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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( July 8, 1983 )

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
July 8, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00124

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
July 8, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00124

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item has the following downloads:


Full Text

.J.I
er23
Of South County
String Boca Raton, Dtaay Beach nd Highland Bern*
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, July 8,1963
9 to*
Price 36 Cent*
\Director Chosen Milton Kretsky Named CRC Chairman
has been chosen
>r of the South
Community Cen-
ement was made
aes. Chairman of
ammittee of the
ster is an agency
jnty Jewish Fed-
[to his new posi-
otte, North Caro
the Executive
Jewish Commu-
/ious to that, he
it Director of the
Center, the
r for the Tampa
rector of Youth
larleston Jewish
[graduate of the
itional College
and has a MSW degree from
Barry College.
In making the announcement,
Byrnes said, "The search com-
mittee was quite thorough. It re-
viewed resumes from highly
qualified candidates from the
entire country and Canada. The
committee also did extensive in-
terviews. I can say that Harold
Cohen is one of the most qualified
JCC Directors in the United
States. We are fortunate to have
him come to South County and to
take the reins of our new organi-
zation."
The Federation is presently
looking for rented faculties for
the new Jewish Center. Byrnes
indicates that Cohen will assume
his new position on Aug. 1.
leration Receives
UJA Award
County Jewish
awarded the
s Sapir National
lievement award
[Jewish Appeal at
tional leadership
Washington, D.C.
m received this
lition for the out-
lign in the inter-
/ision for the year
'was presented by
ip. National chair-
United Jewish
bs Baer, the found-
of the Federation
iice S. Warshal. its
tor, received the
ila evening banquet.
[Netanyahu, acting
of Israel to the
U.S. Senators
id Arlen Specter and
illy acclaimed actress
were present at the
Eontacted by the
Norman I. Stone,
ipaign chairman for
Norman Stone
the 1982 campaign said, "I am
personally most pleased that we
were singled out by the National
UJA for our achievement last
year. Our campaign represented a
57 percent increase over the pre-
vious year. That by far out-
stripped the growth of all other
Federations in the United States.
I want to thank everyone in our
community who worked toward
this success."
Tim NobilHeads Friends
Of Tel Aviv University
Nobil has been
chair a chapter of the
[Friends of Tel Aviv
in the Boca Raton-
each area. The an-
nt was made by Rabbi
Friedman, National
of the American
[Tel Aviv University.
President of TMI
-. a National Property
lent firm with offices in
pon, Akron, Ohio, and
1 Ga. He is currently a
[of the South County
Federation and serves on
rd of Directors of the
Itribution Committee,
iuate of Yale University
York University, Jim
been very involved in
communal affairs for
ars. He is a past Presi-
de Akron Jewish Corn-
Federation, a past Na-
IChairman of the United
[Appeal Young Leadership
\ and also has served as a
of the Executive Com-
I of the United Jewish Ap-
ational Cabinet
Jim Nobil
Rabbi Friedman also an-
nounced the opening of a Region-
al Office for the American
Friends of Tel Aviv University in
Boca Raton and the appointment
of its Executive Director, Lauren
Scharf Azoulai. He stated that
the organisation will work to
Continued on Page S
Marianne Bobick, President of
the South County Jewish Feder-
ation, announces the appoint-
ment of Milton Kretsky as Chair-
man of the Community Relations
Council for the new season.
The activities of the CRC are
directed toward enhancement of
social conditions conducive to
secure and creative Jewish living.
Through a coordinated program
of activity, the CRC seeks to in-
terpret Israel's position and
needs to the American public and
government; to mars ha 11 public
opinion in behalf of justice and
freedom for Soviet Jews and
other oppressed Jewish commu-
nities; to promote in the United
States equality of opportunity,
without regard to race, religion,
ancestry or sex; to secure free-
dom of thought, opinion and as-
sociation; to insure freedom of
religion and separation of church
and state; and to encourage
amicable relationships between
all groups.
Milton Kretsky, with many
years of involvement in Jewish
Communal affairs, has a hack-
ground that lends itself ideally
to the responsibilities he will
Milton Kretsky
handle in his new position.
He was the Director at the
Cleveland, Ohio office of the Na-
tional Jewish Hospital at Denver,
and Director of the New York
Area Office of B'nai B'rith Foun-
dation of the United States.
In the Bronx, he was actively
engaged in both community and
secular affairs for the Nathan
Straus Jewish Center. He has
been honored by B'nai B'rith and
UJA, and has served as Execu-
tive Vice President of Temple
Zion of Miami and is a member of
the Board of Directors and Exec-
utive Committee of Temple Zion.
Kretsky has served one year as
President of the Pines of Del ray
Association and three years as a
member of it's Board of Direc-
tors. In the 1981-82 Federa-
tionUJA Campaign, Kretsky
was co-chairman of Men's and
Family Division Campaign and
the 1983 Chairman of Men's and
Family Division Campaign.
For three years he has been
and still is a vice president of the
South County Jewish Federation
and has been a member of the
Board of Directors since the in-
ception of the Federation serving
on various committees such as
Allocations, and the Community
Relations Council.
Kretsky is a current member of
the Board of Directors and the
Executive Committee. He is a
committee member of the Jewish
Community Center and is a
member of the Board of Directors
of Temple Emeth and Temple
Emeth Brotherhood.
Begin's Visit
White House Confirms He's Due July 27
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The White House
announced that Israeli Pre-
mier Menachem Begin has
accepted President
Reagan's invitation to visit
him in Washington July 27.
The White House also an-
nounced that President
Amin Gemayel of Lebanon
will visit President Reagan
a week earlier, on July 22.
Meanwhile, U.S. special envoy
Philip Habib continued his
consultations at the State
Department on "overall tactics
and strategy in the Middle
East," State Department spokes-
man John Hughes reported.
"Ambassador Habib is playing
an important role in those con-
sultations," Hughes stated.
HE SAID he had no in-
formation on Habib's future
travel plans. "I think the kind of
discussions and consultations he
is presently engaged in would
have a bearing in determining
that ... At the end of those
discussions, his plans will be
clear and will be made fairly
soon," Hughes said.
Prime Minister Begin
Responding to speculation that
Habib may be leaving his post,
Hughes said, "The President has
total confidence" in Habib,
adding that Habib "has done
long and enduring work, and I
assume that at some stage he will
want to go back to California, but
he has also made it clear that he
remains at the disposal of the
President."
Hughes stressed that "it is
baseless to suggest that there are
any pressures on him (Habib) to
stand down." He also said the
role of special envoy Morris
Draper and his future travel
plans are also being discussed.
ACCORDING TO Hughes,
there are no plans for Secretary of
State George Shultz to visit
Damascus or the Middle East in
general when he returns from his
visit to the Far East June 24- July
6. But Hughes added, "never rule
anything out."
He reiterated the Adminis-
tration's position on the possible
redeployment of Israeli troops in
Lebanon. "We are in favor of the
complete and total withdrawal of
all foreign forces from Lebanon.
What contributes to that is what
we are pursuing," Hughes said.
Refusenik to Go on Trial
NEW YORK (JTA) Yuri
Tarnopolaky, a 47-year-old
chemist, was scheduled to go on
trial for "anti-Soviet slander,"
the Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry and the Union of Councils
for Soviet Jews learned. The
Jewish activist from Kharkov
was arrested on March 17. He
had been seeking a visa to
emigrate to Israel.
His daughter, Irina, wrote to
Soviet leader Yuri Andropov on
June 1, appealing for her father's
release and permission for the
family to emigrate. The letter,
made public by the Tarnopolsky
family, reminded Andropov that
he had responded sympathet-
ically to a letter from a 10-year-
old American girl, Samantha
Smith, urging nuclear disarma-
ment.


a*s~ ia

Page 2
TA Jeu/isA Floridian of South County
Frida
>y.
Ju*y 8.19(3
Doctors9Strike Ends
Begin's Son Emerges as Negotiator
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The four-month-old doc-
tors strike ended Monday
along with the mass hunger
strike by doctors that
began 11 days ago and
forced most of the major
hospitals to close or
drastically curtail their ser-
vices.
Dr. Ram Ishai, chairman of the
Israel Medical Association
(IMA), ordered the doctors to
return to work. The doctors' rep-
resentatives and government
negotiators spent the night
working out details of binding
arbitration to which the Cabinet
agreed in face of an unpre-
cedented medical crisis. The IMA
Council convened at noon for a
formal discussion of the agree-
ment. But the priority now seems
to be to get the country's hospi-
tals functioning normally.
MEDICAL EXPERTS said
this would take 2-3 days. But it
may be months before the
backlog of postponed surgery
and other medical treatments can
be brought up to date and the
accumulation of paper work
untangled. Meanwhile, rep-
resentatives of the doctors and
the government will each name
an arbitrator. The two persons
chosen will then nominate a third
arbitrator who will serve as the
neutral chairman of the panel.
are
New 'Game' Puts Jews'
Back in Nazi Death Camps
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) West
German authorities and
the Jewish community
have expressed outrage
over a dice-and-board game
being circulated by right-
wing and neo-Nazi groups,
the objective of which is to
get pawns representing
Jews into squares marked
with the names of Nazi
death camps.
Werner Nachmann, chairman
of the Jewish community of West
Germany, has demanded that
those responsible for the game be
brought to trial. He said the com-
munity was awaiting the results
of a police investigation. Rafael
Schier, chairman of the Jewish
community in Bonn, said the
pame was simply disgusting."
JUSTICE MINISTER Hans
Engelhard said the game, whiclv
has appeared here and in other
cities, "exceeds in perversity
everything that has previously
come from neo-Nazis." He said
his Ministry is working around
the clock to close loopholes in the
present laws forbidding the
circulation of Nazi propaganda-
The game called "Jews, Don't
Get Angry," is hand drawn. It
consists of a large Star of David,
each of the six points of which
contains a square with the names
of Auschwitz, Treblinka,
Maidenek and other camps where
Jews were exterminated during
World War II. Players move
pawns according to the role of
dice; each pawn represents one
million Jews. The winner is the
first to fill all six squares and get
the "Jews" into a "central gas
chamber.'*
The issues up for arbitration
-e salary increases and im-
proved working conditions which _,vernment-employed
the normal process ol nego- *___ __ *..?;
tiations failed to resolve during
the 118-day strike. The Finance
Ministry, which had firmly
opposed arbitration, declined to
comment on the outcome of the
strike, generally regarded as a
victory for the doctors. But un-
official sources maintained that it
was not the Finance Ministry but
the Rovernment as a whole that
suffered defeat.
The doctors insisted that there
were no victors or vanquished.
One physician who had fasted for
eight days, observed that the
doctors may make some financial
gains "but we lost morally." He
was apparently referring to the
prolonged disruption of hospital
and other medical services which
put the burden of suffering on the
ill and infirm.
IT WAS generally agreed that
the hunger strike, which began
Gulf side Getaway
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about two weeks ago at Soroka
Hospital in Beersbeba, created
the criaia that turned the tide
after negotiations between the
IMA and the government became
deadlocked. Dr. Ivor Sober, of
Soroka Hospital welcomed the
end of the fast.
It was estimated that some
3,000 physicians, half of the
medical
force, were fasting. They were
joined in many .places by nurses
and medical students. As scores
of doctors collapsed from
weakness, surgeries were shut
down along with emergency
rooms and other facilities and
several of the country's largest
hospitals simply closed.
Faced with that criaia, the
government was forced to act and
in so doing it emerged that Prem-
ier Menachem Begins son, Dr.
Binyamin Zev Begin, a geologist
by training, played a major role
behind the scenes. It had long
been rumored that Begin was
relying increasingly on his son for
political advice not only on the
doctors' strike but on other
matters of state as far back as the
Camp David accords in 1978.
The younger Begin is regarded
as ideologically even more hard-
line and rightwing i
tkal office and is outsPl
government, the Prime Minkl
ters'Office took pamat^co^
his role. Nevertheless, Binva*.
Begin reportedly mflueweTS
father to support binding .1
tration as the only way outofS
medical crisis and did much^
the behind-the-scenes negotutb,
with reluctant Cabinet tninita^
REPORTERS WHO re*,lj
attend Cabinet Secretary dJ
Meridor's briefing at the clcsirf
every Cabinet session ushered into a side room instead
of Meridor's office. No expuJ
tion was given. One reporter, who
left the room briefly, noticai
Begin's
behind
room
aon was enacoocajl
Meridor's desk bonh
engaged in telephone convent. I
tiona.
When this was brought u|
Meridor's attention, the Cabin*
Secretary was visibly embe
rassed. He noted that "Benny''
Begin was a close friend of ha |
and of other top officials.
Meridor denied that tail
younger Begin had bwi
receiving regular full reporUaM
Cabinet deliberations.
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riday. Ju,y 8-1983
The Jewish Floridian of South Cow 'y
Page 3
reisku '9 Policy Invoked
New Chancellor Sees No Changes
VIENNA Chancellor Fred
cjnowatz of Austria said that his
C Socialist government will
ntinue the Middle Eaat policy
down by hia predecessor,
jar Chancellor Bruno Krei-
which is that there cannot be
"durable peace in the region
at a just solution of the
i problem.
"It is true that the Israeli gov-
itnt has criticized our Middle
j policy very strongly, but it
hit be said that our policy wee
L accepted by many Iaraebe,"
lioowatz told the editor-in-chief
[ Arbnttrztitung, the organ of
ruling Social Democratic
v, in his first interview on
Middle East since taking of-
Jropov 'Bad Sign'
Human Rights
WASHINGTON The as-
ension of Yuri Andropov and his
Jolleagues in the Soviet hierarchy
[is a very bad sign" for Soviet
uman rights, according to El-
ott Abrams, Assistant Secre-
of State for Human Rights
nd Humanitarian Affairs.
Testifying before the subcom-
mittee on Human Rights and In-
ational Rights of the House
foreign Affairs Committee and
i Commission on Security and
operation in Europe, Abrams
kid that the U.S. "is deeply con-
pmed about the down-turn in
nigration" of Soviet Jews
vhich seems brought out of the
oset once again."
Intllsrael
Resolution Kayoed
I GENEVA The resolutions
nmittee at the United Nations
inference on Trade and Devel-
nent (UNCTAD) in Belgrade
rejected an Arab-inspired
Itilsrael resolution. It was
[erred to a special committee
vever and will be brought to a
s at the plenary session.
The resolution condemns Isra-
i policies in the occupied terri-
es, particularly its economic
Mvities there and calls on
NCTAD to create a special unit
i investigate the charges. Meir
kbay. head of the Israeli dele-
tion, said that there probably
buld be a compromise, Israel
not be condemned and the
cial unit will not be set up.
isonerGetsOK
r Kosher Food
| NEW YORK A federal
e, in what was described as
l first case of its kind, has or-
the federal Bureau of Pris-
M to provide a Jewish inmate
1th food certified by a Hasidic
bbinic agency, Howard Zucker-
m. president of the National
wish Commission on Law and
pblic Affairs, reported.
|jhe ruling by Judge John Lar-
T8. Jr. of the federal district
tot for the eastern district of
>fth Carolina was handed down
[Trenton. N.C. Judge Larkins
tM that the prisoner, whose
ipe was withheld and who is
peved to be from Montreal,
entitled to provisions certi-
. as kosher by the Central
fwnjcal Congress (CRC), of
f U.S.A. and Canada, the urn-
fUa agency for all Satmar
aidic groups. The CRC has an
Pensive kosher product certifi-
T'on program.
fC Lifts Ban
i Israal
)NN Israel and the Euro-
' Economic Community
"- signed an agreement last
aaV giving Israel access to the
*embourg-based European
J* for Investment, providing
jmercial loans to Israel of up
[HO million over the next five
m financial accord was the
result of the decision by the EEC
heads of state at their summit
meeting in Stuttgart to lift
the sanctions imposed on Is-
rael when it invaded Lebanon in
June, 1962. Another expected
result of that decision is reactiva-
tion of the joint EEC-Israel com-
mittee for economic cooperation
which was suspended aa part of
the sanctions.
Britain Eatabilahwa
Holocaust Memorial
LONDON Britain's first na-
tional memorial to the victims of!
the Nazi Holocaust was officially !
unveiled more than 38 years
after the Allies liberated thai
death camps.
It is a small garden in a quiet
corner of London's Hyde Park, in
which newly-planted silver birch
trees surround a cluster of large
boulders, inscribed with a pas-
sage from the Book of Lamenta-
tions.
On behalf, of the British gov-
ernment, Patrick Jenkin, the En-
vironment Secretary, declared
the garden open describing it as
"a reminder of the past and a
warning for the future.''
Egyptian Sees Hop*
In PLO Upheaval
BONN The Foreign Minis-
ter of Egypt, Kamal Hassan Ali,
said here that the present up-
heaval inside the Palestine liber-
ation Organization has paved the
way for new momentum in the
Middle East peace process.
The visiting Egyptian diplo-
mat, in his discussions with West
German leaders, said the PLO
can no longer be considered an
independent representative body
Redeployment Up
For Study Again
JERUSALEM Premier
Menachem Begin said that he
will convene a special Cabinet
session this week to discuss the
redeployment of the Israel De-
fense Force in Lebanon. Begin
made the disclosure at a briefing
to the Knesset Foreign Affairs
and Security Committee shortly
after meeting with the U.S.
special envoy Philip Habib, who
arrived here.
Some observers interpreted
Habib's visit at this time as a
U.S. effort to head off any Israeli
decision on redeployment in Leb-
anon until after Begin's sched-
uled meeting with President
Reagan in Washington at the end
of Jury. The U.S. fears a partial
Israeli pullback would be a signal
to Syrian or Palestine Liberation
Organization unite to move for-
ward.
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w.,.
>mriMYt rtf \rtltfi
r&ge*
TheJfwisk Floridian of South County
ffrid
'"y.Julyfl

Jewish Florkdttar*
FREDSMOCMET
Edllof and PuMlahar
of South County
SUZANNE SMOCMET
Exacutlva Editor
rm
(QFrtdSfiocht
")
QERI ROSENBERG
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BOCA RATON OFFICE 2200 N. Mml Hwy., Sulla 206. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phona MS 2001
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Ajtaaaw+^aibMI r^a**BW*4*k** StfaW*! 1 atata)aW aMwtam^ f a a an
Comblnad Jawiah Appaal South County Jawian Fodoratton.'lne.. Offlcara. Praaktant, Martanna Bootck,
Vksa Praaidanta. Marjorla Boar. Erie W. Oacklngar. Milton Krataky; Sacratary. Arnold Roaanthai,
Treaaurar, Baranlca Schankarman, Exacutlva Olractor, Rabbi Bruca S. Warahal.
Jawlth Floridian doaa not guarantaa Kaahruth o( Marchandlaa Advartlaad.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Local Araa $3.50 Annual (2 Yaar Minimum $7). by mambarahlp South County
Jawiah Fadaration. 2200N. Fadaral Hwy.. Sulta 206. Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Phona 368-2737.
Out of Town, Upon Raquaat.
Friday, July 8,1983
Volume 5
27 TAMUZ 5743
Number 23
Hispanic-Looking Men Fire
Shots Near Yeshiva Univ.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
About 20 shots were fired
last Thursday from a
speeding car at a Jewish
restaurant across from the
main building of Yeshiva
University in upper Man-
hattan, injuring two stu-
dents who were dining
there, a spokesman for the
university said. The police
said they were searching for
the assailants who were de-
scribed as "four Hispanic
looking men."
According to the university's
spokesman, Sam Hartstein, the
two students who were injured
are Abraham Weintraub, 26, and
Yossef Aaron Zimmerman, 40,
both senior rabbinical students at
Yeshiva. Borth were taken to the
Columbia Presbyterian Hospital
for treatment. Weintraub was re-
leased from the hospital, while
Zimmerman is still hospitalized.
ACCORDING TO Hartstein,
the incident took place at 11:30
a.m. at the Heshie's Restaurant,
a dairy restaurant operated by.
two Hasidic Jews, which serves
students and faculty members of
Yeshiva University. At the time
of the incident there were about
20 students there, Hartstein said.
This was the third incident in
less than three weeks that in-
volved shooting at Jewish
targets near Yeshiva University -
The first was on June 7 when
shots were fired from a speeding
car at the main building of Yes-
hiva University. The second took
place June 9, when shots were
fired at Jewish Memorial Hospi-
tal, which is located near the uni-
versity.
As in this incident the attack-
ers were described in both previ-
ous cases as "four Hispanic-look-
ing men." Hartstein said that a
pattern was now established and
that there is "a possibility that
the attacks were anti-Jewish." al-
though the police could not es-
tablish a clear motive for the
shooting so far.
Officials of Yeshiva University
met with high-ranking police offi-
cers to discuss the incident and
find ways to prevent similar at-
tacks in the future. "The police
are concerned now, a
definite pattern has emerged
after this last shooting," Hart-
stein said.
Letter to the Editor
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I am doing research for a
master's thesis on the history of
several Jewish agricultural com-
munities that existed in Western
Kansas in the early 1880s. I hope
to complete the thesis as soon as
possible.
The communities were in Ford,
Finney, Clark, Comanche,
Hodgeman, Barber, and possibly
Pratt counties, and were called
Beersheba, Montefiore, Lasker,
Gilead, Hebron, Touro, Leeser
and New Jerusalem.
Many of the families in these
communities were assisted by
Jewish families in New York
City, Rochester, St. Louis,
Philadelphia, Cincinnati. Kansas
City and other cities. And when
they left the communities in the
late 1880s many moved to these
cities and to other major cities
throughout the country.
I'm trying to locate the
descendants of these families. I'll
appreciate corresponding with
anyone who might have
memories, photographs, informa-
tion or records of any of the com-
munities or of the persons who
resided in them.
My telephone is 316-688-0065,
and my mailing address is P.O.
Box 8509; Wichita, Ks. 67208.
Thank you very much.
L. DAVID HARRIS
SIW
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION
BOCA AA TON
0EUUV6EACH
FLORIDA
WANTED
NAMES OF NEWCOMERS
Shalom South County Needs Your Help.
Do you know anyone who has recently
moved to South County?
We want to invite
newcomers to a Shalom
South County event.
Please Call The Federation Office.
368-2737
State Dep't.'Denies Base Going Up In Egypt
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State
Department has denied
published reports that the
United States has estab-
lished a contingency air-
base in an unpopulated part
of Egypt with 100 airmen
1 stationed there.
"The United States has no
forces permanently assigned in
Egypt apart from Defense at-
taches and the Office of Military
Cooperation," Department
deputy spokesman Alan Rom-
berg said.
ACCORDING TO the report in
the Washington Post, based on
classified Congressional
testimony by a high ranking
Pentagon official, military
supplies worth about $70 million
are stored at the facility and the
airbase has been used for the
deployment of AW ACS radar
planes and training missions.
The Pentagon official, Deputy
Assistant Secretary of Defense
for Near Eastern and South
Asian Affairs, Maj. Gen. Richard
Secord, reportedly told the House
Appropriations subcommittee
last February that the base "is in
the middle of nowhere" and thus
"is a very good base for secret
operations."
But Rom berg emphasized that
the U.S. "has no base in Egypt."
He referred reporters to a letter
by former Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat dated July, 1981 to
President Reagan which stated
an Egyptian offer of "the tem-
porary use of military facilities in
Ras Binas for the purpose of
assisting any Arab Moslem
countries requesting such assist-
ance to repell armed attacks
affecting its sovereignty, terri-
torial integrity and inde-
pendence."
"IN HIS LETTER, President
Sadat emphasized that the use of
such facilities should not contra-
dict the non-alliance status and
policy of Egypt," Romberg
continued. "The United States
and Egypt cooperate in a number
of ways fully consistent with
Egypt's sovereignty and in
enhancing security in the Middle
East."
Romberg said that E|rvMi.J
full partner in the MiffiV^
peace process and "J'
affirmed ,ts interest,
&m;m ^^y in the
We beUeve that any coonL
undertaken to supporT rt
objective is mutually beneficial
The Department spoht.
said: "The U.S. has %*
permanently assigned to
/ V
Senator Lawton Chiles (D., Fla.) met on June 9 wit.
Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams to discuss tht
plight of Soviet Jewry. The Senator presented a mailbajj of
letters from concerned Floridians and a petition with hundreds
of signatures to Abrams, the Administration official responsible
for human rights issues. The petition and letters, many of them
written by children, were gathered earlier this year at a rally in
Miami, organized by the South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
Chiles told Abrams,"Repression of Jews and other religious
minorities in the Soviet Union is on the rise. At the same tune
emigration has been all but cut off. I'm very concerned about
this. As you can see, thousands of my constituents are, too, and
they want the President to know just how concerned they are."
Abrams expressed admiration for the work of concerned
citizens in the United States on this issue. He noted that the
State Department has received over 100,000 letters on the cue
of Anatoly Shcharansky alone.
Put Yourself In This Picture
JerusalemTemple Mount
Overlooking the Temple mount of the historic old city of Jerusalem (A
UJA Mission to Israel
NEXT MISSION: OCTOBER 9-19
Join the people from South County already committed to thi mission
$1000 per person mission cost.
comvis i. _,. Minimum contribution of
53000 IsJBflygtftst $1500 for s single to the 1964 U JA/Federation
campaign will be required for all participants on the mission.
For information call Helene Eichler at
The South County Jewish Federation
______ at 368-2737


1 Friday, July8'1963
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
The following represented South County Jewish
federation Women's Division at the recent UJA-
Women's Regional Conference held in Palm
Beach. From left to right: Margie Boer, Florida
Regional Campaign Cabinet representative;
Joyce Heisel, director Women's Division; Anita
Shallev. staff consultant; Lois Romanoff, 1984
Women's Division associate campaign chairman;
Margaret Kottler, 1984 Women's Division
campaign chairman; Berenice Schankerman,
Florida Regional Campaign Cabinet representa-
tive. The two-day conference highlighted speak-
ers and workshops for the entire region on many
subjects pertinent to the coming Campaign year.
Swiss Jews Protest Government's
Decision to Host UN Palestine Confab
ByTAMARLEVY
GENEVA (JTA) -
The Federation of Swiss
Jewish Communities has
3rotested vehemently to
'resident Pierre Auber
Dver his government's deci-
sion, albeit reluctant, to
host the United Nations
Conference on Palestine in
lenneva from Aug. 29-
ept. 7.
In a letter to Auber, who is also
foreign Minister, the Jewish
ody said it would strive up to
|je last minute to prevent the
Difference from being held here
ause it is incompatible with
essence of the UN Charter.
ne letter contended that the
Palestine conference will not
jerve the cause of peace but will
nly support those who aspire to
|estrov Israel by all means, in-
%aaooaoopnooa
eluding international terrorism.
AUBER MET with the Minis-
ter of Police to discuss prepara-
tions for the conference. They
said at a press conference later
that 2,000 persons are expected
to attend, including the dele-
gates, the secretariate and the
press. The conference, to be paid
for by the UN, is estimated to
cost $6 million. It was switched
to Geneva after the French gov-
ernment refused to have it in
Paris, the original site, and the
Austrian government ruled out
Vienna.
The main problem cited by the
various governments was
security, particularly the danger
that the gathering could attract
terrorist elements. Strong politi-
cal pressure was brought to bear
by Israel and its friends to deny
the conference any meeting place.
The Swiss were upset and em-
barrassed when the UN asked for
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Geneva but felt finally that they
could not deny a request from the
world organization which main-
tains its European headquarters
here. The Geneva city fathers
have appealed to the Swiss Con-
federation to supply troops to
help maintain security.
THE SWISS press is almost
unanimously opposed to the con-
ference. The Journal D'Oeneve
warned that in view of the
rebellion now going on in the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization,
the city may be turned into a bat-
tlefield. "We in Geneva are ac-
customed to host conferences on
peace, no conferences inciting to
hatred," the paper said in an edi-
torial.
The European regional prepar-
atory meeting for the conference
is scheduled to be held here July
4-8. The conference organizers are
seeking someone of ministerial
rank to preside at this meeting
and turned to Foreign Minister
Erwin Lane of Austria. He
declined however on grounds that
there was insufficient time to
prepare.
The conference is to debate the
origins and evolution of the Pal-
estine problem; the economic
viability of a Palestinian state;
and the reports of the various U N
commissions on Israeli practices
in the occupied territories.
Nobil
Appointed
Continued from Page 1-
develop~ the tie between higher
education in Israel and the
Jewish communities in Palm
Beach and Broward Counties
through support of Tel Aviv Uni-
versity.
Ms. Azoulai, formerly the Ex-
ecutive Director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Wom-
en's Division, is a graduate of the
- Hebrew University of Jerusalem
and .Nova University. After com-
pleting her social work studies in
Israel, she worked for Israel's
Ministry of Labor and Social
Welfare. Azoulai stated that she
is looking forward to working in
the Boca Raton-Delray Beach
area as part of the effort to build
a cohesive and committed Jewish
community.
The offices of the American
Friends of Tel Aviv University
will be located at 2200 N. Federal
Highway. Suite 229. in Boca
Raton. For additional informa-
tion, call 382-9186.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
NEWSLINE
JEWISH SINGLES
21-60
Sunday. July 10 H a.m.
CATERED BRUNCH includes drinks, bagels, iox. nova,
cream cheese, sable, salads, etc., at B'nai Torah Congregation,
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue (corner of Glades Rd.) in Boca Raton.
Donation: $5.50. RSVP A MUST by July 7 at 368-2737!!! Our
Mission's Chairman, Ed Bobick will join us to speak about
Study Trips to Israel with questions and discussion follow-
ing .. .
Monday, July 11 5:30-8:30 p.m.
HAPPY HOUR Upstairs at Wildflower, 555 E. Palmetto
Park Rd., Boca Raton. Hors d'oeuvres, good music and dancing,
cash bar, (Proper attire please). Donation: $3 (gratuities not
included)
Monday, July 18 7 p.m.
PLANNING MEETING McDonald's Brigg Room, 5th
Avenue Shopping Center, Federal Hwy., Next to Boca Twin
Theatre
Wednesday, Jury 20 7:30 p.m.
A PARTICIPATORY EVENING OF SHALOM
ALEICHEM presented by the Jewish Singles at The Aduh
Enrichment Center, 1700 N.W. 2nd Avenue, (between Glades
Rd. and 20th St), Boca Raton. Coffee and cake will be served.
Donation: II RSVP 368-2787 ...
OVER 46
Tuesday, Jury 6 5:30 p.m.
PLANNING MEETING South County Jewish
Federation, 2200 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 206, Boca Raton.
RSVP 368-2737 .
Monday, July 18 5:30-8:30 p.m.
HAPPY HOUR Upstairs at Wildflower, 661 E. Palmetto
Park Road., Boca Raton. Hors d'oeuvres, good music and
dancing, cash bar. Donation: $3 (gratuities not included) .
CAMPMACCABEE
The last two weeks of the first session of Camp Maccabee
have been packed full of fun and exciting activities. Campers
have taken part in trips to the Waterslide, roller skating, Boca
Academy of Gymnastics, Lion Country Safari and the beach.
Camp Maccabee has celebrated Chanukah, Succot and
Simchat Torah and has experienced the holidays "Israeli Style"
with special skits put on during our Shabbat festivities.
The talent show put on by our children was superb. The
campers have accomplished a great deal in swimming, sports
activities they didn't think they could do, music and arts and
crafts. Just ask any nursery child if he can do the "Lap-a-do,"
which fourth, fifth and six graders can hit the bullseye in ar-
chery or which campers can play spongo-polo. This session we
have finally had our first Camp Maccabee overnight for the
fourth-sixth graders which was lota of fun and very successful.
All in all, the first session was terrific.
The second session of Camp Maccabee will include other
exciting trips, and holiday celebrations and a play put on by
campers and counselors. The second session is almost full with
only a few openings left. If anyone is interested in the second
session, please call the Camp Maccabee office at 392-6676
between 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday immediately.
Shalom.
HAROLD COHEN APPOINTED JCC DIRECTOR
See Page 1 lor Detafla
Sharon Sues 'Time' for $25 Million
NEW YORK (JTA) Attorneys for former
Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon have filed a $25
million libel action against Time, Inc. in federal court
here, charging that "false, defamatory and libelous"
material relating to Sharon was published in the February
21,1983 edition of Time magazine.
THE COMPLAINT REFERS to an account in Time
alleging that Sharon visited the family of Lebanese
President-elect Bashir Gemayel in Beirut a day after
Gemayel was assassinated last September to "discuss the
grave need to take revenge against the West Beirut
Palestinians and encouraged the (Christian) Phalangists
to perpetuate bloodshed among them."
Sharon is represented by MOton Gould of Shea and
Gould, a New York law firm.


The Jewish Floridian of South County
Fnd*y.*iufcl

aVSWBl
Barbara Friedman, Morrison Travel of Boca Raton's tour esc
Israeli guide. Mishi. take time out to plan a visit to the Di
Museum in Tel Aviv. Also pictured are Morrison tour group mt
Edis Cherin. Betty Altschuler, and Mania Adoff. The next M,
escorted tour will leave for Israel and Egypt Sept. 18.
Delray Kings Point
for sale by owner
Two bedroom 2 bath Garden View
Upstairs All Appliances
3 fans Dome Ceiling
Many Other Extras
Priced To Sell
498-3791
Over 200 people filled the sanctuary-social hall of
B'nai Torah Congregation to see the hour
presentation of the Friendship Caravan of the
Israeli Scout movement. Nine Israeli Scouts are
traveling the United States to work with Jewish
camps. They spent the day at the JVC Camp
Maccabee working with the over 100 campers.
The evening was spent entertaining the South
County Adult Jewish population.
Mission Itinerary Set for October
Ed Bobick, chairman of the
South County Jewish Federation
Missions Committee announces
that the United Jewish Appeal
has presented a tentative itin-
erary for the Oct. 9-19 Regional
Mission.
The itinerary is as follows:
Sunday, Oct. 9: Leave South
County for Israel.
Monday, Oct. 10: Arrival at
Ben Gurion International Air-
port. Proceed to Modi'in, birth-
place of the Maccabees. Shehec-
heyanu upon entering Jerusalem.
Dinner and Program: Jerusalem.
Overnight: Jerusalem.
Tuesday, Oct. 11: In-depth
briefing on Jewish Agency and
JDC Youth Aliyah Village, speak
with the children and see their
activities. Visit an absorption
Center, meet with newcomers,
share in their experience of
coming to Israel and starting a
new life. Evening Free. Over-
night: Jerusalem.
Wednesday, Oct. 12: Visit
Kfar Saba. See the growth of our
sister city and the progress made
through the efforts of Project Re-
newal. Overnight: And or Beer-
sheba.
Thursday, Oct. IS: Visit
Northern Negev Region adjacent
to Yamit settlement Sde Boker.
See David Ben Gurion's vision of
"Making the Desert Bloom''
come true. This is a new settle-
ment. Many of the residents were
relocated hare from Yamit when
the land was returned to Egypt
as condition of the Peace
Treaty. Visit Ben Gurion Univer-
sity. Visit new Air Base in the
Negev. As a mission participant
you are privileged to meet with
the Israeli Defense Forces and
tour the Base. Meet with soldiers
on a one-to-one basis. Home hos-
pitality at a Kibbutz see first-
hand how residents of s Kibbutz
live and work. Overnight: Jeru-
salem.
Friday, Oct. 14:
walking historical tours of Jeru-
salem. Walk the walls of the "Old
City.'' Share in a Kabbalat Shab-
bat at the wall. Join a joyous
Shabbat dinner with the chief
Cantor of the IDF and hie en-
semble. Overnight: Jerusalem.
Saturday. Oct. 15: Optional
Tours. 1. Visit Masada, see the
Dead Sea: 2. Walking tour of
Jerusalem's Synagogues; 3. Tour
of Jerusalem museums; 4. Hero-
dian old digs, tells and tun-
nels. Dinner with folklore enter-
tainment. Overnight: Jerusalem.
Sunday, Oct. 16: Visit the
Knesset see the Chagall tapes-
tries. Reaffirm your faith in Jew-
ish survival at Yad Vashem. Visit
Herzl's Tomb at the Military
Cemetery and pay tribute to
those who fought for the survival
of modern Israel. Depart Jeru-
salem. Visit the museum of The
Diaspora and Tel Aviv Univer-
sity. Native dinner at Yemenite
Restaurant. Overnight: Tel Aviv.
Monday, Oct. 17: Head North.
Travel along the Jordan Rift.
Lunch in Tiberias eat St. Peter
Fish. Continue travel up the
Golan Heights. Dinner at Israeli
homes in the north and other sur-
prises. Overnight in the North.
Tuesday, Oct. 18: Travel
through the Galilee. Visit new
settlements. Explore city of
Haifa. Visit museum of the
ghetto fighters. Final banquet.
Wednesday, Oct. 19: Depart-
ure.
Bobick reports that the cost of
the mission is $1,000 per person
with a minimum contribution of
$1,500 per person to the 1984
UJA-Federation Campaign. He
indicates that those interested in
this mission should contact
Helene Eichler, at the South
County Jewish Federation at 368-
2737.
At
Richardson Greenshieldsl
every investor
is a preferred client.
OFFERING A COMPLETE RANGE OF
INVESTMENTS SERVICES WITH
SIGNIFICANT COMMISSION SAVINGS
Stocks (New or Secondary Issues) <
Tax Free and Corporate Bonds
Listed Options
Tax Sheltered Investments ,
Treasury Obligations
IRA and KEOGH Plans
GNMA Certificates
Tax Free Unit Trusts
Credit Balances Over $1,0001
Interest At A Rate 2% Bdaw
Brokers Call Rate.
Members New York Stock
Exchange and Major Stock
and Commodity Exchangee
Member SIPC
Boca Raton Office
Peter Ganyard, Manager
855 South Federal Highway
Telephone 392-2002
raise The
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j#>iy*. 1983_
Thd Jewish Fbridtan of South County

$63 Million in Israel Bond Sales Announced
At International Tribute to Sam Rothberg
uore than $63 million in Israel
gales, representing the
productive international
Jt in the 32-year history of the
aid Organization, were an-
Lced at a world dinner of
UuW to Sam Rothberg, general
man of Israel Bonds, held in
York on Sunday evening,
Lne 12, in the Grand Ballroom
k trie Waldorf-Astoria.
I Of the total figure, $36 million
hs in cash and $27 million rep-
esented new commitments to
urchase Israel Bonds, it was an-
ounced by Jack D. Weiler,
Jiairman of the International
tribute Committee. Since Roth-
jerg and fifty other American
Jewish leaders founded the Bond
breanization in 1951, it has pro-
ceed more than $6.2 billion in
Jevelopment funds for every
Lpect of Israel's economy.
I More than 1,100 Jewish leaders
om Israel, Europe, Latin Amer-
a Australia, Canada and the
Qted States joined in honoring
lothberg, who has been in the
brefront of leadership in Ameri-
i Jewry's support of Israel in
he past 40 years. Baron Edmond
de Rothschild of France, Mayor
Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem, Unit-
ed States Senator Frank Lauten-
berg of New Jersey and Israel
Minister of Energy Yitzhak
Moda'i were the principal speak-
ers.
Mayor Kollek presented Roth-
berg with the Jerusalem Medal
created by the late sculptor
Jacques Lipchitz for outstanding
service to Jerusalem. The pres-
entation was in recognition of
Rothberg'8 role in the re-
construction and return of the
Hebrew University to its original
campus on Mt. Scopus in United
Jerusalem after the Sue Day War.
Julian Venezky, a close
associate of Rothberg for 40
years and a fellow Peorian, made
a special presentation to Mrs.
Rothberg on behalf of the Inter-
national Tribute Committee.
Rothberg received messages of
congratulations from President
Reagan and Prime Minister
Menachem Begin.
President Reagan said: "Dear
Sam For more than 40 years,
you have repeatedly demon-
strated vour great regard for the
welfare and well-being of the
Jewish community. Throughout
a dramatic period in Jewish his-
tory, your strong leadership has
placed you in the forefront of ef-
forts to address the numerous
crises that have influenced the
destiny of your people. Whether
helping refugees from the Holo-
caust or furthering the economic
stability of Israel, you have play-
ed an instrumental part in secur-
ing a hopeful future for those de-
pending on you. Your lifelong
dedication to this cause serves as
an inspiring display of devotion
to the finest ideals of humani-
tarian concern for others."
Prime Minister Begins mes-
sage read: "Dear Sam Please
accept my heartfelt congratula-
tions on this festive occasion.
Your devotion to Israel's cause is
exemplary. Your work of 40 years
is exceptional. May you continue
your noble efforts for many,
many years to come. We are
grateful to you and all salute you
in deep gratitude."
In addition, there were many
cables of congratulations from
other Israel Government leaders.
Former Carter Official Sees Possible
Renewal of Black-Jewish Coalition
By RICHARD YAFFE
| London Chronicle Syndicate
Mark A. Siegel, the
jht young man who was
imy Carter's contact
hth the American Jewish
wnmunity, sees the recent
|hicago mayoralty election
a "watershed" in Amer-
in coalition politics and
laps the renewal of the
lition of Jews and
tacks that shaped thecivil
jhts movement for forty
rs and foundered in the
firmative action" and
Third World" storms.
[ Siegel, who worked for the
tun of Harold Washington,
M Black Democrat, against
ernard Epton, the Republican
who happens to be a Jew, himself
warns that it is perhaps "unwise"
to "read too much into any single
election, much less a local one,"
but comes to the conclusion that
there was enough in the Chicago
results "to encourage those of us
who look for a renewal" of the
Black-Jewish coalition.
THE RESULTS showed that
Washington gained the support
of practically all of the city's
Blacks, and 18 percent of its
white voters. He notes that some
commentators found that
Washington's victory was
assured by his strong showing in
the city's "liberal, affluent. Lake
Shore area of the North Side."
A breakdown of the vote
showed that Washington got
only 6 or 7 percent of the Polish
ethnic vote and about 11 percent
of the Irish and Italian ethnic
voters.
Summer
Dinner
Special
Monday thru Saturday
&30-7.O0
your choice of
Chicken Parmigiana
Veal, Peppers, Mushrooms
File Sole MaitreD'
Mussels Posillipo
File Sole Francese
Chicken Cacciatore
$7
All Entrees Include
Minestrone & Garlic Broad
Garden Fresh Salad A Sidtbinguin* Marmara
Rum Cake
Coffee, Tea or Sanka
For Reservations Call
368-8094
Also A La Carte Menu 6:90 to 10 PM
Mon. Thru Sat.
3a Oerrazza Qtisioratde
St Andrews Blvd. Villas* Square Plaaa
Boca Raton
IntkeLawge5:SO-7M
Drink. 2 for 1
for the Selective Traveler
ISRAEL (Egypt optional)
I Join Barbara Friedman
I on har customized tour
Sept. 18-Oct. 6
"The breakthrough occurred in
the Jewish community," Siegel
finds.
"Mayor Washington's own
polls show that he won SO percent
of the Jewish vote, a figure that
becomes startling when we recall
that Bernard Epton, his Republi-
can opponent, is an active
member of Chicago's Jewish
community.
"THIS EVIDENCE is rein-
forced by the fact that the 'white
liberal, affluent Lake Shore area*
that made the critical difference
corresponds to the city's greatest
concentration of Jewish voters.
"There seems little doubt that
a Black-Jewish urban coalition
came together to elect Washing-
ton"
Siegel says he talked with
leaders of the city's Jewish com-
munity about the vote, and he
was told that it came about be-
cause Washington was identified
with the "traditional program
that had kept Jews overwhel-
mingly Democratic" civil
rights, civil liberties, aid to edu-
cation and other social issues.
On the other hand Epton's
racial appeal "Bernie Epton
before it's too late" "offended
the Jewish sensibilities."
"Rather than make Jews feel
'white,' it apparently reminded
them that they, too, are a
minority and that the slogan
could just as well be used against
them," Siegel says.
There may be some wishful
thinking on the part of Siegel and
others so far as a renewal of the
Black-Jewish coalition is con-
cerned. There was nothing during
.he Chicago campaign to indicate
hat any attempt to reestablish it
was taking place, and that the
lection results, and especially
the large Jewish turnout for
Wasington, were not the result of
any coalition planning.
THAT THE Chicago cam-
paign turned out to be a con-
frontation of sorts between the
Jews and the Blacks was not the
fault of the Jews: Epton was not
chosen to carry the Jewish
banner against a Black "take-
over." If that were the goal, a
much stronger candidate would
have been picked by the Jews,
and the fight would have been
concentrated in the Democratic
primary, not in the Republican
Party where Chicago Jews have
played little or no-part in the past
half a century.
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I *- I *A

Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, July 8, 1983
A Rabbi
Comments
The following it brought to Floridian nadirs by the South
County Rabbinical Association. If there or* topics you would
like our Rabbis to discuss, please submit them to the Floridian.
By RABBI RICHARD AGLER
Shavuot is now past. Confirmation, graduation, and com-
mencement have become memories. The High Holy Days are
still some months away and life in the Synagogue has subsided
somewhat from its customary breakneck, year round pace. In a
word, it's summer.
fln most places, and especially in Florida, summertime is
considered the time for relaxing and for unstructured activity,
the time for taking it easy, for taking vacations, or just for
taking off. And in the Synagogue, it shows. Attendance at
services is generally lower than it is during the winter months,
adult education is in recess, the kids are away, and it's too hot to
do anything anyway. It's summer and it's good and bad; good
because the body needs and enjoys the break, bad because the
spirit doesn't, yet often gets it anyway.
Summertime can, and even should, be the most spiritually
refreshing time of the year. It is the time when outside pressures
diminish and as a result, the opportunity for inner growth is
greatest. The Temple is not quite as crowded and even the
rabbi's schedule usually opens up a little. A rabbi I know once
composed the following ditty for the summer synagogue season:
It's summer!
Time to go to shul and pray,
As well as shmooze;
To go and listen.
As well as snooze.
Not exactly Shakespeare, (thankfully he was a far better
preacher than poet) but it nevertheless captures the op-
portunities presented to Jews in the summertime.
It is important not to let the uncrowded Jewish summer
calendar deceive us into thinking that nothing of great im-
portance happens in the Temple during June, July or August,
for such is simply not the case First of all, Shabbat, the most
important of all Jewish holidays, arrives every seventh day,
even in summertime. It comes to us with its unique op-
portunities for prayer, study, rest, joy, family, and special
sanctity every week during the summer, just as it does every
week during the rest of the year.
In addition, Tisha B'av, the Fast of the Ninth of Av, also
arrives during the summer (this year beginning at sundown on
July 18). One of two major fasts on the Jewish calendar the
other of course being Yom Kippur Tisha B'av commemorates
the destruction of the First and Second Temples in Jerusalem,
as well as other major calamities that have befallen the Jewish
' people throughout history on this same ill-starred day. Tisha
B'av is the time for reflection and it is also the time to con-
template the singular course Jewish history has taken in ad-
dition to the role and mission of the Jewish people. This latter
aspect is called to mind when we remember that Tisha B'av will
be, according to tradition, the birthday of the future Messiah.
Following the Ninth of Av, we mark seven Sabbaths of
Consolation which lead, through the month of daily shofar
soundings, Elul, to the New Year: Rosh Hashana. The cycle
begins again and by September, synagogue activity will once
again become fast and furious.
But all that lies ahead. Meanwhile, let's take advantage of the
slowed down pace of summer. To pray. To learn. To do some
mitzvot. To grow. In peace. Shalom.
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Valerie Decker
Named Organist
At Temple Beth El
James B. Baer, president of
Temple Beth El, Cantor Martin
Rosen and Rabbi Merle E. Sin-
ger, are pleased to announce that
Valerie B. Decker has been
named organist for South Coun-
ty's premier Reform congrega-
tion, succeeding Gertrude Bag-
don.
Mrs. Decker received her edu-
cation at the Guilmant Organ
School in New York City and the
Westminster Choir Collage in
Princeton, N.J. She took her
Master Class with Virgil Fox.
While at the choir collage, Mrs.
Decker presented a recital at the
Princeton Theological Seminary.
Prior to moving to Boca Raton,
she served as organist and choir
director for the Waldwick Metho-
dist Church in Waldwick, N.J.
Since her arrival, she has served
as organist and choir director at
University Baptist Church in
Boca and the North Pompano
Baptist Church. Additionally,
Mrs. Decker does private piano
instruction.
According to Cantor Rosen,
"Valerie comes to Temple Beth
El with a wide range of skills and
talents. In addition to serving as
organist, Valerie will work closely
with our long-time soloist, Elaine
Roberts, and will conduct the
High Holy Day Choir for our
services at Florida Atlantic Uni-
versity. Also, she will serve as
choir director for our growing ju-
nior choir."
During the month of July,
while Cantor Rosen is on summer
vacation, Mrs. Roberts will serve
as cantorial soloist, accompanied
by Mrs. Decker. Cantor Rosen
will return to the pulpit on Friday
night, Aug. 5.
Widow Wins
Hill Seat
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Sala Galant Burton, the widow of
Rep. Philip Burton, won Tuesday
the Congressional seat in San
Francisco left vacant by the
death of her husband last April.
Mrs. Burton was born to a
Jewish family in Poland and
came to the United States with
her family in 1939.
The 57-year-old Mrs. Burton
will bring the number of Jews in
the House to 31. She will increase
the number of Jewish women in
the House to three, aU from Cali-
fornia. The others are her fellow
San Francisco Democrat, Bar-
bara Boxer and Bobbi Fiedler, a
Republican from the Los Angeles
area. There are eight Jews in the
Senate.
Mrs. Burton received 55 per-
cent of the vote, nearly twice that
of her nearest opponent, Duncan
Howard, a Republican, who re-
ceived 22.4 percent of the votes.
There were nine other candidates
in the campaign.
Army Embarrassed
BONN (JTA) The West
German army is embarrassed
that former SS members partic-
ipated in a shooting tournament
organized by the army in Frei-
burg last month and promised
that it would not happen again. A
Bundeswehr spokesman called
the incident a "mishap."
Israelis Visited
GENEVA (JTA) The
International Committee of the
Red Cross in Geneva said here
that their delegates in Syria has
visited the three Israeli POWs
held bv the Syrians.
B'nai Torah High Holy Day Services
The Board of Directors of B'nai
Torah Congregation has an-
nounced that High Holy Day
Services will be held at Temple
Beth El facilities in Boca Raton.
The use of Temple Beth El facili-
ties will enable B'nai Torah Con-
gregation to conduct one service
for these Days of Awe.
Sufficient seating will be avail-
able for the membership, guests
and non-members who wish to
worship with us.
Services will be conducted by
Rabbi Theodore Feldman and
Cantor Donald Roberts. The
schedule is as follows:
Erev Rosh Haahonah, Sept. 7,
8:15 p.m.; Rosh Hashonah, Sept.
8, 9 a.m.; Rosh Hashonah, Sept.
8, 7:15 p.m.; 2nd Day Rosh
Hashonah, Sept. 9, 9 a.m.; Kol
Nidre, Sept 16, 7:15 p.m.; and
Yom Kippur, Sept. 17,9:30 a.m.
For further information on
seating and tickets, please call
the Synagogue office at 392-8566.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat
Service 2nd Friday of each month. Minyan on Monday and
Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road, 1 block south of Linton Blvd. Delray Beach,
FL 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Services daily 8
a.m. and 9 a.m., Saturday. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at First Federal Savings & Loan Associa-
tion Offices, West Atlantic, corner Carter road, Delray Beach.
Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m. and
Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President, 6707 Moonlit Drive,
Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Phone-499-6687. Rabbi Emeritus
Jonah J.Kahn, 499-4182.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at 8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
Month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 340015, Boca Raton, Fla. 33434.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Daily Services
8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m., Sunday 9 a.m. Reuben
Saltzman, President, Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-5557.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Conserva-
tive. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A. Silver, Rabbi; Seymour
Zisook, Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at
8:45 a.m., Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Cason United Methodist Church, 342 N. Swinton Ave. (corner
Lake Ida Rd.), Delray Beach, Fl. Reform. Mailing Address: P.O.
Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi
Samuel Silver, President Bernard Etish, 276-6161.
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Lly8,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
li
mar, Lubavitcher Wage War in Brooklyn
JENOALLOB
fORK (JTA) -
priding and deep-
lifferences between
largest Hasidic
.ents, the
kcher and the
[reached a peak in
Leeks with the cut-
M the beards of two
tch rabbis and
ch accusations that
Hasidim were re-
|Mendel Wechter, 36,
iced here on his way to
sgue by several men
him into a van and cut
Wechter, a resident
aro Park section of
vas pushed out of the
ing a fractured left
ck lacerations.
WAS taken to
hospital, where he
J and his condition re-
atisfactory. Police said
hot know who was re-
but Rabbi Yehuda
a Lubavitch spokes-
man, asserted the attack was
committed by Satmar Hasidim.
He said that Satmar Hasidim
also were responsible for the first
beard-cutting act on May 27,
against Rabbi Pinches Korf, who
was reportedly tanking the son
of a Satmar Hasid in a store in
the Williamsburg section of
Brooklyn, the major center of the
Satmar movement. Five or six
young men burst into the store
and pinned Korf to the floor
before cutting off his beard.
In the only arrest in the two
incidents to date, police arrested
Yakov Kohn, 28, a resident of
Williamsburg. He was indicted
on three counts in the attack on
Korf, and faces trial in Brooklyn
court on June 29.
KRINSKY TOLD the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that Kohn is
an assistant administrator in the
Satmar office in Williamsburg.
Rabbi Krinsky reiterated his
statement that the attackers in
both incidents were Satmar
Hasidim and contended that
leaders of the Satmar movement
knew about the attacks but chose
not to act.
He was asked for comment on
Community Calendar
b's American ORT-Region, 10 a.m. Regional Board
[Beth El-Single Parents, 7 p.m. meeting.
3
I's American ORT-Region, Executive Committee Meeting
11
Bern El-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting Temple
single Parents, 7 p.m. meeting.
|25
|Beth El, 6 p.m. Board meeting.
30
JethEl UAHC Workshop 7:30 p.m.
131
.ouncil Jewish Women-Boca Delray, B p.m. Board
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AMOttrTTYOEPOSITJAULTS
a JTA report from Jerusalem
that the Satmar Rebbe, Moishe
Teitelbaum, condemned the
attack on Rabbi Wechter "by
four Satmar Hasidim." Accord-
ing to the JTA report, Teitel-
baum, making his first visit to
Israel as the Satmar Rebbe, sent
his son as the head of a Satmar
delegation to the United States
with instructions "to find the at-
tackers and oust them from the
Satmar community."
In response, Krinsky cited the
comment of a young man who
identified himself as a Satmar
Haaid and as a "friend of Rabbi
Wechter," who visited Wechter
in the hospital. Krinsky quoted
the hospital visitor, who asked
that his name not be used, as
saying that the Satmar leaders
"condemn it but that they don't
do anything about it. They know
who these people are but by
doing nothing, they encourage
it."
IN RESPONSE to the attack
on Korf, the Lubavitch judicial
council called for a boycott of
foods certified as kosher by the
Central Rabbinical Congress, a
Satmar agency which certifies as
Kosher a wide range of foods.
Clashes between the two
groups, based on deep-seated dif-
ferences on religious philosophy,
have been frequent. Satmar
spokesmen have complained, in
connection with the two attacks
on Lubavitch rabbis, that the
Lubavitch are trying to
proselytize Satmar youth.
Krinsky ridiculed the claim of
alleged proselytizing, declaring
that this "rationale" for Satmar
hostility was "baseless."
He asserted that Lubavitch "is
not at war with anyone. It is not
feuding with anyone. It has no
rivals. It is not competing with
anyone. In the recent incidents, it
has been a case of a villain and a
victim." He said the situation is
"not a two-way street but a one-
way street of violence and terror-
ism that was completely un-
provoked and senseless."
ASSERTING THAT "the
Satmar record of terrorism goes
back more than 50 years," he said
Obituary
he felt "the lurking danger."
Krinsky said he did not con-
sider the situation aa "a Luba-
vitcher problem but one that
should enrage and involve the
entire Jewish community."
Mae Volen
Mrs. Benjamin Volen, 79, of
1180 South Ocean Blvd., Boca
Raton, passed away on Thurs-
day, June 16.
Mrs. Volen and her husband,
14-year residents of Boca
Raton, have been involved in nu-
merous charitable organisations.
Among them are Temple Beth El
of Boca Raton, South County
Jewish Federation, South County
Neighborhood Center, Brandeis
University, and the Boca Raton
Community Hospital.
According to James B. Baer,
president of Temple Beth El and
put president of the Federation,
"It is through the generosity of
people like Mae and Ben Volen
that we in South County are able
to offer services to people of all
ages and in all walks of life. The
community has been blessed by
Mae Volen and she will be sorely
missed by all who knew her."
Mrs. Volen is survived by her
husband, Ben, and a niece and
nephew.
Memorial services were held
for Mrs. Volen on Monday, June
20, at Temple Beth El.
BETH ISRAEL
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Temple Sinai
Ot Palm Beach County
Member U.A.H.C. (Reform)
Invites you to attend our
Sabbath Eve Services
Held Each Friday Evening, 8:15 p.m.. at
Cason United Methodist Church
Corner of Swinton Ave. and N.E. 4th St. (Lake Ida Rd.)
Rabbi Samuel Silver, officiating
For Membership Information Call:
Sid Pearce Samuel Rothstein Sid Bernstein
4981098 President 732 5807
1983 1984 Registration for
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL, and MEMBERSHIP
for the Fall term. Now!
bpecial KULANU Young Family Group
M /.
99 Rev. r 499-04QJ
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High Holy, Day Services
Limited Tickets Available
Jerry Gilbert
499-5f>63
Sid Pearce Sid Bernstein
498-1098 7J2-5801
New Temple Building Early 1984 Occupancy
bite .'475 W.Atlantic Ave. Delray





n--~. in
mmt
Pom in _
The Jewish Fhridia* of South County
Frida
> Julys,
W "j." w". 0 J j neon av. p ogame by FTC
Kw Ve flKtf wtftef It takes.
Share the spirit.
Share the refreshment.