaip, Transfers Porterage, TntrnhnlnsunnceiUedkal, Financial t Personal

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FOR RESERVATIONS INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
OTHER ISRAELI TRIPS, CALL MIRIAM COLLECT AT
TRIANGLE TOURS- 931 -3031
18407 W. DixieHighway^NorthMjar^^
tf
Our special ^formula, tasty cheesecake that
we swirl into our black bottom, for an incredible
mingling of flavors.
^IIWlwIHW HlMllllil
Chunks of semi-sweet chocolate sprinkled throughout our
cheesecake for an "out of this world" taste.
Try some. The new Alden Merrell Black Bottom Cake.
In loaves and cupcakes.

aiDen merreu
OtESECAKE COMFWY
Next to Publix in the Village Square Shoppes, St. Andrews Boulevard
(idjacent to Town Center) just south of Glades Road in Boca Raton.
Hours: Mon. Sat. 8:30 a.m. 9:00 p.m., Sunday 9:00 a.m.-6:00p.m.
Telephone 392-4544.


11- I-.....1 LU__!JJ iM
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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Fr*dy. August 19
tJewish
o South County
C eves'Sftocftet
Thank You For 1983!
SS?S3!L SUZANNE 8MOCHET/ QERI ROSENBERG
Eaitof^ndPuWWy Executive Editor NewsCoordinate.
***^"r&m<**'U*l,*"*>**^-'*+>J**~>r~l ******
BOCA RATON OFFlCf. 2100 I MM Hwy., Suite MS. Boca Raton. Fla. 39432 Phone 388-2001
M1nOmo Plant: 120 NX am St.. Miami. Fie 33101 Phone 1-373-4M8
- HHmw lasis Strata Jaww FlaiUUe, P.O. Bee t1-sm, WMI, Fie. 33181
UMgfHghtq DlractaW afamaaaOa I >*** Muu> aaB 4 AC 4
vT'>wiW.',h pS#!!"82,,h Coumy J#W,,B Federation, W. Officers: Praaldant. Martanna Boblck.
Tr^l!T^!2l!; "^f^8^' Ertc W P""l. MMan Kreteky; Sacratary. Arnold Roaanthal.
Treasurer. Berenice Schankaman. Exacutiva Director, Rabbi Bruc. S. Warahai
SAJlwrsm/\ij?El7,d,*n .*** not0"'antee Ksehruth of Merchandlee Advertised.
J.w^S!22It^Z5S:ii?" ArM $3-S0 Annu" (2 Y#* Minimum I* by membership South County
WiSiSm F-d**'Hwy ** *Boc* R,on- f" ^^ "*>" snw
Friday, August 19,1983
Volume 5
10ELUL6743
Number 26
Herzpg's Unwelcome Position
Israel's President Chaim Her2x>g recently
told the 22nd International Conference of
the World Union of Progressive Judaism
that while world Jewry has a legitimate
right to express its views on Israeli actions
and policies, they should keep those
discussions within the confines of Jewish
circles.
Behind President Herzog's logic was his
warning that advice and criticism are
legitimate, but they must be given "under
the prior understanding that the final
decision rests with those who have to bear
the consequences of any political or
military decision." Meaning, of course,
Israel and Israelis.
In essence, what President Herzog said
was that, if you don't pay any taxes in
Israel, then you have nothing to say.
The fact is that what Israel does also
affects Jews outside of Israel. Remember
the intensity of the AWACS debate of 1982
and the backwash of some pretty vile anti-
Semitic stuff emanating from as high up as
the White House itself? Who took the
brunt of it but American Jewry?
We can point to the settlements issue
and to the West Bank itself as further
examples of the relationship between the
Israeli and American Jewish communities.
And need we mention the war in Lebanon,
itself? What one does, affects the other, and
there is no doubt about it.
And so President Herzog's position was
somewhat arbitrary, we believe, and un-
welcome. The right of the Jewish people
everywhere to have their opinions heard
must stand unchallenged.
NoW PUYiNG.
FoR REAGAN...
Ro&E PJ rm
McFARlAf^rl
I

On August 31, we officially close the books on our 1983 Federation-
UJA campaign. Before we launch our 1984 Drive we want to thank the
over 1,000 volunteers who solicited 12,645 gifts that totaled 12,846,000
for the combined special and regular campaigns Because of the
commitment of everyone listed below we led the country in percentage
growth of campaign.
Abner Levine, General Campaign Chairman
Milton Kretsky, Men's and Family Division Chairman
Margie Baer, Women's Division Chairman
Margaret Kottler, Women's Division Associate Chairman
A***

Ethel Abbott
Al Abraham
Ida Abraham
Sylvia Abraham
Ida Abrahama
Adele Abrama
Al Abrama
Betty Abrama
Eddie Abrams
Ell Abrama
Helen Abrama
Edith Abramson
Abe Ackerman
Sylvia Ackerman
Elliott Adler
Reba Alexander
Barbara Allen
Ruth Alparln
Marian A Itman
Sydney A. Alt man
MorrU Anapolaky
Sylvia Anapolaky
Dr. Saul Anton
Sara Applebaum
Effle Areniteln
Raquel Aronow
Morris Aaher
Sydney Atkin
Herman AugenbUck
Sylvia Auguat
Edith Auater
Helen Avlna
Selma Axelrod
Jim Baer
Margie Baer
MoeBaer
RlUBagua
Arlette Baker
Edward Baker
Ooldle Baker
Mike Baker
Jerry Ballet
MM Bernard Barak
Blanche Barnet
BobBarnett
Gertrude Barnett
Marlon Baron
Edith Barrett
MaryBaakln
Nettle Baum
Gertrude Becker
Lottie Becker
BeaaBeltch
BobBelanoff
Edith Beldock
Bertha Berger '
Mlml Berger
Sam Berger
Samuel Berger
Roae Berghaah
Dave Berkowlti
Mae Berlin
Natalie Berlin
Arnold Berliner
Tonl Berliner
M-M Murray Barman
Either Berner
Geraon Bernstein
Roae Be mat etn
Ell Bernx
EdnaBeron
Sarah Blalogoraky
Bamey Bleber
Abe Black
Either Blank
Teddy Blendei
Hedda Block
Stella Block
Evelyn Bloom
Harriet Bloom
Henry Bloom
MorrU Blooiteln
Sara Blum
Ed Boblck
Marianne Boblck
Jack Borenhelm
Tillle Borenhelm
Sarah Borger
Frances Bomateln
Solomon Bomateln
Evelyn Borauk
Shirley Braff
Dorothy Brand
Max Brandea
GeneBrmun
Pay Braver
Beaa Breecher
MorrU Breecher
Sid Breltman
SylvU Breltman
Ooldyl Breman
TedBreman
Anne Brenner
Barbara Brenner
EUyne Brenner
Henry Brenner
Albert Brier
Mildred Brlggln
Mickey Brtnln
Lao Brink
Katie Broock
NatBroatoff
AIBraut
Dorothy Brown
Ranee Brown
Shirley Brown
TUlle Brown
IUy Brownatoln
Dr. Iarael Bruk
Mary Brumer
Bamey Buchalter
NeiaaBuih
BenBuialn
Evelyn Buaaln
Irving M.Burglaaa
Robert Byrnea
Iaabel Byron
Dr Sid Cacem
Dorla Cantor
Grace Capper
Sldrrey Carnam
Eitrella Caiee
MoUeaOaaea
MM William CaaaeU
Julius Chalk In
Dr. Larry Charme
Phyllis Charme
AlvlnChaae
Dorothy Chaaen
Henry Chaaen
Philip Chealer
Henry Cheater
Arthur Child
Lillian Chodaah
Charlotte Cofman
Belle Cohen
CeUa Cohen
Ed Cohen
Evelyn Cohen
Florence Cohen
Francea Cohen
Ike Cohen
Marlon Cohen
Mary Cohen
MorrU Cohen
Muriel Cohen
Phyllis Cohen
Ro Cohen
Shirley Cohen
Robert Conn
Baron Coleman
Bloaaom Cooper
Andrea Lee Cox
Joyce Croft
Ruth Curl
Sylvia Curtis
Sara Dana
Julius Daroe
Ruth Daroe
Ed Davidson
Helen David
Jean DavU
EiicDecklnger
Dorothy Delbaum
Joseph Delman
Selma Denenberg
Rhoda Denney
Helen Derfner
Baron Deanlck
Jeffrey Deutch
Susanna Deutch
SolDlnlU
Abigail DIUlan
YetUDogan
BeaDonlger
Judy Donow
Florence Dorln
Rebecca Dorla
Sam Dravlch
Renee Dreyfus
Beverly Droat
EnldDuban
Bamey Dubln
Frank Dublnaky
Jean D work in
Mike Dworkln
Sam Eckstein
Sonla Eckstein
CralgElchler
Jay Elchler
Either ElnachUg
M-M Leonard Ellenberg
Teddy Ellin
Francea Elovltch
Milton EUhoU
Sam Engelman
Max EngeUon
Marlon Engle
Shirley Enaelberg
Jerry Epstein
Harry Erdhelm
Syd Esterman
Roi Fabrlcant
Doris Fallkman
Helnx Fallkman
TedFagln
Rae Farbman
M-M Milton Felnberg
Frances Felnman
Jules Felnsteln
Ruth Felnsteln
Bunny Feldman
Florence Feldman
Howard Feldman
Ida Feldman
Rabbi Ted Feldman
Aaron Felteniteln
RuthFerber
Claire Flalkow
Henry Flalkow
LUlUnFlen
Irma Fler
Sol Fie r
AlFlne
Herb Fink
IaabeUaFlnk
Roberta rink
Eatelle Flnkel
Dr. Abe Flnkeliteln
Reha FlnkeUteln
Sam Flnkelstaln
RuthFlnkle
Harry FUcher
Evelyn Planer
Richard F Unman
Adam F1 veaon
Walter Flveeon
EdnaFUgel
Dorothy Fleegler
OertFluhr
Hyman Folkman
Peter Forman
Selma Forman
Pain FoU
LIU Pox
Sam Fox
Stanley Pox
Ethel Frank
Sam Frankel
Selma Frankel
Stella Frankel
Daniel Freed
Erwln Present
Jack Freund
OrahFreyman
Sylvia Pried
Ruth Frledberg
Wendy Frledland
Julius Frledlander
Jim Friedman
Julius Friedman
Helene Friedman
Hilda Friedman
Martin Friedman
Maurice Friedman
Norman Friedman
Selma Friedman
SI Friedman
Sidney Friedman
Murray Frost
Al Gardner
Elate Gardner
Irma Garment
Robert Gef fen
Arlene Gelber
SIGeller
Blanche Gellman
Jack Geringer
RosGe ringer
Pauline Gertman
M-M Benjamin Ghen
Edward Gilbert
Natalie Gilbert
Sylvia Gilbert
Herman Glmbel
Abe Glrahek
M-M Melvln Gladstone
Bertha Glaaer
Oscar Glaser
Fay Glatt
Oscar Glaxer
Simon Glazer
Lillian Glueckman
Saul Glueckman
Adele Godofaky
George Gold
Sarah Gold
Emanuel Goldberg
Mynette Goldberg
Sam Goldberg
Sol Goldberg
Betty Goldberger
Betty Goldenberg
Ethel Goldenberg
Sylvia Goidfarb
Ted Goidfarb
Selma Goldflne
Bob Goldman
MorrU Goldman
Murray Goldman
Rhoda Goldman
M-M Robert Goldman
Anne Goldsplel
Esther Goldstein
Gert Goldstein
Irving Goldstein
LU Goldstein
Louis Goldstein
Sam Goldstein
Sandy Goldstein
Cecelia Gollnko
Isabella Goodman
Lois Goodman
Jean Gordon
IdaGoren
AlGortx
Jane GorU
Larry Gottaegen
Maye Gould
Marilyn Grasslan
Bethea Green
Lynn Green
Philip Green
RIU Green
Rose Green
Shirley Green
SylvU Green
Fanny Greenbaum
Dr. BobGreenberg
Miriam Greenberg
Shelly Greenberg
Alvln Greenfield
YetU Greenfield
Rachel Greensteln
Eddye Greenwood
Marvin Greenwood
Eleanor Ore If
Edith Grimm
RotGrosaman
George Grove
Minerva Grove
Irv Grover
MlnGrumet
William Gruner
Howard Guggenheim
Arthur Halpart
SatnHalpert
Ooldle Hatpin
M*rtha Handelman
lman Hanlah
InaHankln
Ann-LouUeHanovlch
Jean Hans
Muriel HarrU
Meyer Ha Mem
"rletHatoff
Ithel Hauier
Edna Heller
MUUe Heller
Seymour Heller
George Helman
HyHenldn
MaxHenner
Louis Henael
Rose Hansel
Lao Herbitman
Eva Herman
!* Herman
Nathan Herman
Joel Hersh
Harrl-t Herakowltx
Toby Herts
Blanche Hersllch
Pay HeuUinger
Edith HUf
Lillian Hlldebrend
Irv Hill man
Clara Hilt
Buddy Hlmber
Albert Hlrsch
Dr. Nathan Hoffeld
Esther Hoffeld
Harold Hoffman
Meyer Hoffman
Rose H Oliver
BeaHollobow
Ruby HorowiU
Col. Jerome Hurwtts
Judith Huston
Helen Hyman
Edith Inaelberg
Shirley Iseniteln
Lenore Iasacaon
MorrU ItkowlU
Betty Jackel
Miriam Jacknow
A nl t a J a cobs
M-M Donald Jacobson
Natalie JacovlU
Dlna Jay
Evelyn Joelson
Eleanor Jontlff
Sheldon Jontlff
Dr. Lealle Joseph
Iiadore Kadei
Elliot Kaffran
FranKahn
Dr. Dalla Kalal
Dr. Ury Kalal
Nora Kallsh
Emy Kalmanoff
Irving Kalmanoff
Polly KalUnbacher
Adeline Kamen
LeonKamen
Mae Kanners
LeeKanUr
RIUKanUr
Oarlton Kaplan
LouUB. Kaplan
Shirley Kaplan
Lenore KarUn
Ben Karpen
AnlUKassln
Anita Kati
Martin KaU
Nate Kati
Nathan KaU
SolKaUman
Karen Kaufman
Lee Kaufman
Miriam Kaufman
Rose Kaufman
Shep Kaufman
Harold Kay
Barbara Kell
Ealne Kend
Ulllan Kent
Ruth Kerner
Sue Kerper
Jean Keener
AnlU Keasler
Ann Keasler
Ben Kesaler
SylvU Keasler
Ben Kldeckel
Ann Klngsley
Dr. Edward Klngsley
CaUllna Klrshenbaum
David Klrshenbaum
Donna Klein
John Klein
Len Klein
Oscar Klein
Samuel Klein
Dave Koch
Natalie Koff
Jules Kohel
Hyman Korfln
Shirley Kornfeld
Harry Korm
Harry Kottler
Margaret Kottler
Freda Kraftnw
Anne Kalnln
BUI KrelUberg
Ethel KreUky
MUton KreUky
Irene Krleger
Hyman KrUI
BeaKrUburg
Irving KrUburg
LUlUn Kronhelm
Marie Krupp
Sid Krutlck
Alex Kuppersuin
Muriel KuppersUln
RheaLabov
RoseLampert
Rose Land* am an
Florence Lane
Nathan Lanaky
Ray Lapldue
SolLapldua
SulvULappIn
Ida Leaker
LUllanLaakln
Dorothy Laaky
Jack Lasky
Irving Latlmer
Charlotte Lay ton
Garry Lebbln
Mlml Lee
Charles Lefkowlti
Connie Lefkowlt t
HerbLelfman
Barbara Lain
EdytheLeln
FredLeltner
Irving Lemberg
Enid Lerner
Morris Lcshner
OaUUaMr
Jack Lew
Marlon Lam
BeverleeLeVw
aj^leyLevta
A^ner Levin,
Deborah Levi*
f^eaLevu*
la Levins
J<*M. Levu,
Leon Levin,
Marilyn Levin.
PaarlUvine
AlLevii
Alma Levy
RocheUeUvy
Sue Levy
Brt>araL.*ta
Helen Lldiky
Rudy Udiky
Ida Light
BemleUner
Abel.lnn
Dorothy Llnilry
Frieda Upmaa
Herman Upeon
Florence Ltat
Florence Uttmu
Ann Lltwack
Gertrude Lob*
Herb London
Dr. John U Low,
SylvU Low*
Don Lowell
Roe Lowell
Ida lowenbraun
Murray Lowbrs,
Arthur Lucker
Murray Luger
BertLuU
Somner Lyon
TUlle Lyon
Sid Makaron
Marlon Malln
Sylvia Malvln
Dr. Daniel Man
Den a Man
Bea Mandell
ErwlnMann
Irene Marcus
Shirley Marcus
Milt Mardenfeld
Florence Margolin
George Margolli
Hortenae Margolli
Sophie Markowlti
Ben Marsh
Ida Marsh
Ida Mailer
. Erwln Mass
Abe Masiry
. Gloria Masiry
Joe Master
George Maurer
Marlon May
Sherrl Meade
Louis Medwlo
Rose Medwln
Carolyn Meier
Linda Melcer
Harry Melcer
Steve Melcer
Florence Melton
Abe Meltxer
Esther Mermelates \
Ezra Mermeliteln
Henry Merrln
Norman Mervli
Bettle Meyerson
Roberta Meyenoa
Dr. WMUmMeyen
EtU Meyrow
Esther Mlgdal
June Michel
Lou Mllender
Carl Miller
Carol Miller
Symma MUler
Jacob Mlllsteln
Ronnie Milter
Sanford Milter
Florence Mlnkln
MarUn Moldow
MaxMolk
PrUcllla Monen
Rhea Morgan
Carolyn Morlti
Morris WMorrli
Mike Mortmsn
Nina Mufson
Robert Mufson
Myrtle Mullens
Ann Mosa
Charles Most
Lucille Mom
8yd Narva
Marcla Need*
JlmNobU
Manny Norman
Paul Noun
Sajome Noun
Barbara Nuabaun
Marvin Nuibaam
M-MEmanuair-
IrvlngOblow
Charlotte Okono*
Albert Omansky
Bather OmanskT
Samuel Oppanntt
M-M Robert Ortuta* |
RoseOahati
Harold Oaharo*
AlOstrlck
M-MCharlaiOaw"
LouUOttlniar
BebePankki
JeromaPank*
AbsPaseck
lUrry paunktt
MoUla Patfcktn
BeaPaarcs
MdPearce
TlielmaPsartT'
Sherte PacbW*
Kay Peck
Fannie Pelavtn
Murray PU
jackPankoai
Tony PepPr
Robert Perkus
David Perlbanj
Helen Perlberi
David Perllna
Roalyn PrUn
Dorla Perlman
aasa


y, August 19, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
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iRlftln
GdmiiKl Roberti
Elaine Roberte
Martenne Robert*
Charlotte Roblneon
Joyce Roblneon
Mona RobliMon
9am Roblneon
Helen Rochester
Harry Roebere;
MarclaRofJ
Doris Rofm an
Evelyn Rolnlck
Lola Romanoff
Richard Romanoff
Dr. Claire Rommer
Mae B. Rones
Edythe Roeen
Kitty Rosen
Robert Rosen
Sylvia Rosen
Frances Rosenberg
Jack Rosenberg
June Rosenberg
Rae Rosenberg
Sara Rosenblatt
Sam Rosenbloum
Bess Rosenblum
Irving RosenfleId
Leon Rosenmann
Arnold RosenthsJ
Edward Rosen thai
Elinor Rossnthal
Gloria Rossnthal
Joseph RosenthsJ
Sara Rosen thai
Rhode Ro sens we lg
David Rosoff
Irving Ross
Sarah Roth
Seymour Roth
Bessie Rothchlld
Shirley Rothchlld
Betty Rothfeld
Caryl Rothman
Ethel Rothman
Seymour Rothmarm
Kona Rothstetn
Harry Ruback
MargltRudnlU
Lorraine Ruffwsxg
Doris Rufman
BobRugoff
Eleanors Rukln
Ethel Ruttenberg
Joan Sable
Naomi Sachs
Evelyn Sack
Rabbi Louis Sacks
Dolly Saeki
AlSaffer
Bernard 8alpei
MM Gordon Salganlk
FredSalta
Gertrude Salts
Reuben Salts man
Irene Sal wen
Ann Samuels
Ella Samuels
Gladys Samuels
Fred! Sandal
Jeanne Sank In
Jane Saul!
Julia Savin
Dr. Jeffrey Savran
Lauren Sax
Berenice Schankerman
Irving Sc nebs
Bob Schectman
Joe 8. Schenk
Charles Schensul
Marjory Schiller
Herman Schlndler
EsteUeSchlndtor
Linda Schmler
ZeldaSchnee
Claire Schneider
Fay Schneider
Nathan Schneider
Diane Schnlttman
Shirley Scholaohn
Nat Sc nook
? .: -.:-
Irving Schor
Pearl SchosheUn
Alvtn Schrelbman
Edith Schrelbman
Florence Schrelbman
Dr Milton Schud
Nettle Schulberg
MM Bernard Schulman
Sara Schulman
Shirley Schulman
Stuart Schulman
Adele Schwartz
David Sch warts
Elsie Schwartz
MM Julius Schwartz
Mike Schwartz
Pauline Schwartz
Ruth Schwartz
Nay ah SchweMel
Al Segal
MoUle Segal
Charles Selbel
Irving 8eld
Alice Seldman
Abe Selgel
Sidney Seplow
Terry Serper
Florence Shafran
EveShalley
Marten Shalley
Hank Shandler
Benjamin Shank man
Gertrude Shankman
Arthur Shapiro
Eugene Shapiro
Henrietta Shapiro
Rebecca Shapiro
Madeline Shaw
Jane Sher
Llbby Shipley
Arlene Shore
AlShrier
Betty Siegel
Florence Siegel
Gertrude Siegel
Herb Siegel
Is Siegel
Dr. Solomon Siegel
William Siegel
Carole Siemens
Dick Siemens
Leo Silk
Natalie 811k
Edith Sliver
Pearl Silver
Rabbi Bernard Silver
Rabbi Sam Silver
Alex Silver man
Dlanne 811 verman
Fays 8Uverman
Jack Sllverman
Jerry Sllverman
Lillian Sllverman
Selma Sllverman
Ira SUverstein
Milt Sllverstein
Mark SUverton
Alan R. Simon
Eleanor Simon
Freda Simon
Sally Simon
Shirley Simon
Evelyn Singer
Rabbi Merle Singer
Sylvia Singer
Morris Strata
MacSlakind
Ida Skobolof f
Milton Skoteky
Louis Status
Bea Smiley
Sharon Smolar
Marsha Snyder
Rita Snyder
Ell Solomon
Sophia Solomon
Harry Solow
Robert Somer
Marilyn Sonabend
Jack Sperling
Sylvia Sperling
Phyllis Squires
Marlon Bragg
Lawrence Stalest
MoeStamter
Rose Stavenhagen
David Steane
Myrna Stein
Eve Steinberg
Joseph Steinberg
Mark Steinberg
Paul Steinberg
Engagement
SAKOWITZ-DAVIS
Mr. and Mrs. Philip Sakowitz
of Lake Worth announce the en-
gagement of their daughter
Susan to Michael Lawrence Da-
vis, son of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Davis of Boca Raton. A Decem-
ber wedding is planned.
???*?*
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH BOCA RATON
FEDERATION I DELRAY BEACH
f Roberta Steinberg
Joseph SterrUleb
Morton Stlefel
Betty Stone
George Stone
M-M Jack Stone
Norman Stone
Sara Stone
Fran Starch
Helen Sudacoff
Dick Swift
Dorothy Swift
Gerry Timber
Harold Tanenbaum
Harry Tankooa
Golda Tannenbaum
MatUda Tannenbaum
Benjamin Taub
Naomi Tauber
JudyTaxel
Irving Taxel
Dr. Mortis Tear
Reuben Tebeleff
HatUeThum
Betty Tiedrlch
MlkeTolkln
Muriel Tomback
Leonard Tureaky
SydeUe Turman
Byron Turnoff
Sadie Turnoff
Henry Unger
JsanUrdang
Ruben Vlener
Frank Vogel
StanVogel
Ellen Wald
Herman Wald
Arnold Waldm an
Henrietta Waldman
Arthur Wanger
Betty Warner
Sidney Warahafsky
Erie War anal
Lynne Warshal
Sylvia Wasssr
Sid Waseerman
Helen Well
Lester Welnberg
Doris Weinberger
Joe Weinberger
Miriam Welne
Bernard Wetner
Blanche Welner
Dan Wetner
Martha Welner
Nathan Welner
Sylvia Welner
1 HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
Rhode Welner
Esther Wemgarden
Ruth Wslnmger
Gladys Welnahank
Mayer Welnshank
David WelnsteIn
Don Welnste In
Jean Welnsteln
Miriam Weinsteln
Morris Welnsteln
Rose Welnsteln
Audrey Welnstock
Sarajane Weteberg
Ruth Weteen
Alice Weiss
Barney Weiss
Bemlce Weiss
Henry Weiss
Howard Weiss
Karen Weiss
Merlan Weiss
Molly Weiss
Msl Werfel
Leonard Westerman
Benno Wetzsteln
LJJllan Wetzsteln
Sol White
Andrew Whitehlll
Janet Whitehlll
Harry Wilson
Rud Wilson
Rebecca WUltems
Arthur Winkler
Shirley Winkler
Mrs.SldWIrth
Jerry Wolf
Sylvia Wolf
Gerry Wolfe
Morris Wolff
Irving Wolf son
OertWouneta
Dr. Joseph Woodland
Evelyn Woolman
Phyllis Wragge
JackWurtzel
Anne Yaffee
Elaine Tarn
Moese Yam
Lillian Young
TUlie Young
Irene Youngentob
Albert Zalger
Louis Zangwul
Irving Zelgler
Bernard Zeldln
BrlttZlff
Neville Zlff
Ruth Zimmerman
Betty Zlnman
Philip Zlnman
Dr. JoeZlnns
Marilyn Zlnni
Howard Zipper
Susan Zipper
Renee Zonenscheln
Sylvia Zuckerman
Jim Nobil
iMichael Davis Susan Sakowitz
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION
2200 N Federal Highway Suite 206 Boca Raton. Florida 33432
Telephone (305) 368-2737
Nobil to Attend
Tel Aviv U.
Exec. Committee
Meeting In N.Y.G
James H. Nobil, Chairman of
the Boca Raton-Delray Beach
Chapter of the American Friends
of Tel Aviv University, will
attend the Executive Committee
meeting of the organization on
Aug. 23 in New York City.
At that meeting, the leadership
of the American Friends will be
determining its course for the
coming year in light of Israel's
current economic situation and
its budgetary effect on Israel's
institutions of higher education.
The local chapter of the AF-
TAU is now being formed and
will work to support Tel Aviv
University, Israel's largest in-
stitution of higher education. For
further information, please call
592-9186.
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mmmmmmmmmam
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Organizations In The News
_Friday.AuOTit
19,19
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Fwe Sons of land, Delray
Lodge No. 224 will hold their
next meeting on Monday, Aug.
29 at 7 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank, Kings Point, Del-
ray Beach. The blue ribbon
winning film "War Without Win-
ners" will be exhibited that eve-
ning. A discussion will follow.
Tickets will also be available for
the play "The Circle" to be seen
at the Caldwell Theatre on Sun-
day, Jan. 15, at 7 p.m. The cost is
10. Also a reminder that there
are still a few rooms left for the
Regency Spi weekend Oct. 26-29.
You may make your reservations
at this meeting.
B'NAI TOR AH
B'nai Torah Congregation,
1401 NW 4th Ave.. Boca Raton
wishes to invite all new members
and prospective members to a
"Membership Coffee" on Sun-
day, Aug. 21, at 7:30 p.m. at the
home of Dr. and Mrs. Paul
Werner. Please RSVP at the syn-
agogue office, 392-8566 or call
Anita, 368-4236 or 391-6066.
B'nai Torah Congregation will
conduct its services for the High
Holy Days at Temple Beth El in
Boca Raton. For reservations and
further information, please call
the synagogue office, 392-8566.
ANSHEI EMUNA
The theme for Rabbi Dr. Louis
Sacks s sermonic message will be
"The Lord is my Light and Sal-
vation" for the sabbath morning
service, Saturday, Aug. 20 at
8:45 a.m. at the synagogue,
16189 Carter Rd.. Delray Beach.
The High Holy Days seating
committee headed by Mr.
Edward Brown meets Monday
through Friday from 7:15 a.m. to
10 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
For further information, please
call 499-9229.
NATIONAL COUNCIL
OF JEWISH WOMEN
National Council of Jewish
Women-Boca-Delray will sponsor
a new member coffee, on Wed-
nesday, Aug. 24 at 8 p.m. For de-
tails, please call 368-3900.
AMERICAN RED MAGEN
DAVID FOR ISRAEL
American Red Magen David
Singlet
SINGLES 45
AND OVER
The singles, 45 and over, re-
cently held a planning meeting to
look into up and coming events.
The meeting was held at the Fed-
eration office in order to accom-
modate everyone who wished to
attend.
In addition to program plan-
ning, it was decided that officers
and chairpeople are needed.
Elections will be held at the next
open Planning Meeting on Tues-
day, Sept. 13, at the Federation
office at 5:30 p.m. Anyone inter-
ested in becoming involved is in-
vited to attend.
For more information or if you
have questions, call Harold
Cohen at 368-2737.
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Tuesday, Aug. 23, 7:30 p.m.:
Group Discussion The Reality
of Positive Thinking it Really
Works, led by Evelyn Singer, at
B'nai Torah Congregation, 1401
NW 4th Ave.. Boca Raton. Do-
nation: 18.
Tuesday, Sept. 13, 3:30 p.m.:
Open Planning Meeting and
Klections. South County Jewish
Federation office. 22(H) N Feder-
al Hwy., Suite 206. Boca Raton.
Tuesday. Sept. 20. 7:30 p.m.:
Open discussion led by Harold
Cohen, Director, South County
Jewish Community Center. B'nai
Torah Congregation. 1401 NW
4th Ave.. Boca Raton. Donation:
$3. RSVP 368-2737.
Sunday. Oct. 23: Sunday
Brunch Place and time to bt
announced.
SINGLES (21-50)
Aug. 25, 8 pm.: Movie Night
"The Frisco Kid." Donation 50
cents, includes light refresh-
ments. For more information and
location, call 368-2737.
Note: Additional programs
will be publicized in the Septem-
ber second edition of the Florid-
ian.
Shultz:Jewish
SettlersHave
Right to Stay
Continued from Page 1
agreement after Egypt
adamantly refused to allow any
of the settlements to remain in
the area it would control.
BUT AS FOR new settle
ments, Shultz stressed the U.S.
has "stressed consistently" that
"the new settlements on the
West Bank are not constructive,
they don't help us at all in our
search for peace in that region."
for Israel Ram at Gan Chapter-
Delray-Boy n ton, is having a
meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 23 at
7:30 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank. Kings Point, Del-
ray Beach. Refreshments will be
served and all are welcome to
attend. For further information,
please call Mark Silverton, 499-
4706 or M. Lutzker, 499-2471.
TEMPLE SINAI
Construction of the new
building will begin in August, it
was announced by Col. David
Klarer, of the group's building
committee. The temple looks
forward to the occupancy of their
new facilities early in 1984. Sab-
bath eve services for the congre-
gation are now held in Cason
United Methodist Church Fri-
days at 8:15 p.m. At the service
Friday, Aug. 26, Mrs. Valeska
Picker will become an adult Bat
Mitzvah after reading from the
Hebrew Torah scroll and receiv-
ing a blessing from Rabbi Samuel
Silver. Double sessions for the
High Holy Days are being
planned by the ritual committee,
headed by Jerome Gilbert. Infor-
mation about membership or the
purchase of High Holy Day seats
is available from Mr. Gilbert at
499-5563.
BTJAI BRITH
B'nai B'rith Boc. Teeea Lodge
No. 3119 will hold a breakfast
meeting in the activities room.
An open discussion of tl-
lems and Solutions"
who just returned
Ladies are invited.
from
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Murray L. Katz
President
OVER FORTY YEARS Of CONSISTENT OUAUTV AMD ERVIC6


Friday. Augu*t 19.1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 7
Were Making
American History.
American Ingenuity Wforks.
During the past two years, significant changes have
occurred in the savings and loan industry. These changes
are the result of economic factors, higher interest rates and
federal deregulation.
April-June, 1983: the second highest quarterly
profit in American Savings history.
Through management planning, operational efficiencies
and acquisitions... American Savings has dramatically
reversed a $13 million loss for fiscal 1982 into a $9.5 million
profit for the first nine months of fiscal 1983. For the third
quarter (April-June, 1983), net income was $6.1 million.
These results continue the positive earning trend at
American Savings and underscore management
achievement of balanced growth, impiovedciistorner service
and a stronger market position.
Diversification: a significant contribution to
earnings. .
As part of cwrking-fai^ planning, American Savings
acquired a substantial interest in General Homes ___
it Corporation of Houston, Texas, the 4th largest
intheUntedStates.The Associations equity
in the earnings of General Homes totalled $5.9 million
profit for the fust nine months of fiscal 1983.
Positioned to meet future challenges.
R>r the 12-month period ending June 30,1983... net
worth increased to $132 million from $39 million. Equally
significant, assets increased nearly 25% to $2.9 billion.
This current net worth level places American Savings
among the nations strongest capitalized savings and loans.
V\e believe that our financial strength, couptedwith
management depth, uniquely positions American Savings
to seeKout new and exciting opportunities for increased
growth and profitability in the future.
American Savings, the third largest savmgs and loan
association domiciled in Florida, ana the 29th largest in the
United States, is listed on the New "tork Stock Exchange.
Rjr a quarterly report on American Savings, or a
discussion of your individual savings or mortgage loan needs,
visit any of our 55 locations. Our staff vviU provide the same
professional service and personal attention that has been
the hallmark of American Savings far over three decades.
Thars how we made American history.
MAKE MONEY THE AMERICAN WAY
AMERICAN SAVINGS
.... .
Amman SaMfi


Page' Page 8-
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Soviet Mail
Questionnaire
The Post Office and Civil Service Committee, Subcommittee
on Investigations, is investigating the problem of Soviet in-
terference with United States mail to the Soviet Union and Soviet
bloc countries and is requesting assistance in documenting the
problem.
Evidence has already been accumulated indicating tremendous
escalation of interference by the Soviets. Affected by this
escalation are many groups, including the Lithuanian, Jewish,
Christian, Ukranian, Polish, Hungarian, Rumanian, Armenian,
human rights and scientific communities. and many others.
The following questionnaire is being printed upon request of
Benjamin A. Oilman, member of Congress. It is important that
people who are knowledgeable about the issues, having had their
mail confiscated or interfered with in some manner, be polled
about their experiences. A response to the questionnaire will give
the subcommittee a greater insight into the problem and,
hopefully some solutions.
Please complete and detach the questionnaire and mail your
response to Geri Rosenberg, South County Jewish Federation,
2200 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 206, Boca Raton, FL 33432. Your
cooperation is greatly appreciated.
Friday, Auguat 19,1933
Many U.S. citizens mailing letters and packages to friends
and families in the Soviet Union and Soviet-controlled countries
claim that Soviet authorities are interfering with the delivery of
their mail.
Representative Benjamin A. Oilman (R., N.Y.), a senior
member of the House Post Office and Civil Service Committee
and the Foreign Affairs Committee, is in the process of
documenting these charges.
In order to provide the Congress with current information,
this newspaper is publishing the following questionnaire as a
public service to our readers:
YES
NO
1. Do you regularly mail letters to
the Soviet Union?
2. Do you usually send them
registered. return receipt
requested?
3. Does the cost of registered, return
receipt postage ($3.85 plus mailing
costs of 40 cents per half-ounce)
effect whether or not you use this
service?
4. Do you have documents in your
possession or do you have
knowledge of documents that
would indicate interference with
U.S. mail directed to Soviet
citizens?
If so, specify _
5. Are you willing to make these
documents (tampered receipts, etc.)
available to the House Committee
on Post Office and Civil Service's
Subcommittee on Investigations as
exhibits for our hearings?
6. Do you believe current practices
by the U.S. Postal Service ef-
fectively responds to your need in
tracing your mail?
7. Have you offered an invitation to
anyone in the Soviet Union or
Soviet-controlled countries to join
you in the United States?
8. Have you received confirmation
that your written invitation was
received?
in
9. Please specify any problems you have experienced .
sending packages and parcels to the Soviet Union and Soviet-
controlled countries:
10. Are you willing to further
discuss your experiences with
House investigators?
NAME

STREET.
CITY____
t
JAP
PHONE
Israel's Minister of Defense, Moshe Arens
(second from left), gave an optimistic report
on the current state of U.S.-Israel relations
last week to the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organizations. Also
present are Julius Berman (left), chairman
of the Presidents Conference; Meir Rosennt
(second from right), Israel's Ambassador to
the U.S., who also addressed the meeting
and Yehuda HeUman (right), executive vic't
chairman of the Conference.
After School
Program
Starting October 3, the South
County Jewish Community Day
School and the South County
Jewish Community Center will be
offering an After School Program
for children. The program is for
children in pre-school through
6th grade, which will be held at
the newly remodeled Day School
site from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
The day will include structured
activities in sports and arts and
crafts as well as supervised study
times. Leaders for this program
will be from the South County
Jewish Community Day School's
teaching staff.
Final details will be published
in the September 2 Floridian. For
more information, call Burt Low
licht at 395-3212 or Harold Cohen
at 368-2737.
Waldman
HOTEL
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt Kosher Cuisine u
Your Hosts Sam and Morris Waldman, Gary Sher, David Diamond
HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
ROSH HA8HAA A YOU KIPPt R
12 Days 11 Nights $ Q1 /
(Sept. 7-18) 2 meals daily included, v3a\vJ
3 meals Sat. and holidays
DC
Occ
230
0m
DO
Oct
* SPLIT STAY
7 Days 6 Nights
(Sept. 7-11 and Sept. 16-18)
Sleep at adjoining Atlantic Towers Hotel; meals at Waldman
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWNED CANTOR
EARLY RESERVATION'S SKJ(JESTKI)
Phone Sam Waldman 538-5731 or 534-4751
ON THE OCEAN A T43rd STREET
Put Yourself In This Picture
JerusalemTemple Mount
Overlooking the Temple mount of the historic old city of Jerusalem on
UJA Mission to Israel
NEXT MISSION: OCTOBER 9-19
Join the people from South County already committed to this mission
$1000 per person mission cost.
Minimum contribution of
$3000 family gift or $1600 for a single to the 1964 UJA/Federation
campaign will be required for all participants on the mission.
For information call Helene Eichler at
The South County Jewish Federation
at 368-2737


Friday, Augurt 19,1968
: The Jewish Ploridian of South County
Page9
Camp Maccabee Says
Shalom!
A Message From Susan Kerper, Camp Director
The third season of Camp
Maccabee has ended. I can still
envision all of the smiling faces of
119 happy children that ex-
perienced many wonderful activi-
ties and events throughout the
summer. There is no doubt our
children had a wonderful sum-
mer, having grown physically,
emotionally and socially. They
had the opportunity to experien-
ce many new activities at Camp
this year: archery; gymnastics,
three successful overnights, our
first play on our final day, Yeru-
shalayim Day, "Gamad and
Anak Day," Disney film, Pillo
Polo, Clown Day with real clowns
and our own staff magician.
These new experiences combined
with our full-day camp activities
and Judaic program created an 8
week fun-filled summer. Now. it is
time to plan for our 1964 "Better
Than Ever Year."
Looking forward to seeing you
next year for more great activi-
ties with another helpful and
caring staff under the sponsor-
ship of the South County Jewish
Federation and the new Jewish
Community Center.

New Automobile Air Conditioning
System Designed At Tel Aviv University
A new automobile air con-
ditioning system has beei
designed and developed by Tel
Aviv University scientist Prof.
Mordechai Sokolov, which
utilizes the heat generated and
presently wasted by the car,
without requiring additional
energy and expense for fueling
and with no strain on the motor.
Today, only about one third of
the fuel burnt by an automobile is
utilized for powering the motor to
turn the wheels, while two thirds
of the fuel is wasted. Approxi-
mately one third of the energy is
expended through the exhaust
system, while the other third is
| expended on cooling the motor.
Conventional air conditioning
used today in automobiles does
not take advantage of the wasted
neat, requires additional power
and thereby increases the car fuel
| consumption by 10-20 percent. It
also places a greater strain on the
motor which is beyond the capa-
city of small cars, and as a result
small cars cannot be air con-
ditioned.
The system developed by Prof.
Sokolov of the Faculty of
Engineering utilises an
tion refrigeration cycle,
which does not
mechanical
I uses the
absorp-
i process
require
compression, but
wasted heat as its
I energy source. At the same time,
I almost no changes are required in
I the car engine. The new system
I a. therefore, free of running cost
land is suitable even for small
pngines. The invention has been
[patented in Israel, U.S.A.,
[England and other countries.
Prof. Mordechai Sokolpw operates his ew automobile
air conditioning system,.
The new system is presently at
the laboratory stage and is not
available commercially, but
offers hope for more comfortable
and safer driving for small cars
and cheaper cooling for large
cars.
Temple Sinai
Of Palm Beach County
Member U.A.H.C.-(Retorm)
invites you to attend our
Sabbath Eve Services
Held Each Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m.. at
Cason United Methodist Church
Corner of Swinton Ave. and N.E. 4th St. (Lake Ida Rd.)
Rabbi Samuel Silver, officiating
For Membership Information Call:
Sid Pearce Samuel Rothstem Sid Bernstein
498-1098 President 732-5807
1983 1984 Registration for
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL, and MEMBERSHIP
for the Fall term. Now!
opecial KULANU Young Family Group
For 'NFOPMATiONC
..-.. BevcHv Kai 4990404
' N RMATION A. rv6'i
P.0. BOX 7901 DELRA Y BEACH. FLA.
High Holy, Day Services
Limited Tickets Available
jrmatu n
Jerry Gilbert Sid Pearce Sid Bernstein
499-5563 498-1098 732-5807
New Temple Build'mg Early 1984 Occupancy
Site 2475 W. Atlantic Ave. Delray


Page a.
Page 10
TO. r.
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, August 19, iggg
A Rabbi
Comments
Rabbi Nathan Zelizer
The following is brought to Floridian readers by the South
County Rabbinical Association. If there are topics you would
like our Rabbis to discuss, please submit them to the Floridian.
LOST AND FOUND
A little boy wandered away and was lost Scores of people set
out to search the hillsides and wooded areas nearby to find that
lost child. This story comes to my mind during this time in our
calendar when, in a few weeks, so many of our people will find
their way, to the temple and to the synagogue, in order to find
their way. The High Holidays serve as a compass, to help us get
our bearings and find our directions. To know where we are, we
need not only a compass, we also need other devices.
The compass helps us locate ourselves in space; we also need a
clock and a calendar, to help us locate ourselves in time. Often
we wake up from a long deep sleep and do not know how much
time has passed. The first question we ask upon waking is.
''What time is it?" When Robinson Crusoe landed on a desert
island, he was afraid that he would lose his sense of time, so he
set up a post and, as each day dawned, he cut a notch in the post.
Every seventh notch he rested. Thus, he kept a calendar.
We also need another device. The compass keeps us from
getting lost in space. The calendar keeps us from getting lost in
time. We also need some device, which will set us straight, in our
relationship to other human beings, to live also in a world of
persons, in addition to a world of space and time. So, not to get
lost in the world of persons, we need help and direction in the
matter of right and wrong. In Judaism, Jewish law and mitzvohs
provide us with guide lines, which steer us in the realm of human
relationships. Through prayer, study, special ceremonials, such
as the Shofar, the melodies, the Kol Hashem the Voice of God
serves as a kind of compass, to keep us from getting lost in
the maze of human problems. There are times when a compass
can be deflected and lose its value.
As a Jewish chaplain at the Ohio Penitentiary for a quarter of
a century, I counseled with hundreds of criminals from all walks
of life, human beings who, among them had fine parents, good
beginnings, high school and college graduates, yet were lost on
the sea of life and spent time behind bars. Their lives became
defiled by deflections and deviations which caused them to lose
their bearings.
Many times, 1 told these men that God cannot reach down
from heaven to us straight. We must go to Him to set our
"neddle" straight The Bible tells us (Exodus 19,20) "And God
descended to lit Sinai and Moses went up to the top." The
Mechilta on this sentence says "God said to Moses I shall come
to you from above and you will ascent." The pen in my
penitentiary congregation failed to ascend the mountain of the
Lord.
The purpose of the month of Elul is to prepare ourselves to
seek God's help in re-directingour lives, and ask Him to teach us
how to use the gifts of life, how to use our wealth, how to spend
our days, how to love and live by abiding values. Where, but in
the synagogue, can we find the compass and provide ourselves
with devices that will not deflect the needle of that compass, thus
causing us to travel in circles and get lost on the sea of life. God
stretches his hand and wants us to stretch out our hands to get as
close to Him as possible.
In the Sist ine Chapel in Rome there is the great painting of
Michaelangelo, portraying the moment of the creation of Adam.
God is presented as a human figure, stretching forth His hand to
Adam, seeking to rise from the ground. From the Divine finger
comes a spark from which life is transferred to Adam's finger
and to his mortal flesh. It is a thrilling portrayal of the surge of
life which comes from God. The fingers never touch. There is a
gap, between the divine and the human.
During the year, many deflections widen the gap between God
and ourselves. During the High Holidays through repentance,
prayer and charity, we narrow the gap between the finger of God
and the mortal flesh of our body and as the Shofar is sounded at
the end of Yom Kippur, we can almost feel the flush of new life,
new hope and new purpose vivifying our flesh, giving us new
strength and proper direction for the good life.
BETH ISRAEL
menxxwi oPL
South Palm Baach County's
ONLY Jawlsh Funeral Homo
499-8000
Joseph Rubin, Owner
5808 W. Atlantic Ave., Defray Beach, FL 31446
AJC: Religious Clubs in School Unconstitutional
Congressional legislation that
would permit student religious
clubs to use public school faci-
lities was sharply criticized by an
American Jewish Congress
spokesman in Senate testimony.
Marc Pearl, Washington rep-
resentative of AJCongress, told
the Senate Judiciary Committee
that passage of the bill, S. 1059,
would lead to "inevitable pres-
sure" on school children "to
conform to the religious views
and practices of the majority."
"I am not here to urge any
limitation on the right of a reli-
gious majority to observe its reli-
gion," Pearl said. "Rather, the
American Jewish Congress asks
only that the public schools not
be employed to magnify the pres-
sures on students of minority
faiths."
The legislation, Pearl con-
tended, is unconstitutional
because it is imcompatible with
the principle of separation of
church and state as mandated by
the Establishment Clause of the
Constitution.
S. 1059 says that no federal
education funds may be provided
to any state or local educational
agency if any elementary or
secondary school for which that
agency has responsibility denies
equal access to students or facul-
ty seeking to engage in voluntary
religious activities.
The AJCongress is especially
troubled by the provision in-
cluded in the bill for the "right"
of equal access in elementary
schools, according to Pearl.
"Although the bill extends only
to voluntary activities, it is diffi-
cult for us to conceive of any
circumstances under which
elementary students would be
able to voluntarily organize their
own group without the guidance
of a teacher," Pearl said. "But it
BarI Bat Mtzvah
Michelle Claudio
MICHELLE CLAUDIO
On Saturday. Aug. 27, Mi-
chelle Lisa Claudio, daughter of
Beth Ann Claudio, will be called
to the Torah of Temple Beth El of
Boca Raton as a Bat Mitzvah.
Michelle is a student of Boca
Raton Community Middle School
and attends the Temple Beth El
Religious School.
Family members sharing in the
simcha are grandparents, Ber-
nard and Marilyn Schwartz of
Monroe, N.Y., uncle, Michael
Schwartz of Jerusalem, Israel,
aunt and uncle, Iris and Herb
Perten of Pomona, N.Y., and
sister, Tracy.
Michelle's hobbies are reading
and computing and honors and
awards include Honor Society
(National Junior), seventh grade
social studies and citizenship
award, top 5 percent award (first
year). Following services, Mrs.
Claudio will host a reception in
Michelle's honor.
SETH MANINGS
Seth Joseph, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Manings, and grandchild of
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Furer, will
be called to the Torah at B'nai
Torah Congregation in Boca
Raton on Shabbat morning Aug.
27 on the occasion of his Bar Mit-
zvah celebration.
is precisely such guidance which resisting peer pressure to ioin
is unconstitutionally objections- particular club would be in, "
ble. For younger children in mountable." r
particular, the problem of_______________
Wallenberg's Birthday
Marked At UN Ceremony
The birthday observance took
place opposite the United N.
tions building. It was sponsored
by the Raoul Wallenberg Com-
mittee of the United States and
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. The observance
began with a wreath-laying cere-
mony at the Holocaust Memorial
Wall on Dag Hammarskjold
Plaza, in memory of the many
victims of the Nazis whom
Wallenberg was unable to save,
and then proceeded to the Isaiah
Wall across the street from the
UN headquarters.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) More
than 100 people, among them
Naphtali Lavie, Israel's Consul
General in New York, and Hans
Andersson, Acting Consul
General of Sweden in New York,
gathered here last week to mark
the 71st birthday of Raoul
Wallenberg, the Swedish dip-
lomat who saved an estimated
100,000 Hungarian Jews during
World War II and then disap-
peared in the Soviet Union after
being arrested by Russian troops
in Budapest in 1945.
Temple Beth El
of Boca Raton
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue Boca Raton, FL 33432
Merle E. Singer, D.H.L. Rabbi
Ricbard D. Agler Assistant Rabbi
Martin Rosen Cantor
#
High Holy Day
Service Schedule
Kosh Hashanah
Wednesday Night September 7 8:00 p.m.
Thursday Morning September 8 10:00 a.m.
Yom Kippur
Friday Night (Kol Nidre) September 16 8:00 p.m.
Saturday Morning September 17 10:00 a.m.
All services will be held in
The New University Center Auditorium
Florida Atlantic University
500 N.W. 20th Street, Boca Raton
For further information call the temple office: 391-8900
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Hazzan Donald
Koberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Minyan on Monday and Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road, 1 block south of Linton Blvd. Delray Beach,
FL 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Services daily 8
a.m. and 9 a.m., Saturday. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan
Association Office, West Atlantic, corner Carter Road. Delray
Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m.
and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 499-6687. Temple
Office 14600 Cumerland Drive, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446,
Phone 495-0466. Rabbi Emeritus Jonah J. Kahn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton. Fla. 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at 8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
Month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, Fla. 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:46 a.m., Sunday 9 a.m. Reuben
SalUman. President, Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-6667.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Fla. 33445. Ce
servatiye. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A Sflvar, Rabbi; Naftaly
A. Lmkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m.,
Saturday at 8:46 a.m., Daily Minyans at 8:46 a.m. and 5 p.m. I
TEMPLE SINAI
Cason United Methodist Church, 342 N. Swinton Ave. (comer
Lake Ida Rd.), Delray Beach, FL Reform. Mailing Address: P.O.
Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:16 p.m. Rabbi
Samuel Silver, President Samuel Rothatein, 276-6161.



Friday. August 19,1963
7000 In Six Months To Israel
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Pwrell
New Immigrants Present
Housing Problems
By CINDY KAYE
JERUSALEM (JTA)
__ It is said that "good al-
irays comes with bad."
This is the case in Israel in
recent months as olim have
been arriving here in large
numbers, predominantly
from Western countries.
The difficulty in housing
some 7,000 new immigrants
who came here over the last
six months accompanies
the surge in aliya.
According to Ilan Rubin,
deputy director general of the
Jewish Agency's alrye depart
meat, aliya is up over-all by 23
percent so far this year compared
to last year. "The absorption
centers are practically 100 per-
cent full, taking into account the
reserved places slated to be filled
during the very near future by
expected olim," Rubin said.
THE HOUSING problem is a
recent one. It is a combination of
the dramatic turn around in aliya
during the first hall of this year
aliya was up 50 percent from
the West but the drop in the
number of olim from the Soviet
Union and other Eastern bloc
countries has tended to bring
down the significance in the
overall rise in the number of olim
- and the fact that approxi-
mately 20 -absorption centers
were closed for the last three
years because there was no need
for such facilities while relatively
few immigrants arrived here.
"The closed centers along the
periphery of the country, such as
those in Dimona and Maalot,
which might possibly be reopen-
ed, are unattractive to olim and
therefore do not help us," said
Hub in. "The absorption centers
belong to the Ministry of
Housing. When they were not
heing filled, the ministry
demanded them back and now
they are being used for other pur-
poses, such as student housing
centers, residential flats and
other forms of public housing."
Rubin noted that in Kiryat
Shemona. the absorption center
was placed under the army's ju-
risdiction. As a result, these
buildings are no longer available
to be reverted back into absorp-
tion centers.
RUBIN EXPLAINED that
since Jewish Agency funds are
"too tight to be able to invest in
building," that is not an option.
Another situation which exacer-
bates the shortage of space in ab-
sorption centers is the shortage
of low rental public housing.
"Olim are supposed to leave
the absorption centers after six
months which is the approxi-
mate amount of time it takes to
absorb them," Rubin said. "By
then many have found work and
have completed the ulpan
(Hebrew study). But the number
of olim leaving after six months
has decreased because public
housing is not readily available."
Presently, the average stay in
an absorption center is one year.
A small percentage of olim have
even stayed as long as two years.
In addition to the shortage of
housing, some olim remain be-
cause it is so inexpensive to live
in any of the immigrant housing
centers.
A family of four, in a three-
room apartment in an absorption
center pays close to nothing, "a
mere token," as Rubin put it.
After that, if no member of the
family has found work during the
next six months, rent amounts to
$30 a month. If one family
member has found work, rent in-
creases to $100 a month or 25
percent of the incoming salary,
depending on which is lower.
TEMPORARY hostels, which
are absorption centers which do
not include Hebrew courses for
their occupants, are slightly more
expensive. Rent starts at the be-
ginning of the immigrant's stay
comparable to a non-employed
family's costs in an absorption
center during the second six-
month period of their stay. After
three months in a hostel em-
ployed occupants are obligated to
pay 25 percent of their salaries
toward rent.
Permanent residences for olim
also exist. There are 3,500 places
available, and they are filled to
capacity, not to mention the ex-
tensive waiting list which accom-
panies this option.
Olim pay a modest rent and are
entitled to remain in these apart-
ments for an indefinite period of
time. In addition, they are per-
mitted to bring spouses into the
apartments, only after they have
children are they expected to
B NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
1401 NW 4th Avenue
Boca Raton. Florida 3348
A Conservative Congregation
Join us for
High Holy
Oay Servicet

Rath Hithomh
Wed Evening Thur Morning Sept 7 Sept a
Ttnir Evening Fri Morning Sept 8 Sept 9
Tan Klppur Fn Evening Sept 16 Sat Morning Sept 17
Rabbi Theodore Feldman
Our Services wiN t* MM at Cant(Jr D()na,d R()berts
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. 4th Avjpnue. Boca Raton. Florida rfjf?*t
Junior Congregation
and
Supervised Nursery
Available
for reservations
call 392-8566
or stop by
1401 N W 4tn Avenue
(Corner GUces Road)
move.
In all, there are 72 centers
available to olim, 30 absorption
centers, 11 hostels, and 31 per-
manent residences. The budget
alloted to operating these facili-
ties is S20 million a year. This
money covers staff salaries in the
faculties, such as ulpan teachers
(where applicable) maintenance,
rental costs and utilities.
THE ALIYA department has
indicated the need for increased
housing facilities to the Housing
Industry. This request came after
the aliya department raised the
rents of olim who remain in
centers and are employed. The
Housing Ministry, headed by
Deputy Prime Minister David
Levy, would rather olim pur-
chased apartments with the aid
of extensive loans, rather than
living in public housing, Rubin
explained.
The problem with this idea is
that a gap still exists between the
loans provided and the amount of
capital the immigrant must sup-
ply, Rubin said. In addition, in-
terest costs run approximately
$200 a month on a full-scale loan.
"There are around 1,000 unsold
apartments in Jerusalem which
will eventually be turned over to
the government because they
cannot be sold by private
builders," Rubin said. "These
could be reverted into public
housing units. In addition, we
suggested that olim pay a higher
rate than the welfare recipients
who are also entitled to this
housing."
Meanwhile, Rafael Kotlowitz,
head of the WZO immigration
and absorption department, pre-
dicted that some 13,000 immi-
grants from the West are expect-
ed to arrive in Israel by the end of
the year, a record high since 1974.
But he warned that without
proper housing, immigration
might once again decline.
IN ADDITION to the over-
crowded conditions in the ab-
sorption centers and other
transition institutions, Kotlowitz
noted that because of pressure on
aliya offices overseas, potential
immigrants sometimes must wait
up to two weeks before they can
be seen by aliya officials.
According to Kotlowitz, the
breakdown in immigration from
the West this year will be: North
America, 4,200; Latin America,
3,800; France, 2,300; United
Kingdom, 1,500; and another
1,700 from other Western coun-
tries. Kotlowitz said he abo ex-
pected some 5,000 immigrants
from the East bloc and Third
World countries, 1,900 from
Rumania, 500 from the Soviet
Union, and 1,500 from Africa.
Shamir to Visit
Rumanian Prexy
Next Month
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
will visit Rumania next month
where he is scheduled to hold
several meetings with President
Nicolae Ceausescu. Shamir was
invited by Rumania's Foreign
Minister.
The talks are expected to focus
on ways to advance the Middle
East peace process. The
Presidents of Lebanon and Syria
have also been invited to visit
Rumania in the near future.
Community Calendar
August 21
B'noi Torch Congregation membership coffee, 7:30 p.m.
Avftjsf 23
American Red AAagen David for Israel-Delray-Boynton, 7:30
p.m. meeting.
August 25
Temple Beth El, 8 p.m. Board meeting.
August 29
Free Son* of Israel, 7 p.m. meeting.
August 30
Temple Beth El UAHC Curriculum Workshop, 7:30 p.m.
August 31
National Council of Jewish Women, 8 p.m. Board meeting.
SapttunW 1
Jewish War Veterans-Snyder-Tokson Post 459, meeting tO a.m.
September 4
B'nai B'rith-North Pines Lodge.
September 6
Brandeis Women-Boca Century Village, 10a.m. meeting B'nai
B'nth-Boca Teeca Lodge, 9:30 a.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Boca-Delray evening, 8 p.m. Board meeting
Temple Beth El-Solos, 7:30 p.m. Board meeting Women's
American ORT-Delray, 10 a.m. Board meeting Anshei Emuna-
Sisterhood, 10 noon meeting Women's League for Israel, 10
a.m. Board meeting.
jepteniBer 1
B'nai B'rith Integrity Council, 9:30 a.m. meeting.
September 12
Brandeis Women-Boca, 9 a.m. Board meeting Anshei Shalom-
Sisterhood-Oriole Jewish Center, 9:45 a.m. Board meeting
Hadassah-AAenachem Begin, 12 noon Board meeting.
September 13
Pioneer Women-Beersheba, 12 noon meeting Zionist Organi-
zation of America-Century Village Boca, 8 p. m. meeting.
September 14
Hadassah-Aviva, 10 a.m. Board meeting National Council of
Jewish Women-Boca-Delray, 8 p.m. meeting.
September 15
Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 12:30 p.m. Board meeting Women's
American ORT-Oriole, 1 p.m. Board meeting.

Sacrifice
3 cemetery plots with liners and
perpetual care Beth Olom Cemetery
in Lantana.
Will sell double or single.
Call 495-2039.
THE MENORAH
PRE-NEED PLAN
Satisfaction.
Thoughtfulness.
Value.
Your choices set at
today's prices and in the
Jewish tradition.
And now you can receive a FREE Permanent
EMERGENCY WALLET CARD with your personal medi
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I WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE MY FREE EMERGENCY
WALLET CARD. PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION
ABOUT THE PRE-NEED PLAN.
Mail coupon to. Menorah Chapels. 20955 Biscayne Boulevard.
North Miami Beach, FL 33180. Attn: Pre-Need Plan Director
Name.
Address.
City.
State.
Telephone.
Zip-
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In Dade, 945-3939. In Broward, 742-6000.
Cemetery and chapels in North Miami Beach, Fort Laucierdale,
Margate. Deedield Beach & West Palm Beach
JF


Page $.
Page 12
TL. T
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, August 19
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P-METRIC
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sag
P155/80R13
X' WHITEWALL P165/80R13
PRICE F.E.T.
39.84
1.50
44.70
P185/80R13 58.16
200
P185/75R14159.55
------------------------1
ft P195/75R14 62.53 ?13
1 64
1.90
W2 P205/75R15
P215/75R15
71.95U"
74.98
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
77.48
89.42
2 59
2 74
296
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
145x13
155x13
165x13
175x14
185x14
165x15
165/70-13
185/70-13
1185/70-14
MXL
PRICE F.E.T.
36.26! 163
41.39M-42
46.45
1.55
53.1812-08
57.35215
51.36 172
44.761155
55.241178
58.941199
xvs
I TUBELESS BLACK
195/70-14 205/70-14
81.85 87.33
FET. 2 27
FE.T 2 40
THE NEW GENERATION RADIAL
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
PRICE
-FET.
165/70-365 77.08 I'72
180/65-390i 90.30 94
190/65-390
220/55-390
WHITE
99.91 |2 09
107.3912 26
XCAUGHT TRUCK
TUBELESS BLACK
SIZE
700x15
6pty
750x16
8 ply
800x16.5
8 ply
875x16.5
8 ply
950x16.5
8 ply
10x16.5
8 ply
PRICE
77.70
101.18
F.E.T.
2 97
104.33
112.90
128.83
134.26
415
3 79
4 55
4 95
4 76
PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITE WALLS
IMPORT TRUCKS
MICHEUN 85x14 6 p.y
XCT 56" w
PWCt
-ELL.
A78X13
25.26
C78x13 28.20
C78x14
28.83
E78x14 30.03
F78X14 31.48
G78x14 I 33.18
H78xT4 34.74
G78x15
33.26
H78x15
34.98
L78x15
36.94
1 60
1 77
1 89
2 05
2 16
2 28
2 46
236
2 55
260
AvartaM* m 2 Ply only
MAXI-TRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
sat i ewce ; FET
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P2C5/75R14
P215/75R14
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
35.62
1 67
38.39
1 64
40.09
1 78
41.25
1 93
42.62
206
43.90
2 31
45.89
2 47
46.28
48.77
2 49
2 70
53.61
2 89
llRELLI
40,000 MILE
LIMITED
WARRANTY
LOW COST, HIGH
MILEAGE. OUT-
STANDING VALUE
BLACK RADIAL
SIZE
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
PRICE
FE T
39.50
119
34.85
115
41.24
1 24
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
44.73
153
51.12
1 81
54.02
211
52.28
171
SIZE
P155/80B13
P165/80B13
P175/80B13
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
PRICE
31.97
33.81
35.75
37.93
38.79
fet BELTED CLM
J M P-METRIC, POLYESTER
CORD, FIBERGLASS BELT]
WHITEWALLS
1.79
1.70
555/a
0B12
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
39.88
41.82
P205/75B14 42.92
P215/75B14 I 414.25
186
2.00
ype.T,
2.11
50
2.24
P225/75B14 i 46.57 2 **
P155/80B15 35.75 i 1 67
P165/80B15 : 37.44 83
P205/75B15 44.14
2.13
P215/75B15 45.60
2.37
SIZE
SALE PRICE F.E.T
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
47.78 2 52 P165/80R13
50.10 2 n P175/80R13
IFGoodrich P185/80R13
43.46
45.02
1 64
183
46.28 190
LIFESAVER XLM^/70R13 *7.11_l*
STEEL BELTED RADIAL P205/70R14
WHITEWALLS -------------------
P175/75R14
P3/70
BEST SELLING RADIAL
DUAL STEEL BELTS
SIZE
165/70SR13
175/70SR13
185/70SR13
185/70SR14
195/70SR14
PRICE | FET
43.87 26
49.41
1 32
1.57
1 65
1 88
llRELLI
WIDE
RADIALS
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
52.76
46.39
48.57
2.24
1.87
200
52.76 2.1a
P20S/75R14
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
PTJ ''EVOLUTIONARY
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THE ONLY DUAL TREAD
DESIGN, DUAL COM-
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FOR ADDED STRENGTH
_SSL.
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WE ALSO CARRY
P5LP6,P7andP8
SIZES TO FTT MOST
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AT MOST STORES
P225/75R15
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55.06 "4
56.10
59.97
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2.21
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SIZE
55SR12
45SR13
55SR13
65SR13
75SR14
85SR14
165SR15
PRICE
Ml
444.
F.E.T.
1 36
1.23
1 48
1 60
1 84
1 98
179
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WHITEWALL
TRUCK SPECIALU^^SRUlStTi
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