The Jewish Floridian of South County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00126

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
Number 26
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Betray Beach and Highland Beach
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, August 5,1963
9 AM
Price 35 Cent.
Frenchman Remembers Youth
With 'Most Brutal' Man in France
fque D'Ermo
ISA RUBENSTEIN
\Fbridian Staff Writer
brutality of for-
stapo chief Klaus
crimes comes to
tie he awaits trial in
prison for "crimes
humanity" com-
lin France during
far II, the ghastly
is do not shock
i the "Butcher of
40-year exile in
America after the
st, victims of his
I harbor scars from
personal traged-
rill never die.
and women who sur-
ge's bloody reign of
nce. where he alleg-
edly killed at least 4,000 French
Jews and Resistance fighters, de-
ported 7,500 Jews to German
concentration camps, and tor-
tured untold thousands of others,
find their unforgotten tragedies
suddenly relived.
DOMINIQUE D'ERMO is one
of these, one who, in his own
words, has seen a lot, perhaps too
much. For a man who spent much
of his early manhood in face-to-
face confrontation with German
occupation and Barbie terror, re-
membering is easy, and also
bitter.
"Klaus Barbie was without a
doubt one of the most brutal men
the Germans ever sent to
France," says the non-Jewish 56-
year-old native of Lyons. "I
joined the French Resistance
movement because I saw what
was happening to the Jews. And
the Germans were eager to deport
and harass the entire Lyons com-
munity."
Barbie, sent to Lyons in 1942
to terrorize and deport Jews and
eradicate the French Resistance,
spent the years after the war in
Argentina and Bolivia. It was
from Bolivia that he was recently
extradited to France, where he
has been convicted in abstentia
for his wartime activities.
SOME FRENCHMAN have
called for the revival, just for
Barbie, of execution bv truillot-
ine, a practice abolished in
France in 1981.
But D'Ermo doesn't agree:
"What I think is that Barbie
should be hanged by the feet for
what he did to the Jewish people"
such as burning their houses
with people still inside. Hanging
by the feet was one of the former
Nazi officer's favorite methods of
inflicting agonizing death, ac-
cording to D'Ermo.
D'Ermo joined the Resistance
when he was 17 years old and
says he began to resent the Ger-
mans more and more for creating
havoc in the once peaceful town
he had grown up in.
"We had to stand in line to get
our ration of food," D'Ermo, now
a U.S. resident and owner of
Dominique's French restaurant
in Washington and on Miami
Beach, recounts. "And the Ger-
man army was always there. If
they saw Jewish people in line,
they forced them to the end.
"The Jews always got less."
ACCORDING to D'Ermo, the
Resistance was comprised mostly
of young men like himself, al-
though most were Jewish. Jews
ipleEmeth Welcomes New Cantor
His wife, Riva, was an ac-
complished graduate pharmacist
in Russia. A son, Samuel is a
graduate of the Cantorial School
of the Jewish Theological
Seminary and is now actively
engaged as a cantor in New York.
Unfortunately, their daughter,
son-in-law, and child are still in
Tiflis, Russia, since their son-in-
law is an engineer and in the
professional category which
requires a ransom for an exit
visa.
Emeth of Delray
Miounces the appoint-
new cantor, Naftaly
||nkovsky will officiate
Emeth's services,
g with Friday
figust 5, and thereafter
?lichot and the High
Brvices.
bikovsky was born in
From the age of five
is 12, he began his
training as a cantor
ig the Community
kool in Edinitz. At the
ie entered the world-
logical seminary
Kishineff, Bessar-
tion to gaining a Cantor Naftaly A. Linkovsky
[of Hebrew prayers in
who had escaped other German-
occupied countries in Europe had
come to France to try to reestab-
lish their lives, but, according to
D'Ermo, "unfortunately, could
not."
The Frenchman later joined a
Resistance stronghold in the Ver-
rors Mountains southeast of
Lyons, where he lived with about
5,000 others in the woods. He has
vivid recollections, of the day in
that summer of 1944 when a Ger-
man army division, 20,000-
strong, attacked and wiped out
his group.
D'Ermo at one point found
himself alone in an open truck,
with bullets riddling it; when he
jumped off, the truck exploded
into flames. After watching many
of his friends die that day,
D'Ermo and other survivors were
taken to prison and interrogated.
There he came face-to-face with
Klaus Barbie.
"WE WERE brought to a
school in a small village,"
D'Ermo recalls. "We had to go to
the blackboard and write our
names, agea, if we were Jewish,
and other information about the
Resistance.
"Barbie was there with a whip
in his hand. If you didn't write
fast enough, he would whip you
on the face or the legs." Other
prisoners were slashed on the legs
and feet with a razor or a knife,
and acid or gasoline was thrown
on their wounds, causing infec-
tion as well as pain.
"All the Jews," D'Ermo con-
tinues, "were taken immediately
and killed. I saw 40 young men
like myself taken away and shot,
and the instruction to kill them
came straight from Barbie."
D'Ermo, taken to prison and
sentenced to hard labor and later
deportation, was beaten by the
Germans in their efforts to obtain
KulanuA New Organization
In South County
and historic context,
in Kishineff had a
training of cantors
itor Linkovsky at-
he was 16 years of
ceived a diploma as a
i this institution.
served as cantor in
Rumania, and at the
Synagogue in Jassy,
I During this period he
pee culture, music, and
M with some of the
spean musicians and
[as well as with Profss-
charoff, Discontine,
ff. Dinamiter, and
lie heed choirmaster of
taught him personally
[study.
Linkovsky served in
ian Army from 1941
' Upon his return from
I he served as cantor for
Mi community of Czerno-
sn for 12 years he was in
"harmonic Orchestra as
operatic soloist.
From 1958 through 1960, he
was cantor for the largest
synagogue in Tashkent, Russia.
From 1962 until 1971, he served
as cantor of the Ashkenazic
Synagogue in Tiflis, Russia. The
fame of Cantor Linkovsky spread
throughout the Soviet Union and
he was called upon to make guest
cantorial appearances in many
Russian cities such as Leningrad,
Odessa, Kiev, and Lemberg.
In May 1971 he left Russia for
Israel and was immediately
appointed to the post of head
cantor in the leading synagogue
of Cholon, a suburb of Tel Aviv.
He arrived in America on Jury 19,
1972, served as cantor in Congre-
gation Agudas Achim,
Columbus, Ohio; Temple Sinai,
Hollywood, Florida; and the
Gold Coast Synagogue at the
Konover Hotel in Miami Beach,
before coming to Delray.
"Kulanu" was recently formed
by some parents of the children of
Delray Beach's Temple Sinai
Religious School. They have been
meeting every Sunday and found
that they had many things in
common; they began to feel like a
family. With this came the idea
about forming their own group.
Bev Kamin waa elected presi-
dent, and their first meeting
revealed that they shared com-
mon values, primarily to per-
petuate the Jewish heritage, to
teach and show (not just tell)
their children what being Jewish
is all about, and to give them a
sense of pride just as they had
received from their parents. They
also want Kulanu to be a major
attribute to Temple Sinai, not
only with financial donations, but
also by participating physically
in helping the Temple to grow.
It was at this first meeting
that by-laws were written and the
name Kulanu, meaning all of us,
was chosen. Membership is open
to all young Jewish people;
Temple members or not, single,
married, those who have children,
and those who do not. It is geared
toward people who want to
belong to an active, young,
reformed Jewish group.
There is st least one function
happening each month. Some-
times it is a holiday oriented get-
together, a barbecue including
duJdren, or an "adult only" night
out for dinner. They also do their
own fundraising.
Kulanu "s membership has trip-
led in its five months of exist-
ence. Anyone interested in addi-
tional information about Kulanu
can contact any of its board
members: president, Beverly
Kamin, 499-0404; first vice presi-
dent, Sandy Behar, 785-9011;
second vice president, Andrea
Frydman, 498-9339; recording
secretary, Susan Lederman, 732-
5431; corresponding secretary,
Lenae Breger, 994-8654; or
treasurer, Susan Turchin, 487-
3304.
Klaus Barbie
information abut the Resistance.
They knocked his head against a
wall and kicked him when he fell.
He was taken to a cell 24 feet by
12 feet that he was to share with
40 others, 38 of whom were
executed.
"ONE MORNING," he re-
counts, "I saw the sun come up
and those who were to be killed
being dragged off by their feet
and shot."
When the group of fighters was
first captured, one man who had
a Star of David hanging visibly
from his neck was told by his
friends, for bis own sake, to
throw it away. He refused but in-
stead hid the pendant in his sock.
"Unfortunately for him,"
D'Ermo says, "the first thing the
Germans did was strip us. They
beat him up pretty badly, and the
next day he was one of the first to
die."
D'Ermo also clearly remem-
bers the day Barbie ordered five
young Resistance fighters, one a
close personal friend of
D'Ermo's, shot in the neck as
they jumped, one by one, hands
tied behind backs, off a moving
truck.
THEY WERE executed for a
Resistance bombing of a Lyons
restaurant the Nazis had taken
over as their official eatery. The
five bodies, according to D'Ermo,
were left dripping with blood in
the street as an example.
"The Germans thought it was
all very funny," he recalls. "They
even took pictures of the dead
and made jokes about it and
laughed."
Other suspected members of
the Resistance would be dragged
behind a car until dead or im-
paled through the neck on a
butcher's hook and left to die.
Prisoners were tortured by cas-
Continued on Page 5


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday.Auguat^J
Anti-Semitic
Acts Deplored
Reagan Critical of Sad Fate of Nicaragua's Jews
to come to Geneva u, p,-,
.n the conclave scheduled ff
end of August Off, ? *
the conierenep i '"^Wo,
ByJTA Services
WASHINGTON President
Keagan has deplored anti-Semitic
acts in Nicaragua, citing the fact
that "virtually the entire Jewish
community has been frightened
into exile by the Sandinista
regime.
The President made the
comment at a White House
briefing addressed by Rabbi
Morton Rosen thai, director of the
Latin American Affairs Depart-
ment of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. and Isaac
Stavisky, a member of the
Nicaraguan Jewish community
who was forced into exile.
According to Rosenthal.
Keagan told the briefing organ-
ized by the White House Out-
reach Group on Central America
that the repressions against the
Nicaraguan Jewish community is
the consequence of a "self-
proclaimed blood unity between
the Sandinistas and the PLO"
whose "results are evident for all
the world to see and are an evil
echo of history"
Reform Woman Rabbi
Gets 'Solo' Pulpit
NEW YORK A Relorm
ordained woman rabbi, whose
application to become the first
Conservative woman rabbi was
reiected last April at a conven-
tion of Conservative rabbis, has
been appointed rabbi 01 a
Conservative synagogue in
Clifton Park,N.Y.
A source at the Rabbinical
Assembly (RAi. tne association
"l ( onservative rabbis, said
Rabbi Beveraiv Magidson was
named solo rabbi of Beth Shalorr
of Clifton Park, effective Aug. 1
her first pulpit. She is leaving her
current post as associate director
of the Hillel Foundation at
Washington University in St.
Louis to take the Clifton pulpit.
The term "solo rabbi' is used
to refer to a congregation too
small to need or to be able to
at lord more than one rabbi. The
Clifton Park congregation is
made up of slightly more than
100 families, the R A sources said.
McFarlane Replaces
Habib in Mideast
WASHINGTON President
Reagan has named Robert
McFarlane, a deputy assistant
for national security affairs, to
replace Philip Habib as his
personal representative in the
Middle East. McFarlane, who, as
Habib did, will carry the personal
rank of ambassador, is expected
to leave for the Middle East
within a week.
The surprise announcement
was made by Reagan last Friday
as he concluded a 90-minute
White House meeting with
Lebanese President Amin
(iemayel. Reagan said that
Habib "must return to his
business and academic duties.''
But Administration officials
later conceded that one of the
reasons is to bring in a "new
face'' in the United States diplo
f matic process in the hope that
-this will aid the U.S. effort to
convince Syria to remove its
forces from Lebanon. Habib has
not been welcome in Damascus
and it is hoped that the Syrians
will now receive his replacement.
Canadians Big
Gift to Gurion Univ.
MONTREAL The Canadian
government has donated $60,000
to the Canadian Associates of the
Hen Gurion University of the
Negev toward its sponsorship of
tht first "Right to Food'.' cppfer-
ence to be held in Montreal Mav
25-27. 1984.
The check was presented by
Agriculture Minister Eugene
Whelan who declared in the
House of Commons. "The Cana-
dian Associates of the Ben
Gurion University are to be
congratulated for taking this
initiative." He noted that the
conference "is intended to inform
Jie public that hunger can be
beaten within the next generation
if countries use the means at their
disposal."
Soviets Export
Propaganda Film
NEW YORK The National
Conference on Soviet Jewry
(NCSJI reported that a new film
made by the Soviet government
for export abroad, particularly to
the United States, links Zionism
with Nazism and racism.
According to the NCSJ. the
film. "Babi Yar: the Lessons of
History." is disturbing because it
represents an attempt to expand
the ongoing Soviet propaganda
camnaien personified bv the
three-and-a-half month old "Anti-
Zionist Committee."
Narrated in near flawless
English and of high technical
quality, it was apparently sent
out to a wide variety of media
outlets, including CBS News, the
Simon Wiesenthal Center and
private individuals involved in
tracking down Nazi war
criminals.
15 Ultra-Orthodox
Go on Trial
JERUSALEM Fifteen
ultra-Orthodox Jews went on
trial Monday for disturbing the
peace but only 14 showed up in
court after being released on bail
last Friday. A warrant was
issued for the arrest of the
missing man, identified as
Yeshayahu Cohen.
All were arrested following
riots in the Mea Shearim
quarter two weeks ago against
archaeological diggings near the
Old City wall. Two of the
defendants were charged with
assaulting a policeman.
Presiding Judge Miriam Maor
who granted bail after Aguda
Israel Knesset members in-
tervened, instructed the accused
to stay out of Jerusalem except
when the court was in session.
They were required to sign a
pledge not to participate in any
demonstrations for the duration
of the trial and to surrender their
passports and identity papers.
Swiss to Bar
PLO Terrorists
GENEVA Reliable Swiss
sources said that Swiss authori-
t ies have decided to bar entry to
Switzerland to any Palestinian
terrorist, or other terrorists
sought by police, who want to
attend the Conference on
Palestinian Rights in Geneva,
even if they have diplomatic
passports.
Muammar Qaddafi. the Libyan
head of state, has said he would
issue such passports to all
Palestinian terrorists who want
the conference in lheir
citing security problem> ^
Concern reportedly had h-
expressed by official souroT1
(.eneva over the prosoeo *
terrorists wanted by im
moving about freely' ,n cSS
under diplomatic immunity
Gemayal Wants
Referendum
PARIS President .
Gemayel of Lebanon called?
the United Nations i0 conduct.
referendum in the areas no*
occupied by Syrian and \inA
troops to determine the attuut
of the inhabitants there towarf
the presence of the troop,
Gemayel. who arrived hJ
Monday from Washington wt
he met with President RJJ
and other top Administrate
officials last week, told a pro
conference at the Elysee that
referendum is needed to make
the nation's voice heard.'
Boeing Planes
Go to El Al
TELAVrV- new Boeing 767 aircraft, the fir*
of four to be delivered by nea
year, arrived here on its first j
commercial flight from London
Study medicine in Israel,
A challenge and
an opportunity.
Touro College and Technion- Israel Institute of Technology
announce a Aew program leading to an M.D. degree
A new door is open to an M.D. degree from
one of the world's great teaching and research
centers. Starting in September 1983. the
Touro-Technion Program will offer qualified
college graduates a unique American-Israel
educational experience.
The programs 18-month American phase
provides advanced science and Hebrew
^ language studies at Touro College's beautiful
" 15-acre campus in the New York City suburb
of Huntington. Upon successful completion of
these courses, students will receive a second
baccalaureate degree and may continue their
studies in Israel.
Israel phases of the program comprise 6
months of initial bridging courses, 2 years of
Applications will be accepted through
August 15 for classes beginning at Touro
October 3,1983.
advanced clinical study at Technion s Faculty
of rAedicine in Haifa, a thesis and a year of in-
ternship in Israel. An M.D. degree wiH be award
ed by Technion to students who successful
complete its program requirements.
. Our goal is the development of skilled and
compassionate physicians who also will be
well-prepared to meet internship, residency
and licensing requirements in the United
States.
For applications and information call or
write:
Center for Biomedical Education
Touro College
30 West 44th Street
New York, MY. 10036
(212)575-0190


Lav. August5, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
'gntgstic
laht-Medal Coup
Israelis Star in Special Olympics
NEW YORK With several
housand spectators watching
cheering, members of the
Israeli Special Olympics
i scored a fantastic eight
tedal coup four gold, two
Uver and two bronie for their
jand efforts in the 1983
btemational Summer Special
blympics Games. The thrilling
pmpetition, entitled, "A World
[ Winners," held in Baton
ouge, La. July 12-18, under the
uspices of the Joseph P.
Kennedy Foundation, sent seven
I the eight I sraeli team members
oroe with at least one medal.
and Ofra Ezra, who won a bronze
medal. Eli Ben Simon won a gold
medal for the 50 meter race and a
bronze medal for the 200 meter
race.
The final and most challenging
gold medal was won by the girls'
relay team, consisting of Aliza
Twirdin, Yona Gavra, Daphna
Wittenberg and Ofra Ezra for the
100 meter race. The Israeli team
captured the top honor over
several other international teams.
Israeli participants in the
Special Olympics were sponsored
by AKIM, the Association for
the Rehabilitation of the Men-
tally Handicapped in Israel,
which now has eight operating
U.S. chapters in Chicago,
Detroit, Houston, Miami, New
Jersey, New York, Orlando and
Philadelphia, with plans for addi-
tional expansion, under the co-
ordination of national director
Michele Bokobza.
AKIM IS an acronym for the
organization's full name and also
means "I Shall Comfort" in He-
brew. In its 32-year history,
AKIM has annually cared for
more than 25,000 children and
adults in Israel of all denomina-
tions.
Meir Rahman, the first gold
SStfliTS-iSaa Detroit Arabs Picket Gemayel's Talk
cord for the
brow at the Special Olympics
tames. His coach, Edna
Hedalia. of the Wingate Institute
Israel who accompanied the
lathletes" to Baton Rouge, said,
Meir was happy and confident
efore the event, and then went
ut and showed his enormous
^termination."
SUBSEQUENT WINNERS
Lr the 50 meter dash were Moshe
[arsann. who won a gold medal;
baphna Wittenberg and Yona
lavra who won silver medals;
DETROIT (JTA) Presi-
dent Amin Gemayel of Lebanon
concluded his visit to the United
States on Sunday in Detroit with
an address to Lebanese Ameri-
cans in the Masonic Temple
Auditorium. Nine Arab groups in
the area picketed his speech be-
cause of their opposition to the
agreement Lebanon signed with
Israel last May.
Marcel Hage, a Detroiter who
is president of the American Leb-
anese League, said his organiza-
tion promised a strong turnout
for Gemayel's visit here.
Detroit attorney Abdeen
Jabara, a spokesman for the
Arab groups, told the Detroit
Free Press that the organizations
boycotted Gemayel because the
Israel-Lebanon accord "is
odious," because of Gemayel's
cooperation with the Christian
Phalangists, and because of
"continued arrests" in Lebanon
of Lebanese and Palestinians.
ISRAEL $510.
2 WEEK VACATION -s510.
plu air
Plus AJt
5 Nights in TEL AVIV 2 Nights in TIBERIAS 6 Nights in JERUSALEM
Includes: Hotel Acconx, 8 Days of Sightseeing, Twin Bedded Room*.
Israel Stylo Kosher Butlet Breakfast, Transfers A Porterage.
4 WEEK TOUR OF LEISURE s1022.
Woe Air
WITH LATE DEPARTURES, LITTLE WALKING ft SLOWER PACfi
3 WEEKS IN NET ANYA* 1 WEEK IN JERUSALEM
Tour IrKlixtes: Accommodation in First Class Hotel, Twin Bedded Rooms, 2 Kosher MoaH Every Day,
$ Ooyt of Sight*ing, Tntnohn A Porterage, Tratehtrt kmtnnce: Medkal, fsisndalA Pfsonai
s*
FOR RESERVATIONS INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
OTHER ISRAELI TRIPS CALL MIRIAM COLLECT AT
TRIANGLE TOURS- 931 -3031
18407 W. Dixie Highway* North Miami Beach
its*
55**
(3S)SI
DEUCkTY
RESTAURANT
V&i*** ANNOUNCES
Summer Dinner Specials
Served 4 to 7 p.m. weekdays 4 to 6 p.m. weekends
OPIN
7 DAYS
I I A.M.-9P.M.
MONDAVS
ONLY
Vz ROAST OR BBQ
CHICKEN
D'?ors$7.95
TUESDAY AND
WEDNESDAY ONLY
Purchase any dinner at regular price
i- .. -f AC
2nd DINNER AT ^o
V2 PRICE P*c,d dinner
THURSDAY'S ONLY! Mix or Match ... Choice of
mi \ STEW
*TLOAF
STUFFED PEPPERS
BROILED BEEF LIVERS
FRIED FLOUNDER FILLET
PEPPER STEAK
CHOPPED STEAK
STUFFED CABBAGE
SAUTEED CHICKEN
LIVERS
DINNERS
FOR
7.95
WEEKEND DINNER SPECIALS
FHday-Saturday-Sunday Served 4.0O pm to 6:00 pm
Mix or Match ... Choice of:
" BBQ. CHICKEN CHICKEN BROCHETTE
CHICKEN CREOLE RUMAKI SLICED ROAST BEEF
BREAD1D CHICKEN CUTLET STUFFED FLOUNDtR
FILET BROILED FLOUNDER FH FT WHOLE
BROILED FLOUNDER ROAST ( Hl( KEN
CHK KEN SCAI IOPINI STUFFED RO< K ( ORNISM
HfN Hill KABOB ROAST TURK1Y ( OKNI I)
BUT B ( ABBAGt H OUNDER C RIOI F BROOK
TROUT AIMONDINI
ANY
DINNERS
FOR
DINNERS INCLUDE:
Sup. Fa. Pif n. VafMaMa.
1 a mmtter, CeU Steal *
Pfafcto.. C./f.. Tern er fmrnmlm
DAILY LUNCH
SPECIALS AND
CHILDREN'S
MENU
$9.95
Dal Mar Skoppittfj VUUflo
Israelis May Not Buy
F-16 Jet-Fighters After All
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel might reconsider
its decision to buy 75 American F-16 jet fighter-bombers
for economic reasons, it was reported here.
Defense Minister Moshe Arens is believed to want
the advanced aircraft, but their total cost of $3 billion
could be a deterrent at a time when the Finance Ministry
and the Bank of Israel are urging drastic budget cuts.
According to reports, Israel would buy the planes, but
fewer than 75 of them.
The F-168 were a cause of friction with the U.S. last
year when President Reagan suspended the sales process
because of Israel's invasion of Lebanon. The sale was
reinstated after Israel and Lebanon signed their with-
drawal agreement last May 17. But the delay escalated
the cost of the planes.
Waldman
HOTEL
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt Kosher Cuisine
Your Hosts Sam snd Morris Waldman, Gary Shsr, David Diamond
HIGH HOLIDAY SPECIALS
ROSH HASHAAA YOM KtPPUR
12 Days- 11 Nights
(Sept. 7-18) 2 meals daily included,
3 meals Sat. and holidays
310
Per
DM
Occ
* SPLIT STAY
7 Days 6 Nights
(Sept. 7-11 and Sept. 16-18)
*230
Pm
Pecwn
Ota
Occ
* Sleep at adjoining Atlantic Towers Hotel; memls at Waldman
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWNED CANTOR
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
Phone Sam Waldman 538-5731 or 534-4751
ON THE OCEAN AT 43rd STREET


Now 2,000 miles closer!
Grossinger's Rye
comes to Florida!
Great Grossinger's hearth baked rye baked fresh in New York is
now available in the frozen food department of your favorite South
Florida supermarket in a recloseable bag.
Cholesterol free...
No sugar... Artesian well water...
No chemical preservatives
It's made from only the highest quality ingredients-just like you
remember it in New York.
Every loaf of Grossinger's Country Club Rye with Jennie
Grossinger's authentic signature is truly a signed masterpiece.
Certitled Koshar-Parve
25C
STORE COUPON
SAVE 25$
25*
on Grossinger s Rye Bread or Pumpernickel
To the dealer This coupon will be redeemed only as follows For the amount
specified plus 7 handling provided coupon is received trom the customer on
purchase ot listed merchandise Proof ot purchase ot sufficient stock of merchan-
dise to cover coupons submitted must be shown on request (Failure to comply
may void all coupons for redemption) Redemptions are not honored througn
brokers or outside agencies Coupons are not transferratMe and vox! it use Is
prohibited, taxed restricted or a license is required Customers must pay any
sales tax For redemption, mail to Derm Baking Corporation. P0 Box 3909 Grand
Central Station. New York. N Y 10163 This offer is valid only in the United States
rjc*. Limn one coupon per purchase Coupon expires December 31.19B3 OCft*
t*3* STORE COUPON,. ... t ^W
wzr.


Pi*
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Z5^L*Co.
Jewish Flor idt a n
FWCOSMOCHET
*m
of South County
SUZANNESHOCHET
CamMvaidHor
. fnd snocfi
QE ROttNKRG
>>.......*|wW
BOCA UTOW OFFtC 2200 N. Factor ml Hwy.. SuM* 30*. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Pnon38Oi
Man Offtoa Plant: 120 N E. SMi St.. Miami. Fla. 33101 Pnooa 1-3n-aBOS
:Www>iaH7HJlBtoliWarta1aw..0. 1-am.l
Comttnad Jawlah Appal Soutn County Jawiah Faetoratlon. Inc Of'icart PraaKtont Martanna SoMck.
Vioa Praatctonta. Martorto Baar. Eric W. OacMngar. Milton KnMafcy Sacratary. Arnold Roaantnai
Traaaurar. Baranica Scfiankarman. Exacuttva Dtntctor, Rabtx Bruca S Warsnai
Jawiart Ftondian doaa not guaranlaa Kaanruth of Marcftandlaa Advartiaad
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Araa H50 Annual (2 Yaar Minimum in, by mambaranip Soutn County
Jawlah Factor anon, 2200 N. Fadarai Hwy, Sulla 206. Boca Raton. Fla. J3432. Pnona 366-2737
Out or Town. Upon Raquaat
Friday, August 5,1983 26 AB 5743
Volume 5 Number 25
Behind the Be a in
Cancellation
What Made Prime Minister Say 'No
Making of HistoryAgain
This is not good news. If Israel redeploys
no matter what, as Minister Patt declared,
then we can look forward to another storm
of Reagan anger and media fire and
brimstone. If Israel succumbs, then
everything is lost so far as Operation Peace
for Galilee was concerned.
What we hope that Shamir and Arens
reminded the President is just this: During
Israel's best hours in Beirut, when its
victory was absolute, the purposes of the
war had been achieved. The PLO was
destroyed, and Syria was thoroughly
defeated.
But, at American insistence, Israel gave
Syrian troops safe passage along the
Damascus Highway back toward Syria.
What occurred thereafter is history:
Syria reconstituted itself in the Bekaa
Valley. The Russians replenished all of the
Syrian losses in armaments. The Syrians
cuddled the PLO to its bosom where it has
since increased alarmingly in numbers as a
result of the return of PLO terrorists from
abroad in violation of the ceasefire
agreement, which scattered the remnants
of the Palestinian forces into exile.
In short, just like in most every war
Israel ever fought to bring peace to its
people, it is the United States that
engineered the peace to erase the victory
and its fruit. This time by saving the hide
of the PLO and the Syrians.
As Mr. Reagan put the pressure on his
Israeli guests this week, to what extent did
he know his own culpability in the Sy rian-
PLO resurrection?
That is why we say we hope Gideon Patt
knew whereof he spoke.
18.000 New Olim Expected
JERUSALEM-(JTA)- The Jewish Agency is ex-
pecting some 18,000 new olim during 1963, a significant
increase on last year's figure of 13,259. The Agency aliya
department chairman, Rafael Kotlowitz, gave the prog-
nosis in Jerusalem this week. He said 13,000 of this year's
total would come from the West, compared to 8,800 of last
year's figure.
Attention New Residents! j
You art cordially Invited
to attend a
SHALOM SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION
Wine and Cheese Gathering
for
Newcomers to the erea
Place: South County Jawleh Federation Omct
2200 North Federal Highway. SuNa 200
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
Call Federation Office 368-2737 for details.
o
I
N
U
S
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA,
Premier Menachem
Begins cancellation of his
visit to Washington, a week
before it was to begin, has
raised a storm of specula-
tion and concern over the
state of the Prime Minis-
ter's physical and emotion-
al health, his political plans
and the possibility that he
might relinquish his office
soon.
In his brief telephone conver-
sation with President Reagan
informing him that he would not
be keeping their July 27 appoint-
ment at the White House, Begin
cited "personal reasons." The
President did not ask him to
elucidate, and Begin s closest
aides refused to provide any
explanation. though they
vehemently denied that the Pre-
mier's physical condition was a
factor.
POLITICAL PUNDITS sug
gested that Begin wanted to
avoid a mnfrontation with
Reagan over plans to redeploy
the Israel Defense Forces in Leb-
anon to shorter, more defensible
lines, a move Washington is
known to oppose and about
which Lebanese President Amin
Gemayel has expressed serious
misgivings.
That issue was virtually cer-
tain to have figured in the Begin-
Reagan talks. Significantly,
within hours after cancelling his
Prime Minister Begin
visit to Washington, Begin
ordered a secret session of the
Ministerial Defense Committee
which unanimously approved a
redeployment plan, although no
details were announced.
Begin, who was 70 last week-
end, has had medical problems
for years, including a heart at-
tack shortly before he was first
elected to office in 1977, and
other ailments. He was badly
shaken by the long illness and
death of his wife, Aliza, last
J
November which left him
deep depression which his.
associates say. has stOl'notl]
THERE ARE other
problems burdening the
Minister. The war in j^
which began in June, 1982
overwhelming Israeli victo
over the Palestine Libera
Organization and the S
armed Syrians, held out
hopes that the Begin
ment's war aims would
achieved: that the PLO would
erradicated as a military J]
political force, and that L
under a friendly Chri
government, would become
second Arab state to sign,-
treaty with Israel.
But none of this has l_
ized. The PLO. though in 3
disarray, remains capable
terrorist activity, now apparen
under Syrian control. Synij
war losses fully replenished
the Soviet Union, adanu
refused to pull its forces out i
Lebanon.
It is thus able to block in
mentation of the Israeli
withdrawal agreement
May 17 after four months
exhausting negotiations, witht
United States acting as media
The agreement itself falls
short of the peace treaty Is
had expected.
MOST SERIOUS, from ,
standpoint of Israelis, the II
more than a year after the,
began, remains in occupation i
Continued on Page 9
Put Yourself In This Picture
JerusalemTemple Mount
Overlooking the Temple mount of the historic old city of Jerusalem on
UJA Mission to Israel.
e
NEXT MISSION: OCTOBER 9-19
Join the people from South County already committed to this mission
$1000 per person mission cost.
#MM .. Minimum contribution of
$3000 family gift or $1500 for a single to the 1964 UJA/Federation
campaign will be required for all participants on the mission.
For information call Helene Eichler at
The South County Jewish Federation
at 368-2737


iday. August 5, 1963
The Jewish Fkmdian of South County
f***b
Canada Accused of Bias
By ARNOLD AGES
VANCOUVER, British
Gambia (JTA) -
larold Troper, co-author
jrith Irving Abella of
[None Is Too Many," a
Look which details Can-
Ida's restrictive immigra-
tion policies against Jews
efore and during World
/ar II. told the Canadian
ciety of Germanists that
Canada's attitude towards
erman Jewish intellec-
tuals was even more
[trident during that period.
Troper. who delivered his pa-
er at the annual meeting of The
earned Societies of Canada
(where more than 50 academic
Hisciolines meet for scholarly ex-
changes I. said that Canadian
?overnment policy was part of
the larger immigration
philosophy endorsed by
Canadians from the early years of
|he century.
THOSE POLICIES were an
Expression of Canada's belief that
pnly Northern European types
jvould make the proper kind of
nmigrant needed to develop
Canada's vast rural areas. Jews
|uid Italians (and other peoples)
vere not considered suitable for
Ibis kind of settlement popula-
unlike the situation in other
countries (the United States, for
example) they met with a total
blockade.
In surveying the Canadian
university scene Troper produced
grim evidence of the attitude of
Canadian academics towards the
prospects of German Jewish in-
tellectuals arriving in Canada.
The initial response to the Ger-
man Jews was that there were no
academic vacancies. Troper said
ironically that even if there had
been any vacancies no German
Jews would have been invited be-
cause in the 1930's and 1940's the
Canadian universities did not
employ Jewish academics. That
situation did not change until the
1950s.
TROPER, who teaches history
at the Ontario Institute for
Studies in Education in Toronto,
quoted from documents in which
university spokesmen during the
pre-war years warned ominously
about the spectre of Jews inun-
dating the universities if German
Jewish intellectuals were allowed
into Canada.
In the late 1930's at a meeting
of national scope at which Cana-
dian professors debated academic
on.
policies (the predecessor of The
Learned Societies of Canada) and
listened to scholarly papers, a
resolution was introduced on the
issue ot German Jewish immigra-
tion into Canada.
The assembled Canadian aca-
demics voted unanimously to
urge the government in Ottawa
not to open its doors to those
prospective immigrants. Troper
pointed out, with considerable
poignancy, that because of Can-
ada's short sightedness and self-
interest the country lost an op-
portunity to enrich itself through
the acquisition of some of the
world's finest minds.
THE SAME myopia actuated
Canadian government policy
with regard to the German Jews
who were sent to Canada by
Britain as enemy aliens along
with other German nationals.
The Canadian government re-
fused to permit these Jewish anti-
Nazis to involve themselves in
activities which might have
helped the Allied war effort
against the Axis powers.
During the question period a
number of professors expressed
incredulity with regard to Can-
ada's war-time policy towards
Elaine Kleinman of Boca Raton recently attended a consultation
on (Conscience Educators Conference in Washington, DC,
sponsored by the Social Action Commission of Union of
American Hebrew Congregations and Central Conference of
American Rabbis. Here she is pictured with Congressman Dan
Mica.
Jews. Asked by one protessor
whether any German Jewish in-
tellectuals made it into Canada at
that period. Troper replied that a
handful had gained entrance
through the subterfuge of listing
their religion as Protestant in ap-
plication forms. "1 would that
many more had done so," said
Troper.
When the Nazis took over in
(Germany, Troper related, many
German Jewish intellectuals tried
b obtain asylum in Canada and,
Israeli Troops
Kill 1 Arab,
Wound Others
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
[troops fatally shot one Arab and
wounded two others in a battle
[with rioting inmates of the A near
(detention camp in south Leb-
janon. Two Israeli soldiers were
[slightly injured by rocks. The
[army said the troops opened fire
[when the riot seemed to be get-
[ting out of hand. It is investigat-
ing the incident.
Meanwhile, two Katyusha
[rocket launchers used to fire
shells into western Galilee were
[discovered in Lebanon about 10
[kilometers north of the Israeli
border. The rockets caused slight
damage but no casualties. The
launchers were found in the area
I of south Lebanon patroled by the
Fijian unit of the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNI FIL), the army said.
In Beirut, the death toll rose to
.six in the blast that partially
[wrecked the Summerland Hotel.
Fifteen persons were injured.
Klaus Barbie
Continued from Page 1
tration, whipping, and electric
shock.
Another Barbie-ordered opera-
tion of terror involved 80 Jewish
children and their teachers who
[Were hiding in school 16 miles
< from Lyons, D'Ermo recalls.
Barbie had the building sur-
rounded, and when-"five kids
tried to escape, they were shot.
The rest were shipped to Buchen-
wald."
WHAT SHOCKS D'Ermo
most about Barbie's recent reap-
pearance is his apparent total
lack of remorse for his Crimea. He
recounts an interview the ex-Nazi
gave while en route to France in
which he iremained is cold and
cornpassionless as ever.
D'Ermo wants Barbie not only
to die for his crimes but to be
forced to truly comprehend them.
IVrhaps if he were shown films,
the Frenchman feels, with actual
raw footage of Gestapo activities,
shown continuously and unend-
ingly, on par with the methods
used in the film, "A Clockwork
Orange," the man could be made,
after all, to suffer for his sins.
CALIFORNIA FIG JUICE
A Deuqously Different
tastetkeat
From Sunsweet

INew Sunsweet* California
Fig Juice is sweet and tangy,
a deliriously different fruit
juice. 100% natural, it con-
tains no artificial sweeteners
or preservatives.
Try new Sunsweet Cali-
fornia Fig Juice, and save 15*.
15 CALIFORNIA FIG JUICE
RETAILER Tn coupon i itAmmbk lor fan v.lu.
nd7 hiw.Bmacri.iajM pi a ii irairlaa follow. m ranrtrad
-, a ralau ub oJ I ha product .parMhmai. Itou mail 11
Sun- Diamond Crowar. of CiUonai PO Bo. 1M. Chntan.
52714 On nvM you muat upplv invoice* pcovina full.
mwrttm lubmlm. It iifraiailiin.
owpow may nol^ba aaihywfor
cMVM Mock purehaan
Other uaa commute. Iraud
tranafarrad Cuatomer muat pay any uln laa. Void where pra-
I. laud. Ienr required or rewrtcled by law Caah valu* l/KJ
r>ly m US A Offer limited to on. coupon par pure haaa COUPON
11113 10S76S
C Sun-Diamond Growmot California 1983


VL /'cJ, U)nA____UL. J I'
Pe6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday.Aueu,t6,Q^
BALLOONS

All, Or Nothing At All,
Administration Declares
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Reagan Administra-
tion appeared to warn Israel that its decision to redeploy
its troops in Lebanon could "complicate" the already
"very difficult tasks" of the government of President
Amin Gemayel. State Department spokesman John
Hughes stressed that the U.S. was still "consulting" with
Israel in order to learn the details of its decision which
have not yet been made public.
"Israel, of course, makes its own decisions," Hughes said. "But our
position on partial withdrawal of all foreign forces has not changed.
Our basic objective is the full withdrawal of all foreign forces from
Lebanon. Any partial withdrawal, therefore, should be within the
framework of that objective and should not complicate the very
difficult tasks facing the government of President Gemayel," the
State Department spokesman said.
THE ADM IN ISTRATION has reportedly ben opposed to any re-
deployment by Israel unless it is part of a timetable for full withdraw-
al. Israel has held a decision in abeyance pending the visit of Premier
Menachem Begin to Washington. However, Begin telephoned Presi-
dent Reagan to postpone that visit for "personal reasons." Hughes
appeared to see no link between the postponement and the Israeli
Cabinet's redeployment decision.
Meanwhile, Hughes underscored the warning against complicating
Gemayel's problems by making a strong statement about the
heavy shelling of Beirut from the Shouf mountains area, the very area
Israel is believed ready to vacate.
"This brutal and indiscriminate shelling of populated areas is
especially distressing at the very moment the Lebanese President is
engaged in talks here in Washington aimed at the withdrawal of all
external forces leading to national reconciliation and the extension of
the Lebanese central government's authority throughout the coun-
try," Hughes said, "This latest incident poignantly underscores the
necessity for the speedy withdrawal of all foreign forces which remains
the key and paramount objective of our efforts with all the parties.''
Sharon Said to be Unhappy;
Rumors He May Resign
JERUSALEM- (JTA) -Ariel Sharon is unhappy
with his limited role in the government since he was forced
to resign as Defense Minister and i frJifrjirmg of quitting
the Cabinet according to "close friends" quoted in a
Maariv report
ACCORDING TO THE REPORT, he is "chaffing at
his enforced idleness." He did not attend the weekly
Cabinet meeting last Sunday and rarely appears at his
Jerusalem or Tel Aviv offices, Maariv said.
He spends most of his time on his ranch in the Negev.
The report triggered speculation over repercussions
Sharon's departure might have on Premier Menachem
Begins coalition.
Prices and Coupons Effective
Thursday, August 4th thru
Wednesday, August 10, 1983.
Quantity Rights Reserved.'
Pickups
Pubiix your picnic
from the Deli
atPiiMix >
and make the lazy days of k
summer delicious! |$

T
Chicken,
Beef or Pork............ 2"
CMokm,BMforPwk
Barbequed
.2 *.
Italian Submarine
nsj
[ wt^esrxyp^isopleosueydcxjSQweek | PubllX
1


priday, August 5,1963
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 7
Women's Mission To Go To
Prague, Czechoslovakia And Israel
Margie Baer. Florid, legaonal
I missions chairman for UJA
Women's Diviajon, haa an-
nounced that plana are being
Slued for the 1963 National
IWomen's Division Mission. Mrs.
Baer said, "I am so excited about
[this mission that I can hardly
|snd it. Prague is our past, Isra
|el is now; how can this help but
| be an unforgettable experience?"
Singles Groups
Activities
Continue
The Jewish Singles group, age
121-50 sponsored by the Jewish
| Community Center, which is an
(agency operated by the South
County Jewish Federation, an-
Iwunces the following events:
Saturday, August 6 7 p.m.-
111 p.m. Drift (ocean) Fishing
Meet at Sea Mist Fishing
Marina, E. Ocean Blvd., Boynton
Beach, (2 blocks E. of Federal
Hwy. behind the "Banana
J Boat "I, by 6:16 p.m. to buy your
I tickets. (1st come 1st serve basis)
Spend the evening outhia large
I fishing boat. Ail equipment
I provided. Tickets $14. RSVP 368-
12737 by Friday, August 5. No
I alcoholic beverages please.
Thursday, August 11 8:30-
111 p.m. Bowling Night Don
I Carter's, Boca Raton, (off
[Military Trail, near Glades)
I Lanes will be reserved. RSVP
1368-2737 by Monday, August 8,
j noon. Cost: $1.50 per game and
175 cents for shoes.
Saturday, August 13 9 p.m.-
1 a.m. Dance Temple Beth El,
1333 S.W. 4th Ave., (off Palmetto
I Park Road), Boca Raton, co-
sponsored with Beth El Singles.
D.J.: Dave Pirro. Donation: $5
I (includes first drink and noshies),
leash bar for wine, beer, soda.
Dance, hoola hoop and trivia
contests hourly with prizes,
(record albums, wine, etc.). Don't
I miss this summer bash!
Monday, August 15 7 p.m.
[Planning Meeting McDonald's
I Brigg Room, 5th Avenue Shop-
I ping Center, Federal Hwy., next
I to Boca Twin Theatre.
The Singles group age 45 and
I over, which is also a part of the
Jewish Community Center-Fed-
eration program announces the
following event:
Tuesday, August 28 7:30
[p.m. Group Discussion "The
Reality of Positive Thinking it
Really Works," led by Evelyn
(Singer, professional group
discussion leader. B'nai Torsi
Congregation, 1401 N.W. 4th
Ave., Boca Raton. Donation: $3.
RSVP 368-2737.
Four Moscow
Jews Arrested
NEW YORK (JTA) Four
| Moscow Jews were arrested last
| Friday night for holding a private
prayer service, the Student
[Struggle for Soviet.Jewry re-
|ported. Of the approximately one
down persons pteiBBt at the
service, those arrested were Mik-
hail Abramov, Igor Briskman,
I and Mikhail Baajasjej
The arresting officer. Capt.
Mikhail Stepanov, told them.
"Until you leave the country, you
will live by our rules," the SSSJ
| reported.
, The apartment's owner, Mark
j Feldman, was arrested when he
went to the police station to ask
about his friends. All were given
15-day sentences. The SSSJ
spokesman said, that such sen-
tences usually are served in local
jail but had no information on the
four arreetees.
The Mission to Prague and Is-
rael runs Oct. 12-24 and will be
led by Harriet Zimmerman, the
dynamic UJA National Women's
Division chairman. "This is a
chance for women who can get
away to be in the company of
women like themselves who care
about Jewish survival and well-
being an opportunity to be on
a mission that is geared around
interests, of concern to
commented Mrs. Baer.
"You will be astounded to hear
how reasonably priced the Mis-
sion is," she added. For more de-
tails call Joyce Heisel at the
South County Jewish Federation
office, 368-2737. Completed ap-
plications for visas to Czechoslo-
vakia must reach the Women's
Division office by Aug. 25.
B'NAI TORAH
CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue
Boca Raton. Florida 33432
A Conservative Congregation
Community Calendar
Angvstii
Temple Beth El-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting Tsmpls
Beth El-Single Parents, 7 p.m. mooting
AnfittU
South County Jewish Federation-Shalom South County Wins and
Cheese, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
AvfittlS
Temple Beth El, 8p.m. Board meeting
AngwtSO
Temple Beth EI-UAHC Workshop, 7:30 pirn
AeJMSI
National Council Jewish Women-Boca-Delray, 8 p.m. Board
meeting
Join us for
High Holy
Day Services
art Hassans*
Wed Evening
Thur Morning
Thin Evening
Fri. Morning
Sept 7
Sept 8
Sept 8
Sept 9
Tea Kipper
Fri Evening Sept. 16
Sat. Morning Sept. 17
Rabbi Theodore Feldman
Cantor Donald Roberts
Temple Betti El of Boca Raton
333 S.W. 4th Avenue. Boca Raton. Florida tffiffy.
Our Services will be held at
| Junior Congregation
and .
'Supervised Nursery
, Available
for reservations
call 392 4556
or stop
1401 H W 4th Avenue
(Corner Giaces Road)

awaaj
Does.
viAen it iiieets cream
I
\

It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel
But it's a lot harder to do
Croissants crumble Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast Just terrible
~m 00EhT SfWElOCONTEMPTBE
WHIPPED CREAM'
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese
is whipped
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread
Even on something as delicate as
potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
*.I3.C
KK
Mb Grocer !&*. Inc aj| ratrnburst
you far the face wius of das coupon
phtsK raider* alowaneeprwaasd
you ssdssmsd a on your was! saw
of th. nemed productW and that
upon request you agree to turrssn
proof of purchase o* suAcfcsnt prod
ucttocover 1 redemptions. Coupon
I
O Kraft. Inc. 1963
void wham taxed.
tare taxed, proMntod.
by taw, and may not
or
bs
_ or transferred by you. Cash
m 1/20C Customer must pay
appecaota Out For rademptton, mall
toKrah, Inc. Dairy Group. RO. Box
1799. Canton. Iowa 52734
I/SM4
\Vi3Q0 222oo3


/*
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. August 5,1963
A Personal Encounter
By GERI ROSENBERG
I have just returned from a
personal vacation in Israel, and I
wish to share with you a deeply
moving experience that I had.
While working on the Floridian
here in South County, I have co-
ordinated many stories for Pro-
ject Renewal, so I knew that
when I arrived in Israel I would
find my way to Kfar Saba, a city
which encompasses the three
neighborhoods that were adopted
by the South County Jewish
Federation as part of Project Re-
newal.
I left my hotel in Tel Aviv and
caught a bus to Kfar Saba, which
is located approximately 20 miles
to the northeast. 1 was surprised
to see that the city of Kfar Saba
looks like a normal, small, every-
day town. Nice buildings, good
restaurants and interesting cafes,
and people strolling in the streets
who appeared to live relatively
comfortably.
However, the city of Kfar Saba
itself is not the area that is in-
volved in Project Renewal. Three
neighborhoods located approxi-
mately three kilometers from the
actual city are the focus of the ac-
tivity. Going into those neigh-
borhoods one can see what we
could only call a slum in the
United States.
Jews settled in these neighbor-
hoods beginning in the 1950's.
They came from Morocco,
Yemen, Iran, and Iraq. Coming
from culturally deprived areas
they found assimilation into Is-
raeli society very difficult.
These neighborhoods are also
merely a couple hundred yards
from the pre-1967 westbank Arab
borders. They were constantly
being pillaged. Arabs would come
in and steal, attack, and rape the
people in these communities. Ob-
viously, those who could, left;
those who stayed were quite
poor. They did not have trades or
professions, and many did not
work. They could not read nor
write. They lived in abject
poverty for many years until the
inception of Project Renewal.
With my smattering of He-
brew, I found my way to the Pro-
ject Renewal office and was met
there by Shlomo Yaffe, the
project director. He is a warm
and friendly, dynamic man in his
mid-forties, who speaks haulting
English and prefers to speak
through an interpreter. You can
see by his gestures and by his in-
tensity that he is deeply com-
mitted to these neighborhoods.
I was then introduced to Leah,
a social worker in the neighbor-
hood, and Elie, the director of so-
cial services. Both of these en-
dearing people remained with
Shlomo and myself, acting as in-
terpreters, guides, and sources of
interesting anecdotes. In our
conversation, Shlomo stressed
how far they have come in the
three years since Project Renewal
has been in existence. When he
began working in the neighbor-
hoods, people were living in bar-
racks; 88 families to one small
barrack! Those who had apart-
ments or homes also were living
in very unpleasant circum-
stances. Often 12-15 people were
living in a two room apartment
under extremely poor sanitary
conditions. Within the past three
years, apartments have been re-
novated and enlarged, some have
been torn down while new ones
have been built.
Shlomo also emphasized the
need for social programs as well
as physical rehabilitation. Pro-
ject Renewal in Israel has not re-
peated the mistakes of American
slum clearance. It is perfe
easy to build a new project wt
will turn into a slum within a;
if the people living within the
buildings are not trained and
rehabilitated.
Progress, however, did not
occur without obstacles. Shlomo
remembered that initially the
people were quite skeptical of the
Project Renewal program. It was
new and foreign and they did not
understand what was going to
happen to them or how they were
going to be involved. This atti-
tude has since changed dramatic-
ally as positive programs have
succeeded. New apartment
buildings are being constructed
constantly. New streets, side-
walks and promenades with at-
tractive flowers and ample street
lights are being completed. Resi-
dents are now beginning to feel a
sense of pride in their environ-
ment.
As proud as Shlomo was of the
physical rehabilitation of the
neighborhoods, he was even
prouder of the social programs.
He, Leah, and Elie personally es-
corted me through the pre-school
and kindergarten programs. He
talked about a special program
that diagnoses disturbed children
and works with them. He ex-
plained another in which young
mothers are taught how to work
and play with their children from
birth. There are extensive pro-
grams for couples and families
and family planning and birth
control education.
I found it exciting to see the
construction of the new Senior
Citizens Center underway in the
neighborhood, which, upon com-
pletion, will have an abundance
of activities available.
At one point Shlomo became
very intense and deliberate in his
speech. He didn't want to be mis-
understood, and said, "I don't
want to make the decisions con-
cerning what this community
needs. I firmly believe that this is
a group process through which
the neighborhood residents can
grow as they identify their own
needs and report to us how they
feel they can be implemented.
Towards this end, classes have
been developed to teach leader-
ship skills to the people living in
' the communities. They are also
taking classes in basic Hebrew
reading and writing to prepare
themselves for leadership in their
own community. The people do
not feel as if "big brother" is
handing them pre-determined
projects. They are actively in-
volved with the professionals so
that they feel that they have
ownership and pride in the social
programs as well as physical re-
habilitation. That is the crucial
reason why Project Renewal
neighborhoods throughout Israel
are succeeding while slum clear-
ance in the United States has
basically failed.
What a good feeling it was to
have Shlomo greet me with the
Before and after. A clear indication of positive
physical changes in one of the Kfar Saba neigh-
borhoods.
I_________
The senior citizens center presently under con-
struction is shown at left. Two senior citizens,
above, right, eagerly anticipate the completion of
their new center. .
question, "How is my good friend
Jim Baer from Boca Raton?" Jim
has been to Kfar Saba so many
times working on Project
Renewal that the entire profes-
sional staff, the mayor of the city,
and many people living in the
neighborhood consider him a
personal friend. The most impor-
tant thing that I learned in my
half-day in Kfar Saba is that we
are in a partnership with these
neighborhoods, that these people
do not look upon us in South
County as merely a money
supply, but look upon us as
friends, fellow Jews who care and
want to assist in remedying their
situation.
Our Jewish Community Day
School children are correspond-
ing with the children of Kfar
Saba. But Shlomo stressed to me
the need for more human contact
between our two communities.
He is most eager for more visitors
from South County. Last year,
eight children from the local Kfar
Saba Project Renewal neighbor-
hood orchestra, with their
musical instructor, toured Fort
Lauderdale, Orlando, and South
County. Shlomo suggested that
we should have some of our chil-
dren visit their community.
Possibly some of our teenagers
could work in the neighborhood,
teach English, help to teach
sports or work in their summer
camps. Shlomo became very
excited with the thought of their
neighborhood being able to reci-
procate the hospitality shown to
the Kfar Saba children, and
asked that we initiate an ex-
change program.
This was my second trip to Is-
rael: 1 had not been there in 12
years.Obviously, the country has
gieatly changed within this time.
The entire trip was exciting and
awe-inspiring, but no part of it
was more exciting than that pre-
cious half-day I spent investigat-
ing for myself the small miracle
that is happening in our Project
Renewal neighborhood of Kfar
Saba.
Arms to Saudis
BONN 1JTA1 The West
German government is currently
examining the question of possi-
ble arms sales to Saudi Arabia,
Economic Minister Otto Count
Lambsdorff told a radio inter-
viewer.
raise The
Fun Ships
Every Saturday and Sunday the fabulous "Fun Ships".'
Carnrvale, Festtvale. Mardl Gras and Traplcale depart
from Miami and Los Angeles for exotic ports... Virtually
everything's included for the low price of your cruise:
You can feast on eight meals and snacks a day...
challenge the odds in a full gambling casino...
thrill to spectacular live entertainment nightly...
dance till the wee hours of the morning to three
live dance bands or in an authentic disco-
theque and more!
SNpi at Panamanian and umnon B^gWiy


itS, 1983
The Jewish Floridfcn of South County
it Made Israel's Prime Minister Say 'No' to Reagan
I from Page 4
of Lebanon, forced to
iuous, dangerous and
policing duties to
own security and to
p peace between in-
warring Christian,
[and Druze factions
I beyond the control of
government. As a
IDF is suffering
th toll since the in-
Lebanon began 13
to stands at over 500
than 2,000 Israeli
lave been wounded,
to Begin's intimates,
death causes him
f sical pain. He is deep-
by his personal
hty and by his personal
{bring the Lebanese
a speedy and secure
All of this helps explain his
doleful mood, his seeming lethar-
gy and self-imposed near-
seclusion. The changes in Beam's
personal style have been evident
to the public for some time and
widely reported by the media.
Although Begin has had periods
of depression before, he always
bounced back to confound politi-
cal opponents all too ready to
write him off.
BUT HIS present slough of
despondency is the deepest and
longest. He has limited his public
appearances to the bare mini-
mum in recent months. When he
does deliver a brief speech or an
address to the Knesset, the old
fire and fight are missing. He has
flatly refused interviews even to
the most eminent foreign
journalists. He was never
generous with interviews to the
Israeli press which he considers
Irganizations in the News
IAL COUNCIL OF
riSH WOMEN
Council of Jewish
Delray will sponsor
iber coffee on Wednes-
10 at 8 p.m. For de-
be call Ann Greenspan,
IADASSAH
ih-Rainberry -Delray
ted their name to
ay" which means
elray in Hebrew. For
formation, please call
Siskin, President at
IEIEMUNA
[my God" will be the
i sermonk message to
by Rabbi Dr. Louis
the sabbath morning
Saturday, Aug. 6,
at 8:45 a.m. at Con-,
lshei Emuna located
l Carter Rd., Delray.
>n services begin at
at 5 p.m. Seminars
bical Judaic texts, led
by Rabbi Sacks, precede these
daily services and at 5 p.m. on
Saturdays. Seating arrange-
ments are now being made for the
High Holy days. For further in-
formation, please call the syna-
gogue office, 499-9229.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women-Boca is
sponsoring an evening of dinner,
dancing and entertainment on
Saturday, Aug. 13 at 6:30 p.m.
on the Paddle Wheel Queen. For
information and reservations,
please call Ruth at 994-1537 or
Frieda at 483-5887.
endemkally hostile to him and
his policies.
The Premier's failure to go on
television to explain his decision
to cancel his Washington trip has
worried his supporters and
perplexed the Israeli public. The
opposition Labor Party is still
wary of raising the issue of
Begin s health it has backfired
on them before given the
Premier's still enormous popular-
ity with wide sections of the
electorate.
But Labor leaders believe there
is no alternative this time. Labor
Party Chairman Shimon Peres,
brushing aside the official ex-
planations of Begin'8 decision not
to go to Washington, declared
that it "raised serious questions
about his (ability to) function."
BEGIN MAY still pull out of
his despondent mood. He and his
senior ministers hope that the
partial pullback of Israeli forces
in Lebanon will reduce casualties
and costs and will ease the
burden of prolonged service on
army reservists. If this is
achieved, it would certainly
improve the government's
standing at home and might give
Begin the needed lift to recapture
his lost energy and joy in political
combat.
But much can go wrong. There
is no guarantee that the rede-
ployment will substantially
reduce IDF casualties. Most of
the recent casualties in Lebanon
have been the result of terrorist
ambushes and hit-and-run at-
tacks within the designated
security zone of south Lebanon to
which the Israeli troops will
withdraw.
The IDF, moreover, will still
control a population of some
600,000 Lebanese and Pales-
tinians if the city of Sidon is
included within its lines. That
matter apparently has not been
decided.
Internecine warfare is bisaJfing
out all over Lebanon in antici-
pation of an Israeli pull-back
There is no way of predicting
whether or not the fighting will
escalate after Israeli troops leave
the Shouf mountains and the
Beirut area. It is not clear either
at this stage whether the
multinational force, now in a
' peacekeeping role in and around
Beirut, will be redeployed to
cover the areas evacuated by the
IDF.
for the Selective Traveler
ISRAEL (Egypt optional)
Join Barbara Friedman
on her customized tour
Sept. 18-Oct. 6
MofrisonTravd
2401N. Federal Hwy.
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
Boca 391-8545
Broward 421-8671
Don't Trawl Alone
TheSim** Connection
>
THE GREATEST
SHOW ON EARTH.
nan
Athr
r

TLB*'
h'mnrimv\
\iumg
f* ^?%Kimg Hotinlnk
Manila
4
%h*lSai Sure tofawHW
Safaga SfcfjsJ^ "n
Djibouti
Honiara
Arafnikv
f/tof Etrrgtadcs
\~-Nassan
Mtmtego Bay
' I'tlfMrll
CRUISE THE WORLD ON P&0.
hAPR. 10,77 NIGHTS
a trip of world
lence. Through
ima Canal to the
Riviera. The
South Seas.
Hong Kong and
fore. Then onward.
th the Suez Canal,
istic Greece.
[otic Tangier,
ours when you
ird the graceful
registered Sea
>. Rated 5 stars
ling's Guide.
EVERYTHING S INCLUDED,
INCLUDING THE FLIGHT.
When you cruise the
world with P&0,one price
includes airfare to and
from the ship from New
York, Miami or Tampa.
It's considerably less than
the cost of purchasing
cruise and air tickets
separately.
Or if you can't join
us for the entire cruise,
shorter segments from
19-62 nights are also
available. Some are "fly
free" And others offer
air credits up to $1,000.
P&O's World Cruise.
This year, don't let the
world pass you by.
for a free brochure,
write P&O Cruises,
2029 Century Park East,
Los Angeles, CA 90067.
Or ask your travel agent
w o
R
D
ALSO
TRANSOCEANIC
EUROPEAN
SOUTH PACIFIC
P&Ot*CRUISES
150 YEARS AT SEA
Gulf side Getaway
Vacation 2 *SOns
4 NIGHTS onlC1MM
2 NIGHTS iLv90a_
Doubt* occupancy, inchuHno taiea/graluitiM April
15 thru December 15,1983
PACKAGE INCLUDES: 4 NIGHTS 2 NIGHTS
Double room for 2 people 4nigrrts 2 nights
Continental breakfast lor 2 4rnomincs 2momings
Dinner lor 2 2 evenings 1 evening
A Welcome Cocktail lor 2 in our Gangplank Lounge
Special Golf Packages and
Discounts also available
C
RAMADA* en
11000 Gulf Shore Drive. North
VANDERBILT BEACH
Naples, Florida 33940
Miles of white sand beaches, heated
swimming pool, live entertainment in
lounge, tennis and golf nearby, boat
trips available for sightseeing,
fishing, shelling. Children 18 and
under FREE in room with parents
Children's meals at menu prices
Writ* or call for
RESERVATIONS
813-597-3151
I RAMADA VaNDEMILT INN N tni inlf Dipt RTA
| 11000 Bell Stan Drive. N.. Nattos. Fk. 33940 D
| D Send tree brochures D Gott Package D Gutfside Getaways
| D Reserve room (No of days)--------for (No of peopleU
I
arrival date.
NAME.
ADOBESS -
1
MAIL
COUPON I
TODAY! C|T'STA
ON THE GULF OF MEXICO


in
Pear '"
/Tit T.
iKe 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. August 5
A Rabbi
Comments
Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks
The following is brought to Floridian readers by the South
County Rabbinical Association. If there are topics you would
like our Rabbis to discuss, please submit them to the Floridian.
"BETH HELO'KIM THE HOUSE OF GOD"
By RABBI DR. LOUIS L. SACKS
In the town of Berdichev, more than a hundred years ago,
there lived a saint by the name of Levi Yitzhak.
One day he abruptly ordered his sexton to appear before him.
"What is your desire, Rabbi Levi Yitzhak?" inquired the
Shamos.
"Go to every store and shop in the market square. Tell them
to close their shops and to gather in the market court for I have
an exceedingly momentous announcement to make to them."
"But master." complained the sexton, "today is the
marketday. Everybody is busy in selling and buying, and this
hour is the very busiest one of the day. Could you not postpone
your announcement to another day or, if it must be this day, at
least to another hour?"
"No." replied the Tzaddik. "Go and tell them what I have
said: go and tell them that Levi Yitzhak, the Son of Sarah of
Berdichev, has an important announcement to make to them
which cannot wait a day or even an hour, and that they must
shut their shops, cease their trading, and come to the town
square and listen."
The Shamos. fearful of the repercusions of the order, but
nevertheless obedient to his master, went on that busy market
day in that busy hour to each and every shopkeeper saying that
the saintly and holy tzaddik, Levi Yitzhak, had commanded
them to leave their stores and come to the center of the town
square, that he had an announcement of tremendous importance
to make to them. Grumbling and complaining, yet wondering
what could be of such urgency, they obeyed, closing their shops
and gathering in the square.
When all had gathered together, the saint mounted a small
box, raised his hands for silence and then began to speak. "I
have asked you to close your stores and come here, even on this
busy day in this busy hour for I have news of great importance
for all of you which could not be delayed another day or another
hour. And this is my announcement: I, Levi Yitzhak, son of
Sarah of Berdichev. I announce and proclaim to you that there is
a God in the world!"
Oh, if there were only a Levi Yitzhak today who could make us
close our shops, offices, recreational and amusement centers for
an hour and proclaim to us the tremendously momentous and
redeeming truth that "There is a God in the world!" That He
created the earth and the sea and all that is in them; that He
fashioned the wood and the rock and the animals out of which
our stores and merchandise come; that all we have and own
comes from Him and has been allotted to us only during our
brief lifetime on this planet to be used for His purposes His
ends; that we are merely His stewards of whatever we possess;
that we hold our belongings in trust for Him; that He is the
rightful owner and that all we possess must be used in His
spirit; that only through our having been created in His image
have we. as His children, been dowered with the dimensions of
divinity and eternity; that only through His grace as our
beloved and loving Father have we, His children, been redeemed
from doom, gloom and ultimate extinction; that without fervent
taith in Him, as our Savior and Redeemer, life, even at its op-
timal best is "a tale told by an idiot full of sound and fury
signifying nothing."
The To rah commands us to pray several times a day, to
remind ourselves of God and that we are the children of God;
that we close our eyes, turn to the Eastern Wall and proclaim
"Shema Yi-nnel Adonuy Eloheynu, Adonoy Ehad" (Hear, O
l-.-uel. the Lord our God. the Urd is One"i. and medituu-: I am
not alone in this universe, I am not a cosmic orphan, there is a
loving God in the universe, a Father in Heaven, who created me
in love and has implanted in me eternal life, that He is the
redemptive ground of our divinity and eternity.
"And Jacob awakened from his sleep and said: 'Surely the
Lord is in this place, and I did not know it.' (Gen. 28:16).
I m tragedy with our world, with mankind, with world liwr\.
wild iHil own mIuv is that "the lrd Is in this place hul do
.it, >.11. >\ 11
I hi- is oui In wildi ring predicament, our dire Iragvd}
May the forthcoming High Holy Days bring to us in a san-
torian and imperious and resounding manner the cardinal truth
of Yiddishkeit and of our Torah as experienced by Jacob in his
divine dream. "There is a God in our cosmos."
"Behold, I am with thee ... I shall not forsake thee." And
affirm this quintessential and redeeming truth in the im-
passioned prayer of Yom Kippur, "For we are Thy children, and
Thou art our Father."
Like Jacob of old, may we, too, awaken from our slumber, our
long lonely, materialistic, godless sleep, and seek God and find
Him. Then we shall learn what is the most profound of all truths
that there is a Heavenly Father and that every place can be a
house of God and every door a gateway to heaven. Amen.

Justice Dep't. Sending Nazi Criminals
rw\ T lO each case, including Trifa's, prosecute the person undWi L
Q ISrSlCl whether they will be able to raeli law.__________ "* |1 -
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The U.S. Depart-
ment of Justice is conduct-
ing high level talks in Israel
about the possibility of
deporting or extraditing to
Israel Nazi war criminals
living in the U.S.
Representing the U.S. in the
talks with Israeli Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir are Depu-
ty Assistant Attorney General
Mark Richard of the Justice
Department's Criminal Division;
Neal Sher, acting director of the
Department's Office of Special
Investigations (OSI), which is
responsible for investigating and
prosecuting Nazi war criminals in
the U.S.; and Murrey Stein, of
the Criminal Division's Office of
International Affairs.
AN EARLIER meeting in
Israel was abruptly cut off when
U.S. officials refused to meet
with Zamir at his office in East
Jerusalem. John Russell, a
Justice Department spokesman,
said he did not know where in
Jerusalem the current meetings
are being held.
The talks are centered on
Valerian Trifa, the Rumanian
Orthodox Archbishop in the U.S.
who was stripped of his citizen-
ship and ordered deported for
having entered the U.S. without
disclosing his wartime position
and activities with the Fascist
and anti-Semitic Rumanian Iron
Guard. However, Russell noted,
the U.S. is also discussing
sending other Nazi war criminals
to Israel.
Under a 1950 law, Israeli
courts can try persons who com-
mitted crimes against the Jewish
people or crimes against humani-
ty during the Nazi era. According
to the Justice Department, the
Israelis will seek to determine in
Redeployment
Plan Approved
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet has unanimously
approved a plan to redeploy Is-
raeli troops in south Lebanon.
The announcement, after a closed
session of the Ministerial Defense
Committee, contained no specif-
ics but empowered Premier
Menachem Begin, Defense
Minister Moshe Arens and For-
eign Minister Yitzhak Shamir to
'' determ ine the deta ils."
REDEPLOYMENT to shorter
lines in Lebanon was approved in
principle by the Cabinet several
weeks ago. But no date was ever
set and it was generally believed
that there would be no move until
Begin's meeting with President
Reagan in Washington, which
had been scheduled for July 27
when the Prime Minister unex-
pectedly cancelled his trip for un-
explained "personal reasons."
The official communique
stated: "As proposed by the
Prime Minister, the Cabinet has
unanimously approved the plan
for redeployment of the Israel
Defense Force in Lebanon as pre-
pared and submitted by the IDF
General Staff."
THERE WAS NO indication
where the new lines in Lebanon
will be. But Chief of Staff Gen.
Moshe Levy said on a television
interview that the line would
follow the Awali River which
enters the sea just north of Sidon
in south Lebanon.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
11401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman, Cantor Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Minyan on Monday and Thursday mornings at 8:16 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEIEMUN A
116189 Carter Road, 1 block south of Linton Blvd. Delray Beach,
IfL 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Services daily 8
|a.m. and9 a.m., Saturday. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WE8T DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loin
Association Office, West Atlantic, corner Carter Road, Delray
Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m.
and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 499-6687. Temple
Office 14600 Cumerland Drive, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446,
Phone 495-0466. Rabbi Emeritus Jonah J. Kahn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
1333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform.
I Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at 8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
I Month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, Fla. 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m., Sunday 9 a.m. Reuben
Saltzman. President, Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-5557.
TEMPLE EMETH
.>> W.-si Allanlk: Ave.. IMray Bbuch, Kb. n hn
servative. Phone: 498 3536. Bernard A Silver, Rabbi. N'aftaly
A. Linkovsky, Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m!.
Saturday at 8:45 a.m.. Daily Minyansat8:45a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Cason United Methodist Church, 342 N. Swinton Ave. (corner
Lake Ida Rdl, Delray Beach, Fl. Reform. Mailing Address: P.O.
Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi
Samuel Silver, President Samuel Rothstein, 498-1340.

CHRYSLER
LUXURY
BBANEWI1983 CHRYSLER "E" 4 DR.
$9499
Factory a*, automate
power brekee, tinted giesi, white
Ottawa! Urea, steal belted.
31*. No. 7704
4^1*9*1'63 CHRYSLER NEW YORKER
10,999
Factory air. automatic transmlMlon,
power steering, power brakes. 50/50
seats, white aideweli steel betted
tiree. tinted glass. Landau vinyl root.
Stk No 9753
*A$*1
CHRYSLER LeBARON 4 DR.
$9199
Factory a*, automat*
transrreaaton. power **
power brakee, tinted glen. JJJ
leal belted twee.vjnyi
roof. Stk. NO. 7701
HARBOR
ttKlJVJK PLYMOUTH
f i np.i.io ('<' i ? too Nor" Higr-way
Dnei '> a, ir m i i'.hi,,-> Squan i-l? '
I .


Friday-
August 5. 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
On the Bookshelf
Sad Tale Told With Melancholy Humor
The Rabbi's Life Contract. By community college who is himself
Marilyn Greenberg. New York: an ordained rabbi. He is also an
Doubleday and_ Company, eccentric bigot and, though mar-
1983.231 Pp. S14.95
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jtwish Floridian Book Editor
This book may be seen as a sad
ale told with humor or a funny
ory filled with melancholy.
Whichever way you see it, Mari-
yn Greenberg, a rabbi's wife, has
proven wit and woe together to
ihIucc a readable and entertain-
I novel- As a rebbitzin, she has
Special sensitivity for all of the
Jiaracters in her story, but par-
ticularly for the rabbi and his
-ife.
The story opens as the rab-
binical couple returns home after
year's sabbatical in Israel,
iited to them by their con
egation on completion of the
abbi's twentieth year since he
ounded the synagogue in "New
[Saxony, Illinois."
BEFORE HE has even had an
Opportunity to unpack, let alone
) rest after the long journey, the
abbi is peremptorily summoned
i the home of a board member
ml told that he is being fired.
three board members who
present insist that the
rmgretfation is behind them in
heir decision and that they in-
end to carry it out even though
he rabbi has a life contract
The prime mover in this action
I l)r Milton W inegarten. an
English instructor at the local
_-------------0~~ ..v*. vaivrugll Ilia' -
ned. has homosexual tendencies.
What follows is the story,
sometimes sad and sometimes
comical, of how the rabbi fights
this decision to let him go. Many
congregants rally round the
rabbi, especially two lawyers who
coach him and handle his "case."
The rabbi's family, his wife and
six grown children, as well as a
local minister, also support him.
The congregation is split, as is so
typical, between the friends of
the rabbi and the enemies of the
rabbi.
Still fulfilling his rabbinical re-
sponsibilities, the rabbi officiates
at a Bar Mitzvah, and we are
treated to a hilarious description
of the party which follows the
synagogue ceremony. On a sad-
der note, there is depicted the
rabbi's ministrations to a dying
congregant and his family, as
well as his conducting the funeral
service.
TENSION MOUNTS and side-
taking hardens as the story
moves to the congregational
meeting where the rabbi's fate is
to be determined. The meeting
quickly descends into a farce with
speakers shouting their views
and serving as prototypes of typ-
ical shut balabatim. Many of the
rabbi s supporters leave in dis-
gust as a negative decision is
railroaded through.
The supporters begin to orga-
nize a new congregation and hold
a service at the church of the
minister who has befriended the
rabbi Meanwhile. Winegarten
has trouble at the college, and his
cohorts begin to disagree among
themselves. Their situation de-
teriorates as Winegarten loses his
job and evidence appears regard-
ing his personal problems; his
marriage goes downhill. In
despair, he kills himself. The
rabbi presides at the funeral with
great grace, compassion and for-
giveness.
The story ends with the de-
cision to ask the rabbi back.
Winegarten s widow expresses
the general sentiment: "just tell
him we need him and we want
him. Just tell him we love him."
ALTHOUGH the writing can
hardly be described as mem-
orable, it is quite serviceable. The
author uses one effective literary
device. She intersperses the
narrative with letters, some of
which are satires of the pro and
con feelings in the congregation.
Others deal with the usual re-
quests made to a rabbi which
seem incongruous and laughable
coming at this t ime of stress. One
of the saddest letters of all, offer-
ed with special irony, comes from
the rabbinical placement office,
announcing openings in
Australia, New Zealand and a
"part-time position in Curacao."
Obviously, the story has a
moral: support your rabbi, and
don't be so quick to join the in-
evitable segment of any congre-
gation with grievances against
the rabbi real or imaginary.
And what the story finally shows
is that there is too much truth in
that old joke: being a rabbi is no
job for a Jewish boy.
Temple Sinai
Of Palm Beach County
Member U.A.H.C.(Reform)
Invites you to attend our
Sabbath Eve Services
Held Each Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m., at
Cason United Methodist Church
Corner of Swinton Ave. and N.E. 4th St. (Lake Ida Rd.)
Rabbi Samuel Silver, officiating
For Membership Information Call:
Sid Pearce Samuel Rothstem Sid Bernstein
498 1098 President 732-5807
1983-1984 Registration for
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL, and MEMBERSHIP
for the Fall term. Now!
Special KULANU Young Family Group
Fo- INFORMATION CALL-
Marj Aaron 737-3599 Bevc'v Kamm 499-0404
Temple INFORMATION CALL 276-6161
P.O. BOX 1901 DELRA Y BEACH. FLA.
High Holy, Day Services
Limited Tickets Available
For Information Call
Jerry Gilbert Sid Pearce Sid Bernstein
499-5563 498-1098 732-5807
** AMERICAN BRAKE & TIRE
VfCUUSIS M UU1 4 FMMT EM MM. OMD10KUTC0 IT HMffT I SIC* I HI 10! UMM
Alunmaniaoalanongpficeiflof molAmtricncrt Chertllet ClwvH*rt F WO a,MgWhissightlyhif he
CUSTOM POLYSTEEL W/W TIRES
?V-1
AMERICAN BRAKE TIRE GOOD/rYEA
PRICES PRICES *
P15S40-13S42.95 1.50 F.E.T '49.95 F.E.T.
P1M-7S-14- 64.95 2.13 F.CT. 69.95 F.fcT.

uu*n '
m
wm HV'iu
ftrt^fott*
mm mam
FKMLttt IMUl /
pwmn *36hmi
milieu
r-*nr.< rmlyrmrt <~4
tikrrflmii Brtlrd ilr.
DELTA
STEELBELTEl
RADIAL
MI
fIIVMI3 33M M
B
an ti*56,s,2.ij
IMPORTED STEEL BELTED RADIAL WHITEHALL* "Limited #"
P155-80R13 $35.95 pui F.C.T. PI 95-7514 $44.95 f.e.t.
OTHER SIZES AT COMPARABLE SAVINGS
SUPER SUMMER SAVINGS
Cw*
SUPER COMBO SPECIAL
OIL CHANGE LUBE AND FILTER
COMPUTER BALANCED (ALL 4 STANDARD
WHEELSJTMEROTATIONA
FREE AUGMENT tei.SS2.95
$29.95
HATKS-
wtnts*. $21.95
INSTALLEO
*tix*.S2995
INSTALLEO
Tm^jPtcttu American
MM CAMutnot
tfMMMMG
BRAKE $ TIRE
278-8088
330 N CONOtfSS AVE
OfUAY tfACM
Mr. Can
I. PrtONfNi
MOM Ml I SA1 J
10% Senior
Citizen Discount
Etc** i tkM. UmVaai Saedab,
a*4 Cra4H Car* at tim, < Safe
We Service Foreign end
4 Wheel Drives
Batteries Shocks
Tune-Upse Alignment
Oil & Lube
New Temple Building.Early 1984 Occupancy
Site 2475 W.Atlantic Ave. Delray
BETH ISKREL
mEfnORMLCHRPEL
South Palm Beach County's
ONLY Jewish Funeral Home
499-8000
JoMph Rubin, Ownir
seas W. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, FL 33445
THE MENORAH
PRE-NEED PLAN
Satisfaction.
Thoughtfulness.
Value.
Your choices set at
today's prices and in the
Jewish tradition.
And now vou can receive a FREE Permanent"
EMERGENCY WALLET CARD with your personal medi-
cal information a gift to you from Menorah Chapels.
I WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE MY FREE EMERGENCY
WALLET CARD. PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION
ABOUT THE PRE-NEED PLAN.
Mall Coupon to: Menorah Chapeia, 6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
FL Lauderdale. Fl. 33313 Attn: Pre-Need Plan Director
Name________.______________,---------------------------------_
Addre*s_
City-----
Stale__
-Zip.
Tatephone.
QjapelS
In Dade, 945-3939. In Broward, 742-6000.
Cemetery and chapels in North Miami Beach. Fort Lauderdale,
Margate, Oeerfield Beach & Weat Palm Beac
JF


R- ],..,,], vLnmw^^
Paor ***
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Fri<*y. Augu^ i



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E3B7M101Z_UN7YW0 INGEST_TIME 2013-06-05T23:10:59Z PACKAGE AA00014304_00126
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES