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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( July 22, 1983 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
July 22, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00125

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
July 22, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00125

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
pJemsti Floridian
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Betray Beach and Highland Beach
flume
5 Number 24
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, July 22,1983
O'fMSftocMf
Price 35 Cent*
General Assembly
In November
Marianne Bobick, President of
t South County Jewish Feder-
|on announces that there are at
ent 17 registrants from
uth County for the Council of
wish Federation's 52nd Gener-
Assembly which will be held on
jnesday, November 16 to
nday, November 20 in Atlanta,
orgia.
,he GA is the largest gather-
I of Jewish communial volun-
. and professionals in the
led States. Over 3,000 people
[expected to attend this year's
neral Assembly. Mrs. Bobick
es that the South County
lush Federation will send at
*t 40 representatives to the
Ihering. Any contributor to the
fcua! Federation campaign is
bible to attend.
fhe agenda of the GA will
blight speakers, panels, and
Lp discussion on such topics
Israel-Diaspora Relations;
nfrontint; the New "Anti-
Semitism"," The Middle-East-A
Challenge to the Peace
Makers; Meeting our Responsi-
bilities for the General Welfare;
Unity Amid Diversity-Creative
Management of Differing View-
points in the Jewish Community;
Strengthening Contacts with Re-
surgent Jewish communities in
Europe and Around the World;
Engaging Women Effectively in
the Jewish Communal Enter-
prise; Jews on the Move-The
Challenge of Organizing An In-
creasing Mobile Jewish Popula-
tion; and The Jewish Family in a
Period of Change.
The conference will be held at
the Hyatt Regency Hotel in
Atlanta. Details concerning re-
gistration and flight arrange-
ments can be obtained by con-
tacting Helene Eichler, Assistant
Executive Director of the South
County Jewish Federation, at
368-2737.
Knesset Votes Approval
Of Woman in Cabinet
By DAVID LANDAU
(JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Knesset voted 62-50
[approve the appointment
tht- Cabinet of Liberal-
|kud MK Sarah Doron as
M inister- Without-Port -
llio. There was one ab-
1'iition.
boron will be the first woman
I he all male Cabinets presided
fcr i>v Premier Menachem Be-
Bini Likud was first elected
|office in 1977. There had been
sidi rable opposition to her.
necessarily on the basis of
k. The Orthodox Aguda Israel
ri\ objected strenuously to
Imn's liberal positions on abor-
l and on the relationship of the
pte to the religious establish-
Ini
JIT THAT opposition
nud to abate as her
lunation was brought to a
leading Labor opposition
\s to suggest that a "deal"
been made with the Aguda
the controversial "Who is a
amendment which Likud's
eral Party wing vigorously
ed The defeat of that
pendment which would make
Valid conversions to Judaism
by non-Orthodox rabbis, was at-
tributed to the Liberal MKs. It
was rejected by a 58-50 vote when
submitted to the Knesset last
March.
According to unconfirmed re-
ports. Begin has recently written
to the Aguda leaders that he is
"committed to make every ef-
fort" to secure a Knesset major-
ity for the amendment.
He had made similar pledges to
the Aguda in the past to "do his
best" for the amendment but
without reference to a "commit-
ment." Some opposition MKs
suspect that Begin intends to
exert pressure on the Liberals not
to oppose the amendment when it
is next raised in the Knesset, pro-
bably after the summer recess.
THE OPPOSITION also noted
that Doron would be the 21st
minister in a government which
also includes eight deputy minis-
ters. They observed that this was
hardly the "compact and stream-
lined government" Begin had
promised in his election cam-
paigning.
Doron will be replacing former
Energy Minister Yitzhak Herman
who resigned from the govern-
ment last September following
the Sabra and Shatila refugee
camps massacre.
Charge Misleading
View of GAO Report
By ABRAHAM FOXMAN
Recently, the Govern-
ment Accounting Office
(GAO) released a study
indicating that Israel may
be in need of increasing aid
from the U.S. in the future
because of its external debt
structure and because of
rising costs to maintain the
security balance. The study
also said that total aid to
Israel since 1948 may be
more than $24 billion,
rather than the estimated
$18-19 billion usually
reported.
These are significant points of
information and analysis that the
American public should know
about. Unfortunately, James
McCartney of the Philadelphia
Inquirer and the Knight-Ridder
chain has sought to convert the
GAO's objective report on the
history and possible future of the
U.S. aid to Israel into a polemic
against the aid program itself.
RATHER THAN limit himself
to reporting the informative
statistical information and
analysis, McCartney selectively
uses speculative judgments in
the report pointing to the nega-
tive impact of the U.S. aid
program and completely omits
discussing the broad purposes of
the program as understood and
articulated by administration
after administration. by
Congress after Congress.
Thus McCartney alludes to
Israel breaking assurances to the
United States that it would not
invade Beirut.
Nowhere, however, does he
discuss the mainfold strategic
benefits accruing to the United
States from Israel's operation in
Lebanon, including the
manifestation of the superiority
of U.S. over Soviet arms which
helps U.S. arms sales as well as
its sense of strategic strength;
the possibility of Lebanon
becoming whole again and
moving into the Western camp;
and the weakening of the interna-
tional terrorist movement
through the disruption of PLO
bases.
ELSEWHERE McCartney
says that Pentagon officials
believe that Israel has "over-
emphasized" the military threat
from Arab countries and has been
asking the United States for
more military aid than it needs.
But since 1973, with vast
amounts of oil money available,
the Arabs have spent huge sums
on arms. Syria has spent more
than $10 billion; Iraq, $9 billion;
Jordan, more than $2 billion;
Libya, $7 billion: Saudi Arabia,
$13 billion; and Egypt more than
$7 billion. And much more is in
the works.
Israel has the basic responsi-
bility to its citizenry to keep
peace, not to allow Arab arms to
exceed Israeli by more than 3:1
or 4:1. But the cost of such heavy
arms purchases is prohibitive for
tinv Israel, requiring increased
U.S. military grants to keep the
external debt within bounds.
Moreover, it is not so long ago,
back in the first days of the Yom
Kippur War, that some officials
were saying the same thing about
the overwhelming strength of
Israeli arms, and one cannot help
but remember what happened:
Israel found itself in an arms
crisis during the war and was
forced to turn to America for
massive emergency arms ship-
ments.
MORE DISTURBING than
any of these particular
judgments, however, is the
failure to appreciate the purpose
of aid to Israel. Not to do so is
comparable to an assessment of
federal funding of transportation
Continued on Page 2
Anti-Zionist Committee
Sponsored by Soviets
f o Open New Branches
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The recently established Anti-
Zionist Committee of the Soviet Public will open branches
in major cities throughout the USSR in addition to
Moscow where it is headquartered, the Soviet Communist
Party newspaper Pravda reported.
Pravda said the committee, chaired by Gen. David
Dragunsky, the highest ranking Jewish officer in the Red
Army, will operate "regional and provincial offices" and
organize activities "in certain cities to fight the spread of
Zionist propaganda."
PRAVDA SHARPLY attacked Israel and "world
Zionism," charging that they "used methods similar to
those of the Nazis." The Communist Party organ accused
Israel of "operating concentration camps in which Arabs,
Palestinians and Lebanese are held as the Nazis used to
do."
Jewish circles here fear that the Anti-Zionist
Committee might try to spread its activities to other
Soviet bloc countries. Such a move, they said, would
endanger existing contacts and cooperation between the
Jewish communities in countries such as Hungary and
Czechoslovakia with Jewish organizations abroad.
ilsrael Withdraws from Two Areas Outside of Beirut
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV(JTA)Israeli forces have withdrawn
from two areas on the outskirts of Beirut, but army
sources insist this is not part of a planned redeployment of
the Israel Defense Forces in Lebanon.
The sources said Israeli patrols had left the Monteverde
and Ein Saade areas and have handed these over to the
T*hanese army as part of a "routine shift m the position
of forces. The army is putting the finishing touches on
plans for a major redeployment of forces.
THE FIRST WITHDRAWAL, which may take place
within a few days, will be from the immediate Beirut area
to near the town of Damour just south of the capital. At a
later stage Israeli forces will withdraw to a new defense
line along the Awali River just north of Sidon.
Part of'Routine Shift*
hi Positioning of Forces
The line will run along the river in a generally northern
direction, leaving the Jebel Barukh high ground overlook-
ing the Syrian positions in the Bekaa valley in Israeli
hands. But the new line will mean that the Israelis will be
leaving the Shouf mountain area where Druze and Chris-
tian Phalangists and militia have recently been battling
each other.
m


in i
Pa~in
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. Juiy jj
How Columnist Turned
Statistics to Polemics
TI1D TO'T ^


/"
Charge Misleading View of G AO Report
Continued from Page 1
simply in terms of the outlay by
the taxpayers without assessing
the positive value of better high-
ways, railways, etc.
Nowhere does McCartney note
that Anwar Sadat made peace
with Israel, in part, because he
recognized that the U.S. would
stand behind Israel. And
nowhere is there mention that the
only way the other Arab states
will ever come to end their three
decade-long struggle against the
Jewish state is through the same
process.
In the broadest sense.
McCartney does not deal with the
real issue of costs and benefits.
Sen. Rudy Bosch witz has
recently pointed out that aid to
Israel is far better understood in
the context of America's defense
budget than foreign aid The US
spends an estimated S80 billion a
year in N ATO-related matters.
ABRAHAM FOXMAN is
associate national direc-
tor and director of the
International Affairs De-
partment of the Anti-
Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
THESE EXPENDITURES
evolved in the post-war world out
of a sense of the primary strate-
gic importance of Western Euro-
pe. In the last decade the Middle
East has increasingly become a
vital area of strategic importance
to the West and. in that context,
the $2 billion of aid to Israel is a
reasonable expenditure for the
larger gains accruing to the U.S.
through a military strong, politi-
cally stable democratic ally
In purely economic terms, if
Israel did not existss a strategic
asset to the U.S. in the heart of
the Middle East, the expenditure
needed to provide what Israel
provides would undoubtedly cost
far more and would not be
guaranteed to last. Conse-
quently, even if GAO is correct in
its figures, and aid to Israel
actually has totalled $24 billion.
the benefits to America are clear.
It is clear that Israel needs and
welcomes U.S. assistance. It is
equally apparent that the United
States benefits greatly from its
aid to Israel which helps to
promote peace in the region and
to maintain a stable presence
with the ability to deter Soviet
pressures.
American aid to Israel is subs-
tantial. It is a good investment
with greater potential for the
future Since the U.S. began
supplying Israel with military
aid, each administration and
Congress has recognized this fact
and undoubtedly future Ameri-
can governments will continue to
do so.
B'nai B'rith Rabbis, Directors Demonstrate
WASHINGTON For the
second time in a month, rabbis
and directors of B'nai B'rith Mil
lei demonstrated before a
gathering of B'nai B'rith leader-
ship in order to press their
request for collective bargaining
recognition.
About a dozen Hillel profes-
sionals set up an informational
picket outside the Breckenridge
Inn in St. Louis, where B'nai
B'rith District 2 was holding its
annual convention The directors
have been asking B'nai B'rith In-
ternational to recognize the
American Federation of State.
County and Municipal Employ-
ees (AFSCME) as its representa-
tive for purposes of collective
bargaining.
Hillel staff, who had come to-
gether from throughout the Mid-
west, and as far away as Atlanta
and Boston, were seeking to have
the International Board of Gov-
ernnors reverse its decision to
deny recognition. At that time, in
late May. some 25 Hillel profes-
sionals converged on Washing
Gulf side Getaway
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ton. in order to protest the action.
The informational picket at the
District gathering was part of the
Hillel directors' efforts to public-
ize to both B'nai B'rith member-
ship and to the Jewish commu-
nity as a whole its disappoint-
ment with B'nai B'rith's position,
and its determination to continue
to press for collective bargaining
rights. Rabbis Abie lnger and
Jim Diamond, coordinators of the
protest, expressed satisfaction
with the event.
B'nai B'rith President Gerald
Kraft and two officers of the Dis-
trict met with the Hillel leaders
Rabbi lnger. vice president of
the Association of Hillel and
Jewish Campus Professionals
(AHJCP). reiterated his confi-
dence on liehalf of the Hillel di
rectors that our just request for
recognition will ultimately be
accepted.
SlGMUND FREUD so
To mark the 50th anniversary of the Israel Psychoanalyt
Society, the European Psychoanalytical Federation nut
cently in Jerusalem, and Mayor Teddy KoUek, a nativt,
Vienna, like the good doctor, dedicated Sigmund Freud Squ
in Jerusalem's Liberty Bell Garden
Argov Attacks Israel's
Operation in Lebanon
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Shlomo Argov, Israel's
Ambassador to England
whose attempted assa-
ssination on June 3, 1962
triggered the invasion of
Lebanon, has bitterly criti-
cized the war as unjustified.
In remarks dictated to a friend
from his hospital bed and
published in the weekend edition
of Haaretz, Argov branded the
war policy as one of "adventur-
ism" and said. "Those who
thought of (launching) the war
should have thought twice and
thrice. Particularly, they should
have thought of the cost in lives
. Israel does not have vast
human resources to throw
around. We cannot afford to con-
duct experiments in the hope that
one of them will be successful.
And what is success anyway
when it entails loss of life and
limb?"
ISRAEL LAUNCHED its
invasion of Lebanon a few days
alter Argov was shot outside a
london hotel. A London court
later convicted and jailed three
Arabs lor the shooting. Argov is
still fighting to regain his full
faculties in the wake of the head
wound he sustained in the attack
He is said to be partially
paralyzed.
His wife, however, reads toL
a great deal of printed materkl.
books and newspapers and*!
published remarks seem to stm|
he has thoroughly grasped
course of events that
after he was shot.
Some of Argov s reference i
his remarks are elliptical, and I
does not name names.
Haarvtz columnist Yoel Mi
to whom Argov sent the _.
cript for publication, terms i
"searing critique of the war."
ACCORDING TO Argov, I
war was a failure from Isi
standpoint. "Our nation en__
from this war weaker than iti
before." he asserted, "li
must always avoid embroil
in unreasonable military
ventures Our soldiers sh
always have the right (to
that they will not be sent to 1
unless war is the sole option I
survival."
The envoy drew a distil
between no-option wars, suchi
the Six-Day War. and other i
which are not over the survivsU
the nation. "We are a nationt
lives by its sword. We need i
be ashamed of that, tor it isi
our fault (but the Arabsl.
must not be waged lightl
Sometimes history in
drastic action and then therti|
no option. That was the case i
the Six-Day War .
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I ^


>y, July 22,1983
The Jewish Flaridian of South County
Paged
farsher Measures Demanded
gainst Arabs in Hebron
Settlers Enraged by Stabbing Murder of Youth
armed Jewish settlers.
THE BODY was taken to the
Hebron hospital by local Arabs
where Gross was pronounced
dead, still under the mistaken
impression that he was an Arab.
Kiryat Arba settlers who claimed
the body much later, insisted
that he was still alive but had
been allowed to lose too much
blood to be saved.
Rv DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Jewish settlers are
ssing their demands on
I government for harsher
easures against Arab
ouble-makers on the West
jik in the aftermath of
he murder of 19-year-old
Jiaron Gross near the
lebron marketplace last
hursday.
Representatives of the Council
I Jewish Settlements in Judaea
y Samaria met with Premier
lenachem Begin Sunday morn-
lg, shortly before the weekly
jbinet meeting. They insisted
at the government crack down
jrder on Arabs and that it ex-
knd the Jewish presence in the
Enter of Hebron. Begin promised
raise their demands at the
abinet session.
GROSS, an American-born
Jeshiva student whose parents
[tiled in Israel in 1974, was
Lried at midnight funeral serv-
es in Jerusalem Thursday. He
pd been fatally stabbed late that
ernoon while waiting for a ride
i his home in Kiryat Arba, the
thodox township adjacent to
tbron.
Israeli authorities clamped a
Irfew on downtown Hebron and
|ter removed Mayor Mustapha
bdul Natshe from office for al-
ged "indirect" incitement to
olence against Jews. But
spite the curfew, infuriated
Lir> i11 Arba Jews roamed the
perted marketplace Thursday
ght, setting fire to Arab stalls.
|0n Friday, Israeli border police
tear gas and clubs and fired
the air to disperse some 200
Dne-throwing Arabs demon-
ating on the Temple Mount in
i Old City of Jerusalem against
Hebron curfew. One police-
on and six Arabs were reported
lured and about 40 Arabs were
psted. The police also detained
number of suspects in the Heb-
stabbing and the market
fcce arson but no further details
tw released.
IIN WASHINGTON Friday,
Reagan Administration con-
mned the violence in Hebron
It suggested that the only way
end such incidents was to
Wve the issues of the West
nk.
State Department deputy
okesman Alan Romberg said,
^e deplore the murder (of
loss) and those responsible for
p\e also condemn the burning
I parts of the Hebron market.
need, we are greatly concerned
anj development which in-
dues the likelihood of con-
Nation and violence on the
i'l Bank. Yesterday's (Thurs-
~ 9| events underscore the need
find a way to address, in a con-
ttctive way, the underlying
1MB of unrest in that area,"
Imberg said.
|n New York, the Herat Zion-
of America said in a
'tement Friday that it
widemns the cowardly murder
[Hebron of yet another innocent
Rabbi Dov Aharoni-Fisch,
putive director, declared: "We
[eve that Jews throughout the
r'd should respond by in-
casing their support for Israeli
vernment efforts to settle the
Kh and breadth of Judaea and
naria."
FRE EVENTS in Hebron con-
lnt Begins government with a
^mrna that has been develop-
_ 'or some time. The West
r*k settlers, particularly those
Kirsat Ar08i a Gush Erhunim
stronghold, had been calling for
tougher measures against Heb-
ron Arabs, and for the ouster of
Mayor Natshe long before the
stabbing of Gross last Thursday.
They have since seized upon
the murder as proof that they
were right all along and have
berated the army for alleged
"softness" in dealing with Arabs
who disturb the peace.
At an emergency meeting Fri-
day morning, settler leaders con-
tended that restrictions imposed
on soldiers in the use of their
weapons to quell stone-throwing
and other Arab acts of violence
against Jews only encouraged
such acts. The settlers and their
supporters within the political
community, notably Science
Minister Yuval Neeman of the
ultra-nationalist Tehiya party,
are demanding an end to the re-
strictions.
SOME SETTLERS are asking
life imprisonment as punishment
for stone-throwers and deporta-
tion for local Arab politicians, not
just removal from office. But
Shlomo Ilya, head of the West
Bank civil administration, flatly
rejected settler demands for the
creation of Jewish vigilante units
on the West Bank. He declared at
a Jerusalem press conference Fri-
day that the army and only the
army would continue to be re-
sponsible for the security of all
inhabitants of the territory.
The settlers responded by
threatening to turn in the weap-
ons provided them by the army
for self-defense, thereby chal-
lenging the army to protect them
and their families at all times.
The settlers are a politically
potent and highly vocal part of
Begins constituency. But the
government, fearful that harsher
measures will only engender
worse violence, is anxious to keep
the West Bank as quiet as possi-
ble, particularly in the next few
weeks before Begin goes to
Washington to meet with Presi-
dent Reagan. The general mood
in the Cabinet therefore is to take
no further measures at this time
besides the ouster of Natshe.
AT THE same time, the gov-
ernment is anxious to restore the
main municipalities to Arab
hands. At present, Nablus, Ram-
allah and El Bireh, three of the
largest West Bank towns, are ran
by Israeli army officers. Their
mayors were deposed some time
ago and the Israeli administra-
tion has been unable to find
Arabs willing to replace them.
The same problem has now arisen
in Hebron where Natshe is the
second mayor ousted by the Is-
raelis in recent years.
Ilya explained to the press that
the situation in Hebron should
not be used to judge the entire
West Bank. He said the case of
Natshe was a special one, due to
his constant opposition to both
the Israeli administration and to
the settlers. There would have
been no choice but to dimiss him
eventually, Ilya said.
The settlers, of course, want
him deported as was his predec-
essor, Mayor Fahd Kawasme
three years ago after an ambush
attack that killed seven yeshiva
students in Hebron. But Ilya
noted that Natshe, unlike Kaw-
asme and other deposed West
Bank mayors, was not regarded
as a serious political leader but
rather a puppet manipulated by
his citv council members, all of
whom are considered "hostile"
elements.
NATSHE IS regarded in some
quarters, however, as a Palestin-
ian moderate. He was quick to
condemn the murder of Gross
and to urge calm. In a radio in-
terview after his dismissal, he re-
marked bitterly that the Kiryat
Arba settlers have now gotten
what they wanted all along and
will now be able to do as they
please in Hebron.
According to Natshe, he and
his councilmen opposed violence.
He blamed the steadily increas-
ing presence in Hebron of Jewish
militants from Kiryat Arba for
provoking violent acts. The
settlers have angrily denied this.
The stabbing of Gross had a
particularly tragic aftermath.
Some Jewish settlers complained
that his fellow yeshiva students
left him bleeding on the street
while they engaged in a running
gun battle with his assailants
who fled in a car. His body lay
near the scene of the stabbing for
some time, apparently mistaken
for an Arab who, according to an
unconfirmed radio report late
Thursday, had been wounded by
The Hebron hospital director,
Abdul Halim Namur, hotly
denied this. He said that when
the youth was brought in he had
no pulse, no blood pressure and
was not breathing. He was, in
short, clinically dead.
Hebron remained under high
tension over the weekend. The
Israeli authorities later lifted the
curfew in the market place to
allow residents to shop for the
approaching Moslem feast of Id
Al Fiter. Israeli officials expres-
sed hope that by the time the
holiday ended, tempers would be
cooler. Meanwhile, municipal
employes were given a 50 percent
advance on their salaries in the
hope that they will cooperate
with the new Israeli admin-
istration.
Burg Rescinds 14-Day Sentences
JERUSALEM (JTA) In-
terior Minister Yosef Burg, over-
riding the recommendations of
the police, rescinded the 14-day
prison sentences imposed on
three rock-throwing religious
zealots.
The police had urged vigorous
punishment for the three who
hurled rocks at passing vehicles
on the Ramot road last Saturday
and attacked police officers who
tried to stop them. Burg, a leader
of the National Religious Party,
ordered the men released so that
they could spend their nights at
home rather than in jail cells.
They will serve their sentences by
working days at the local police
precinct.
According to Burg, the ultra-
Orthodox Jews who have been
harassing non-observant motor-
ists for years on the Ramot road
which passes near an Orthodox
leighborhood, had threatened
worse violence if the arrested men
were kept in jail.
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4 WEEK TOUR OF LEISURE s1022.
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WITH LATE DEPARTURES, LITTLE WALKING It SLOWER PACE
3 WEEKS IN NET ANY A* 1 WEEK IN JERUSALEM
Tour Includes: Accommodation in First Class Hofet Twin Bmdded Rooms, 2 Kosher Meets Every Day,
8 Day* of Sightseeing, Transfers Porterage, Travelers Insurance: Medical, Financial A Personal
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FOR RESERVATIONS A INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
OTHER ISRAELI TRIPS, CALL MIRIAM COLLECT AT
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"i 'nej ewisn tr lofiauih 0} South- Loun ty
Krtday.ju^i^
^Jewish Floridian
of South County
CFfdShocntt 1
SUZANNE SMOCHET
Exacullva Editor /
OERI ROSENBERG
Nawa Coordinator
FREOSHOCMET
Edttof and PuWiahar
BOCA RATON OFFICE 2300 N Fadaral Mwy.. Sulta 208, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432 Phooa 386-2001
____ Main Otfloa Plant 120NE 6th St., Miami. Fla. 33101 Phona 1-37*4605
Poatmaatar PUturn too. M7t to Jawlah Flortdlan. 0. to. 01 26TJ. Mtaml. FU. 3J101
r~-K,~. i AdwrMalng Wrartot. Start Laaaar, Phawa 666-1662
vZ?12>?Wl,h *PP|South County Jawiah FaOaration. Inc.. Ottloafa: Praaldant. Marlanna BoOicx.
vica Praaidann Manooa Baar Erie W. Dackingar. Milton Krataky: Sacratary. Arnold Roaantha
iraaauraf, Bafanice Schannarman, Exacutiva Director. RaDOi Bruce S Warahal
i,oe^o.oT..'f,^!th,-'0"<",n a** 00'0o,r"' Kaahruth ot Marchandiaa Advaniaad
\~ZZcll! ZEi LoC*' A,M *3-50 A'",ul ,2 YMr Mlnlmm I7)- D* mamoarahip South County
Jaa-iah.Federation. 2200 N. Fadaral Mwy.. Sulta 208. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368-2737
Out ol Town. Upon Requeet
Leo Mindlin
The Seduction of a Journalist
Friday, July 22, 1983
Volume 5
12 AB 5743
Number 24
Negotiation American-Style
What is worse, as a principle negotiator
for peace in the Middle East between Israel
and its Arab neighbors, time and again the
Reagan Administration and the U.S. State
Department have managed to create new
sets of facts when they were either in dis-
pute before, or else did not exist at all.
The Reagan Administration's repeated
violation of the stipulations in the Camp
David agreements having to do with the
West Bank and Gaza (Judea and Samaria,
if you will), despite the President's brave
assertions to the contrary during his run
for office in 1980, is a perfect example of
creating a new set of facts involving an
issue previously in dispute.
The State Department's drawing of a
new map of the Middle East is a perfect ex-
ample of creating a new set of facts in-
volving an issue that did not exist before at
all.
In what sense then are the President and
all of his men negotiators in the cause of
peace in the Middle East today? What do
they leave open to negotiate as they go
along arbitrarily changing the rules, the
conditions and the realities of the dispute
among the parties involved?
This is neither negotiation nor arbi-
tration. This is high-handed ordination
instead. Furthermore, it is a terribly
dangerous game which the Administration
is playing. It shows the Arabs increasingly
that the U.S. isn't worth a hill of beans in
honesty or integrity so far as its Israeli ally
is concerned, and Israel is constantly being
assured the U.S. is an ally, is it not?
Under these circumstances, given the
dim-witted attitudes of the Administration,
can there be even among its policy-makers
any doubt that the United States is not
staunching the flames of further fighting in
the Middle East, but fanning them?
A Sense of Foreboding
As of now, at any rate, the date between
them is still on. Menachem Begin will be
meeting with Ronald Reagan in
Washington on July 27. But there is no
jubilation in Jerusalem about this. And, we
suspect, there is little more at the White
House.
What both parties fear is a Begin ex-
plosion, with Begin's propensity for
Biblical peroration. There is some reason
for this: Begin's emotional state of mind
since the death of his beloved wife, Aliza.
And on top of this, the death of his
longtime friend and pohtical ally the other
week, Deputy Prime Minister Simcha
Ehrlich.
Heightened by the tensions in Hebron
and the growing anti- Lebanon campaign
sentiment in Israel itself, Mr. Begin's
depressed but smouldering state of mind
these days may result in what nobody
wants. Not even the careless, callous
Reagan Administration.
THE INSIDIOUS controllers
of the middle-American mind are
now saying that the Carter paper
caper is a draw and therefore of
no significance. They allege that
both sides knew about it before it
took its toll on President Carter
in his fateful debate with then-
candidate Ronald Reagan, and so
how could it possibly matter
then? Or now?
Charles Crawford, an aide to
Mr. Reagan during the cam-
paign, is supposed to have told
Carol C. Darr, a worker in the
Carter reelection organization,
that Reagan had copies of Presi-
dent Carter's debate briefing
papers.
IN TURN, Darr told her boss,
. Timothy G. Smith, the Presi-
dent's campaign counsel. But
Smith thought that the notion
was so unbelievable as to be
untrue, and that it wouldn't even
be worth mentioning Darr's story
to Carter. Now, of course, Smith
says he's sorry.
But the main point of all of this
past tense sleuthing is that we
are now meant to believe that the
Carter paper caper doesn't
amount -to a hill of beans. That it
was all a happy intrafamily joke.
That everybody knew about it,
and no one cared. Even Steven.
Nonsense. I do not subscribe to
the theory that, even if the
Democrats surrounding their
man knew nothing about the
stolen papers, as the media now
allege, it wouldn't have mattered.
According to the theory, Jimmy
Carter could never have beaten
Ronald Reagan anyway.
I AM NO Carter fan. Between
him and President Reagan, it is a
toss-up as to who is the greater
national disaster. But the fact is
that the media, principally tele-
vision, are devastating in their
capacity to shape the average
middle-American mind, which
believes that if you read it in
print or see it on TV, why then it
must be true.
"Now, there you go again, Mr.
President." That was Ronald
Reagan's refrain in reaction to
every telling Carter point in the
fateful Oct. 28. 1960 debate be-
tween them. And suddenly, old
dullard Reagan sounded like a
Phi Beta Kappa bent on being
brilliant about everything from
foreign policy to the intricacies of
economics. It was the paper
caper, of course, that prepared
him.
Is it conceivable that this
staged Republican performance
had no impact on a rapt nation
watching it? Or that it can have
no significance now, when
suddenly all the gory tales are
pouring so profusely from the
mnw of it c oretwhjlp secrprv9
THE TRAGEDY, for example,
of Watergate is not that stolen
papers from Democratic Party
Headquarters changed the course
of the election. Nothing could
have given George McGovern the
power to defeat Richard Nixon,
even if he had suffered the same
liability that President Carter
suffered in his campaign for re-
election eight years later.
The Watergate theft was
bungled, but suppose it had
succeeded. In either case, the
result was irrelevant to the
outcome In the end, the tragedy
is that the attempt at theft
should have occurred at all.
Beyond this, I feel like those
Americans who were cheated out
of their proper choice in the 1968
campaign, when Sirhan Sirhan
assassinated Robert Kennedy. In
the same way, I feel cheated by
the assassination of John F. Ken-
nedy in 1963 because he hadn't
even been granted a chance in the
presidency to get off the ground
and show what he could do.
Or by the assassination of
Martin Luther King, Jr.. which
George Will
changed, hardly for the better,
the whole character of the civil
rights movement after that.
THE MANIPULATORS of
public opinion may be strutting
their stuff once again, but there
can be no trivializing of this
latest fraud perpetrated by the
Republican Party's presidential
planners. There can be no
counting on the fact that, by
now, most Americans are tired of
this kind of trickery anyway,
what with the saturation they
feel of Watergate and its after-
math. There can be no im-
munizing of the public conscience
against the horror of such pro-
found immorality in our highest
halls with the vaccine of repeated
immoralities there. Or plays
about these immoralities in the
movies and on TV until we are
meant to shrug them off as na-
tural to the national condition.
For the manipulators and the
planners themselves are finally
being hunted out, as well as their
puppets, the Nixons and now thf
Reagans.
Enter George Will, the disti i-
guished syndicated columnist.
No wonder President Reagan, old
affable Ron. could keep shaking
his head in disbelief during that
Oct. 28 debate and say, "Now.
there you go again, Mr. Presi-
dent." That, in fact, is what
America must now come to say
to Mr. Reagan.
WHAT DID Will do. a man
who writes conservative columns
of such profound punditry and
winsome wisdom for millions of
the nation's citizens to peruse?
Will knew all about the Carter
paper caper. It was Will, as it
turns out he is Ronald Reagan's
"favorite" columnist, who was
called in to coach Mr. Reagan in
the use of the stolen material so
that Reagan could respond to
President Carter's line of debate
with maximum effectiveness.
Will not only knew about the
theft, but he helped Reagan use
the purloined papers in repeated
rehearsals of the answers Reagan
would be called upon to give.
Here was a newspaperman, a
gifted and respected and trusted
writer and thinker, engaging in a
lie with a flunkie perfectly willing
to participate in the deception,
knowingly or otherwise. And
then what else did Will do?
Following the debate, Will
a widely-syndicated
m which he expressed
surprise at how weU Mr. Reagan
had done. One was meant to
believe that Will had had small
regard for him beforehand, but
that the debate changed his mind
about the Reagan candidacy.
I SAID in this spot last week
that one of our genuine national
tragedies is that we no longer
**m to have high minded men
among our leaders with the
capacity to act wisely. And what
u more, to speak to us and to
write for history in the noble
t-nghsh language in such
wrote
column
Well, here is Ronald U,
busybody hick telling eve"
how they should live
when it comes to aborti.
prayer and other such
moral stuff. But who n
have stolen into the pr
by the most insidious
possible, whether he knew^
the Carter paper caper, ori
allowed himself to
manipulated by the
surround him and
him everyday.
And here is Will. What is th
to be said of him'1 I can
repeat what I said here
media last week: In the I
of American idealism,
they preach freedom of tbel
in practice they are lib
handmaidens of the
the power-hungry."
Dutch Review
Withdrawal
From UNIFIL
JERUSALEM |JTA|
Dutch Foreign Minister
Van der Broek said here that]
government might be willing til
reconsider its decision to wit
draw its troops from the I
Nations Interim Force in
non by Oct. 19 if by then a i
and useful role was available!
the troops and if the Leba
situation was improved.
Van der Broek was respon
to Israeli Foreign Ministtrl
Yitzhak Shamir's suggestion!
that UNIFIL contingents mightl
be able to play a role alongsK>|
multinational force units,
aiding the Lebanese army totikel
over and control areas of thaj
country that Israeli and Symtf
forces vacate.
The two Foreign Ministersi
for four hours. Van der Broeki
later with Premier Menachal
Begin. Israeli officials stressa!
the warm and friendly atm|
phere at the talks despite difie-l
rences that surfaced especially I
over the Palestinian issue and Is-1
raeli West Bank settlements fl* I
officials said both ministers had|
felt the talks went "excellently."
Singles Groups
Plan Events
The Jewish Singles group, i
21-50 sponsored by the Jewi
Community Center, which is i
agency operated by the
County Jewish Federation. l
nounces the following events:
Wednesday, July 27 7:3
p.m. Speaker and Discuss*I
Spencer Gellert. Director of tbl
Jewish Family and Children!!
Service, will speak about Besfl
Jewish and Single, (as an ope]
ended topic at The Adult Ei
meat Center, 1700 N.W.
Ave., (between Glades Rd., -
20th St.). Boca Raton. Coffeeinl
cake will be served. Donation: II
- RSVP 388-2737.
Monday, Ang. 1 5:304|
p.m. Happy Hoar UpstairsK
WldOoww, 561 E. Palmetto
Park Rd.f Boca Raton. Horjl
d'oeuvrea, good music *w
dancing, cash bar. (Proper atta*
please). Donation:
(gratuities not included)
The Singles group age 45 and
over, which is also a part of *j
Jewish Community Center-F*l
e rat ion program announces u
following event:
Tneaday, Aug. 2 5:30 p^-]
Planning Meeting
a County Jewish Federation,
2200
entrant wo.. ^-HU^^y JCW1H rwnraiiu",
rnS nur^l arU*i Ur hin N Federal Hwy.. Suite 206. Bo
moral purpose as people. Raton. RSVP 368-273"


Friday. July 22'1963
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Miami Rabbi Dissents from Reform 'Flight of Derangement'
'God save us from rabbis
turned amateur lawyer'
<'
By RABBI
HASKELLM.BERNAT
As is well known, the
I Jewish line has been
conferred by the mother for
about 19 centuries this is
called matrilineal descent. I
I emphasize the time period
to underscore that for the
I first 19 centuries of Jewish
life dating back to
I Abraham, Jewish status
was conferred by the father.
Indeed, yichus, Jewish
ritual status such as Cohen,
Levy and Yisrael, is confer-
red partilineally.
We assume that the change
was crystallized during the
Koman persecutions of the First
and Second Centuries. Slavery
and rape left Jewish women with
offspring who. in a sense, had no
identifiable fathers, but whose
cjres were non-Jews.
IT WAS an act of compassion
.hat led to an innovation which
x-rmitted Jewish mothers to
confer Jewish status on these
'itherless" children. Not only
was the change humane, but it
was also demo graphically sound.
for it kept the size ot the Jewish
population in tact and even
growing despite Roman brutal-
ity.
In fact. Jews were, during that
time, the single largest minority
in the Roman Empire. What
began, however, as permitting
Jewish women also to confer de-
scent eventually became oniy
Jewish women and not Jewish
men. Given the rigors of the time,
it was understandable, for pater-
nity may be questionable, where-
as maternity is always patent.
This change was to set up an in-
equality that would haunt the
Jewish community in modern
times.
What had begun as an
amelioration in the ancient world
became a vexation in today's
world. With the crumbling of the
ghetto walls, the Jew entered
modernity, and the open society
exploded upon him. Without the
social and religious constraints of
the past, we began to intermarry
at an unprecedented rate
often without conversion. The
children of unions of Jewish
fathers and unconverted non-
Jewish mothers were, of course,
not considered Jews.
THE CHILD could be con-
verted at birth and raised as a
Jew. Jewish law certainly allows
for it; it always did notably
with adopted children. Save only
that, at 13 years for a boy and
approximately 12 years for a girl,
the child would appear before a
1 tcth Din to confirm the parental
decision made in infancy.
Basically, the Reform rabbi-
nate adhered to this pattern, ex-
cept that Bar Mitzvah, or
Confirmation, was accepted as
the child's assent in lieu of ap-
pearing before a rabbinic court.
The Reform rabbinate reasoned
that these ceremonies were suf-
*-. f iciently public to clearly express
* the child's intent and eliminate
the potential trauma of appearing
before an august judiciary.
This pattern worked for 25
years. Two factors did lead to
dissatisfaction. The rate of mixed
marriage without conversion
climbed, which made the problem
numerically more acute. Further,
modern times brought the ethical
dawning that Jewish law was
really discriminatory to Jewish
men by casting their offspring
into the disability of not being
Jewish, no matter what the
father may have wanted, whereas
he children of Jewish mothers
vere Jewish without any defect
in their status.
AT THE urging of Rabbi
Alexander Schindler. the Central
Conference of American Rabbis
created a committee on patri-
lineal descent to explore and.
RABBI HASKELL M. BERN AT
The Central Conference of American Rabbis, in a flight
of intellectual derangement, has clouded the identity of]
children of Jewish mothers. So claims Rabbi Haskell M.
Bernat in this article written for The Jewish Floridian.
Rabbi Bernat, spiritual leader of Temple Israel of Greater
Miami [Reform], explains why he dissents from the
CCAR's Doctrine of Patrilineal Descent and prays: 'May
God save us from rabbis when tHey function as amateur
lawyers.'
them, both parent and child, to
Jewish life."
presumably, to find a solution to
the problem. What the times call-
ed for was the restoration of the
Biblical right of Jewish fathers to
determine the Jewishness of their
children while at the same time
continuing the Talmudic practice
of the mother conferring Jewish
status.
It was a completely ethical and
logical response sharpened by the
movement toward equality of the
sexes in contemporary Judaism.
It sounds simple and, in truth, it
should have been so. It would
have taken courage on the part of
the Reform rabbinate to defy the
censures of Orthodox and
Conservative Judaism, but
ethical audacity has never been
part of the movement's limita-
tions. The potential benefit to the
Jewish population would ad-
ditionally justify it.
Rather than following the
function mandated by the com-
mittee's own name- Patrilineal
Descent its members focused
instead on the condition of chil-
dren of mixed marriages as such,
declaring:
"THERE ARE tens of thous-
ands of mixed marriages ... It
can no longer be assumed a
priori, therefore, that the chud of
a Jewish mother will be Jewish
any more than the child of a non-
Jewish mother will not be.
"This leads us to the con-
clusion that the same require-
ments must be applied to es-
tablish the status of a child of a
mixed marriage, regardless of
whether the mother or the father
is Jewish."
Therefore:
"The Central Conference of
American Rabbis declares the
child of one Jewish parent is
under the presumption of Jewish
descent. This presumption of the
status of the Jewish offspring of
any mixed marriage is to be
established through appropriate
and timely public and formal acts
of identification with the Jewish
faith and people. The perfor-
mance of these mitzvot serves to
commit those who participate in
WHILE THIS sounds well-
reasoned, it is really maddeningly
deceptive. The key word in the
resolution is "presumption."
Presumption is a condition based
on opinion or belief. It is de-
pendent on another set of facts
j for its own veracity without any
independent truth of its own: and
as any first-year law student
knows, presumption is thorough-
ly arguable.
What relief does this resolution
bring, seeing that it creates a
Jewish status that is arguable?
Presumption means tentative,
probable. In other words, chil-
dren whose status prior to this
resolution was incontrovertibly
Jewish because of their Jewish
mothers are now relegated to be-
ing "probably" Jewish but not
definitely.
The resolution has the po-
tential of creating the chaos that
Jewish women endured earlier in
history. Instead of lifting the
burden of discrimination upon
the Jewish man and his offspring,
the Central Conference of Ameri-
can Rabbis, in a flight of intel-
lectual derangement, clouded the
identity of children of Jewish
mothers. They did achieve equal-
ity of men and women an
equality of disability and
anguish.
THE RESOLUTION is also
a denial of a cardinal aspect of
Judaism that status is confer-
red by birth and not by activity.
Mitzvot, Jewish sacred activity,
determines the quality of one's
Jewish life, but not that one is
Jewish. Only birth confers this
status. Conversion also confers
Jewish status precisely because it
is a "birth." Traditional conver-
sion involving circumcision and
immersion is a birth ritual.
Emerging out of the waters is
the symbolic act of being reborn.
Even within Liberal Judaism
where these rituals are viewed as
optional, still a new name is gryen
to the convert. His own birth
parents' names are not mention-
ed, but he is rather called the
child of Abraham, signifying
clearly that the non-Jew has been
reborn as a new Jew.
Whether through natural birth
lor through spiritual birth, it is
{.bvrtW t\vt confer* Jewish status.
IThe Reform rabbinate has
1 diminished birth, or perhaps even
eliminated birth as the central
agency for conferring status.
SHOULD NOT the time have
come to simply and courageously
say that a child born of a Jewish
parent is Jewish? This the
Reform rabbinate did not do. It
exhibited neither courage nor
clarity.
Following the "logic" of the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis, should not the Jewish
status of a child born of two Jew-
ish parents also be presumptive
unless there are mitzvot to prove
it? The convention at which this
was voted was to have been an
historic conclave a watershed
of Jewish life. Historic indeed, it
plunged us back into the chaos of
.ancient history, and the only
waters we see are terribly murky.
As for myself. I will continue
to regard the child of a Jewish
mother as fully Jewish no
presumptions or probabilities
about it. Until a body of rabbis
can come up with a clearer and
better way than has served the
Reform rabbinate for the past 25
years. I will continue to support
Jewish fathers and their non-
Jewish wives in raising their chil-
dren as Jews, leading to the
public affirmations of Bar Mitz-
vah and Confirmation as to pub-
lic assent of their conversion in
infancy.
May God save us from rabbis
when they function as amateur
lawyers.
Put Yourself In This Picture
JerusalemTemple Mount
Overlooking the Temple mount of the historic old city of Jerusalem on
IUJA Mission to Israel
NEXT MISSION: OCTOBER 9-19
Join the people from South County already committed to this mission
$1000 per person mission cost.
Minimum contribution of
$3000 family gift or $1600 for a single to the 1984 UJA/Federation
campaign will be required for all participants on the mission.
For information call Helene Eichler at
The South County Jewish Federation
at 368-2737


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, juiy;
Century Village '83,
A Special Campaign
An Enhanced Peeling of
Jewish Identity and Community
The 1983 Campaign has been a
highly successful one. Lay indivi-
duals and areas deserve special
recognition for making this cam-
paign a success it has been. How-
ever in this article, we feature the
story of campaign '83 in Century
Village, Boca Raton. It is not just
because of the impressive statis-
tical gains in monies, but also be-
cause of the special nature of how
this campaign got off the ground
and unfolded that we wish to
share.
It all started back in November
when the professional staff of the
South County Jewish Federation
started having individual meet-
ings with several residents in
Century Village. It was not
known at that time that these in-
dividuals would turn out to be
some of the leaders which carried
this campaign over the top. We
conferred and we listened, and
with patience the contacts grew,
not only with Federation, but be-
tween people in Century Village.
It took two months of this
gradual process in which much
listening was done and much
creative sharing.
The month of January came
and we saw a first time meeting
at a free brunch in Century Vil-
lage turn out 50 interested people
to volunteer for the 1963 cam-
paign. From this group a Cam-
paign Cabinet was formed. From
this cabinet, four co-chairpersons
were chosen to lead the cam-
paign. From this point on, deci-
sions were made quickly and the
campaign got off to a great start.
The first major decision
created a fund-raising event for
the first time in Century Village
history. In the month of March, a
SI00 family minimum gift brunch
was held with over 125 people at-
tending. The guest speaker
Jerome Gleekel literally moved
the crowd to tears and laughter,
and very positive feed-back was
heard for days and weeks after
this event. The outgoing presi-
dents of all the Jewish service or-
ganizations in Century Village
were honored at this event. The
momentum had begun.
The following statistics tell
part of the dramatic story of
campaign '83 in Century Village.
Last year, where less than 10 vol-
unteers could be found, 50
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Storting October 1st. our origjnd "Happy Ship: msBoheme will
begin weekly cruises from Miami to the western Caribbean, visiting
Porf-ou-Prince. Port Antonio. Grand Cayman and Cozumel.
Century Village UJA-Federation Cabinet seated
left to right are: Teddy Blendes, co-chairman;
Isabella Goodman, Charlie Seibel, and Hattie
Thum; standing left to right are: Dr. Hy Henkin,
co-chairman; Bob Rugoff, Marion Sragg, lz
Levine, co-chairman; Pearl L. Levine, a,,
chairman; and Al Fine. Cabinet members not
pictured are: Eugene Broun, Isabella Fink
Cantor Joseph Pollack and Ruben Salt z man.
Standing left to right: Co-chairpersons Teddy-
Blendes; Guest Speaker at $100 minimum Family
(iift Brunch, Jerome Gleekel; Dr. Hy Henkin,
Pearl L. Levine. h Levine.
worked this year. In 1982, 10
buildings participated. In 1983,
55 buildings participated. Last
year the number of gifts received
from Century Village was 591.
This year, 1,543 gifts were re-
ceived. The total monies collected
last year was $21,635 and this
year. $45,128 thus far has come
in. Through mass mailings and
invites, a victory celebration and
much talk, everyone in Century
Village knew this year there was
a campaign. However, the real
reason behind monetary success
was the fact that many new rela-
tionshps were forged.
The thing that stuck out in
each person's mind who partici-
pated in this campaign, was the
genuine personal experiences
that positively affected all who
participated. People got to know
each other, new relationships
were formed on a deep level
quickly, and everyone who par-
ticipated expressed a feeling of
fulfillment and even fun. What
really came out of thia campaign
as expressed by those who par-
ticipated in it, was a feeling of
Jewish identity more so than
New Movement
TEL AVIV is sponsoring a new movement
known as "For Israel" to counter
Peace Now and other movements
opposed to Premier Menachem
Begins foreign policy and the
settlement drive on the West
Bank.
"For Israel" is billed as non-
partisan. Its founding session
was addressed by former Chief of
Staff Gen. Rafael Eitan who, ac-
cording to press reports is being
wooed to join Herat. Eitan reiter-
ated his support for massive set-
tlement of the West Bank but did
not refer to any personal political
plans he might have.
they had before and a sense of
community which developed
within Century Village that had
not yet happened until this cam-
paign got under way.
As this campaign was closing,
many expressed an enthusiasm in
looking forward to participating
in the 1984 campaign with new
and creative ideas. Through list-
ening to each other, and agreeing
that the common goal was to help
Jews in our community, around
the world, and in Israel, this
group of enthusiastic individuals
were able to use their volunteer
time in a manner which was quite
admirable and refreshing.
Thanks to the volunteers who
gave their time and effort. All
those associated with the cam-
paign in Century Village can hold
their head high to know that the
process they went through is an
example to our entire commu-
nity.
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day
July 22. 1963
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 7
On This and That
By RABBI
BRUCE S. WARSHAL
Executive Director,
outh County Jewish Federation
ny reports pass across my
1 take this opportunity to
bare two articles that I received
[is week with you.
[The first was a news item that
received from Senator Lawton
lies. Our senator wrote:
Financial need
asing opportunity
and in-
have en-
more and more women into
> working world in the past few
As a result, there are at
t 13 million American chil-
aged 13 years and under
mothers are employed full-
[ It is expected that by 1990,60
ent of our school-age children
. have mothers in the work-
ce, children requiring care and
supervision during the
r.er-school hours before their
brents return home from work.
[Unfortunately, for many
ailies there are few good,
ffordable child care options.
bme children are under the
egular care of relatives or
> sitters; others are under the
Bpervision of an older brother or
ster.
ver 1.8 million, becoming
ivn as "latchkey" childern,
completely on their own,
bsent any adult supervision fol-
Iwing school. As we know, this
1 a breeding ground for trouble.
[The Senate recently heard from
group of former latchkey
bildren. and they talked about
he fear and boredom they ex-
erienced when they were at
;i me alone. Rather than
pquiring a sense of independen-
children who must care for
emselves or for a younger
ild often feel overwhelmed
the responsibilities they face.
tieir concerns and fears are not
founded: the opportunities for
ingerous or emergency situa-
ons to develop are only too
I This phenomenon affects the
ewLsh as well as the general
cular community in our
untry. This past year, our Jew-
Community Day School has
vided after school care for it*s
dents who have working
ents. Many of you may have
Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal
read that the Federation will
operate a full-blown Jewish Com-
munity Center beginning in the
fall. We are already making plans
so that our new JCC will
cooperate with our existing Day
School to provide an after school
care program for Jewish students
enrolled in any school in South
County.
I am passing the following
article from a publication of the
Jewish Federation of Chicago. It
concerns Jewish poverty. In the
article, the Coopers received help
from the Jewish Vocational
Service of Chicago. Had they
lived in South County, the identi-
cal service would be available
through our Jewish Family and
Children's Service, which is an
agency operated by the Federa-
tion. The point that I am trying
to make, before you read this
article, is that our Jewish Com-
munity is structured through the
Federation to help other Jews in
need, whether they be "latchkey"
children or unemployed wage
earners.
The Chicago article reads:
Two years ago, Hal and Terri
Cooper came to Chicago, hoping
for a fresh start. They had been
living in the East, but repeated
anti-Semitic incidents convinced
them to take their two young-
sters elsewhere. When the 41-
year-old salesman received an
offer from a Fortune 500 com-
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pany.
move.
the family made their
For the first year, according to
Hal, "I could do no wrong. I took
a million dollar territory and
turned it into $2 million." He and
Terri bought a home in Wilmette.
made friends, and joined a
congregation. The company was
happy, and so were the Coopers
(not their real names).
Then, business started going
bad. "One thing led to another,"
said Hal, "and they offered to
move me to San Francisco. That
was their answer of how to im-
prove business change people.
It's a common thing." However,
the Coopers were not ready to
transplant themselves after
carving out a comfortable life in
Wilmette. But when Hal refused
the move, the walls came
crashing in anyway.
"I was floored when I went to
New York, and was told my
services were no longer needed,"'
he said. Once the shock wore off,
Hal felt certain he could find
something else, but it wasn't that
easy.
The jobs just weren't out there.
Hal tried it all. He said, "You go
to employment agencies. Many of
the jobs advertised in the news-
paper do not exist." And job-
hunting costs money, too. "I
went to New York. As a sales-
man, a lot of the companies are
not based in Chicago." But there
was nothing substantial there,
either.
The Coopers were confronted
with a huge financial crisis. Al-
though Hal was given three
months severance pay, and Terri
had recently begun work as an
executive secretary, they
couldn't make ends meet. The
spanking new car, the beautiful
home, all the material goods that
had provided so much pleasure,
suddenly became burdens. In
order to continue paying the
mortgage, the Coopers dipped
into their savings. That was
exhausted in three months. "We
had no money. My bank account
there was one time when all we
had was $13 left."
By then, Hal was on unem-
ployment. "People would say to
me, 'You're collecting unemploy-
ment!' There was pity, but there
was also animosity," Hal said.
"They looked upon you as,
'you're a failure.' I looked upon
myself as a failure."
In their time of need, the
Coopers saw many of their
friends drift away. "A lot of your
'friends,' look upon unemploy-
ment as a contagious disease,
that's definitely fatal. They avoid
you. They're embarrassed
because they see that what's
happening to you could possibly
happen to them," he said.
With the disappearance of
friends and financial security, the
Coopers found their lives
changing in many ways. Before
he lost his job, Hal said, "We
lived from day to day and
that's wonderful, until the
paycheck stops." Afterward, he
said, "we stopped going out. You
don't do anything that's not
essential. Food got cut back. You
use generics. You don't eat meat
every night. But when you have
these fixed expenses, you can't
cut them back. You can't cut
back on your mortgage."
In addition to the financial
strain, Hal underwent a tremen-
dous emotional strain. At one
time, he stayed in bed (or a weak,
paralysed by the enormity of his
problems. Later, he was so
desperate for help that he called
the White House. "There's an
awful lot of stress involved," said
Hal. "You begin to doubt your-
self. You realize how vulnerable
you really are." Finally, Hal said,
"I saw myself manifesting all
this frustration, and mental
abuse on my children and my
wife." He turned to his rabbi for
counseling, and was advised to
try the Jewish Vocational Ser-
vice. This set Hal on the road to
recovery.
Hal credits the counselors at
JVS with "helping me get back
my self-esteem. I felt good.
Without JVS, I would have com-
mitted suicide." With confidence
on the mend, Hal joined a JVS
workshop that taught him how to
find a job. "So I went out," be
said, "and it was a very trying
experience, because lit's
humiliating. But one thing led to
another and I found a job more
than a job, a whole new industry,
a whole new opportunity."
Now in real estate, Hal has
been back to work less than two
months. He appears calm, confi-
dent. For this, Hal says, JVS.
deserves a lot of credit. "They
gave me back my pride, my self-
worth. They gave me so much."
But Hal is concerned about their
ability to help others like him.
While the quality of service at
JVS is high, he says they are
understaffed to meet current
needs.
"You send money to Israel,
and people identify with it. But
part of being Jewish is the Jews
in the Diaspora.
"We're a mini-culture in a
giant culture, and we're being
gnawed at and eaten at. If we
want to survive, we've got to pay
more attention to our own here.
And a lot of our own happen to be
poor. They're not all rich. And
they need help."
Correction
We apologize for having inadvertently omitted the name of
Florence Riesberg as one of the South County Jewish Federation
women attending the UJA Women's Regional Conference held
in West Palm Beach recently in the photo on Page 5 of the July 8
issue of the Floridian.
WANTED!
Any Information, photos, pertaining to formation and
aarly years of the Jswlan Federation In South Coun-
tyfor tha purpoas of creating accurata historical ar-
chlvaa...
Plaaaa contact Federation officeHelena Elchler
368-2737 or mall to the attention of Helene Elchler
South County Jewish Federation
2200 N. Federal Hwy.-Sulte 206
Boca Raton, FL 33432
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Lea


uKeo
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, July 22, 1983
Law Experts Warn Senate Committee That 'Religion In
Public Schools' Amendment Would
Create Strife and Limit Freedom
WASHINGTON A pro-
posed constitutional amendment
that would permit a fixed period
of silent meditation in the class-
room and allow student religious
clubs to use public school facili-
ties was sharply criticized by two
legal experts in testimony before
a Senate committee this week.
They charged such an amend-
ment would limit rather than
expand religious freedom and
equality.
Testifying before the Senate
Committee on the Judiciary
(June 27), Joel Levy, who repre-
sented the American Jewish Con-
gress, said a constitutional
amendment to permit classroom
lime to be set aside for medita-
tion would directly involve
teachers in religious affairs and
lould lead to abuses. Younger
students, who would require or
seek the advice of a teacher on
how to use the "moment of
silence." could be influence in
their religious beliefs by such ad-
vice, he said.
Mr. Levy also pointed out that
while proponents of the amend-
ment claim that the decision to
use the period of meditation for
prayer would be voluntary on the
part of the students, those who
do not wish to participate might
find it difficult to do so without
"stigmatizing" themselves in the
eyes of other students or their
teachers.
Appearing on behalf of the Na-
tional Coalition for Public Edu-
cation and Religious Liberty
known as PEARL An um-
brella group representing 32 or-
ganizations. Nathan Z. Dersho-
witz challenged the provision of
the proposed amendment that
would allow student religious
clubs the same access to public
school facilities as other student
Organizations
ORT
Women's American ORT-Del-
ray is having a Theatre Party at
Caldwell Playhouse, on Tuesday
evening, Aug. 9 at 8 p.m. to see
"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof." For
reservations, please call Edith
Bunis 499-2422 or Ann Swilling
498-5958.
PIONEER WOMEN
Pioneer Women-Beeraheeba
Club will have a Lunch and Card
Party on Wednesday, Aug. 10 at
11:30 a.m. at the Adult Commu-
nity Center. 802 NE 1st St.. Del-
ray Beach. For further informa-
tion, please call 499-8667 or 499-
1573.
ARMDI
The Ramat Gan Chapter of
American Red Mag en David for
Iarael-Delray-Boynton. is having
a meeting on Tuesday, July 26 at
7:30 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank, West Atlantic
Ave., Del ray Beach. There will be
an interesting speaker and re-
freshments will be served. All are
invited to attend. For further in-
formation, please call Mark Sil-
verton, 499-4706 or M. Lutzker,
499-2471.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women-Naomi
will sponsor a Rosh Hashanah
Holiday at the newly renovated
Ramada Renaissance, Sept. 7-10,
four days and three nights. The
rooms are all ocean front with
terrace and king-sized beds. En-
tertainment nightly, and cocktail
party. All tips included, parking
is $2.50 per day. The cost will be
S315 for two people or $435 for
three in a loom. Please call Belle
Kern for reservations and further
information at 499-9277.
groups. The existence of such
clubs would lead to proselytiza
tion. he said. The presence of a
teacher as faculty advisor, a re-
quirement for student organiza-
tions in public schools, is "partic-
ularly troublesome" because it
would make the existence of reli-
gious clubs "pregnant with the
danger of administrative entan-
glement," he claimed. Mr. Dersh-
owitz, who serves as counsel to
PEARL, is a member of the legal
staff of AJCongress.
The presence of a teacher "is
not a neutral factor in a student's
decision whether or not to partic-
ipate in a particular club." Mr.
Dershowitz told the Senate com-
mittee. "In some cases, students
will view a particular teacher as a
role model, and therefore imitate
him or her as much as possible."
He also suggested that a stu-
dent whose grade depends on the
good will of a teacher may feel it
"advantageous" to participate in
a club sponsored by that teacher
in order to curry favor. "Con-
versely, a student who desires
not to participate in a religious
club may feel ill at ease in the
sponsoring or supervising teach-
er's regular class because of that
refusal." Mr. Dershowitz con-
tended.
He said such official involve-
ment by teachers and school offi-
cials would constitute a "govern-
ment thumb on the scale" in con-
trast to the traditional govern-
ment neutrality in religious mat-
ters called for in the Bill of
Rights. An "equal access"
amendment might require the
subsidization of religious clubs
from school funds raised through
taxes or student activity fees, on
the same basis as non-religious
clubs, he said.
Mr. Dershowitz declared that
"at the heart" of the proposed
amendment "is a dissatisfaction
with the special status accorded
religion by the Constitution and
the relevant Supreme Court deci-
sions." Proponents of the amend-
ment, he said, want to see reli-
gion given the "special benefits"
of the Free Exercise clause of the
Constitution which prohibits the
government from interfering with
religious freedom, but "none of
the disadvantages" of the Estab-
lishment Clause that mandates
separation of church and state by
prohibiting sponsorship of or as-
sistance to a particular religion.
Noting that the "rose cannot
be had without the thorn," Mr.
Dershowitz disclaimed any desire
to "hobble" religion. "Rather, we
believe that the restrictions im-
posed by the Establishment
Clause are the only ones available
to insure that the public schools
do not become the battleground
or students' souls," he said.
That is precisely what will hap-
pen if student religious clubs are
permitted to function. Such a
result would benefit neither the
public schools nor religion and
would be particularly painful for
religious minorities."
He said it would "revive"
those painful years in which the
public schools were drawn into
bitter sectarian strife between
"Protestants and Catholics."
Mr. Dershowitz told the Senate
Committee that "it is not easy to
oppose proposals which, like the
instant one, can be plausibly
labelled as enhancing equality."
But, he added, "equality between
faiths will not be enhanced, nor
religious liberty furthered, by
this proposal."
Mr. Dershowitz also warned
that the provisions of the Bill of
Rights, which would be changed
by the proposed amendment,
"have remained inviolate for
almost 200 years now, despite
periodic calls for change."
A successful attempt to amend
the provision on religion would
open the way to further amend-
ments, he said. "Only a need of
the highest order and the
issues dealt with here are not
such should suffice to justify a
constitutional amendment to the
First Amendment, the corner-
stone of our religious and politi-
cal liberties."
SPOTTING EYE DISEASE Scientists at the Technion-Israel
Institute of Technology in Haifa, have developed a new instrument
which will enable doctors to detect vision problems at an early,
treatable stage. The device, which can be wheeled to the patient's
bedside, measures the electrical activity in the brain associated with ., ,.
vision. As an image on a television screen is altered, the respon-
siveness of the patient's visual pathway can be measured, enabling
physicians to detect the slightest degeneration of nerves, as well as the
early onset of multiple sclerosis. The vision diagnosis device is easier
to use and less expensive than models currently in use and is another
example of how medical engineering innovations developed at the
Technion enhance the diagnosis and conquest of disease.
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The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
jngress Says Court Ruling Denying Tax Exemption
icist Group Is Landmark In War Against Bigotry
Court of Appeals deci-
hig tax exemption to an
fist group has been
[the American Jewish
las a major step in
Ttax loophole used by
tnizations to finance
[iti-Semitic and racist
sion, by the Seventh
the U.S. Court of Ap-
the District of
declared that an orga-
Jling itself the Nation-
did not meet require-
ip by Congress for tax
because its materials
"educational" under
Enable interpretation"
tional Alliance had
, it was entitled to tax
ecause it served an
(function.
; overtuned a deci-
U.S. District Court
Kstrict of Columbia
lered the Internal
ervice to grant tax
j The IRS appealed the
I decision.
anal Alliance is a Vir-
sration organized for
[purpose of "arousing
lericans of European
i understanding of and
Iheir racial and cultural
an awareness of the
I dangers to that
[Redlich, Co-chairman
imission on Law and
ion of the American
ress, said that this is
)wn decision denying
tax exemption to a
program consists of
jt propaganda.
Dean Redlich said the decision
will insure that American tax-
payers will not be compelled to
subsidize the publication and dis-
tribution, under the guise of edu-
cational activities, of crude anti-
Semitic and other racist materi-
als. The decision does this with-
out in any way endangering First
Amendment rights, he explained.
AJCongress filed an amicus
curie brief in the case. Lawyers
for the Jewish organization were
Paul S. Berger, Walter J. Rockier
and Thomas C. Spring of the
Washington law firm of Arnold &,
Porter.
The National Alliance's princi-
pal publication, "Attack!," pub-
lished in newspaper format,
contains stories, pictures and
editorials alleging that "non-
whites" principally Blacks
are inferior to white Americans of
European ancestry and are ag-
gressively brutal and dangerous,
and that "Jewish control" of U.S.
Policy is harmful to the interests
of White Americans of European
ancestry.
The appeals court decision un-
derlined the claim by the IRS
that the National Alliance's ma-
terial was not educational and
therefore not eligible for tax-
exempt status.
"Even under the most minimal
requirement of a rational devel-
opment of a point of view, Na-
tional Alliance's material fall
short," stated the court decision.
"The material may express the
emotions felt by a number of peo-
ple, but it cannot reasonably be
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Scientists Discover New
Synthetic Form of Vitamin D
BEERSHEVA, Israel A
major breakthrough in medical
research is taking place at Ben-
Gurion University on the body's
processing of Vitamin D which
may mean the end of suffering for
millions of senior citizens and
kidney dialysis patients through-
out the world.
Dr. Shraga Shany of the Toor
Institute, Ben-Gurion University
of the Negev, together with Prof.
David Galinsky, head of the
Geriatrics Department of Soroka
University Hospital in Beersheva
found that many nursing home
residents suffer from an
inadequate supply of Vitamin D3
which is the bone-building form
of Vitamin D manufactured by
the body. These elderly patients
lack D3 even after receiving a
CHRYSLER
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499
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considered intellectual exposi-
tion."
The court reiterated that the
material doesn't resemble any
definition of "educational" con-
ceivably intended by Congress.
"In the present case we see no
possibility that the National Al-
liance publication can be found
educational within any reason-
able interpretation of the term,"
the court concluded.
I .:>p.i.>n r'i-..'-i 7100 North f-rtfera Hiflhwaj
roctly An man 142 ''100
sufficient supply through such
foods as fish, margarine, and ex-
posure to natural sunlight.
After treating nursing home
patients over a six-week period
with supplementary doses of
Vitamin D, Dr. Shany and Dr.
Galinsky found that although the
patients absorbed a significant
amount of the compound, their
kidneys did not manufacture suf-
ficient Vitamin D3 to promote
the healing of bones. Their re-
search also clearly demonstrated
that the body's ability to produce
the essential requisite amount of
Vitamin D3 declines with age.
Ben-Gurion University's re-
searchers have also found a link
between the kidney's ability to
process metabolites from
Vitamin D in order for the body
to absorb calcium, and success in
creating compounds which can
use the calcium to build bones.
Dr. Shany suggests that treat-
ment of kidney patients with the
new synthetic medicine to en-
courage bone-repairing functions
will necessitate application of the
drug which imitates the calcium-
providing effects of Vitamin D.
It became apparent that a syn-
thetic form of Vitamin D3 would
assist elderly patients to over-
come their high susceptibility to
bone fractures and kidney* disor-
ders as well. Another research
team at BGU headed by Dr.
Shany and Dr. R. S. Kestenbaum
together with Dr. Yitzhak Meller
and Prof. G. Torok of the Ortho-
pedics Department of the Soroka
University Hospital discovered
that an increase of this form of
Vitamin D applied directly at the
site of the fracture, helps speed
the bone healing process indic-
ating an exciting and important
break-through in this area of
treatment.
Interestingly also, the success-
ful manufacture of this synthetic
vitamin might also prove impor-
tant in treating Bedouin mothers
and infants in the Negev desert
who, according to Dr. Shany,
evidence unusual difficulty in
producing this bone-restoring
compound through natural body
processes. The Bedouin's high
susceptibility to bone ailments
may, finally, and for the first
time, be greatly reduced.
A total of S3 million is being
invested in drug research at Teva
Pharmaceutical Industries in
conjunction with its affiliate,
Yeda, the high technology com-
mercial research arm of the Weiz-
mann Institute. The new drug is
called 24, 25 dihydroxy Vitamin
D3 and will be marketed world
wide for the treatment of osteo-
porosis, the bone disease common
among old people and kidney dia-
lysis patients. Clinical tests of
the drug are already under way in
Israel and overseas, the results of
which are eagerly awaited in
medical circles worldwide.
?????*
JEWISH
FEDERATION BOCA RATON
DELRAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
WANTED
NAMES OF NEWCOMERS
Shalom South County Needs Your Help.
Do you know anyone who has recently
moved to South County?
We want to invite
newcomers to a Shalom
South County event.
Please Call The Federation Office,
368-2737

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:>-~ in
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1
mi i
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, July 22- ^
On the Bookshelf
7Y*x> Volumes At
The Age of Wonders. By Aharon |
Appelfeld. New York: Wash-
ington Square Press of Pocket
Books, 1983 208 Pp. $3.95.
Childhood. By Jona Oberski.
Garden City. N.Y.Doubleday
and Co.. 1983. 120 Pp. $11.95.
By MORTON L. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
About two-million Jewish

A Rabbi
Comments JP
Rabbi Zelizer
The following is brought to Floridian readers by the South
County Rabbinical Association. If there are topics you would
like our Rabbis to discuss, please submit them to the Floridian.
TAKING A VACATION
By RABBI NATHAN ZELIZER
Rest is a necessary ingredient for the happy and balanced life.
We must rest from the work we do. Neither our brains, nor our
muscles, can be useful indefinitely. We cannot be continually in
the company of people without solitude. We must retreat to
privacy. Life's current is an alternating current. Even God
rested after six days of work. It is also not true that God so
arranged nature? The earth must rest every seven years as the
Bible tells us (Lev. 25) "Six years shalt thou sow thy field and
six years shalt thou prune thy vineyard ... but in the seventh
year there shall be a sabbath of solemn rest for the land, a
sabbath unto the Lord ... it shall be a year of solemn rest for
the land ..." The same solemn rest for the land was decreed
every fiftieth year the jubilee year.
Yes, we must rest from work. Only fools work without rest
until they "plotz" until they drop dead. That is why people
take vacations "to get away from it all."
The tragedy is that few people realize that the same principle
applies to the concept of rest. Retirees, especially, discover that
too much rest can be very damaging, mentally, spiritually and
physically. It is good to go on vacation, but it "feels so good" to
come back to return. We love the summer months when we
usually go away "to rest." But, "how sweet it is" to go back to
"work."
Unfortunately, there are some retirees, who do not recognize
this truth they simply play and play the same game or games
day after day until their "dying day." Some time ago, I called
several people for some purpose. I got the same story regarding
each of the people I tried to contact. "Joe plays cards in the
clubhouse. Try him every Monday afternoon." "On Tuesday,
you can reach Joe at Jack's homj where he always plays poker."
Similar messages I received for every day of the week when
and where he would be. everyday, on the hour, by the hour.
Other pasttimes golf, tennis, shuffleboard, bike riding are in
vogue. These and other pasttimes are all useful. But, shall these
pasttimes be the "be all' and the "end all of retirement?" Shall a
person, because he worked for 50 years, indulge only in canasta,
tennis or gin rummy? Are these activities all that we need in our
golden years? Shall we spend these golden years playing canasta
twice a day, five times a week? Will this kind of monotonous life
make us happy, content and well adjusted? Is the one who
occupies the same poker chair in his condo's club house, every
Monday and Wednesday, and absent himself, from that chair for
a few hours only when his grandchildren visit him once a year?
You call this retirement?
The fact is. that the real world is made up of varied interests.
Like a piano, the music of life cannot be played on one key.
Would not life be more interesting when, after being redeemed
from the slavery of a time-punch clock, to be involved in a
variety of activities.' Play, yes! But, how about some in-
volvement in tasks that have to be performed to make life better
and more meaningful? How about some work for the synagogue?
There are tasks to be performed for Jewish Federation,
Madassah, Sisterhood. B'nai B'rith, Israel and so many other
causes that are crying tor help!
I firmly believe that life would be so much less boring and so
much more interesting if we would only permit Jewish tradition
- the synagogue, the Sabbath, the holidays and home ob-
servances if we would only permit these wonderful agents to
enter our lives and permit them to teach us how to alternate our
lives between rest and work, and how to return from rest to work
and from work to rest. Oh, if we, who moved to Florida would
stop saying, I've had enough up North ... I've had enough -
let some one else build and work and be involved. All I want
from now on is peace and quiet and to sit in the sun and play and
play and play." For our own self-preservation, for our own
happiness, we must become "active" in something else besides
play and rest and take a "vacation from rest" and "return to
work."
An old Quaker was asked to explain her youthful appearance
and charm. She said with a smile, "I use for the lips truth; I use
for the voice prayer; I use for the eyes pity; I use for the figure
righteousness; I use for the heart love." My friends, how is this,
for a make-up kit? This kind of a kit a kit which can only be
'bought" with mature religion a kit that develops new tastes,
new ideas, new interest such a kit will help us turn old age
into a victory not into a defeat. May our vacation teach us to
return to a life lived on an alternate current. A happy and safe
and meaningful vacation to us all.
children lost their lives in the
Holocaust. Half of that number
were murdered by the Nazis: the
rest died of disease and star-
vation. Many children fled,
encouraged by their parents who
hoped against hope that this
might give them a chance to sur-
vive. They wandered all over
Europe, destitute, terrified and
emaciated.
Two who did manage to survi-
ve have written these powerful
books which look at the Holo-
caust from the vantagepoint of a
child. That perspective gives
special poignancy and pain to
this greatest of all human trage-
dies. Each author knows whereof
he speaks from bitter personal
experience, having lost parents to
the Nazis. Their touching books
are autobiographical.
APPELFELD escaped from a
labor camp at the age of eight
and then wandered through the
forests for three years, Many such
little wanderers were brought to
Israel by the heroic efforts of
Youth Aliyah. Appelfeld reached
what was then Palestine in 1946.
A veteran of the Israeli army,
he now teaches Hebrew literature
at Ben Gurion University in
Beersheba He has written
several books and short stories in
Hebrew. The first one to be
translated into English was
' Badenheim 1939." "The Age of
Wonders" is his second English
appearance.
The first half of Appelfeld's
book tells how the Holocaust
came to the small town near
Vienna where Bruno, an only
child, lived comfortably with his
middle-class parents. His father
was a successful writer who
gradually found it impossible to
publish anything because he was
a Jew.
THE FAMILY'S lack of
identification with things Jewish
did not save them as their friends
turned against them and life be-
came even more difficult. Unable
to withstand their worsening
condition, the father finally
deserted his family and was
eventually killed by the Nazis,
just where or how remaining a
mystery.
Bruno and his mother, along
with all the other Jews in the
town were locked in the synago-
gue and then sent off to a concen-
tration camp, marked for des-
truction.
The second half of the book
takes place years later when
Bruno, now grown to manhood,
leaves his home in Jerusalem to
visit the town where he was born.
He spends several weeks there,
visiting places and people he
knew as a child. He relives
memories, almost as though he
had to suffer through this exper-
ience in order to put it behind
him.
Packed with emotion, this well-
written book evokes recollections
of a mournful and melancholy
lime.
' HILDHOOD," by Fona
Oberski, is translated from
Hutch, having originally been
published in Holland in 1978 The
author now works in Amsterdam,
where he was born in 193K.
His book is a series of short,
forceful vignettes, written in the
simple, moving language of a
child. The book opens with some
pleasant scenes, depicting the
loving relationship which the boy
has with his parents.
Kvil intrudes quickly, first in
the form of a yellow star sewn to
his jacket and then on the
miserable train ride to the
concentration camp, Bergen-
Belsen. The horror of life in the
camp is shown through the eyes
of the child.
His understanding grows as
his father dies and as he learns to
differentiate between the Ger-
mans and the Russians who
!:berutea "he camp. Liberal
Sally OK Mm K>it hanging out her ma*a
comes too late for the mother.
Weakened and starved, she dies
soon after they were freed.
THE BOY is befriended by a
young girl who gets him back to
Amsterdam. There, the story
ends as he finds a home with
"Aunt" Lisa and her husband.
He is old enough to realize that
0*lyNt*|
they really are not his relatives.
This book takes its place along
side of the Diary of Anne Frank
as a special contribution to our
grasp of the Holocaust.
Together, both books add to
our understanding of that which
cannot be understood.
Community Calendar
July 26
American Red Magen David for Israel, 7:30 p.m. meeting
August 1
American Friends of Tel Aviv University, 4:30 p.m. 6 p.m.
meeting
August 3
Women's American ORT-Region Executive Committee Meeting,
9:30a.m.
August 11
Temple Beth El-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting Temple
Beth El-Single Parents, 7 p. m. meeting
August 25
Temple Beth El, 8 p.m. Board meeting
August 30
Temple Betn LI UAHC Workshop, 7:30 p.m.
August 31
National Council Jewish Women-Boca Delray, 8 p.m Board
meeting
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Cantor Donald
Roberts. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at
9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat Service 2nd Friday of each month.
Minyan on Monday and Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road. 1 block south of Linton Blvd. Delray Beach.
FL 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Services daily 8
a.m. and 9 a.m., Saturday. Phone499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at Carteret Savings and Loan
Association Office, West Atlantic, comer Carter Road. Delray
Beach. Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat. Saturdays. 9 a.m.
and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President 499-6687. Temple
Office 14600 Cumerland Drive. Delray Beach, Fla. 33446,
Phone 495-0466. Rabbi Emeritus Jonah J. Kahn.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue. Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
Month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton. Fla. 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Service*
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m., Sunday 9 a.m. Reuben
Saltzman. President, Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-6567.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Conserva-
tive. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A. Silver, Rabbi; Seymour
Zisook, Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday *
8:45 a.m., Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Cason United Methodist Church, 342 N. Swinton Ave. {corner
Lake Ida Rd.l, Delray Beach. FL Reform. Mailing Address: P_U.
Box 1901. Delray Beach. Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m. R*N
Samuel Silver, President Bernard Etish, 276-6161.
::>
m
wmmmmm


Friday. July 22,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
State Pep % Draws
Mans for Middle East
In New Colors, Gaza and West Bank Called 'Occupied'
By JTA Services
WASHINGTON The State
Department has finally pinned
down its official policy on United
States government maps that
show the West Bank and Gaza
Strip The new maps that will be
used by all US. government
agencies will show the areas in
different colors than Jordan and
Israel.
For years, United States maps
have shown the West Bank as
part of Jordan. Martin Miller, a
Washington area resident, long
complained about this to the
State Department and when he
received no satisfaction, he
enlisted the aid of his Congess
man, Rep. Michael Barnes (D.,
Met). In March, the Department
of State Bulletin showed a new
map which included a series of
dashes separating the West Bank
from Jordan.
But in an announcement to the
press last week, the Department
said that, from now on, all maps
which include the West Bank and
Gaza will show them in a diffe-
rent color from Israel and Jordan
and "bear the legend 'Israel-
occupied' and 'status to be deter-
mined.' "
Germany's Kohl Will
Visit Israel in August
BONN Chancellor Helmut
Kohl will visit Israel from Aug.
31 through Sept. 4, government
sources said. Official announce-
ments are expected shortly here
and in Jerusalem.
Kohl, who just returned from
Moscow, is expected to visit
Arab countries after Israel. While
in Jerusalem, he will have several
meetings with Premier Mena-
chem Begin to discuss bilateral
relations and the Arab-Israeli
conflict, the sources said. They
are also likely to da German
plans to sell advanced weaponry
to Saudi Arabia, notably the
Leopard II tank, which Israel
adamantly opposes.
Government circles here hope
that Israelis can be persuaded to
mute their objectives. In that
case, Bonn will propose to sell
Israel the 120 mm. cannon that
goes with the Leopard II, a
weapon the Germans say can be
very useful to Israel and save it
the costs of developing a similar
cannon, estimated at over SI
billion.
Racists Appeal
Exemption Denial
NEW YORK The National
Alliance, described by the
American Jewish Congress as an
openly racist group, plans to
appeal a federal appeals court
decision denying it tax exempt
status, the AJCongress said it
has learned.
A ruling which overturned a
lower court decision upholding
tax exemption for the Alliance
was hailed by AJCongress offi-
cials as a major step in closing a
tax loophole used by such organ-
izations as the Alliance to finance
virulent anti-Semitic and racist
propaganda.
Norman Redlich, co-chairman
of the AJCongress commission
on law and social action, said this
was the first known decision
denying a federal tax exemption
to a group whose program
consists of issuing racist pro-
paganda.
The Alliance, a Virginia cor-
poration with its office in Arling-
ton, had argued that it was
entitled to tax exemption because
it served an "educational fun-
ction." The federal district court
for the District of Columbia, had
ordered the Internal Revenue
Service, on May 27, 1961, to
grant the exemption. The IRS
appealed the lower court decision.
Hebron Mayor's
Ouster Con!Irmated
JERUSALEM The Cabinet
has confirmed the ouster of
Mayor Mustapha Abdul Natshe
of Hebron and his town council in
connection with the murder of a
yeshiva student in Hebron last
Thursday and decided to proceed
with plans to enlarge the Jewish
presence in that West Bank
Temple Sinai
Of Palm Beach County
Member U.A.H.C.(Reform)
Invites you to attend our
Sabbath Eve Services
Held Each Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m., at
Cason United Methodist Church
Corner of Swinton Ave. and N.E. 4th St. (Lake Ida Rd.)
Rabbi Samuel Silver, officiating
For Membership Information Call:
SidPearce Samuel Rothstein Sid Bernstein
498-1098 President 732-5807
1983-1984 Registration for
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL, and MEMBERSHIP
for the Fall term. Now!
Special KULANU Young Family Group
For INFORMATION CALL
Marj Aaron 737-3599 Bevc'v Kamm 499-0404
Ten Nl RrV MION CALL 2/6 6161
P.O. BOX 1901 DELRA Y BEACH. FLA.
High Holy, Day Services
Limited Tickets Available
For Information C
Jerry Gilbert SidPearce Sid Bernstein
499-5563 498-1098 732-5807
New Temple Building Early 1984 Occupancy
Site 2475 W.Atlantic Ave. Delra
Federation of Ramallah, Pales-
tine, which claims a membership
of 20,000, held a convention in
Dearborn at which it pledged
continued support for embattled
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion chief Yasir Arafat.
During its four-day convention
at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in
the Detroit suburb, the conven-
tion heard the PLO's deputy
observer at the United Nations,
Dr. Hatem Hussaini, claim that
Arafat "is not on the ropes. He is
getting stronger." The reference
was to the fighting between PLO
elements in Lebanon, and
Arafat's leadership being
threatened by Syrian-backed
factions.
The convention received a
message from Arafat calling for
"revolution until victory" and a
letter from President Reagan
calling for the organization to
join in the Middle East peace
effort.
Zealots Protest
Jerusalem Dig
JERUSALEM About 2,000
ultra-Orthodox Jews caused a
mammoth traffic jam in down-
town Jerusalem in a protest
demonstration against the
> resumption of archaeological
excavations in the City of David
just outside the Old City walls.
Several policemen were injured in
clashes with religious zealots.
Twenty-five protestors were
arrested.
The Education Ministry last
month licensed Hebrew Univer-
sity archaeologist Yigal Shilo to
continue with the digging after it
was suspended because of claims
by Orthodox Jews that ancient
Jewish cemeteries were being
desecrated. The area where
digging is permitted, known as
Area G. was delineated in an
agreement reached between the
Ministry and the Chief Rab-
binate.
The Orthodox demonstrators
said they did not seek a license
from the "Zionist police" for then-
prayer and psalm-singing session
in what is known as "Shabbes
Square," a traditional Jerusalem
site for Orthodox rallies. Cordons
of police prevented attempts by
the demonstrators to move
toward the digging site.
Media Can Help
AMSTERDAM (JTAI -
Nazi-hunter Simon Wiesenthal
believes that the mass media
could help bring war criminals to
justice despite the fact that many
of them are now nationals of
countries far from the scene of
their crimes.
town.
A Cabinet statement declared Jfefft hrOCI Memorial ChapelBkVMXOIBU
"The security authorities will
protect the lives of all Jews all
over Eretz Israel and will not
allow anyone to take the law into
their own hands."
But there was no official
condemnation of either the
murder of 19-year-old Aharon
Gross or the arson and des-
truction of the Hebron market
place by Jewish settlers that
followed. Officials explained that
to have condemned both acts
together would equate them
while to condemn one unlawful
act and not the other would be
unseemly.
Nevertheless, government offi-
cials were instructed to inform
the press that the ministers did in
fact condemn both the murder
and the arson and rioting by
Jewish settlers that followed it.
Cabinet secretary Dan Meridor
stressed to reporters, however,
that "As long as Arabs believe
that by murder they can drive us
away from Hebron they have a
motive. Jews are going to live in
Hebron and in all parts of Eret7.
Israel.'.
Facts About Falashas
Hard to Come By
WASHINGTON Fact
finding missions to Ethiopia from
the U.S. have a difficult time
learning of the plight of the Fala-
shas because the Ethiopian Jews
are intimidated by the govern-
ment, a Jew who escaped from
Ethiopia last November asserted
here.
Simcha Desta, in a Capitol Hill
briefing for Congressional staff
members, said that any meeting
of Ethiopian Jews with foreign
visitors are always infiltrated by
government spies. In addition, he
noted that if foreign visitors
complain to the Ethiopian
government about the treatment
of Falashas, Ethiopian Jews are
arrested after the foreigners
leave.
Desta said Jews in Ethiopia
are persecuted because of their
religion. He said that while
Christians are arrested for poli-
tical reasons, Jews are arrested
only for practicing their religion.
ProPLO
Mooting In Detroit
DETROIT An organization
calling itself the American
Beth Israel Memorial Chapel
has announced that it has re-
named itself Beth Israel-Rubin
Memorial Chapel after Joseph
Rubin, who has worked on behalf
of his business and has been in-
volved for the past ten years in
civic, relieious. and fraternal or-
ganizations in the community.
Beth Israel-Rubin Memorial
Chapel will continue to provide
its current standard funeral ser-
vice and will continue to aim to
serve the needs of the Jewish
community, according to Robert
C. Mandell, co-owner.
BETH ISRAEL
rnemoRira. cHftPtL
South Palm Beach County's
ONLY Jewish Funeral Horns
499-8000
Joseph Rubin, Owner
5808 W. Atlantic Ave., Oelray Beach, FL 33445
THE MENORAH
PRE-NEED PLAN
Satisfaction.
Thoughtfulness.
Value.
Your choices set at
today's prices and in the
Jewish tradition.
v..,-
Mrd
* '"M.,
""'*"X~,
.(
;r3
-.......-,..; ;:"""".......!:::r-'............*
.....^^?st
And now vou can receive a FREE Permanent VX>^S^$$
EMERGENCY WALLET CARD with your personal medl
cal informal ion a gift to you from Menorah Chapels.
I
I WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE MY FREE EMERGENCY
WALLET CARD. PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION
ABOUT THE PRE-NEED PLAN.
Mail Coupon to: Menorah Chapels. 6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. 33313 Attn: Pre-Need Plan Director
Name______________________________________________.-----------------
Address.
Cily_
Stale.
-Zip-
Telephone .
CljapelS
In Dade, 945-3939. In Broward, 742-6000.
Cemetery and chapels in North Mum Beach, Fort Lauder Jaie.
Margate. Deerfield B<*ach & West Palm Beach
JF



CBOM^SCCt
------The Jewish Florididn of South County
Friday.July22
NORTON
SINCE 1924-
nonton mm cot umnw wmmntt
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED
sahty
CWTT1
y
U
^
STEEL BELTED RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
IS-----EmXSSEI^
M05/80R13
P175/S0R13
P185/80R13
P196/70R13
P2W/70R14
P175/75R14 47.
P185/75R14
BELTED CLM
P-METMC, POLYESTER
CORD, FIBERGLASS BELT
WHITEWALLS
SIZE
P155/80813
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
56J2
59,37
P225J7W14j60
P195/75R15
P205/75R15" 61;73
P165/80B13
P175/80B13
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
P185/75B14
"*
P2W75M?J64J)9
P225/75R15
Push-Cutton
telephone and
lands-free 2-way
speaker plus a lull
featured AM/FM
clock radio in one
compact unit
TELEPHONE-
CLOCK RADIO
WITH THE PURCHASE OF AMY FOUR
P195/75814
PRICE
31.97
33.81
35.75
37.93
38.79
39.88
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
P225/75B14
PI 55/80815
PI65/80815
<>
Retail value
$89 95
/*>
TECH
v RADIALS
Ofler expires July 31st
P205/75B15
P215/75815
P225/75815
P235/75B15
41.82
42.92
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
F.E.T.
1.44
1.50
1.63
1.69
1.70
1.79
1.95
2.07
2.20
2.35
168
1.83
2.15
45.60
47.78
50.10
234
2 46
265
Iirei.lTFirel.i_i
40,000 MILE 1A#I r^C I
LIMITED 1-* -I
WARRANTY RADIALS
0"7"j revolutionary
# /all season radial
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
HIGH PERFORMANCE
SPEED RATED
LOW COST. HIGH t 0MLY DUAL TREAD
MILEAGE OUT DESIGN, DUAL C0M-
STANWNG VALUE POUND TIRE
KAttltAIIIAt STEEL BELT IN SIDEWALL
pwce Ifet.. FOR ADDED STRENGTH
39.50
34.85
41.24
44.73
51.12
54.02
1.19.
MS*
1 24.
20S/70HR1
PWCE F.E.T.
195/70HR14 86.192 06
219
1 53
OTHER SIZES AVAILBLE
WE ALSO CARRY
PSJ^UPZandPS
181 SIZES TO FTT MOST
AMERICAN A MPORT CARS
AT MOST STORES
2.11
1.71
EXPERIENCE
& INTEGRITY
THAT SAVE
YOU MONEY
Since 1924 Norton fire Co has
ottered quality brands competitive
pricing last & efficient service T A
high tech specialist store managers,
certified mechanics, personal
integrity plus guaranteed
satisfaction You pay no eitra lor our
service and eipenence
PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
6
A78x13
C78xl3
C78x14
E78x14
F78x14
G78x14
H78x14
678x15
H78x15
L78X15
~mr
25.01
27.91
28.53
29.73
31.16
34.39
32.93
34.61
36.56
****! in 2 Ptyonty
IEET-
159
1 80
201
212
226
2.49
2.35
2.54
279
WE HONOR "'SSSlZZ .itiaSSSSsi
VISA -moTS **.*, ""vxxxzzsr*
BRIDGE RD. & OLD DIXIE HWY.
PH. 746-9215
QUALITY VALUE PERFORMANCE
P155/80R13
P-METRIC
TUBELESS
V WHITE WALL P165/80R13
P185/80R13
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
PRICE FET
39.84
44.70
58.16
59.55
62.53
70.73
73.66
71.95
74.98
77.48
89.42
1.50
1.64
1.90
200
213
234
2.49
244
259
274
296
XZX TUBELESS
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
145x13
155x13
165x13
175x14
185x14
165x15
PRICE
36.26
41.39
PET.
1.63
1.42
46.45 155
53.18 2 08
57.35
2.15
51.36 172
165/70-13144.76
1.55
175/70-131 49.93 i 1.66
185/70-131 55.241178
185/70-14
58.94! 199
TUBELESS BLACK
195/70-14 205/70-14
81.85 87.33
F.E.T. 2.27
F.E.T. 2.40
THE NEW GENERATION RADIAL
BLACKWALLS
SIZE
165/70-365
180/65-390
190/65-390
PRICE
77.08
90.30
99.91 2 09
220/55-390
WHITE
107.39
F.E.T
1 72
1 94
226
XCAUGHT TRUCK
TUBELESS BLACK
SIZE
700x15
6py
750x16
pta
800x16.5
spy
875 < 16.5
Spry
950x16.5
Spry
10x16.5
8pty
PRICE
77.70
F.E.T.
2 97
101.18
4 15
104.33
3 79
112.90
128.83
4 55
4 95
134.2614 76
IMPORT TRUCKS
MICHEUN185x"6p.y
XCT 56" W
r YOKOHAMA
Y865 STEEL BELTED RADIAL.
FOR FOREIGN A MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL t INTERMEDIATE CAM
SIZE
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
PRICE
F.E.T
1.36
1.23
1.48
160
1.84
IJ
1.1
SMALL TRUCK^nCUiLU^^RufSOL
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30100S FMhf M7-W22
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nWH IMnwMyOr 4M-13U fcMWfW iOHOtnrtay 744-RIS
<*niMMC t*fT.I
DhW.Oiib ,7".VJS?iict'4M "W**"^0*"!W S"W4n^al*,-,^0 NU" "BBK* 77.4700 IWMMUMiM
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2usm2*. sn-nMo msoMHmw-ws ^wSm%*S7,$Fm ^Caniwion ViS3mT38% .nEEE^T*;
PLANTATION
3i1N SttMRd 7M7J1M
LAWMM. NUMMACM
Aw. 277
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
,