The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00109

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
^Jewisti Floridiairi
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Defray Beach and Highland Beach
Volume 5 Number 8
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, February 25, 1983
Price 35 Cents
U.S. 'warming' to Israel with Arens as Defense Minister
Following Moshe Arens acceptance last week of
I'rime Minister Menachem Begins invitation to be-
come Israel's Minister of Defense succeeding Ariel
Sharon who officially resigned in the wake of the mas-
sacre inquiry recommendations, U.S. Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger invited Arens, Israel's Ambassador
lo U.S., to a meeting in his office. Arens had been seek-
ing such a meeting with Weinberger ever since (some
three weeks ago) confrontation between a Marine and
Israeli forces near Beirut that had caused headlines
worldwide.
The Pentagon, in a statement following the Arens-
Weinberger meeting, described it as "cordial" and
"agreed that Israeh-American friendship was impor-
tant to both countries." Weinberger "expressed re-
sets" that Arens will be leaving Washington after
serving a year as ambassador.
Meanwhile, without the presence of Sharon at last
week's Lebanon-Israel talks on withdrawal of foreign
troops, the negotiations moved along at a better pace, it
was reported, although Sharon remains as a member of
Begin's Cabinet as "minister without portfolio."
Begin's Coalition last week beat back three "no-
confidence" votes in the Knesset.
And in Algiers, in the opening sessions of the Pales-
tine National Council, the presumed parliament in exile
for the Palestinian Liberation Organization's multi-
faceted groups of terrorists, Yasser Arafat made his
usual denouncements of Israel publicly but privately, it
was reported, was trying to seek an accomodation with
Jordan's King Hussein. Reports increased that Syria's
President Assad, whose forces are being strengthened
with the arrival of more Russian-made weaponry and
Russians to operate that war material, is opposing any
such movement. Also opposed are other factions.
In the wake of Israel's Knesset, the parliament, giv-
ing approval to the massacre report, more favorable re-
ports were appearing in the news media about the
handling of the inquiry. Newsweek, last week, head-
lined one report "And the gunmen go free," noting that
"the Christian gunmen who actually carried out the
slaughter continued to go free." And widely-respected
columnist Meg Greenfield wrote "the Israeli society is
at once stronger and more secure as a consequence of its
refusal to walk away from the implications of the kill-
ings in the Sabra and Shatilla camps."
Hebrew University Greater Boca Raton Chapter Installs
Paskin As President and Other New Officers At Mar. 12 Ball
Roberta Meyerson
Karen Weiss
Keynoters Luncheon
Chairmen Appointed
Margie Baer, South County
Jewish Federation Campaign
Chairman, Women's Division,
announced Roberta Meyerson
and Karen Weiss as co-chairmen
of the Keynoters Division for the
!'.ih:i UJA-Federation Campaign.
The luncheon will be held
Wednesday, March 16, at the
beautiful home of Shirley and
Mvin Cohen in the Sanctuary,
Boca Raton.
This year the keynoters have
combined forces with the
I'ioneers to form one strong unit.
Mrs. Meyerson came to South
County from New York in 1981
where she attended Cornell
University and graduated with a
law degree from Brooklyn Law
School. She practiced as a cor-
porate tax attorney until the
birth of her son three years ago.
In addition to her Keynoter
position, Roberta is on the South
County Jewish Federation Career
Women's Committee. She is a
board member and Bulletin-
Editor for Boca National Council
of Jewish Women; member of
Hadassah, and ORT. Roberta is
married to Dr. William
Meyerson.
Karen Weiss came to South
County from New York two years
ago where her family was actively
involved in UJA for many years.
Her father has been honored
numerous times for his
dedication. Karen is a member of
National Council of Jewish
Women and served on the
Pioneer Women's Division Com-
mittee last year.
Karen is married to attorney
Howard Weiss and has one child.
She has had an extensive profes-
sional music career, appearing
across the country in various
operas.
"We are fortunate to have two
such talented and committed
women working on the 1983 cam-
paign," said Margie Baer.
Merwin K. Grosberg, Presi-
dent of the Greater Boca Raton-
Delray Beach Chapter of the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University, announces the March
12 installation of Bernard S.
Paskin as President of the chap-
ter at the Greater Boca Raton-
Delray Beach Gala Founders Ball
at the Boca Pointe Country Club.
Bernard S. Paskin, former
president of the District of
Columbia Hebrew Beneficial
Association, is a member of
Technion, a member of the
Century Club of B'nai B'rith,
Treasurer of Temple Beth El,
member of the Mason Scottish
Rite and the Shriners, and the
past Treasurer of the Greater
Boca Raton Chapter of the
American Friends of the Hebrew
University.
He is a member of the Ameri-
can Institute of CPA's, a former
college professor of accountancy
of the Southeast University of
Washington, D.C. and a member
of its Honor Society. He formerly
was president of a number of
private corporations and is on the
Board of Presidential Realty
Corporation which is on the
American Stock Exchange.
Serving with Paskin will be
Sidney Hildebrand, Executive
Vice President; Vice Presidents:
Max Alperin, Samuel Blair,
Henry Brenner, Joseph Z. Feller,
Martin B. Grossman, Dr. Goldie
R. Kabocfc mmI A4JH !*.
Honorary Vice Presidents:
Samuel Melton, Abraham
Continued on Page 8
Bernard S. Paskin
Trudeau Vows Plea to Andropov
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
Prime Minister Pierre Elliott
Trudeau met in Ottawa with
A vital Sharansky, wife of
Prisoner of Conscience Anatoly
Sharansky, and promised her he
will intervene with Yuri Andro-
pov. Soviet Communist Party
leader, for the release of her
husband on humanitarian
grounds.
Mrs. Sharansky later told a
press conference that she was
going to Paris to meet with
Georges Marchais, leader of the
French Communist Party, and
give him her personal letter
addressed to Andropov, ap-
pealing for her husband's release
from Christopol prison where he
has been on a hunger strike since
Sept. 26.
Marchais, who was scheduled
to meet Andropov in Moscow last
week, released a letter from the
Soviet Communist leader stating
that Sharansky had ended his
hunger strike.
During her visit to New York,
before arriving in Ottawa, Mrs.
Sharansky said that she had no
independent confirmation that
her husband had ended his
hunger strike. Prof. Irwin Cotler,
president of the Canadian Jewish
Congress, who has been Mrs.
Sharansky's defense counsel
since her husband was arrested
more than five years ago, told the
press conference that "despite
affirmations to the contrary,
Sharansky continues his hunger
strike and is deprived of any
contact with his mother."
Cotter also appealed in a letter
to Andropov for Sharansky's
release from prison "on humanit-
arian grounds. He has endured
the ravages of a hunger strike,
the pain of forced feeding and
deprivation of any human
contact with his family. His
continued confinement serves
neither the cause of human rights
nor the cause of Communism
with a human face."
fax Credits for Tuition?
Orthodox Jews Struggle With Foes
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Orthodox supporters and
non-Orthodox foes of gov-
ernment aid to private
schools, specifically Jewish
day schools, have squared
off again in a renewal of
their long-running legal
fight over the constitution-
ality of such aid. The forum
for the latest clash again is
the United States Supreme
Court.
At issue is a Minnesota state
law which permits parents of
pupils of elementary and secon-
dary schools, both public and pri-
vate, to claim as a deduction on
their state income tax forms up
to $700 per year of the cost of tui-
tion and other educational serv-
ices for their children.
MINNESOTA parents of stu-
dents attending schools in Min-
nesota, North and South Dakota,
Iowa and Wisconsin may deduct
up to $500 for each dependent in
grades kindergarten to six, and
up to 1700 for each pupil in
grades seven to 12 for tuition,
textbooks and transportation
costs. Such parents may also
deduct from their state taxes
outlays for summer school, driver
education and tutoring.The taw
was passed in 1965.
The opposing sides have pre-
pared friend of the court briefs.
The Jewish Telegraphic Agency
was told that, barring any ab-
stentions from participation by
any of the nine judges, a defini-
tive ruling is certain and that it
will be the first Supreme Court
ruling on the constitutionality of
any taw which provides tax de-
ductions for outlays by parents of
children attending private
schools.
The Minnesota case is at pre-
sent before the Supreme Court
after first rulings in district
courts in St. Paul, Minnesota and
a hearing in the Court of Appeals
for the Eighth Circuit, sitting in
St. Louis. The three courts up-
held the constitutionality of the
Minnesota law.
IN THE FIRST of the initial
lower court tests, which dealt
with Minnesota Civil Liberties
Union v. Roemer, a three-judge
federal district court decided
on June 19, 1978 that the Minne-
sota taw was constitutional.
Before 1976, any plaintiff raising
a constitutional issue had the
right to ask for a three-judge
federal district court, an arrange-
ment which made it possible to
take such a case directly to the
Supreme Court without having to
bring the issue to a federal ap-
peals court. The suit was filed be-
fore 1976.
However, the JTA was in-
formed, the three-judge ruling
was not appealed to the Supreme
Court by the plaintiffs because
Continued on Page 11



Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. February 26,1983 I =
Genetic Engineering
'Preventive Medicine' Against Criminal Tendencies
By DONALD CLAYTON
Imagine how convenient
it would be if society could
use genes as tea leaves and
environment as an oracle to
forecast future criminality
in children before their anti-
social behavior ever sur-
faces. In effect, we could
then practice "preventive
medicine" to cure criminal
tendencies before they do
harm.
criminal behavior shot up to 40
percent."
That 40-percent figure is a
source of hope rather than dis-
couragement for Cloninger. As
director of psychiatric out-
patient services at the Jewish
Hospital of St. Louis, he is inter-
ested in applying his research to
reduce the frequency of criminal
and anti-social behavior.
A professor of psychiatry and
genetics at Washington
University School of Medicine in
St. Louis is able to make such
predictions with unprecedented
accuracy.
AFTER COMBINING de-
tailed Swedish adoption and
medical records in search of
certain high-risk environmental
and genetic factors, Dr. C. Robert
Cloninger discovered that he was
able to predict with chilling ac-
curacy whether or not a child
would exhibit criminal behavior
in adolescent or adult years. In
men, for example, his predictions
were correct more than 90 percent
of the time.
"The genetic factor is present
and it exerts a powerful in-
fluence." says Cloninger. "Envir-
onmental factors alone don't
exert a strong influence except in
cases involving genetically high-
risk children."
Cloninger's data, published in
6 recent issue of "Archives of
eneral Psychiatry,r' bear him
out. Children with neither genetic
nor environmental factors have a
"background" risk for criminal-
ity of about 3 percent. Strong en-
vironmental predisposition raises
the risk to only 7 percent, but the
presence of strong genetic influ-
ences raises the risk even higher
all the way up to 12 percent in
males.
"THE HIGHEST risk by far
exists in those young people who
are unfortunate enough to be pre-
disposed both genetically and en-
vironmentally." says Cloninger.
"For males with a high risk in
both categories, the frequency of
"The study shows that if we
can eliminate the environmental
factors, the risk of criminality
will drop to 12 percent or less in
men even lower than that in
women because of their
resistance to genetic predisposi-
tion," he explains.
ANOTHER AREA of activity
which should flourish in the light
of such evidence is the pursuit of
biological or physiological causes
of criminality. "Strong evidence
that genetic factors are impor-
tant in criminal behavior may
mean that many cases of crimi-
nality are actually a disease with
important physiological
aspects," says Cloninger. "Many
scientists are already searching
for genetically determined
biological defects which can
cause criminal behavior."
These relationship between
genetics and environment
became evident to Cloninger
during his study of criminal and
anti-social behavior in 862 men
and 913 women bom 30 to 50
years ago in Sweden.
When it comes to the likelihood
of becoming a criminal, there is
no equality of the sexes. Clonin-
ger's studies show not only that
the tendency to become a petty
criminal is inherited from one's
parents, but also that women are
more resistant than men to the
effects of genes that lead to crim-
inality.
"GIVEN THE same genetic
load," women will become crimi-
nals less frequently than men
will." says Cloninger.
Men are three times some sen-
sitive than women to the effects
of those genes which predispose
to criminality, according to the
study. Cloninger says that "16
percent of the males with crimi-
nal parents grow up to be crimi-
nals while only 5 percent of
women with the same genetic
background will eventually
become criminals."
When Cloninger began to
search for those environmental
factors that bore an influence on
criminal behavior, he found that
they, too, varied between males
and females.
"Foremost is the fact that
severe violent antisocial
behavior is much more common
in men. It's almost never noted in
women," says Cloninger. "We
think that is because most
violent crimes are associated with
a certain type of alcoholism that
appears almost exclusively in
men. We would expect to curb
much violent crime if we attended
to the control of the alcoholism
that is associated with it. In
many families, violence is the
direct result of environmental
factors linked to severe alcoho'
addiction." '
IN THE case of petty crimi-
nality, which occurs in the indivi-
duals who are nervous and im-
pulsive rather than cold and cal-
lous, the important environment-
al factors for men prove to be
social status and home stability-
According to Cloninger, if a boy
grows up in a home with low so-
cial status and has a father who is
Christians Urge Solidarity
With Israel's Cause
I
March 20
On the phones with
09
?
Moises Cases
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Nearly 500 Jews and Christians
expressed solidarity with the
State of Israel at a National
Prayer Breakfast in Honor of Is-
rael.
The Bible says that "Those
who love Israel will be blessed,"
Rep. Mark Siljander (R., Mich.I
declared. This theme was echoed
by Doug Krieger, of the Ameri-
can Forum for Jewish-Christian
Cooperation, and E. E. McAteer,
president of the Religious Round
Table, the two groups sponsoring
the prayer breakfast-
The breakfast was held for the
second consecutive year in con-
junction with the annual conven-
tion of the National Religious
Broadcasters at the Shoreham
Hotel. Rabbi David Ben Ami. of
the American Forum, noted that
those present represented not
only secular organizations but
Reform, Conservative, Orthodox
and Hasidic groups. He said that
such a mixture was not likely to
be found even at a Jewish gather-
ing.
BENJAMIN Abileah, the Is-
rael Consul General in Washing-
ton, said the breakfast, which
was held under the words from 1
Samuel 17:29 "is there not a
cause?" was "enough to give any
Israeli a boost these days."
Morton Black well, represent-
ing the White House, said the
Reagan Administration is com-
mitted "to an Israel that is secure
and free." Krieger had told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
earlier that the purpose of the
breakfast wrs to demonstrate to
the Administration that there is
great support for Israel among
many Americans.
The Rev. Jerry Falwell, head of
the Moral Majority, took note of
this in his remarks. He urged
Christians to "stamp out anti-
Semitism" and to publicly sup-
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port Israel not only in places like
New York City "but every place
you go, where there is not a Jew
in the audience or in the town."
DR. BEN ARMSTRONG.
executive director of the National
Religious Broadcasters, said his
group has some 1,000 members
whose radio and television
programs reach the "grass roots"
in support of Israel.
Falwell urged Christians to
take the lead in support not only
of the survival of Israel but also
that it may prosper. "Israel is the
only friend we have in the Middle
East and friends should stand to-
gether," he said.
He supported both Premier
Menachem Begin and Israel, not-
ing that Begin has stood fast
against almost all world leaders
because he, like many Israelis,
has gone through the "hell of the
Holocaust" and is determined
that "my children and my chil-
dren's children will never go
through what I had to."
Falwell said that to ask Israel
to give up the West Bank is like
asking the U.S. to give up all its
land between the Blue Ridge
Mountains and the Rockies to a
country that wants to destroy it.
He said Israel's operation in
Lebanon should have been
"cheered" by all free countries
since it was not an "invasion"
but a "liberation of Lebanon."
Falwell stressed that he con-
sidered the Palestinians "a peo-
ple in need" but does not consider
the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization as their representa-
tives but only as "terrorists."
unskilled, low paid and lacking
good management talents, the
young man's chances of becom-
ing a petty crook are increased.
That risk is also increased in
males if the lifestyle includes
many changes in the home site
such as when the family and
household are frequently
relocated, or when children are
moved from one foster home to
another while awaiting placement
in a permanent home.
"In women these environment-
al factors weren't nearly as influ-
ential," says Cloninger.
His study indicates that pro-
longed institutional care and
urban rearing increases the risk
of petty criminality in women.
CLONINGER NOTES that
those agencies involved in adop-
tion services would do well to
watch his research and the re-
search of others in his field.
"Guidance in adoption practices
and in the way our courts place
abandoned children or the chil-
dren of imprisoned petty crimi-
nals would seem to be sound uses
of this research. It is important
to remember that even a child
with a relatively high genetic risk
will show no criminality if placed
in a home environment that gives
him or her the greatest advan-
tage.
"That's not to say that in-
come level should be the highest
priority. The parents' discipline
patterns and management
talents may be more important
for young men. Rapid relocation
from an institutional environ-
ment to a family setting may be
more important than household
income when trying to find
adoptive or foster homes for
girls."
Cloninger continues: "Every-
body has the opportunity to in-
fluence the risk of criminality in
their own children. Parents who
know their child has a higher
thun average risk due to factors
I've mentioned should get coun-
seling and advice on how to
hucontp effective parents. It could
make a difference."
COMMENTING on the ways
in which Cloninger's research has
changed our understanding of the
relationships between
procreation and habitation in de-
termining criminality, the
respected English medical
journal. "Lancet" said: It is now
clear that genes do not confer a
certainty of criminal behavior
and probably play little or no
part in predetermining the career
of the master criminal. (But) we
have to conclude that genetic in-
fluences are probably among
those factors which confer a
liability to the more common or
garden variety transgressions of
the law."
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Friday, February 25,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
Tall Man Was in the Crowd
And Then Came the Powerful Explosion
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Police intensified their in-
vestigation this weekend of
the grenade attack on a
group of Peace Now
I demonstrators opposite the
Prime Minister's office last
Thursday night while the
Cabinet was meeting to
accept the full report and
recommendations of the
commission of inquiry into
the Beirut massacre. One
'man was killed and nine
"others injured.
The man killed in the attack,
[which reports said was well pian-
ino I and coordinated by an un-
known group, was identified as
lEmil Grunzweig, a 33-year-old
(immigrant from Czechoslovakia
and mathematics teacher at the
Van Leer Institute in Jerusalem.
Thousands attended his funeral
Friday.
FIVE OTHERS were hospital
|/ed. including Avraham Burg,
cnn of Interior Minister Yosef
|Hurg, a leading Peace Now ac-
tivist. One demonstrator, Yehos-
Ihua Shkedi, a 26-year-old stu-
Jdent. was seriously wounded and
ipcrated on for eight hours by
[doctors at the Hadassah Medical
[Center. He was reported in stable
Vnndition. Three others remained
[hospitalized with minor injuries.
Meanwhile, police last weekend
Attempted to piece together the
Jvints leading to the attack.
l\uthorities found the safety
patch of the Israeli-made grenade
and the cardboard wrapping in
which it was stored. The grenade
lu as hidden in a hollow electricity
i< which was lying in the area
t he demonstrators.
The remains of the grenade
|*ere found on a hill across the
|areet from the Premier's office,
ime 'lOO meters northeast of the
building. The hill served the pro-
government demonstrators
[whereas the Peace Now group
demonstrated at the foot of the
li'll closer to the street. Accord-
ing to eye-witnesses, a shout was
heard "Now." and then the ex-
plosion followed.
THIS IS one of the indications
which have led police to the as-
sumption that the attack was not
a one-man initiative, but rather
the work of several people. A spe-
cial investigation team has been
established and is now trying to
locate an unidentified man who
was threatening the demon-
strators and others who did like-
wise.
According to one witness to
the attack, a tall unidentified
man followed the Peace Now de-
monstrators on their way from
downtown Jerusalem to the Pre-
mier's office, threatening the
demonstrators that this was
"their last day."
Police also interrogated Rabbi
Meir Kahane, leader of the ultra-
nationalist Kach movement, and
said he was asked to supply the
names of his followers who par-
ticipated in the pro-government
demonstration. Kahane denied
any responsibility for the attack,
condemned such "crimes," but
said that the Peace Now move-
ment and other leftist move-
ments should be fought because
they stab the nation "in the heart
and in the back."
LABOR ALIGNMENT MK
Yair Tzaban meanwhile demand-
ed that Interior Minister Burg
order an investigation of the con-
duct of the police during the fatal
Peace Now demonstration. He
argued that evidence pointed to
the fact that police may not have
done enough to protect the
demonstrators. Tzaban accused
the police of acting leniently to-
ward the antagonistic bystanders
who threatened the demon-
strators.
At Grunzweig's funeral Fri-
day, angry shouts erupted from
the crowd when Ashkenazic Chief
U.S. Leaders React to Findings
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK- (JTA)-
Leading officials of Ameri-
cans Jewish organizations
said that the findings of Is-
rael's commission of in-
quiry into the massacre of
Palestinians in the Sabra
and Shatila refugee camps
in Beirut last September is
representative of the
vitality of Israel's demo-
cratic process.
At the same time, two of the
officials urged full implementa-
tion of the commission findings
which include a call for the resig-
nation of Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon or the Defense Minister's
dismissal by Premier Menachem
Begin.
CALLING THE commis
don's report a "striking example
of Israel's democracy at work"
which "stands in vivid contrast
to the thunderous silence out of
Beirut," Julius Berman. chair-
man of the Conference of Presi-
dents of Major American Jewish
Organizations, declared: "As
painful as this experience was,
Israel had emerged stronger for
it.*' He said he believed Sharon
will offer his resignation "out of a
sense of patriotism" as called for
in the report.
Gerald Kraft, president of the
B'nai B'rith International, said
the "free operation" of the com-
mission "is indicative of the
strength of democracy in the
Jewish State."' He added: "The
anguish of the Israeli people in
this tragedy reaffirms the high
moral character and humanitar-
ianism of the nation."
Maynard Wishner, president of
the American Jewish Committee,
said, "There are few countries in
the world that would freely un-
dertake so painful and far reach-
ing an inquiry into the conduct of
its highest elected officials and
its defense establishment."
NATHAN PERLMUTTER,
national director of the Anti-Def-
amation League of B'nai B'rith,
said the commission's investigat-
ing "procedure is a remarkable
testimonial to a vibrant demo-
cracy. Letting, the chips fall
where they may is a bold confir-
mation of this young demo-
cracy's vitality."
The findings of the commission
"brings to a culmination a
process- that does only honor to
Israel." Rabbi Alexander Schin-
dler. president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congregation
said. "Very few nations in the
world would have had the
courage and the freedom to go
through so relentless a self
searching.*' He said he was
"confident" the recommenda-
tions of the commission would be
accepted by the Israeli govern-
Israel's Second Test Tube Baby
Born to Childless Mom of Decade
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's second test-tube baby
vas born by Caesarian section in the Sheba government
lospital at Tel Hashomer. The boy's mother, Miriam
Kleiner, 35, had been childless throughout the 10 years of
">er marriage. The operation was carried out by local
mesthetic, with the mother fully alert throughout.
Medical sources said that very few of the 100 babies
L"i n through ex-uterine fertilization had been males. Of
the total number of test tube babies to date, 59 have been
horn in Britain, 34 in Australia, 11 in the U.S., and 3 in
I'ranee.
The Israel government has licensed two hospitals Tel
lashomer and the Hadassah Hospital in Jerusalem to
carry out ex-uterine fertilization treatment.
CAMP
1MACCABEE
4
is looking for ;
J
I Sensitive and caring counselors and Junior;
| Counselors interested in working with;
) emtdren In a Jewish Day Camp setting.j
e Please call South County Jewish Federation,
: at 368-2737 for an application and interview.<

"'iiiuimnjjjijnjjuiiinnnnmMiuii
ment.
Ivan Novick, president of the
Zionist Organization of America,
called on journalists and Reagan
Administration officials to
"admit that while Israel may
have committed the fault of om-
mission, it was not commission.
The tragic events of Shatila and
Sabra still fall squarely on the
Lebanese themselves. Israel did
not plan it. did not do it, and did
not want such a catastrophe to
occur."
BERNICE Tannenbaum. act-
ing chairman of the World Zion-
ist Organization American
Section, said the genesis and con-
clusion of the inquiry panel is
symptomatic of "moral decency,
self examination and forthright
devotion to democratic principles
which demonstrate to America
the worthiness of its only demo-
cratic ally in the Mideast."
Half-Million Bequest
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The late Arthur Rubinstein left
half a million dollars in his will
for the heautiflcatfon of Jerusa-
lem, the Jerusalem Post reported
Monday. The paper cited
municipal sources. The report
said that Rubinstein, who died
Dec. 20 at the age of 95, left the
bequest to the Jerusalem Foun-
dation, the fundraising-for-Jeru-
salem organization which is
closely associated with Mayor
Teddy Kollek.
Rabbi Shlomo Goren sought to
speak.The shouts, directed at him
and against Premier Menachern
Begin, were halted at the ex-
pressed wish of the family. The
only eulogy delivered was by a
fellow professor. Yehuda Elkana,
of the Van Leer Institute.
Deputy Premier David Levy,
who represented the Cabinet at
the funeral, told reporters that
attacks as that which occurred
during the Peace Now demon-
stration should be "rooted out.
Everybody has the right to ex-
press his own opinions." Many
Knesset members joined with the
hundreds of Peace Now members
and sympathizers at the funeral.
Mianwhile, across the street
from the Prime Minister's office.
Peace Now members are main-
taining a round-the-clock vigil for
seven days at the spot where the
grenade took the life of Grunz-
weig.
THE NEWS director of
Maariv said on Friday he re-
ceived a telephone call from a
man who identified himself as a
lecturer at the Hebrew Univer-
sity and said he had been the per-
son who gave the order to throw
the grenade.
At one stage, this man told
Grunzweig: "I will pee on your
grave you will pay for the
death of my brother in Lebanon."
According to this eye-witness,
the man held a suspicious object
in his hand.
Maariv reported that the man,
who sounded quiet, controlled
and articulate, said the target of
the grenade was Gen. (res.) Mati
Peled who last month met with
PLO chief Yasir Arafat. But in
his absence from the demonstra-
tion, the grenade was aimed at
Avraham Burg.
An-nell
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Dinner for 2
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Whole Roasted Chicken
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1 lb. Cole Slaw FREE
with either above purchase &
copy of this ad.
Daily Lunch Specials &
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7146Beracasa Way
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(corner of Powerline A
Palmetto Park Roads)
Boca Raton, Fla. 33433
Dinner Specials-
Monday: Boned Stuffed Brook Trout
Tuesday: Stuffed Rock Cornish Hen
Wednesday: Prime Rib King Cut
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Thursday: Roast Duck with
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Choice of Entree:
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BRISKET OF BEEF $8.25
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Glass of Wine. Challah. Gefiite Fish. Matzo
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Made Cole Slaw. Entree with Potato Pancake
and Vegetable. Coffee or Tea. And Dessert






^m^
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, February 25.1983
Jewish Floridian
Pragmatism Humiliates U.S. Ideals

FRED SHOCMET
Editor and Publisher
ol South County
SUZANNE SHOCHE1
Enecutlve Editor
FiadShochet
GERI ROSENBERG
NwiCoo'dintoi
****** WMidy Mid September Item* Mid-May. Bl Weekly balance Secoitd Cteee Poetage Paid at Iwt Raton. Fla. MM MO-HO MSN 027441M
BOCA RATON OFFICE 2200 N Federal Hwy.. Suit* 206, Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368-2001
Main Otflca Plant: 120NE 0th St.. Miami. Fla 33101 Phona 1-373-4605
Poetmaetar Return form 367* to Jaitoh Ftortdton. P.O. Boa 01 -267J. Miami. Fla. 31101
_ M Adwrttolng Director. Mad Leeeer. Phone MMM
combinad Jewish Appeal South County Jewiaft Federation, inc.. Olflcere Praaident, Jamaa B Bear.
Vic* Preeldenu, Marianne Bobick. Eric Deckinger. Norman Stone; Secretary. Gladys Weinehank.
Troaaurer. Margaret Kottier. Executive Director. Rabbi Bruce S Waishai
Jewisn Floridian doe* not guarantee Kaehruth ot Merchandiee Advertiaed
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area (3.50 Annual (2 Year Minimum (7). by membership South Count>
Jawlah Federation 2200 N Federal Hwy.. Sulla 206, Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368-2737
Out ot Town. Upon Request
Friday, February 25, 1983
Volume 5
12ADAR5743
Number 8
Enter Moshe Arens
From our own point of view, the more
remarkable occurrence last week
followed the report, perhaps over-
shadowing the report itself. And that
was the resignation of Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon.
If we are at all comforted by the
resignation, it is for the reason that an
even more eloquent spokesman for
Israel's best interests, Moshe Arens,
now takes his place. Apart from this, we
take little comfort from the resignation.
There are those who have criticized Gen.
Sharon for his alleged "megalomania."
But so legendary a figure, whose con-
tributions to the cause of his country
both on the battlefield and off it are
simply not to be diminished by the
picayune criticisms of the softhearted,
was nevertheless bound to be attacked in
this way. And, doubtless, in others as
well.
Exit then, for the moment, Ariel
Sharon. Enter Minister of Defense
Arens. What can we expect? Well, for
one thing, a difference in the tone of
diplomatic performance. Certainly,
Arens will be more velvety in spirit.
Rut. lpt t hat vplvet not confuse anyone,
least of all the Reagan Administration
which, immediately after the publication
of the commission of inquiry report,
speculated that the report and the
possible departure of the Begin
government in toto might mean
revivification of his "peace initiative" of
last Sept. 1.
Behind Arens' velvet lurks a fist of
iron. For who more eloquently than
Arens rejected the Camp David accord
even when Prime Minister Begin signed
it? Although these days Arens says that
the accord is a fait accompli and that he
is prepared to live by it, his initial
reaction to that disaster foretells a
toughness on Judea and Samaria that
minimally matches Begin's own.
WHe*e isth thirp pv^cr?
'>
SERGE KLARSFELDS
stunning revelation that the
United States was doing business
with Klaus Barbie, the "Butcher
of Lyons."for a number of years
following World War II leaves a
member of my generation with a
gnawing sense of anguish.
That, according to Klarsfeld,
we cozied up to this Nazi war
criminal responsible for the
deaths of so many Jews and pro-
tected him from French justice
because Barbie was providing us
with intelligence about the Sovi-
ets does not make the sense of
anguish any less persistent.
THE RAW fact is, as our own
Office of Special Investigations
attached to the Immigration and
Naturalization Service can af-
firm, U.S. attachments to Nazi
war criminals, helping them to
escape European authorities and
to fly to freedom in South Ameri-
ca and even to our own country,
has been a more common practice
than is recognized.
Those who have done their
homework know that this
growing American sense of being
casual about playing footsie with
the enemy extends beyond the
world of Nazi war criminals into
the Middle East and the very
heart of the Palestine Liberation
Organization, as well.
There is, for instance, the case
of Ali Hassan Salameh who was
slain in a car-bomb explosion in
Beirut in January, 1979. Salameh
was in the top echelon of PLO
terrorists.
IN THE early 1970s, Salameh
was reported to have helped mas-
termind the slaughter of 11 Is-
raeli athletes at the Munich,
West Germany Olympic Games.
That newly-reconstructed
paean of political politesse, Yasir
Arafat, said of the slain Salameh,
"We have lost a lion."
And that peanut brain of presi-
dential presence and Sunday
school saintliness, that Bible-
thumper Jimmuh Carter, who
knew Salameh's background as
well as anybody high in his ad-
ministration at the time, sighed
sadly when told of Salameh's
death and "expressed concern."
Over what? The demise not
only of Salameh but of his PLO
Gold Card connections? He could
hardly have been saddened by so
unseemly an end to one of the
masterminds behind the Munich
massacre. Could he?
STILL, Carter, in behalf of the
U.S.. could and indeed was irri-
tated when CIA reports told him
that Salameh died at the hands of
Israelis seeking revenge. That
made it doubly difficult for him
to bear. The ultimate question, of
course, is why the prophet from
Plains should have been so
terribly disturbed.
Because, as it turns out, Sal-
ameh, acting with the approval of
U.S. connection to Barbie, no less
than to Salameh, was also prag-
matic. It may .have worked, but it
was wrong.
One would have thought that
the world learned this lesson
when that first Munich massacre
occurred, not the one at the
Olympics in 1972, but the one
cooked up between Adolf Hitler
and Neville Chamberlain some 35
years before, when Chamberlain
returned from his drawing and
quartering of Czechoslovakia
with his phony "peace in our
time" message.
ONE WOULD have thought
that the world learned then, if
never before, that you can't do
business with the devil a les-
son the Israelis themselves may
very well have learned if only in
recent retrospect.
For in Salameh's pocket at the
time of his assassination was a
note to him from Bashir Gem-
ayel. the leader of the Phalangist
forces in Lebanon, warning Sal-
ameh that he was about to be fin-
gered. Gemayel, himself assas-
sinated in October, 1982, shortly
after his election to the presiden-
cy, was at the time of the Israeli
invasion of Lebanon the previous
June at least a tacit supporter of
that operation against the PLO.
It may be hard to follow, but
those are the facts. The complex-
ity of the cast of characters and
events in the Salameh story is
something like a novel by Tolstoy
or Dostoievski. But then, weren't
those sour Russians always
dealing with the morality of his-
tory vs. the morality of heroes for
whom morality was not an absol-
ute, for whom sometimes it be-
>came a very personal thing?
IN THE beginning, I men-
tioned the gnawing sense of
anguish that someone especially
in my generation feels about
America's growing tendency
toward the duplicity of fascists
enterprise and why not, since
we already are a fascist nation by
definition.
If that sounds cavalier, it is for
the reason that only a cavalier
flourish can hide the corrosive
effect of this duplicity on one
from my generation.
We grew into a world in which
America had come of age out of
the childhood of its innocence, its
isolation and rugged individual-
ism. We participated in the war
against fascist tyranny, a war
from which many of our numbers
never returned. We believed in
the war and its ultimate therapy.
We believed in a new era of
human enlightenment and free-
dom led, not by a pragmatic
America, but by a moral Ameri-
ca. (Already then, we understood
the difference and were made
anxious by those who saw them
as the same thing.)
NOW, we behold America
trading with the offal of fascism
with the surviving originals
such as Barbie and the new up-
start pretenders like Salameh and
Arafat.
What, for instance, can we
think of our nation's latest peace
bids in the Middle East opposing
Israel when we suspect that the
plan stems not from the desire for
equity for Araby but for a payoff
to agents and counteragents who
supplied U.S. intelligence with
information? What we can think
of our condemnation of Ariel
Sharon's "massacre" at Shatila
and Sabra when we played footsie
with the mastermind Salameh of
the massacre at Munich?
We can say, oh but other na-
tions do the same: Britain and
France and Germany and Russia.
Why should we be different?
And I say. yes but I thought
somehow we were different. I
thought that is what America
was all about. Once.
Italy Asks Greece
To Extradite Terrorist
Who Attacked Synagogue
ByLISABILLIG Greek authorities was that Al
KOMK IITAi Iail Zumar and two other Arabs were
U\2 *i ?./? y arrested when their ca' was
18 seeking the extradition stopped at the Greek-Yugoslav
Irom Greece of a 22-year-old border and found to be carrying
Jordanian, Osama Abdel Al
Zumar, believed to be one
of the terrorists who at-
tacked the main synagogue
in Home last Oct. 9, killing
Yasir Arafat, had been providi, two-year j)W child and
the CIA with secret PLO goon wounding other persons,
squad information about just
which U.S. diplomats were on a
liquidation list of Arab terrorists
and how to protect them.
Furthermore, Salameh served
as a go-between in a subsequent
agreement involving the U.S. and
Al Fatah, the mainstream Arafat
bullyboy outfit, to keep PLO
hands off Americans generally.
IT MAY perhaps be argued
with some considerable per-
suasive force that these were
noble U.S. purposes the pro-
tection of its citizens for which
our CIA'niks were willing to pay
any price. That is, after all, the
essence of pragmatism, which is
the one unique American contri-
bution to the philosophical pro-
cess.
Al Zumar was arrested in
Athens at the end of last Novem-
ber. On Dec. 23, two Italian
magistrates, Luigi Gennaro and
Pasquale Lapadura, issued ex-
tradition orders after his arrest
through Interpol. The Italian
government submitted a formal
extradition request to the Greek
government on Jan. 8 and is
awaiting a reply.
NEWS OF these developments
was suppressed until now in the
hope that Al Zumar's accom-
plices said to number at least
four would be traced in other
countries with the cooperation of
local police and Interpol.
But pragmatism, rooted in
utility (what works is right and
true), has little to do
therefore
According to press reports
here the Greek authorities^ re-
leased a deliberately false report
ot the circumstances of Al
with targer questions of morality: tSTllSSM f^f *
For Serge Klarsfelds expose of to tol^to^i.* '^ P'
Klaus Barbie and the U.S^Ie in 1% SLi ? hw actlvit
Barbies affairs also strikes at the ~Jh<>8e f hu "Splices in
heart of krger question, of -
morality precisely because ?*- rhc'
a large quantity of explosives."
It is not clear whether Italian
authorities furnished their Greek
counterparts with information
that led to AI Zumar's arrest or
whether the information was
transmitted after the arrest was
made.
THE MAIN objective of the
police investigation in Greece
Mm to be to trace terrorist
movements. Since the Palestine
LaWntion Organization was ex-
pelled from U'banon. terrorists
have been using Cyprus and
Greece as way-stations, one
Italian newspaper reported. Ac-
cording to the paper, Al Zumar
and three accomplices stopped off
in Cyprus where the PLO has re-
portedly established an active
center of operations to stage new
terrorists acts. They travelled to
Greece from Cyprus, the paper
said.
Another paper reported that
the Italian magistrates were in-
formed by Interpol that fragmen-
tation grenades used in attacks
on Jewish institutions in other
European capitals in the past few
years were identical to those used
in the Rome synagogue attack.
The terrorists have been linked to
an extremist Palestinian terrorist
group headed by A,bu Nidal
which is also purported to be re-
sponsible for attacks on PLO
the
. for attacks on
vW


Friday, February 25,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
Boca Logo Luncheon Quite A Success
The first annual South County
Jewish Federation Boca Lago
Women's Division event had a
sell-out crowd of over 300 women
attending.
The luncheon-fashion show
was held at Boca Pointe Country
Club, with over $28,000 raised for
the 1983 UJA-Federation Cam-
paign.
Doris Cantor and her commit-
tee did a fabulous job and every-
one enjoyed the fashion show by
Etoile."
Pictured above are (left to right) Ruth Schwartz, Door Prize Coor-
dinator; Arlene Shore, Fashion Show Coordinator; Doris Cantor,
Chairman; Miriam Kaufman, Invitations; Rhoda Weiner, Pod Coor-
dinator.
Pictured above are (left to right) Margie Boer, Women's Division
Campaign Chairman; James Baer, President South County Jewish
Federation, Guest Speaker; Doris Cantor, Chairman Boca Lago
Women's Division.
Howard Stone To Speak At
Toast of life' Eftanria Event
Co-Chairpersons Nina Mufson,
Toni Berliner and Al Gortz are
excited to announce that Howard
Stone will be the guest speaker
for the Estancia's "Toast of Life"
event which will be held in
Fstancia on March 12, at 8 p.m.
This will be the first joint
men's and women's event in
Fstancia. It will be a Cocktail
and Dinner Party held at the
home of Irma and Sol Fier.
Mr. Stone had dedicated his
entire adult life helping to rebuild
Israel. He also assisted in smug-
gling Jews out of North Africa
into Israel.
He remained in Israel for
several years and lived on a kib-
butz. He was soon recruited into
government services and for
several years, was a part of many
sensitive projects. He returned to
the United States and began a
successful career in advertising
and public relations.
Mr. Stone then became active
in the United Jewish Appeal and
in 1971, he was first the Director
of the Young Leadership Cabinet
where he was instrumental in
helping to create a new genera-
tion of leadership for our com-
munities. He then became the
Director of the Overseas Program
with responsibilities for all UJA
activities abroad. Recently he left
the UJA in order to devote more
of his time to writing, lecturing
and to serve as a consultant to a
number of travel companies,
Jewish organizations and cor-
Watch Your Words
Navon Cautions Politicos
Howard Stone
porations doing business in the
Mid-East.
Al Gortz, who knew Mr. Stone
when he lived in New York and
heard him speak several times,
said the following: "Each time I
have heard him speak, he has ex-
cited and moved the audience in
such a manner as few speakers
that I have ever heard. We are in-
deed fortunate to have Howard
Stone come speak to us. Nina
Mufson, Toni Berliner and I are
looking forward with much
anticipation to this significant
event in Estancia."
Jerome A. Hurwitz, Announces Qiairmen
In Growing Boca Del Mar Areas
Col. Jerome Hurwitz, Boca Del
Mar Chairman, announced the
following area appointments:
Leonard Forman, Woodhaven
Fred Saltz, Woodhaven East
Jack Stone, Sierra Del Mar
Jim Singer, Windrift
Dr. Morris Siegel, Camino
Woods I
Harold Mintz, Colony Woods
Jack Osterweil, Camino Woods
II
Hurwitz's aim for the 1983
campaign is to try and reach
more of the evergrowing Jewish
population, and with these new
leaders in the above mentioned
areas, he feels certain there will
be growth this year in Boca Del
Mar.
Waterfront
Naw 2 atory Don* aaat ol FarJaral appron
500 11. Itom Intracoaalal. PcticMy
maintenance traa N owr>ara P" '^fl
vacation. 2 Bdrma. eat-W kltchan & laraa
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Broker Saleaman, avaa 498-3*33.
Woodhaven Parkview
$85,900
1900 Sq Ft. of pura charm. An affordaWa
country club litMtyki. Baautlful eat In
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Lobby afford* privacy Have a piece to
come nem eeeaon or enjoy all year. Dorle
Babb Realtor Aaaoc. 997 7376. evee
HAGGERTY
MALTOIS ,lf>l$lM
Reduced for Quick Saks
Attention OoMart. 4 Tennte aume Laroe
li. floor Conoo et Boca Bar-ood
Faaturea full aed waeher dryer in Unit
Rolladlne on acreened-in porch WelK
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Tenn.a Courta a Pool arer Muel eelll
Need ofleral Judy Welher. ava*. 272-2573,
Realtor Aaaoc We 900
Price is Right
n-town location. Walk to ell
conveniences ehopplng. library, tennia.
reataurenta. etc. 5 mlnutea to Beech 2
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Oxenrelter, Realtor-Aeaoc.. 272-7517,
3330 S.
Federal Hwy.
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272 7442
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
President Yitzhak
Navon has called for an im-
mediate halt to the use of
such phrases as "traitor,"
"PLO supporter," and
"stabbing the nation in the
back," when describing po-
litical opponents. "We
must remember that we are
one people, with one com-
mon destiny, and if, God
forbid, our existence should
be in danger, we are all in
the same boat," he said in a
television interview Friday.
Navon also praised the govern-
ment for setting up the judicial
commission of inquiry into the
massacre of Palestinians in the
Sabra and Shatila refugee camps
and expressed the view that the
Israel Defense Force could accept
criticism and emerge stronger in
the process.
"Army officers may be criti-
cized," Navon said, "but criti-
cism does not erase their service,
their dedication, their praise-
worthy deeds. Rather, it deals
with certain behavior over two or
three days. The army's strength
has not been harmed, and there is
no reason for fear that officers
will not want to take upon them-
selves positions of command."
Speaking to officers, Navon
said: "The State of Israel will
Erosper and strengthen, if it is
uilt on a high moral level. The
IDF in the Lebanon war restrain-
ed itself, soldiers had sacrificed
themselves, and there was a lot of
hesitation otherwise the war
would not have lasted long .
Because there was the will to
Israel Rejects
Taba Complaint
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
has discounted and rejected
Egyptian complaints that Israeli
soldiers have breached any
agreements in the Taba area.
The Egyptians complained offi-
cially to the Israeli Charge d'Af-
faires in Cairo that a visit to the
disputed Taba area just south of
Eilat by Deputy Chief of Staff
Maj. Gen. Moshe Levy and a
party of about 20 fellow officers
last week, was a violation of the
peace agreement.
Israel has responded by saying
there are no restrictions under
the agreement on the entry to the
Taba are of "any Israeli, whether
civilian or military."
The Foreign Ministry says
that Levy did not go "one mili-
meter outside Israeli territory."
avert hurting civilians, and be-
cause of the desire to allow the
political negotiations to achieve
the utmost."
In praising the government for
setting up the commission,
Navon said, "We were obliged to
hold this inquiry, for ourselves,
for our heritage, for our basic
concepts of the sanctity of human
life."
Meanwhile, it was learned that
in a segment edited out of the
television interview on Friday,
Navon mentioned the possibility
of a "national unity govern-
ment," involving both Labor and
Likud. "It may be unlikely to
form such a government, but the
leaders of both camps should
meet to discuss the ideas,"
Navon said.
|IIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIM
SOUTH COUNTY WOMEN
Mark the date Mar. 16, Keynoters' Luncheon ($150 W
Minimum gift). Call 368-2737, ask for Joyce.
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Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, February 25,
>
Tourism Council Formed
Will Promote U.S. Travel to Israel
NEW YORK In a dramatic
show of unity, leaders of organi-
zations representing the entin
spectrum of the American Jewish
community met here last week
with Israel's Minister of Tourism
Abraham Sharir and formed the
American Council for Tourism to
Israel, a body dedicated to the
development of Jewish tourism
to the Jewish State.
In meeting with leaders of
groups belonging to the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations.
Sharir described the importance
of tourism to Israel on a number
of levels. He highlighted the eco-
nomic input tourism brings to the
country, and the fact that "sup-
port for Israel's position in its
dealings with its neighbors is in-
creased markedly by travelers
visiting the country and seeing
the realities of the situation."
SHARIR STRESSED that
visiting Israel "is an opportunity
for Jews in the Diaspora to iden-
tify not only with Israel, but also
Reaganites Say
Report Won't
Affect Talks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan Administration has
rejected* any suggestion that the
impact of the findings of the Is-
rael commission of inquiry into
the massacre at the Beirut
refugee camps last September
will have any effect on the Cur-
rent Mfgniiiranir hdirccii Iarmtyl
and Lebanon.
"We don't see why the impact
of this report, whatever that may
be, should effect the Lebanese
negotiations or the current Habib
mission," State Department
deputy spokesman Alan Rom-
l>erg said.
"Our view is clear. Romberg
stressed. "The issues being ad-
dressed are urgent and must be
resolved as soon as possible in
the interest of Lebanese stability
and sovereignty as well as in the
interests of Israeli security."
Romberg said it would not be
"appropriate to comment" on the
findings of the Israeli commis-
sion. Nor would he comment on
the commission's finding that the
U.S. shared some blame for the
massacre because it withdrew its
marines too soon after the PLO
terrorists left Beirut and because
it did not pressure the Lebanese
army to take the responsibility to
police the camps.
with their own Jewishness,"
citing tourism to Israel as "the
first step in assuring the co-
hesiveness of the world Jewish
community."
Chairman will be Rabbi Joseph
Sternstein, former president of
the Zionist Organization of
America. At a press conference,
Sternstein stressed the urgency
of the Council's task in develop-
ing American Jewish travel to Is-
rael and underlined the Council's
role in strengthening not only the
economy of Israel, but also the
spiritual bonds between the Jews
of the United Slates and Israel.
ACTI will be organized on na-
tional, regional and local levels to
ensure that support and enthus-
iasm for the project reaches all
levels of the Jewish community
across the country. In charge of
coordination of the project will be
Amnon Gilad. director of the Is-
rael Government Tourist Office
in the Eastern U.S.A.
At the same press conference,
Charlotte Jacobson. president of
the Jewish National Fund, added
her own comments confirming
her belief in the importance of
travel to Israel and gave as an
example the last-minute decision
of the JNF, in response to the call
by Israel's Ministry of Tourism,
fo hold its 1983 convention in
Eilat. rather than in the United
States.
As a first step in organizing
ACTI's work, a series of working
sessions will be held in New York
early in February during which
officials of the Israel Ministry of
Tourism in North America, the
Israel Government Tourist Office
and leaders of Jewish organi-
zations will plan their promotion-
al work.
Sessions will include briefings
to the organizations by the
Ministry's marketing experts in
promoting travel in the eighties,
reflecting the desires of the new
generation of Jewish travelers
not only to experience the relig-
ious and Zionist aspects of Israel,
but also to cater to the require-
ments of a travel destination
which offers sophisticated, relax-
ing and often luxurious facilities.
Prior to the Jan. 20 meeting
with Jewish leaders, Minister
Sharir paid a call on Rabbi
Joseph Soloveitchik in his study
at Yeshiva University. Soloveit-
chik assured Sharir of his belief in
the importance of American Jew-
ish tourism to Israel, stressing
that there was a special mitzvah
in the holding of Bar Mitzvahs
and weddings in Israel.
Israel's Minister of Tourism Abraham Sharir (right)
congratulates Rabbi Joseph Sternstein (left) on his becoming
chairman of the newly formed organization, The American
Council for Tourism to Israel, dedicated to the promotion of
travel to Israel in the American Jewish community.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
Honors Its Members
Vatican Telling Catholics How
To React to Jews, Intermarriage
By LISA BILLIG
ROME (JTA) The
Vatican has presented, for
the first time, precise and
detailed directives to be
followed by Catholics in
their relations with the
Jewish community of
Rome. The directives, part
of a pastoral letter ad-
dressed to the Diocese of
Rome, were broadcast by
the Vatican radio station.
The announcement stated:
"The Diocese of Rome has placed
itself in an avant-guard position
in the dialogue between Catholics
and Jews ... in the promotion of
a deeper knowledge of Jewish
culture and in the consequent
commitment to act as barrier
against the resurgence of
phenomena of anti-Semitism."
THE LETTER, titled "An
Outline for An Ecumenical
Pastoral," was several years in
preparation and was completed
under the leadership of Msgr.
Clement Riva. president of the
Diocesian Ecumenical Com-
mission. Its special section on
relations with the Jews is clearly
aimed at improving the climate
between the two faiths in the
aftermath of the terrorist attack
on the main synagogue in Rome
last Oct. 9 in which a two-year-
old child was killed and 33
persons were wounded.
A theme running through the
pastoral letter is recognition of
the spiritual affinities between
Christianity and Judaism and
respect for their different
theologies. "The dialogue is seen
not in terms of a relationship
between majority and minority,
between the three million bap-
tized Romans and the 15,000
Jews in one of the most ancient
communities in the world, but in
a spirit of profound respect and
equal dignity in a reality whose
history is closely interwoven with
that of Christians." the Vatican
Radio stated.
This is elucidated in the section
of intermarriage. It states that
the Roman Catholic spouse of a
non-Catholic Christian is ex-
pected to "sincerely promise to
do all that is possible to have his
or her partner baptized and
educated within the Roman
Catholic Church."
Sam Robinson and Iz Siegel co-
chairman of the 1983 United
Jewish Appeal-South County
Jewish Federation campaign of
Congregation Anshei Emuna
proudly announce the First An-
nual Testimonial Breakfast to be
held on March 6. 1983. Sam and
Iz are excited to announce that
the members of Congregation
Anshei Emuna, who this year es-
tablished and inaugurated their
new house of worship, will be
honored.
The breakfast will be held at
the Congregation, 16189 Carter
Road, Del ray Beach at 9:30 a.m.
the morning of Sunday, March 6.
The entire membership is being
invited to participate in this most
meaningful event and a large
crowd is anticipated.
The guest speaker will be
Harvey Grossman, Campaign
Director of the South County
Jewish Federation. Mr. Gross-
man's subject will be "The Youth
of Israel."
Both Sam Robinson and Iz
Siegel emphasize that in this very
trying year for the Jewish people,
Congregation Anshei Emuna has
decided to hold this fund-raising
event, not only for the people of
Israel and their social and educa-
tional needs, but also for our own
community which is the fastest
growing Jewish community in
the United States.
Both Sam and Iz are quoted as
saying, "It is especially impor-
tant during these most difficult
and trying times that we show
our support more than ever. For a
lack of support would be mis-
interpreted not only by the Jew-
ish community here and in Israel,
but also by the rest of the world
Therefore, we at Congregation
Anshei Emuna in this founding
year of our new house of worship
wish to extend our hand out to
our own Jewish community, the
Jews of the world and particular-
ly to the people of Israel.''
PASSOVER PACKAGES FOR
OUR SOUTH FLORIDA FRIENDS
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From
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March 28 -April 6
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PHONE: 538-5731
Camp Maccabee
An exciting Summer experience within a
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Varied activities Include:
Swimming Instruction
a Free Swim Dally
a Arts and Crafts
Music
a Drama
a Dance
Field Trips
Two four-week sessions
Pra school division
a School division
a Mini bus pickup to and from camp
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For information call
South County Jewish Federation
368-2737
Jewish Community Center Department
.
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TcfcFFses


Friday, February 25,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page!
*
Half-Way To Somewhere
y DVORA WAYSMAN
United Jewish Appeal
Special Correspondent
Adi lives with three roommates
in an attractive apartment on a
tree-lined street in one of Jeru-
salem's older neighborhoods. He
is 24 and works in a book bind-
ery. The four occupants do all
their shopping, cooking and
cleaning.
Nothing particularly unusual
or remarkable. Except that Adi,
Eli, Shmuel and Yitzhak are all
retarded adults.
A few years ago, the future
would have been very dim for
these young men. If their parents
were willing, they might have
lived a "sheltered" life at home
... an inactive and spirited kind
of existence until such time as the
parents became too old to care for
them or died, when they would
have been institutionalized
probably for the rest of their
lives.
They are fortunate to be part of
the program of Agudat Shekel"
iShikun Kehillati 1'Mefagrim
Institute for the Retarded),
which aims to integrate the mild-
ly retarded into society by mak-
ing them as independent as pos-
sible. The program is partly
funded through the UJA-Com-
munity 1983 Israel Special Fund.
This live-in-the-community
Filling in Background
How Sharon Finally Took the Hint
By HUGH ORGEL
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- The Cabinet voted 16-1
last Thursday night to ac-
cept in full the report and
recommendations of the
commission of inquiry into
the Beirut refugee camps
massacre. Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon, whose resig-
nation was called for by the
commission, cast the lone
dissenting vote.
Sharon said after the five-hour
session that he would not attend
any more Cabinet meetings. The
commission recommended that if
Sharon did not resign, Premier
Menachem Begin should exercise
his statuatory authority and dis-
miss him.
AS THE Cabinet was meeting,
a hand grenade was thrown at a
Peace Now demonstration oppo-
site the Prime Minister's office.
At least seven people were in-
jured, and one was reported
killed. The injured included
Avraham Burg, the son of In-
terior Minister Yosef Burg. Po-
lice asked any eyewitnesses to
the incident to come forward im-
mediately and testify. As Begin
left the Cabinet meeting he told
reporters that his "his heart cried
out for the man killed by to-
night's murder." He called the
grenade attack "a terrible,
shocking tragedy "
Begin declined to comment on
the Cabinet decision to strip
Sharon of power. Political
analysts pointed out that the
government had averted a crisis
and could now return to function-
ing without pressure upon it. As
a s, mi I )cr Defense Minister
walked to his car from the Cabi-
net meeting, a few supporters ap-
plauded him.
As the Cabinet prepared to
meet Thursday evening, severe
pressure was brought to bear on
Begin and the ministers to reach
a decision on the recommenda-
tions of the inquiry commission.
The three-member panel, which
published its reports Feb. 8,
called, among other things for the
resignation or dismissal of
Sharon and faulted the Begin
government for indirect responsi-
bility for the mass killings carried
out by its Christian Phalangists
allies fast Sept. 16-18.
THE PANEL'S report precipi-
tated a political crisis that ap-
pears to have seriously polarized
the nation. The Cabinet met in
special session last Wednesday,
but was unable to reach agree-
ment on what course to follow. It
adjourned after less than two
hours after deciding to reconvene
Thursday night. *
Pressure built up both within
Begin's coalition and among the
grass roots membership of its
constituent parties who were
sharply divided over the fate of
Sharon. Moderate elements in the
government and in Begin's Likud
urged implementation of the
commission's recommendations,
while Herut hardliners and the
far rightwing Tehiya party de-
manded that Sharon stay.
If Sharon refused to resign,
and Begin had to dismiss him,
the Premier might have faced a
revolt within Herut and the de-
fection of Tehiya which could
jeopardize his narrow Knesset
majority. Pro-Sharon forces, led
by Herut MK David Magen, took
the offensive before the Cabinet
met. They proposed that
Sharon's fate be determined by
the Likud Knesset caucus, not
the Cabinet.
Magen reportedly told Begin
that Sharon would agree to step
down if he is asked to by a
majority of the Likud faction.
Begin, who was reluctant to dis-
miss the Defense Minister, indi-
cated nevertheless that he would
not reject Sharon's resignation if
it was submitted to him.
MK GUELA COHEN, a one-
time Herut member who broke
with Begin over the peace treaty
with Egypt and helped found
Tehiya, delivered a scathing de-
nunciation of the commission's
report. She charged that it had
exceeded its authority in recom-
mending "punitive sentences"
against Sharon and senior mili-
tary officers.
In a related development, At-
torney General Yitzhak Zamir or-
dered the Inspector General of
Police to take all necessary steps
to protect the three commission
members from violence. Zamir
acted after anonymous telephone
threats to Supreme Court Justice
Aharon Barak, a member of the
panel.
Zamir warned that any at-
tempt to threaten members of the
commission or harm them was an
attempt to undermine the inde-
pendence of the commission and
the perpetrators would be dealt
with by the law.
President Yitzhak Navon,
whose office requires him to re-
main above politics, has re-
portedly studied the commis-
sion's report thoroughly. His
office said that he would not react
"at this stage."
MEANWHILE, the opposi-
tion was deep in deliberation over
what course to follow. The Labor
Party's Knesset faction met for
the first time in joint session with
the Secretariate of Mapam,
Shulamit Aloni's Civil Rights
group and the Independent
Liberal Party.
Most speakers at the meeting
heeded Labor Party chairman
Shimon Peres' injunction to keep
a low profile until the coalition
decided what it will do. But they
demanded full implementation of
the commission's report. Peres
urged a "statesmanlike ap-
proach." Former Premier Yitz-
hak Rabin called on the opposi-
tion to concentrate on the report,
not on political personalities.
But former Foreign Minis-
ter Abba Eban made an ob-
vious reference to Sharon when
he spoke of "a minister who is
stuck to his seat by the strongest
glue produced by modern tech-
nology, so that his chair goes to-
gether with him."
David U. SeHgman
A.S.I.D.
system is a recent development in
Israel, and there are only seven or
eight apartments such as Adi's in
the entire country, although
quite a few more are in the plan-
ning stage.
To the first-time visitor, Adi's
flat is a delightful surprise. The
pictures in the living room are in
bright colors vivid posters, a
Van Gogh print of a wheatfield.
The divan and easy chairs are
modern and inviting. There is a
stereo and a TV set, and a large
bowl of fruit sits on the coffee
table. The color scheme is
autumnal brown-beige-orange.
You can see the sparkling
kitchen, with its large re-
frigerator, laminated cupboards
and the modern oven. The bed-
rooms have built-in closets, and
the kind of divan beds that make
the rooms more like attractive
studies. They are immaculately
clean and tidy.
The four roommates were all
born in Israel, two of Moroccan
parents. Eli also works, in a Jeru-
salem chocolate factory. He does
not earn a large salary, but both
he and Adi take special pride in
being wage-earners, and contri-
bute one-third of their wages to a
special fund for the apartment.
They are not wasteful with the
remainder, often buying bank
shares or stocks as a hedge
against inflation, just like the
rest of the population.
Both wage-earners were
brought up at home and went
through the regular school sys-
tem, but in Special Education
classes. At 18, they went to the
Rehabilitation Center run by the
Jerusalem Municipality to learn
vocational skills.
Adi has been, at the book
bindery for two years and is so
conscientious that he leaves
home soon after 6 every morning,
to make sure he won't be late for
work at 7:30 although the trip
only takes 20 minutes.
Shmuel and Yitzhak are still
being trained, but also hope to
find jobs in the near future, eilher
in sheltered workshops or in the
open market.
Although there are only four
residents, the apartment has a
staff of three half-time Agudat
Shekel employees: Yehudit
Beiner, the director; Karen, the
house-mother; and David a coun-
selor.
There is no institution-like at-
mosphere it is relaxed and
friendly, with the boys and staff
all on a first-name basis. The
staff supervises the shopping,
cooking and cleaning; advises the
residents on handling their
money; and helps with any prob-
lems they might have with family
or friends.
Hobbies and other interests are
strongly encouraged. Adi has ex-
pressed a wish to learn English
and is making good progress.
Shmuel wants to learn Tanach,
and David, who is a religious
studies student at the Hebrew
University, sits and learns with
him.
The four decide what clothes
they want to buy, which friends
they want to invite and when,
and how to spend the petty cash
left for them every day. In fact,
their lives are not very dissimilar
to normal men in their peer
group, and their standard of liv-
ing is much higher than many.
None of the staff stays over-
night at the flat, so the residents
feel independent and unsuper-
vised. They recently asked for
and were granted Tuesdays as
staff-free days also. They can en-
tertain friends, go to restaurants
or movies, or do whatever they
want.
At times when no staff member
is in attendance, an upstairs
neighbor is paid to be available if
they need any help or advice. The
neighbors are all supportive and
kind to the four young men,
whose retardation is classed as
mild and all of whom are func-
tioning well in their new com-
munity setting.
Yehudit and Karen have
taught them all kinds of recipes,
and they can cook eggplant par
mesan, baked fish, thick vege-
table soup and a variety of cas-
seroles.
Jerusalem already has two
other similar apartments operat-
ing one for six retarded young
women in Kiryat Yovel and
another for four men in the pres-
tigious neighborhood of Rehavia.
Soon Anudat Shekel man" *~
open one for sue children (who
will have a live-in house-mother).
In this way, Israel's mildly re-
tarded are being brought out of
the shadows into the sunlight,
where they are learning to make
valuable contributions to society
while they enhance their own self-
image and self-worth.
Instead of facing a life with no
future, they are already halfway
to somewhere ... on the road
with no dead-end.
Gloria Drummond
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=ss
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, February 25,1983
Organizations in the News
>
TEMPLE SINAI
Rabbi and Elaine Silver of
Temple Sinai, Delray Beach, will
conduct a Seder on the second
night of Passover at 6:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, March 29 to be held at
Boca Teeca Lodge. Tickets are
$20 per person and all are invited
to attend. The room will accom-
modate 200 people and tickets
will be sold on a first come first
serve basis.
.. Temple Sinai Sisterhood will
have their next meeting on Mon-
day, Feb. 28 at 12 noon at the
American "Savings Bank, Atlan-
tic Ave., Delray Beach. The
program will feature observance
of Jewish music month under the
direction of Elaine Silver. All are
welcome. For information please
call Clara Hilt 499-1293 or Ann
Gottlieb 499-0481. The Sister-
hood are also having a lunch and
card party on Monday, March 7
at 12 noon at the Western Steer
Family Steak House in Boca
Raton. The cost is $6 per person.
For reservations, please call Shir-
ley Feingold 499-2530 or Helen
Stone 499-5506.
HADASSAH
Hadasaah-Ben Our ion will hold
an open current events meeting
on Monday, March 7 at 9:30 a.m.
at the American Bank. The sub-
ject will be Anti-Semitism, Abuse
of the Press. All are welcome.
"Sylvia Lappin is the leader. Also,
please make a note on the March
9 Lake Okeechobee cruise the
cost is $24.25 not $27.95 as
posted.
Hadaaaah A viva announces
the Youth Aliyah Luncheon will
take place on Monday, March 14
at 12 noon at Boca Pointe, Pow-
erline Kd Boca Raton. The
Regional Speaker will be Dorothy
Kaye and singer Anne Turner
will perform. For reservations,
Ir, ..... ,.i; Amlln \rrl.L-m 007
7228, Helen Perlberg 994-1113 or
Hedda Krainin 499-5203.
Hadaaaah-Menachem Begin
will hold their Board meeting on
Wednesday, March2 at 9:30 a.m.
in the American Savings Bank,
W. Atlantic Ave., Delray
Beach.
Ml ZRACHI WOMEN
American Mizrachi Women
Beeraheva will hold their next
meeting on Wednesday, March 9
at the American Savings Bank,
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, at
J2 noon at which time a lunch will
be served to all paid up members.
BRANDEIS
Brandeis University Women-
Century Village West will hold
their annual Brandeis Fair dn
Wednesday, March 9 in the Com-
munity Room at Town Center
Mall, Boca Raton, from 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Along with merchandise
for sale, there will also be tupper-
ware and cosmetics. A Cosmetic-
ian will give advice on the art of
make-up. Everyone is welcome.
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel-Delray
Does Your Group
Need A Speaker?
Call The South County Jewish Federation
SPEAKERS BUREAU
368-2737
WE'LL HELP YOU FIND ONE!
Speakers available for both Jewish and non-Jewish groups.
Lodge No. 224 will hold their an-
nual Dinner Dance on Sunday,
March 6 at the Poinciana Country
Club. Lake Worth. The cost is
$29 per couple. Also the Free
Sons of Israel will hold their next
meeting on Monday, March 7 at
7:30 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank, Kings Point. The
new members will be introduced
to the three principles of
fraternity, friendship and
equality.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women-Boca will
hold a Progressive Dinner on
Sunday, Feb. 27. This dinner will
be limited to 60 people. The cost
is $15 per person. Please call
Norms 482-7772 for further infor-
mation.
B"tui B'rith and B'nai B'rith Women of Greater Boca Raton and State
of Israel Bonds will pay tribute to Irving Goldstein and Mrs. Myron
(Louisef Cohen at the Second Annual Testimonial Breakfast on
Sunday, March 6, 9:30 a.m. at the Glades Road Sheraton in Boca
Raton. Goldstein is the South County General Chairman for State of
Israel Bonds, and has held leadership positions within B'nai B'rith on
a local and regional level his entire adult life. Mrs. Cohen has been in
the forefront of Jewish organizations for more than 25 years. Active in
B'nai B'rith Women. Federation, ADL, ORT, Hadassah, and
numerous others, Mrs. Cohen is also a leader in Bonds, sponsoring
Bond brunches and having been honored as a Women of Valor in 1972.
Hebrew University Greater Boca Chapter
Installs Plaskin As President and
Other New Officers At Mar. 12 Ball
B'nai B'rith Women-Naomi
will sponsor a Matinee Movie at
Delray Square on Tuesday,
March 8 for the cost of $1. For
further information, please call
Ann Schwartz 498-5136 or Mil-
dred 499 1382.
B'nai B'rith Boca Teeca Lodge
No. 3119 will hold its election of
officers at their next meeting
after breakfast in the activities
room on Tuesday, March 1, at
9:30 a.m. Harry Babish, Treasur-
er of B'nai B'rith International
will speak on "Involvement of
B'nai B'rith in the future of Ju-
daism."
ORT
Women's American ORT-Boca
Glades will be having a theater
party on Sunday, Feb. 27 to see
"One of a Kein" which features
impersonator Richard Kein.
Transportation to the Persian
Room of the Marco Polo Hotel is
included in the price of the ticket.
For further information, please
call 487-1988.
Women's American ORT-Boca
Century Chapter will take their
annual trip to Pompano Race
Track on Thursday, March 17.
The cost will be $17 which in-
cludes admission, parking taxes,
dinner and program. For further
information and reservations,
please call Jo 482-9862, Marilyn
483-2113 or Estelle 482-2108.
Women's American ORT-A1I
Points will hold their next meet-
ing on Tuesday, March 15 at the
American Savings Bank, Atlan-
tic Ave.. Delray Beach. A fashion
show by Gloria, featuring ladies
spring sportswear will be fea-
tured.
m>%,
Make Eye-To-Eye
Contact... Here!
EYE GLASSES
from $
(Complete Frame & Lens)
See Our Collection
of Designer Frames
including
Sophia Loren
YSL
Avant-Garde
Porsche Design
PERFECT
VISION CENTER
Gary D. Cohen, Optician
Market Place of Delray
i Corner of Military Trail
Mon.-Fn. 9-7 Sat. 10-4
498-4477
Continued from Page 1
Wechsler, Treasurer, Marvin J.
Nusbaum and Secretary, Ann
Krainin.
Chairman of the Executive
Board will be Irving N. Rifkin
and other members of the Board
are Merwin K. Grosberg, Herman
Herst. Jr., Dr. Albert Schiff and
all above Officers.
Chairman of the Board of
Trustees is Merwin K. Grosberg.
Trustees serving under Merwin
K. Grosberg are Edith
Abramson, Mr. and Mrs. James
laer, Mr. and Mrs. Elbert
_ is, Mrs. Samuel Blair, Mrs.
Henry Brenner, Mr. and Mrs.
Herbert Brody, Mrs. Nathaniel
A. Cohen, Mr. and Mrs. William
Davis, Mrs. Joseph Z. Feller, Mr.
and Mrs. Herman Gimbel, Dr.
and Mrs. Robert Greenberg, Mrs
Merwin K. Grosberg, Mrs.
Martin B. Grossman, Mrs.
Herman Herat, Jr., Mrs. Sidney
Hildebrand. David Krainin. Mr.
| and Mrs. Jerome Lefenfeld. Mrs.
Adolph Levis, Mr. and Mrs. Elli*
Levy, Dr. and Mrs. Alan B.
Marcovitz. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Maharam, Mr. and Mrs. Ben-
jamin Marsh, Mrs. Samuel
Melton, Mr. and Mrs. Murray
Nemeroff, Mrs. Marvin J.
Nusbaum, Gloria Ostrer, Mrs.
Bernard S. Paskin, Mr. and Mrs.
Morton Peyser, Mrs. Irving N.
Rifkin, Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel
Rosenzweig, Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Samuels, Mrs. Abe
Schankerman. Mrs. Albert
Schiff, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Sch-
wartz, Mrs. Elias Secal, Mr. and
Mrs. Bernard Sher, Mr. and Mrs.
Irving Shore, Mr. and Mrs.
Mitchell Smith, Mr. and Mrs.
Reuben Tebeleff. Mr. and Mrs.
Reuben Viener. Mrs. Abraham
Wechsler, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard
Weisenberg, Mr. and Mrs.
Charles Wender, Dr. and Mrs.
Ben Wetchler, Mr. and Mrs.
Philip Zinman.
Honorary Trustees are Rabbi
Richard Agler. Rabbi Theodore
Feldman, Rabbi Louis Sachs,
Rabbi Bernard Silver, Rabbi
Samuel Silver. Rabbi Merle
Singer, Mrs. Aleon Deitch, Mr.
and Mrs. Marvin Dekelboum,
Elias Secal, Charles Smith,
Robert Smith and Ms. Winnie
Winkelstein.
Reservations for the March 12
Founders Ball and installation
can be made by calling 428-2233.
OflCU
"Music lovers will enjoy the
excitement of Quisisana musical
evenings with future greats from
Julliard and other conservatories.
These young artists are members of
our staff and present concerts,
Broadway musical excerpts and
evenings of opera. We also feature
dancing, folk "sings" and movies.
Quisisana...cuisine par excellence
from brioche to blintzes. Continental
chefs make each meal an "adventure
In Dining."
Happiness is...
a game of tennis on our clay courts...
shuffleboard, badminton or ping
pong... selling, water skiing,
canoeing. Golfing at Lake Kezar
Country Club.
Informal
luxury on...
LAKE
KEZAR
Center Lovell,
Maine
QUISISANA
Canter Lovall,
Maine 04016
(2O7)S2-36O0
QUISISANA
PO Box250U
Ft. Laodardato,
FL, 13*20
(305)731-7397
(305)739-3317
Our tantalizing torte,
a mouthwatering
addition to the
delicious AldenMerrell
collection of cheese-
cakes, carrot cakes
and chocolate cakes.
Tantalicious!
aLDen merreu
CHEESECAKE COMRW
Next to PuWiK in tht Village
Square Shoppei, St. Andrews
Boulevard (adjacent to Town
Center) ju south ot Gladet
Road in Boca Raton. Hourt:
Mon.-Sat. 8:30 a.m. -9:00 p.m.
Sunday 9:00a.m. 5:00p.m.


Friday.
February 25.1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
Nuclear EnergyIts Dangers and Costs
"Nuclear Energy It* Dangers
nd Costa" will be the subject of
address by Mr. John R.
Jewell on Monday evening,
h 7, at 8 p.m. at Temple
eth El of Boca Raton, 333 S.W.
i Ave. All are welcome there
I nn admission charge.
This subject is of special in-
est to us in South Florida be-
oi what Mr. Newell and
Ithers regard as a very dan-
gerous situation at the Turkey
Point nuclear power plant,
situated approximately 65 miles
south of Boca Raton. Mr. Newell
feels that to continue to operate
the nuclear facility at Turkey
Point invites a disaster of the
kind experienced four years ago
(and still going on) at Three Mile
Island, Pa., where the nuclear re-
actor core was reported to have
come within 30 to 60 minutes of a
Poll Shows Most French Favor
Death Penalty for Barbie
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A
jblic opinion poll released
;re showed that a
Majority of French people
Ivor reinstatement of the
ith penalty in the case of
laus Barbie, the one-time
|estapo chief in Lyon who
ill be tried in that city for
[crimes against
imanity."
Several prominent personali-
M here have also called for the
[si oral ion of capital punishment
br crimes of that nature. Senator
lenri Cavaillet, a Centrist
al and Gaullist Francois
.it.inl. proposed that the
liament enact a law that
mild make the death sentence
jplicable to Barbie.
UT A government spokes-
retorted that passing a
troactive law was contrary to
He Administration's basic be-
efs. Barbie was sentenced to
path in absentia in 1946 and
52 but capital punishment was
lished in France since then.
The poll, published in the news
kagazine VSD, showed that 56
erccnt of the respondents
vored the death penalty for
arbie and 81 percent agreed
ti.it even 38 years after the end
" World War II, war criminals
should be found, apprehended
nd brought to trial."
Virtually the same number ap-
kwed the government's suc-
tssful efforts to gain custody of
[arbie after he was expelled from
livia, the country where he
jnd haven after the war.
THE LEGAL definition of
"crimes against humanity" in
France includes crimes com-
mitted on racial or religious
grounds or because of the vic-
tims' political or idealogical be-
liefs. Barbie, whose wartime
activities earned him the title
"butcher of Lyon," is held re-
sponsible for the murder of 4,000
Jews and resistance fighters and
the deportation of 7,000 others to
certain death.
But the prosecution will base
its case on two incidents not con-
nected with the French resis-
tance. These involved the arrests
and deportation to Auschwitz of
41 Jewish children and 83 Jewish
adults.
The Chief Rabbi of Lyon,
where the trial will be held, said
that Jews "do not seek ven-
geance." He said "if Barbie
would renounce his Nazi convic-
tions, if he would ask his victims
for forgiveness and if this whole
affair will serve as a lesson and
example, the trial would have
been useful and we would feel
satisfied."
BARBIE, for his part, is
threatening to reveal the names
of prominent French people who
allegedly collaborated with him
in the arrests, tortures, murders
and deportations when he served
in Lyon from 1942-1944.
Although the overwhelming
majority of French people want
Barbie punished for his crimes,
the pending trial has triggered at
least one anti-Semitic manifesta-
tion. In Boussy-Saint Antoine, a
small village near Paris, slogans
were smeared on the city hall and
other public buildings reading
"Yes to Barbie and No to the
Jews"; "Barie Shall Win"; and
"Six million dead Jews are not
worth one Barbie."
meltdown.
Mr. Newell is a graduate
engineer of MIT, also the re-
cipient of several honorary
degrees. During the years 1950 to
1965 he was President of the
Bath Iron Works Corporation of
Bath, Maine, the principal
builder at that time of destroyer
type ships for the United States
Navy. They also designed a nu-
clear powered frigate for the
Navy. From 1957 until 1965 he
was a member of the Atomic In-
dustrial Forum (the trade asso-
ciation for the nuclear industry);
however, he now has taken an
anti-nuclear position since de-
velopments in more recent years
have convinced him, and many
others, that nuclear power is
much too dangerous and even-
tually much too costly. Mr.
Newell has spoken about the sub-
ject on radio and to various
organizations, including the
vigorous campaign in Maine last
November in favor of the referen-
dum to phase out the Maine
Yankee nuclear plant. Presently,
he is a Board member of
Floridians United for Safe
Energy (FUSE), an organization
which has been calling attention
to the situation at Turkey Point
and elsewhere in Florida and has
struggled with the Nuclear
Regulartory Commission and the
Florida Public Service Commis-
sion to avoid unsafe conditions
and greatly escalating utility
rates. In the early 1960s, Mr.
Newell was a Director of the
Federal Reserve Bank of Boston
and was also President of the So-
ciety of Naval Architects and
Marine Engineers.
At the meeting on March 7,
Mr. Newell will give detailed in-
formation and will answer ques-
tions concerning the Florida
situation and other aspects of nu-
clear energy.
The State of Israel Bond office has
relocated to new quarters at 2300 Palm Beach
Lakes Blvd., Suite 216. The new phone num-
ber will be 686-8611. The new office will com-
bine Palm Beach-Florida Region and National
Israel Bond operations. The move was
necessary due to the tremendous increase in
sales of Israel Bonds by people in the State of
Florida.
The Israel Bond organization expresses its
most sincere gratitude to the many people
who have made ttw Florida Region one of the
most successful Israel Bond sales areas in
the United States. Please come by and say
hello and have a glass of Sabra. We will be
open normal working hours, 9 am to 5 pm.
Bert Sales, Florida Regional Manager
State of Israel Bonds
B'nai Torah Congregation of Boca Raton and State of Israel Bonds
will pay tribute to Dr. and Mrs. Sidney Leib at the annual Bond dinner
on March 3. at 7:30 p.m. at the Temple. The Leibs are being honored
for their lifelong dedication to numerous Jewish causes. Dr. Leib is a
former president of the Detroit District of ZOA, and is currently on
the Board of the B'nai Torah Synagogue Men's Club. Mrs. Leib is
active in Hadassah, JNF, and Sisterhood Chairmen of the event are
Dr. and Mrs. Sol Gittelman.
Dr. and Mrs. Sidney Leib
To Be Honored Mar. 3
Professor Adam Gillon, author
and Professor of English Litera-
ture at Haifa University, will join
B'nai Torah Congregation of
Boca Raton and State of Israel
Bonds in honoring Dr. and Mrs.
Sidney Leib at a dinner on March
3 at the Temple.
Gillon has written many books,
including one on Israel, and has
been associated with the Bond
Organization since its formative
years in the early 1950's.
STAND-UP AND BE COUNTED!
Help work on our Keynoters Luncheon Committee. Call 368-
2737.
ANSWER THE CALL TO LMFE.
"Super Sunday" marks ths pinnacle of the
1963 United Jewish Appeal Campaign. It Is your
chance to make fund-raising history.
Join thousands of volunteers In federations
across the country In an all-out telephone drive-
to reach more people and raise mote money In a
single day than ever before.
Give us two hours of your time on March 20.
To call your friends and neighbors.
To ask them to Join you In helping our fellow
Jews at home, In Israel and around the world-
through our community campaign.
The calls you make may determine the quality of
Jewish life in this decade.
neeerve your "Super Sunday" telephone now.
TOUFE
Please reserve a telephone for me.
Name_____________________
TEAR OFF AND MAIL
Address
Telephone # (Home)
Affiliation----------------
(Bus)
I wW be able to staff the telephone from:
C 9,30a to 11.30a. !*** to 3l30P"
D 11:30a* to l:30pa
-;
D 3:30p to 5:30pw
Q 5:30pw to 7i30p
Q 7:30pei to 9.30pei
NOTE You will be requested to be at the phone center tor Orientation and Training 45 minutes before your
session begins It you have not made your 1983 pledge, you will be given the opportunity to do eo at
the close of your Orientation & Training session
Phone South County Jewish Federation al 368-2737 or Mail Coupon to:
2200 N. Federal Hwy, Suite 206, Boca Raton, FL. 33432
To Reserve Your Telephone_____________________


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, February 25, 1983
Human Rights Report Concludes
Settlements Cause Problems on Bank
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State
Department, in its annual
report on the human rights
situation throughout the
world, charges that Israels
human rights problems
have been "exacerbated"
by its settlement policies in
Judaea and Samaria_______
"Relations with Arabs in the
occupied territories the West
Bank, Gaza, East Jerusalem, and
the Golan Heights caused the
most significant human rights
problems for Israel in 1982," the
Department's Country Report on
Human Rights Practices for 1982
said. "These relations were
strained and the human rights
problems exacerbated as a
consequence of the (Israeli) gov-
ernment's implementation of its
declared policy of expanding and
developing Jewish settlements."
HOWEVER, Elliott Abrams,
Assistant Secretary of State for
Human Rights and Humani-
tarian Affairs, in explaining the
1.323-page report, covering 162
countries, said that the Israeli
settlements were not a violation
of human rights "per se."
Instead, he said the Reagan
Administration considers them
an "obstacle" to the peace
process.
The report, which was
presented to the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee and the
house Foreign Affairs Committee
Jan. 31, predicts no change in the
situation on the West Bank.
"Aboent dramatic progress in
the peace process, confrontation
between the inhabitants of the
territories and the occupation
authorities is likely to remain at
the same level as in recent
years," the report concludes.
situation in Israel, which is a full
democracy, and the West Bank
and Gaza, which is under military
occupation. He said the residents
of the occupied territories do not
have control of their government
but added that there are "a
number of military governments,
included in the Middle East
which are a good deal harsher"
than Israel.
THE REPORT expresses
concern for the some 5,400 Pales-
tinian prisoners held in Israel as a
result of its invasion of Lebanon.
Abrams said the U.S. hopes that
many of them can be released and
that those the Israelis plan to
bring to trial have their trials
soon.
The human rights situation in
Lebanon deteriorated during
1982 because of the thousands of
persons killed as a result of
Israel's invasion, Abrams said,
but he added that no one knew
the exact number of fatalities.
The report said that the
Lebanese government estimates
that 19.800 Lebanese and Pales-
tinian civilians, were killed since
last June, the majority during
Israel's siege of West Beirut. The
report notes that dozens died as a
result of terrorist bombings and
assassinations, "the most
serious" of which was the
bombing assassination of
Lebanese President-elect Bashir
Gemayel. "Doznes, perhaps
hundreds, of civilians were killed
in 1982 in clashes between militia
forces elsewhere in Lebanon," the
report adds.
AT THE same time, the report
displays the same ambiguous
attitude toward Israel's "Peace
for Galilee" operation as has the
Administration since last June.
Israel's invasion "dramatically
altered the situation" in which
"clashes among Lebanese
militias, Syrian forces in Lebanon
and the PLO created widespread
abuses of human rights," the
report said.
"PLO and Syrian influence
was eliminated in Beirut and
south Lebanon, but Israeli action
also led the abuses. In addition to
violations by the Israelis in areas
under their control, the Lebanese
government itself was respon-
sible for serious abuses as it reas-
serted its control over west
Beirut."
The report added that the
withdrawal of all foreign force?
from I Lebanon and the restoration
of the Lebanese government's
authority over its territory
should lead to "an improvement
in the human rights situation."
DID WE MISS YOU?
Join Us At The Women's Divison Keynoters' Luncheon $150
minimum gift. Call 368-2737. March 16, 1983
Community Calendar
'' I srael is likely to continue its
efforts to contain and reshape the j March 6
politics of the West Bank and
Gaza through the acquisition of
land for settlement, official sub-
sidization of population growth
in existing settlements and polit-
ical support for the Village
Leagues."
I February 25
i Community Relations Council meeting 12 noon.
; February 27
; Temple Beth El Distinguished Artist Series 8 p.m. B'naiTorah
[ Men's Club, 9:30 a.m. meeting Temple Emeth-Singles, 9:30
| a.m. Board meeting.
; February 28
[ Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 12:30 p.m. meeting Diamond Club,
= 9 am meeting Temple Beth Shalom, 10:30 a.m. meeting
i B'nai B'rith-Shomer Lodge, 2 p.m. meeting Temple Sinai-Sis-
= terhood, 12 noon meeting.
| March 1
| Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood, 12 noon meeting B'nai B'rith-Boca
Teeca Lodge, 9:30 a.m. meeting Brandeis Women-Boca, 10
I a.m. meeting Temple Sinai-Men's Club, 7:30 p.m. meeting
i Hadassah-Boca Maariv, 1 p.m. Board meeting.
1 March 2
| Women's American ORT-Region, 9.30 a.m. executive meeting
S Hadassah-Menachem Begin, 9:30 a.m. Board meeting
i National Council Jewish Women, 8 p.m. Board meeting
H Women's Division Cabinet meeting 9:30 a.m.
| March 3
Jewish War Veterans-Synder-Tokson Post, 10 a.m. meeting
[ Hadassah-Sabra, 8 p.m. Board meeting Women's Club of Boca
Teeca-Paramedics Luncheon and meeting 12 p.m. Temple
I Emeth Sisterhood, 12 noon meeting B'nai B'rith Women-
j Genesis, 10 a.m. Board meeting Women's American ORT-AII
s Points, 2 p.m. meeting.
South County Jewish Federation Community-Wide Program on
Cults, 7:30 p.m.
March 7
Brandeis Women-Boca, 9:30 a.m. Board meeting Diamond
meeting Women's American ORT-Boca Glades,
THE REPORT labels the
Leagues as "rural-based quasi-
political organizations" through
which it charges Israel wants to
"transfer patronage and
authority from elected and
established Palestinian na-
tionalist leaders whom Israel
objects to as being supporters of
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization."
The report devotes 21 pages to
Israel. 12 of which cover the
occupied territories. Abrams
stressed that the length devoted
to a country has no relation to the
human rights problem there but
reflects the availability of in-
formation.
Abrams pointed out that the
report differentiates between the
Stravinsky Work
Going to Library
JERUSALEM JTA) -
Mayor Teddy Kollek has donated
a rare manuscript by composer
Igor Stravinsky to the music de-
partment of the Jewish National
and Hebrew University Library.
The manuscript, is the only
complete manuscript version of
"Abraham and Isaac," a ballad
for baritone and chamber or-
chestra.
XmCK'XiXXXK- VVVVVVvmV.~. -.v. v.
S Club, 9 a.m.
10 a.m. Board meeting Women's American ORT-North Pines]
10 a.m. Board meeting Women's League for Israel, 10 a.m!
; Board meeting Free Sons of Israel, 7:30 p.m. meeting Boca
= Teeca Federation Breakfast 9:30 a.m. Brooklyn Friendship Club
S of Century Village West, 10 a.m. meeting.
; March
i Zionist Organization of America, 8 p.m. meeting Hadassah-
| Aviva, 10 a.m. meeting Hadassah-Shalom-Delray, 9:30 a.m.
i meeting B'nai Torah Congregation, 7:30 p. m. Board meeting
Temple Beth El-Solos, 730 p.m. Board meeting Temple Emeth-
: Brotherhood, 7:30 p.m. meeting.
| March 9
\ B'nai Torch-Sisterhood, 7:30 p.m. Board meeting.
| March 10
I Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood, Movie 1 p.m. American Mizrachi
Women, 10 a.m. meeting Hadassah-Ben Gurion, 9:30 a.m.
\ Board meeting Hadassah-Sabra, 8 p.m. Board meeting
Temple Beth El-Sisterhood, 10a.m. Board meeting.
i March 12
: Hadassah-Menachem Begin, 9:30a.m. meeting.
! March 13 '
B'nai B'rith Integrity Council, 9:30 a.m. meeting B'noi Torah
Men's Club, 9:30 a.m. meeting Temple Beth El-Brotherhood,
Breakfast 10a.m. Temple Beth El Young Artist Series, 3 p.m.
March 14
Temple Emeth-Singles, 12:30 p.m. meeting Diamond Club, 9
a.m. meeting Women's American ORT-North Pines, 12:30 p.m.
meeting Hodassah Association of South County, 9 a.m.
meeting Career Women
Open meeting 10 a.m.
7 p.m. Brandeis Women-Boca.
March 15
Hodassah-Boea Maoris, 12
Pioneer Women Zipporah,
American ORT-Delray, 12:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah-Shalom- |
Delray, 10 a.m. Board meeting B'nai B'rith Delray Lodge, 7:30 jj
p. m. meeting.
March 16
Women's American ORT-Region, 10 a.m. Board
Hadassah-Menachem Begin, 12 noon meeting.
meeting s
March 17
Temple Emeth-Sisterhood, 12:30 p.m. meeting Temple Beth El-
Sisterhood, 12:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah-Ben Gurion, 12:30
p.m. meeting Women's American ORT-Oriole, 1 p.m. Board
meeting Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 12:30 p.m. Board meeting
American Mizrachi Women-Kfar, 10 a.m. meeting.
Torah Congregation
noon meeting and Card Parry
10 o.m. meeting Women's
March 18
Israel Bond's, 4 p.m. Hamlet B'nai
Installation of Rabbi Feldman 8:15 p.m.
March 20
SUPER SUNDAY Zionist Organization of America Polo Match 5
and Picnic 12 noon Young Leadership Development, 7 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Olympic Lodge XI, 9:30 a.m. meeting Temple
Emeth Concert 8 p.m. Temple Beth El Forum Series, 8 p.m. =
Boca Teeca Cocktail Party, Israel Bonds 6 p.m.
March 21
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi, 12:30 p.m. meeting Diamond Club =
meeting 9 a.m. B'nai B'rith-Shomer Lodge, 2 p.m. meeting
Women's American ORT-Boca Glades, 1 p.m. meeting B'nai
B'rith Women-Ruth, 1 p.m. meeting.
March 22
Pioneer Women-Zipporah, 12 noon meeting Hodassah-Aviva,
12:30 p.m. Board meeting Temple Beth El-Solos, 7:30 p.m.
meeting.
March 23
Women's American ORT-Sandalfoot, 1 p.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Delroy, 12:30 p.m. meeting National Council
Jewish Women, 9a.m. meeting.
March 24
Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting Jewish War
Veterans-Auxiliary, 7 p.m. meeting Jewish Wor Veterans-
Delray, 7 p.m. meeting Temple Beth El, 8 p.m. Board meeting
South County Jewish Community Day School 7 p.m. Model
Seder B'nai B'rith Women-Boca, 1 p.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Oriole, 12 p.m. meeting Hodossah-Sabra, 8
p.m. meeting Temple Emelh-Brotherhood, 10 a.m. Board
meeting Temple Emeth-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting
Brandeis Women-Delray, 1 p.m. meeting.
March 25
B'nai Torah Men's Club and Zionist Organization of America co-
sponsor Shabbat Service, 8:15 p.m.
|IIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHtMllllillllHlllllllllllllllllllllllll|||||||||||||||||||||||||||||^
I FEDERATION UJA CALENDAR CAMPAIGN EVENTS 1
February 28
Boca West Coffee, home of Mr and Mrs. Jontiff, 7:30 p. m.
March 6
Congregation Anshe. Emuna-Federation Breakfast, 9:30 a.m.
March 7
Boca Teeca Federation Breakfast, 9:30 a. m.
March 14
Caree Women, 7 p.m.
March 16
Women's Division Keynoter's Event $150-plo
March 20
SUPER SUNDAY
*'VVVVVVV.VjVVV.V.!.V.1.'..'.MA.:

miini<< %j i a a


Friday, February 25,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
THE FOLLOWING HAVE JOINED THE
WINNING TEAM1
FOR SUPER SUNDAY '83
SUPER SUNDAY
MARCH 20
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION
IS PUTTING
YOU ON THE LINE
*******
NTY Z1Z ^
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION | BOCA RATON
DELRAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
The following have Joined the 'Win- FLORIDA
nlng Team' for Super Sunday '88
March 20 South County Jewish
Federation la putting you on the line
1 '
I (
1 I
I F
Al Abraham, Boca Teeca
Ida Abraham, Boca Teeca
Abe Ackerman. Kings Point
Morris Anapolaky, Temple Emeth
Sylvia Anapolaky, Temple Emeth
Herman Augenbllck,
Temple Anahel Shalom
Helen Avlns. JWVA
James Baer. Federation
Margie Baer. Federation
Bob Byrnes. Federation
Jenna Barnes. Federation
Gertrude Bamett. Kings Point
Dr. Arnold Berliner. Federation
Ton) Berliner. Federation
Ed Boblck. Federation
Marianne Boblck, Federation
Irving Bonwlt. Temple Emeth
Sylvia Bonwlt, Temple Emeth
Dorothy Brand, Federation
Mildred Biiggln. JWVA
Irving Burglaas. Boca West
Mrs. Irv Burglasa, Boca West
Ben Bussln. Temple Slnal
Evelyn Bussln, Temple Slnal
Doris Cantor, Boca Lago
K at re I la Cases, Federation
Molses Cases, Federation
Philip Chester, Century Village
Lillian Chodash, Temple Slnal
Cella Cohen
Blossom Cooper, Temple Slnal
Julius Daroe, Temple Emeth
Ruth Daroe. Temple Emeth
Eric Decklnger. Federation
Rhoda Denney, Century Village
Yetta Dogan, Federation
Brian Elchler, Federation
Cralg Elchler, Federation
Jay Elchler, Federation
Ellssa Ellant, Federation
Marlon Engle, B'nal B'rlth
Bobbl Falk. Federation
Esther Feldman, Federation
Ida Feldman, Temple Emeth
Isabel Fink. Hadassah
Adam Flveson, Federation
Gloria Flveson. Federation
Walter Flveson, Federation
Daniel Freed, Boca West
Harriet Freed, Boca West
Al Gardner. JWV
Elsie Gardner. JWVA
Sylvia Gardner. High Point W
Molly GarfInkel. Kings Point
Sarah Gold. Hadassah
Robert Goldman. No. 8144 B'nal B'rlth
JaikGerlnger. JWV
RoiGeringer. JWVA
Lillian Glueckman. B'nal Torah
Saul Glueckman. B'nal Torah
Ida Goren. JWVA
AlGortz. Federation
Maye Gould. Oriole
Eddye Greenwood
Marvin Greenwood
Harvey Grossman. Federation
Roz Grossman. Federation
IrvHanner. JWV
*>Hy Hanner. JWVA
oyce Helsel. Federation
!* Herman, Temple Emeth
[Harriet Herskowltz. JWVA
Edith HIM, Temple Emeth
Esther Hoffeld, Boca West
I'r. Nathan Hoffeld. Boca West
Bea Hollobow, Boca Teeca
Alfred Horowitz, B'nal Torah
Donald Jacobson. Boca Lago
Mrs. D. Jacobson. Boca Lago
Eleanor Jontlff, B'nal Torah
tieldon JontMf. B'nal Torah
r Dalla Kalal, Federation
r. Ury Kalal. Federation
en Karpen, Temple Emeth
m Kati, Federation
ren Kaufman, Federation
e Kaufman, Federation
< Kaufman. Century Village
arold Kay. Temple Emeth
nn Kessler. Temple Emeth
en Kessler. Temple Emeth
en Kideckel. Century Village
<1ward Kings ley, Oriole
argaret Kottler. FederaUon
Uton Kretaky, Federation
nne Lakof f. Kings Point
ay Lapldus, Temple Emeth
1 Lapldus, Temple Emeth
dy Lechtenberg, FederaUon
!rt> Lelfman. Boca Wast
arbara Lain. FederaUon
red Leltner. JWV
arol Levin, FederaUon
rb Levin, FederaUon
ner Levtne, FederaUon
borah Levlne. Oriole
ackM.Levine, Oriole
erman Upson. Century Village
lorence Llttman. JF8
r. John M Lowe, Century VUUuje
Lowenbraun, Temple Emeth
urray Lowenbraun, Temple Emeth
rthur Lucker, Temple Emeth
rl Lucker, Temple Emeth
Da^lV^^fliajMuaon
na Man. FederaUon
In Mann, Temple Emeth
Sanford Meade, Federation
Sherrl Meade, FederaUon
Louis Medwln, Temple Emeth
Rose Medwln, Temple Emeth
Linda Melcer, FederaUon
Steve Melcer. FederaUon
Roberta Meyerson, FederaUon
Dr. William Meyerson, Federation
Carl Miller, Temple Emeth
Syma Miller. Kings Point
Mortis Morris, FederaUon
Albert Omansky. FederaUon
Esther Omansky. FederaUon
AlOstrlck, Federation
Hy Packer, Temple Emeth
Norma Packer, Temple Emeth
Sherle Pechenck, Temple Emeth
David Perllne, Boca Tlerra
Roslyn Perllne, Boca Tlerra
DotUe Perslco, FederaUon
Nick Perslco, FederaUon
Bernard Person, Century Village
Meryle Praeger. JWVA
Lou Rlfkln, FederaUon
Rose Rlfkln. Federation
Elaine Roberts, Temple Beth El
Charlotte Robinson. Federation
Marcla Roff, Boca Teeca
Sylvia Rosen. JWVA
Arnold Rosenthal, Federation
Bessie Rothchlld. Temple Emeth
Eleanor Rukln. Federation
Naomi Sachs. Temple Beth El
Berenice Schankerman. Federation
Joe S. Schenk, Temple Emeth
Albert Segal, Federation
Mollle Segal, Hadassah
Anita Shalley, FederaUon
Eve Shalley. Federation
Marian Shalley. FederaUon
Hank Shandler. JWV
Betty Slegel. ORT
Iz Slegel. FederaUon
Rabbi Bernard Silver. Temple Emeth
Edith Sliver, JWVA
Myma Stein. Temple Beth El
Eve Steinberg, Coco Wood Lakes
Joe Steinberg, Coco Wood Lakes
Lenore Steinberg. FederaUon
Mark Steinberg. B'nal Torah
Paul Steinberg. Federation
Roberta Steinberg. B'nal Torah
Mrs. Jack Stone. ORT
Jack Stone. FederaUon
Sara Stone, Temple Emeth
Joel Tanen, Federation
Dr. Morris Tear, Temple Emeth
Marge Tepperman, HWVA
AndreaTrlpp, FederaUon
Sydelle Turman, Kings Point
Grace Warner, Century Village
Seymour Warner, Century Village
Lynne Warahal. FederaUon
Rabbi Bruce Warahal, Federation
Fran Waterman. Temple Beth El
Miriam Welner. Temple Beth El
Gladys Welnshank. FederaUon
Mayer Welnshank, FederaUon
Dorothy Young. Atlantic Demo. Club
Tom Young. Atlantic Demo.Club
Dr. Joe Zlnns. FederaUon
Marilyn Zlnns, FederaUon___________
Tax Credits for Tuition?
Continued from Page 1
they were reportedly uncertain
whether the facts developed
during the district court trial
would provide the best vehicle for
Supreme Court consideration.
The second hearing at tne uib-
trict court level before a single
judge, dealing with Van. D.
Mueller v. Clyde Allen, et al, de-
veloped when Mueller, as a St.
Paul taxpayer, sued to overturn
the Minnesota law. The district
court ruled on May 13, 1981, that
the law was constitutional.
IT WAS THAT ruling which
was appealed by Mueller to
the Eighth District Circuit Court
which ruled last April 30 that the
Minnesota law did not violate the
First Amendment ban on reli-
gion.
In response to the Supreme
Court's agreement to hear the
case, the opposing sides filled
friends-of-the-court briefs. The
opponents* brief contended that
such deductions are just as un-
constitutional as direct govern-
ment grants to such schools. In
response to that brief, a group of
Orthodox organizations joined in
a brief which argued that there is
no difference between deductions
for tuition and other related
schooling costs for pupils of
parochial schools and charitable
contributions to such schools and
other religious institutions.
The major sponsors of the op-
posing brief are the National
Committee for Public Education
and Religious Liberty (PEARL);
the National Parent Teacher As-
sociation; the American Federa-
tion of Labor-Congress of Indus-
trial Organizations (AFL-CIO);
and the American Jewish Con-
gress.
Each of the four major spon-
sors signed the brief on behalf of
itself and a number of other orga-
nizations, including eight Jewish
Federations, eight Jewish Com-
munity Relations Councils; and
two Jewish Community Councils.
THE BRIEF for the law was
written by Nathan Lewin. a
Washington attorney who is vice
president of the National Jewish
Commission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA). Joining in the
COLPA brief are nine national
Orthodox organizations.
A spokesman for COLPA said
the Supreme Court could order
and hear oral arguments and rule
on the constitutionality of the
Minnesota law during its current
term, which ends next June; or
the high court could schedule
arguments and reach a decision
during the next term, which be-
gins in October and ends in June
1984.
The latest battle on the deduc-
tions issue was sparked by a
statement from Agudath Israel
of America, one of the nine Or-
thodox agencies joining in the
COLPA brief, which charged that
the Jewish organizations joining
in the other brief were guilty of
"irresponsible behavior" because
they were "fighting the interests
of Jewish education."
THE ORTHODOX agency
added that it was "almost hypo-
critical to believe that Jewish
fund-raising agencies would deny
assistance to parents of children
in yeshivos at the same time that
they continue to keep their purse
strings knotted when funds are
needed for Torah education, for
which most of them provide only
paltry, token allocations."
The American Jewish. Con-
gress noted that the Minnesota
law grants income tax deductions
for education costs of parents of
children attending both public
and private schools. But, the
AJCongress declared, because
public schools are porhibited by
law from charging for tuition,
textbooks and transportation to
and from school, the tax deduc-
tion benefit, in reality, affects
only parents of private school
pupils.
The opposition brief added
that, in Minnesota, some 90 per-
cent of all non-public schools are
religious institutions,and that, in
1980, Minnesota taxpayers,
taking advantage of the law,
reduced their taxable income by
$32 million.
THE BRIEF asserted that
since the tax deduction benefit is
not restricted to expenditures for
secular items for religious
schools, the Minnesota law
violates the constitutional re-
quirement of church-state
separation. The brief cited earlier
Supreme Court opinions
declaring direct government aid
to religious schools unconstitu-
tional and contended the same
principle should apply to the tax
deduction option, on grounds
such deductions should be con-
sidered equivalent to government
grants.
The COLPA brief stresses that
a tax credit could arguably be
viewed as providing direct gov-
ernment financial support, while
a tax deduction or exemption did
not involve direct government
aid but represents a decision by
the government not to tax poten-
tial sources of revenue.
Congressman William Lehman presents Secretary of State
George Shultz with thousands of postcards from the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, urging help for Anatoly
Sharanskv-


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Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, January 7.1983
Friday, February 25, 1983
Egypt Denies Israeli Belief Normalization Is At Dead End
i
j
By JUDITH KOHN
CAIRO Foreign
Minister Kamal Hassan Ali
said that Egypt's Ambas-
sador to Israel would return
to Tel Aviv as soon as an
agreement was reached on
the withdrawal of Israeli
forces from Lebanon.
In an interview, the Foreign
Minister also reiterated Egypt's
claim to the disputed area of
Taba, but said that should the
dispute be submitted to arbitra-
tion, Egypt would abide by the
ruling of the arbitraiton panel,
even if it meant conceding the
territory to Israel.
SPEAKING about his
scheduled visit to the United
States, where he will be accom-
panied by President Hosni
Mubarak, Ali said that the
Egyptian side would press the
question of Israeli settlements in
the West Bank, "as one of the
major points to be raised with the
(Reagan) Administration."
.The following is
an abridged transcript of the in-
terview:
For Cairo, Results
Are Shy of Purpose
By JUDITH KOHN
CAIRO (JTA) A
major Egyptian news daily,
in an editorial published
here, suggested that the re-
port of Israel's commission
of inquiry into the massacre
of Palestinians in Beirut
did not go far enough in its
condemnation of top Israeli
leaders for their role in the
events which led to the kill-
ings last September. At the
same time, it urged the
Arab world to capitalize on
the commission's findings.
"Although the condemnation
dealt with many big names," said
the semi-official Al Ahram, "the
question which now arises is are
those leaders the only ones to be
found guilty? The resignations of
(Defense Minister Ariel) Sharon
or (Director of Israeli Military
Intelligence Gen. Yehoshua)
Saguy, whose dismisssals were
recommended by the report, suf-
ficient to wash the hands of (the
Israeli government) completely
clean of those massacres?"
CHARGING THAT the com-
mission's findings "adds another
black page to the annals of Is-
rael," the newspaper called the
decision of Israeli leaders in
question to remain in office or re-
sign "an internal matter."
But it called upon the Arabs to
"capitalize on the condemnation
as much as possible," especially
after the Arab world turned what
the editorial called "a blind eye"
to the massacres when they oc-
curred.
Another major news daily, Al-
Gomhuriyya, said the results of
the commission's inquiry should
be judged according to the
changes they might or might not
bring about in Israeli policy.
"If the investigation con-
ducted by the Kahan Commis-
sion and its results are the begin-
ning of a change," it said in an
editorial, "then those who believe
in peace in all parts of the world
must welcome this. But if the
condemnation ends with a mere
dramatic reshuffling of the Israeli
government, this would be some-
thing else."
No official response to the
commission's findings has been
offered yet by the Egyptian
government.
American, Russian Share
Wolf Prize in Math
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
1982 Wolf Foundation prize in
mathematics is to be shared by
an American and a Russian, the
Israel-based Foundation an-
nounced here.
They are Prof. Hassler
Whitney, of the Institute for
Advanced Studies at Princeton,
N.J., and Prof. Mark Grigorevich
Krein, of the Institute of Physical
Chemistry of the Ukrainian
Academy of Sciences in Odessa.
They will share the $100,000 prize
to be awarded by President
'Yitzhak Navon at a ceremony in
the Knesset in May
Krein is the third Russian
mathematician to be awarded the
Wolf Prize. While they have been
allowed to accept the award, they
have not been allowed to leave
the Soviet Union to accept it in
person. The Foundation is now
trying to obtain permission for
them to accept the award at a
foreign embassy in Moscow rep-
resenting Israeli interests.
Whitney is honored for his
work in algebraic and differential
topology and differential geo-
metry. Krein is honored for his
"fundamental contributions to
functional analysis and its ap-
plications."
The Foundation prize in
chemistry for 1982 is to be shared
by Prof. George Pimental, of the
University of California, for the
discovery of photodissociation
and chemical lasers, among other
accomplishments, and Prof. John
Polanyi, of the University of
Toronto, for his studies of che-
mical reactions envisaging the
principles underlying the
chemical laser.
Q. Egypt's Minister of State
for Foreign Affairs, Dr. Boutros
Ghali, was quoted recently as
saying that improved relations
between Egypt and Israel re-
quired that Israel
withdraw from Lebanon, start
peace talks on the Palestinian
issue and agree to negotiate the
future of Taba. Does this mean
that the normalization process
will remain frozen until all of
these conditions are realized?
A. Well, I would like to dis-
agree at the beginning about the
normalization being frozen, be-
cause, in fact, the normalization
was not frozen. For instance, im-
plementation of the Egyptian-Is-
raeli treaty is going on in most of
its articles and in most of its
spirit also. The liaison commis-
sion, the joint Egyptian-Israeli
commission, meets periodically,
as mentioned in the treaty.
We received the Israeli delega-
tions for purchasing our oil, and
it is not a commitment in the
treaty. But we still sell our oil to
Israel. We received at the end of
November, 1982 a delegation
from Israel, and we sold about
two million tons. Again, some Is-
raeli purchases have been imple-
mented by the government, be-
cause all the sources of export in
these fields are governmental
organizations.
So, officially the normalization
has never been affected, except in
those areas where there is a pos-
sibility of affecting the popula-
tion, as in the cultural field, for
instance. Of course, you can't de-
pend much on getting a professor
from Tel Aviv University or Ben
Gurion University in Egypt dur-
ing the massacres going on in
Lebanon. We have to tackle such
areas very delicately because we
do not want to affect the nor-
malization.
Q. What about more specific
aspects (of diplomatic relations),
such as the return of the Israeli
Ambassador? Is this linked up
with those three conditions that
Dr. Ghali had mentioned?
A. No, it is not linked with the
Taba issue. It is not linked with
the normalization, but it was
linked by only one incident
that is the Israeli bombing and
series of massacres in West Bei-
rut. So, it was linked in this area
only.
Q. Dr. Ghali also maintained
that Kgypt would only take part
in negotiations with Israel on the
transitional period and the Pales-
tinian issue in the presence of a
Palestinian delegation. Does this
mean that the participation of
representatives from the PLO
specifically, whether in their own
delegation or as part of another
delegation, is now a prerequisite
for resuming the peace process?
A. You know, we are linked to
the framework for peace in the
Middle East, which was signed
by the three countries Egypt,
Israel and the United States.
And it calls for a participation
El Al Planning to Dismiss
650 Employees, Including Pilots
TEL AVIV (JTA) The El
Al management presented a list
of 650 employes they intend to
dismiss to Histadrut in order to
restore the airline to economic
health. The employes have 14
days to protest. But about 300 of
them are prepared to leave
willingly. Of 21 pilots on the list,
10 will accept early retirement.
The others include 24 flight
engineers, 60 flight attendants,
men and women, and 200 tech-
nicians.
The airline, which resumed
service on a limited scale two
weeks ago after being gounded
for four months, is operating
under a new set of work rules that
supersede all previous arrange-
ments.
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from Jordan and the Pales-
tinians, who will be attached or
be an organic element in the Jor-
danian or Egyptian delegation.
So we are tied to this.
Q. So it doesn't necessarily
have to be the PLO?
A. As we all know, all the
mayors of the West Bank and
Gaza are PLO members. So it is
only a formal appearance that a
separate or an integral part of the
Palestinians will be in the delega-
tion of Jordan or Egypt.
Q. Do you think the participa-
tion of the Palestinians could
take place without the explicit
approval of the PLO, and do you
think that under such conditions
Israel would agree to negotiate
with the delegation?
A. We have, in this respect, to
implement the framework for
peace, and in this sense it is for
the Jordanians and the Pales-
tinians to agree together about
the formation of the delegation.
Q. By the "Palestinians," you
are not referring specifically to
the PLO as an organization?
A. They can agree to that to-
gether. It is not for Egypt or
anybody to urge the West
Bankers or the PLO members to
insist this or that.
Q. Has communication be-
tween Egypt and Israel on the
Taba dispute reached a total im-
passe, or is there reason to be op-
timistic about an early break-
through at least an agreement
on a negotiating framework
with the help of U.S. mediation?
A. I am still optimistic that our
meetings will be resumed, be-
cause it is an obligation an
Egyptian Israeli obligation which
was signed on the 25th of April,
1982 the day of the final with-
drawal of Israel from Sinai. And I
am quite sure that both countries
are keen to implement all the
agreements, and these meetings
are aiming to start the concilia-
tion, not as negotiations, but the
conciliation, on the Taba lamin.
And I would like to tell you
something about this issue. It
was needless to raise it. It was
needlessBecause whenever there
is a frontier dispute, between two
countries, you know, the full rela-
tions will be absent. And, as
everybody knows, all the docu-
ments are very clear that this
area is an Egyptian area.
Whether it is one kilometer or one
centimeter, it doesn't matter. But
it is the principle. So we have to
solve this dispute in the nearest
future for the sake of the peace
and for the sake of the full rela-
tionship between the two coun-
tries.
Q. You spoke of conciliation,
which, according to the peace
treaty provisions on resolving
border disputes, is supposed to
come before arbitration. Are you
at all confident though that it
could be resolved through con-
ciliation, or do you expect it to
eventually have to be submitted
to arbitration?
A. There is always the possi-
bility of differences in concilia-
tion, and then we can transfer to
arbitration. During the negotia-
tions for the conciliation we can
agree together that we can auto-
matically, if we do not agree on
conciliation, transfer to arbitra-
tion so as not to lose time.
Q. Egypt has stated repeatedly
that it would never cede an inch
of the Taba area and that it is.
Egyptian territory. Should the
issue be submitted to an arbitra-
tion panel, has your government
entirely ruled out the possibility
that the panel might decide in Is-
rael's favor?
A. If the arbitration will con-
clude that this land is not Egyp-
tian, we will respect it, because
an agreement is an agreement.
But what we are sure about it
that all the documents (show),
and in its nature, it is our terri-
tory."
JTA Feature Syndicate
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'
"
Friday, February 25,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 13
On the Bookshelf
London Jews' History Good Reading
rhe Enduring Years. By Claire Negative attitudes towards the
Kayner. New York: newcomers were common in each
Delacorte Press, 1982. 579 P'ace. Also similar were the ef-
forts to Anglicize or Americanize
Pp., $15.95.
By MORTON TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
If you can_get-past the confus-
g 80-page -prologue of this his-
orical novel, you will be re-
arded with an interesting story
bout London's Jews from 1885
1980. The prologue is a mish-
mash which races through the
enturies from the destruction of
Ihe Temple in 70 CE to 1885.
lention is made of Jewish life in
agdad. Cordoba, Shanghai
oledo, Amsterdam, Bombay
nd Lublin. Brief reference is
ade to the Crusades and the In-
jisition. Too much is covered
oo quickly.
The story really begins in 1885
ith the arrival in London of
athan Lazar from Lublin. His
ialfl and tribulations in the East
nd of London are very similar to
experiences of Russian and
olish immigrants to New York's
.ower East Side in the same era.
loth encountered established
(immunities the German Jews
America, the West European
ews in England and the
phardic Jews in both places.
the "greenhorns."
THE THEME of the story is
the interaction between the older
settlers such as the Rothschilds
and the Montefiores and the
newer East European immi-
grants, personified by Nathan
Lazar and his relatives. Nathan's
daughter. Hannah, the heroine,of
the book, is the chief bearer of
this interaction.
She is befriended by Mary
Lammeck, a wealthy member of
the established community, who
"adopts" Hannah from Sunday
to Friday as a companion. This
relationship flourishes over a
seven-year period during which
Hannah develops rich tastes,
polite manners and skills as a
seamstress. She falls in love with
Daniel Lammeck, Mary's
nephew, and marries him despite
the opposition of his parents. She
also becomes estranged from
some members of her family, par-
ticularly her father.
However, she maintains con-
tact with her uncle and, as the
story unfolds, she keeps associa-
tions in both communities. Occa-
sional meetings between the
Pym Summons Popov to Talk
About Plight of Sharansky
LONDON (JTA) The British Foreign Office took
virtually unprecedented step in summoning the Soviet
[Ambassador to discuss the plight of imprisoned Jewish
lissident Anatoly Sharansky. Foreign Secretary Francis
Pym told Ambassador Viktor Popov that Sharansky
should be released immediately, and expressed concern
ibout the effect of his hunger strike and forcible feeding.
THE BRITISH appeal was timed to coincide with the
reopening in Madrid of the two-year-old European
Conference on Cooperation and Security. Sharansky is
Ibelieved here to be in poor health and weak as a result of
|his ordeal.
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher granted an in-
terview to Sharansky's wife, Avital, several weeks ago
and publicly supported her single-handed campaign for
[his release. Pym raised the Sharansky case with Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko at the United Nations
last September.
RonnyWin,M.D.,P.A.
Obstetrics and Gynecology
annouces the opening of an additional office
Medical Center of Delray
Suite 202
909 Palm Trail
Delray Beach, Florida 33444
(305) 276-2300
Office Hours
By Appointment
Boca Raton Office:
Boca Medical Plaza
5458 Town Center Road
Suite 5
(305) 368-3466
families prove to be disastrous.
By the end of the story, the com-
munities have more or less
merged into British Jewry just as
the decendants of the various
waves of Jewish immigration to
the United States have come to-
gether in American Jewry.
HANNAHS MARRIAGE to
Daniel is not successful. He dies
when she is only 18 years old,
leaving her with a two-month old
daughter. She establishes a
dress-making business and be-
comes very successful when she
turns part of the business into
making uniforms for the soldiers
of World War I. After the war,
the uniform factory becomes a
plant for making cheap dresses,
and new workshops are estab-
lished where she designs dresses
for the wealthy. The business
flourishes; Hannah remarries;
her daughter has many problems
growing up.
The family saga continues
through World War II and there-
after. There are more tragic
events and some triumphs. The
story ends with Hannah's grand-
daughter, her husband and their
child. Hannah's great grand-
daughter, moving to Jerusalem,
thus closing the circle which
began in Jerusalem in 70 CE.
Aside from the prologue, the
book maintains the reader's in-
terest. The author, a British
woman, has written more than 60
books. This one was first pub-
lished in England under the title
The Running Years. For Ameri-
can Jews, the book offers an easy
and entertaining way of learning
about our British cousins.
PARTICULARLY noteworthy
is the similarity between the suc-
cess achieved in both Britain and
America in amalgamating vari-
ous strains of immigrants into
Jewish communities which are
fundamentally united despite in-
ternal differences. These dif-
ferences are no longer related to
country of origin. Both countries
have increasingly native-born
populations which are relatively
homogenous.
Rayners book describes the
long road along which British
Jews trod to achieve that homo-
geneity. We are more familiar
with the American story of in-
tegration among Sephardic Jews,
German Jews and East European
Jews
Perhaps there is hope in these
stories for the Ashkenazim and
Sephardim of Israel. The sharp
differences which exist are no
keener than those described in
this book nor those which once
existed in America. Rayner has
shown how time has eradicated
these differences in Britain. We
know that they are no longer sig-
nificant in America. Perhaps the
tensions between the two Israeli
communities will also wither
away. Let us hope so. While un-
doubtedly unintended, this is
surely a useful lesson of this
story.
Meyer Robinson (right) of Lawrence, LI, chairman of the board and
treasurer of Monarch Wine Co., producers of Manischewitz Wine, is
presented the Canal Founders Award of the Israel Bond Organization
by Lt. Col. Baruch Spiegel of the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). A Canal
Founder is an individual who invests $100,000 or more in Israel Bonds
to provide "seed capital" for Israel's Mediterranean-Dead Sea Canal
project, which when completed will provide hydroelectric power to
greatly reduce the country's independence on imported oil. Col.
Spiegel made the presentation while in the United States with a group
of senior IDF officers to promote the Israel Bond campaign.

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Pare 16
i ne jewisn tionaian of South County
Friday, February 25, 1983
Spanish Government and Jews To 'Ensure' Religious Rights
By MILTON JACOBY
MADRID (JTA) -
For the first time since
1492, Spanish Jewry is on
the eve of a major break-
through: the forging of an
historic concordat with the
government of Spain,
which will ensure total reli-
gious freedom, rights and
privileges on a par with
those enjoyed by their
Catholic neighbors.
A State Commission on Reli-
gious Liberty has recently been
formed, comprising seven repre-
sentatives of the various minis-
tries seven from the religious
faiths and seven professional
experts. A member of the Stand-
ing Commission of four is Samuel
Toledano, a Madrid industrialist
and an ardent Zionist. The re-
maining members of this impor-
tant working group are two
Catholics and one Protestant.
TOLEDANO considered it
most significant that, although
there are only 10,000 or 12,000
Jews out of a population of 38
million, one of the four Commis-
sion members is a Jew. He saw it
as "a matter of historic vindica-
tion after centuries of suppres-
sion." and added that "whereas
doors have been closed to Jews in
several countries in the Mediter-
ranean area, the fact that the
door has been reopened in Spain
reflects the vitality of Judaism,
and indicates that Jews can still
play a vital role in ameliorating
the social and religious life of the
nation."
A first and important step was
taken in 1980. he pointed out.
with the passage of a law dealing
with religious liberty and non-
discrimination, and the Jewish
community was consulted in the
drafting of this progressive legis-
lation.
Toledano is the secretary of the
Federation of Communities.
There are 11 Federations in
Spain. Five have permanent
offices Madrid, Barcelona.
Bar Mitzvah
Eric Zeitlin
ERIC ZEITLIN
On Saturday. Feb. 26, Eric
Zeitlin, son of Karen and Leonard
Zeitlin will be called to the Torah
of Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
as a Bar Mitzvah. Eric is a
student of Boca Raton Academy
and attends the Temple Beth El
religious school. Eric's grand-
mother, Lottie Sommers of North
Miami Beach will be sharing in
the Simcha. Out of town guests
include sister and brother-in-law:
Cindy and Mark Schottenfeld
from New 'ersey and Jacqueline
and Robert -ewis of Chicago, 111.,
along witli rother, Bruce of New
York City
Eric e"
eluding
tennis a:
awards in
Followin,
Mrs. Zeitli
in Er; s h< >r.
vs all sports, in-
- has honors and
ny sports.
services. Mr. and
will host a reception
Malaga; and in Ceuta and
Melilla, which are two Spanish
enclaves in Morocco.
THE REMAINING six each
comprise a number of Jewish
families which gather together
for services in towns such as Sev-
illa, Valencia, Alicante, Majorca,
and two cities in the Canary Is-
lands. The role of the Federation
is to coordinate the interests of
the 11 communities and to act as
spokesman in relations with the
government.
Toledano is now busily en-
gaged, together with the three
other members of the standing
commission, in the drafting of the
historic Concordat with the gov-
ernment, containing a broad
spectrum of specific issues to be
resolved.
These involve marriage, the
status of rabbis, the observance
of Jewish holidays, programs of
Jewish studies in state schools,
facilities for kosher meat and
ritual slaughtering, the purchase
of land for Jewish cemeteries, tax
exemption for Jewish instruction,
access to the state radio and tele-
vision networks for programs of
Jewish interest, and other mat-
ters of importance to the Jewish
community.
TOLEDANO IS is also work-
ing quietly and steadfastly to
broaden and intensify the accept-
ance of Israel bv the new Social-
ist government of Spain.
Although Spain now has trade
and cultural relations with Israel
and has accepted a permanent
representative of Israel, with the
rank of Ambassador, accredited
to the World Tourist Organiza-
tion, a specialized body of the
United Nations with its head-
quarters in Madrid, it is Toled-
ano s earnest hope and he is
doing all he can to foster it
that there will be full recognition
by the new government and the
exchange of Ambassadors be-
tween Israel and Spain in the not
too distant future.
It is interesting to note that
the government's reluctance to
do so up to now is partly based on
the fact that in 1951. the then
Prime Minister of Israel, Moshe
Sharett. instructed his UN dele-
gate to vote against Spain's ad-
mission to that body.
Although the leftist elements
in the new government are com-
mitted to Third World causes,
favor the PLO, and are somewhat
antagonistic to the United
States, there are other elements
within the Socialist Party which
are definitely pro-Israel, includ-
ing three Ministers who have
visited Israel and will work to-
ward improved relations.
THE RENAISSANCE of
Spanish Jewry, of such recent
origin, bodes well for the future of
Jews throughout the Mediterra-
nean region. It is interesting to
discover that the 3,000 Jews in
Madrid, the 2.000 in Barcelona,
and the remaining 5,000 to 7,000
in other areas, returned to Spain
not too long ago, primarily from
Morocco, with a small contingent
of Ashkenazi Jews who fled from
Germany and Eastern Europe,
and even a smaller number from
the Balkans and Turkey.
Toledano disclosed that there
are hundreds of Argentinian
Jews who have migrated to
Spain, but who profess no
religion, and indeed refuse to
identify as Jews or to show any
interest in Zionism or in Israel.
It was his opinion that these
South Americans had turned
against the religion and the tra-
ditions of their parents because of
their own leftist tendencies, and
that there was no hope of
bringing them into the fold,
despite repeated attempts by the
official Jewish body.
IT IS A touching experience to
visit the Jewish community
enter in Barcelona, maintained
by the 500 Jewish families in the
region. It is an imposing, well-
kep building containing two syn-
agogues, the larger one on the
main floor for the Sephardim and
a smaller one upstairs for the
Ashkenazi members.
In another part of Spain's
largest city is the beautiful
Jewish day school, opened 12
years ago, where some 120 stu-
dents pursue an eight-year pro-
gram of Hebrew studies. Like the
impressive school in Madrid,
which cost more than $1 million,
the operating costs are enormous
and a severe financial drain on
Headlines
the limited financial resources of
both communities.
One can only admire the
tenacity of Spanish Jewry in
their efforts to ensure a Jewish
heritage for their children and for
generations yet unborn. For the
American-Jewish tourist, it is a
treat, for heart and mind, to visit
these proud bastions of Sephard-
ic Spain, as well as to wander
through the narrow, twisting
streets of the ancient Jewish
quarters of Toledo, Sevilla,
Granada and Cordova, and to
recall Maimonides and other
great Jewish scholars of the past,
who were among the great glories
of the land before Ferdinand and
Isabella set to work.
TOLEDANO points with pride
to the fact that the Jewish com-
munity has sponsored, in con-
junction with the Center for
Judaeo-Christian Studies (a
church body), an annual meeting
of Israel and Spanish university
professors, alternately in Spain
and in Israel, who hold seminars
on the bible, history, sociology,
the humanities, medicine and
law. Such exchanges serve to
heighten the prestige and influ-
ence of the community, which
exerts a national influence far in
excess of its numbers.
Haig Praises Israel's Inquiry
By JTA Report
PALM BEACH Former
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig praised Israel's democratic
form of government and declared
that the United States should not
interfere in the internal affairs of
the country.
Referring to the Israeli inquiry
commission report that led to the
resignation of Israeli Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon, Haig told
a meeting here of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith that "we have learned a
lesson Israel is indeed a
democracy." He added:
"That means American and
even members of the American
diaspora (the U.S. Jewish com-
munity) have no right to com-
ment on the internal affairs of the
State of Israel."
The former Administration of-
ficial also told a dinner at the
ADL'fl national executive com-
mittee at The Breakers Hotel
that the United States "must in-
sist on the withdrawal of all for-
eign forces from Lebanon not
just Israeli forces."
Barbie Transferee!
To a New Prison
PARIS Nazi war criminal
Klaus Barbie, now awaiting trial
in France for "crimes agair-jt
humanity" committed while he
headed a Gestapo unit in Lyons
from 1942 to 1944, has been
moved to a new prison in the cen-
ter of the city.
Police said he was moved from
Montluc prison, where he de-
tained thousands of Jews and
local resistance fighters while he
headed the Gestapo, to another
prison for security reasons. In his
new prison cell, at the St. Joseph
House for Detention, he will be in
a separate wing, away from other
prisoners.
While a reportedly unrepen-
tant Barbie languished in his cell,
French television broadcast an
interview he gave to two Bolivian
reporters while on his way from
La Paz to France last week. The
Bolivian reporters said Barbie
started out from La Paz calm and
self-confident. "He thought at
the time that he was being taken
to West Germany," reporter
Carlos Soria said. "He became
agitated and despondent, how-
ever, when he landed in French
Guyana and first learned that he
was being taken back to France."
Begin Raps European
Parliament Peace Move
JERUSALEM Premier
Menachem Begin told a group of
visiting members of the Euro-
pean Parliament that their insti-
tution's support for President
Reagan's Middle East peace ini-
tiative was "destructive." He in-
sisted that the Camp David ac-
cords are the only framework for
peace negotiations.
Begin said the peace process
would not be affected by the
changes in his Cabinet made
necessary by the forced resigna-
tion of Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon. He also made it clear
that the changes would have no
affect on his government's poli-
cies.
He said Israel would never halt
settlement activities in the occu-
pied territories, would never
agree to a Palestinian state and
will never negotiate with the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion "because a people does not
talk to those who come to destroy
it."
Swiss City Hit
By Anti-Semitism
GENEVA Swiss police are
investigating the recent emer-
gence of what appears to be a
well-organized campaign of
virulent anti-Semitism in the
town of Basel near the German
lx>rder. Its targets are not only
Jews but non-Jewish families
who have Jewish friends. The
campaign is aimed particularly
against faculty and students of
the medical school in Basel. Jew-
ish and non-Jewish.
Vicious anti-Semitic slogans
have been daubed on the walls of
the local synagogue, the Jewish
cemetery, public telephone
)xoths and on the walls of under-
passes near the university.
Several prominent members of
the Jewish community and their
non-Jewish friends have received
anonymous letters or telephoned
death threats or anonymous calls
telling them that their sons or
daughters were dead.
Some of the slogans read,
"Jews Out," "Jews are Swine,"
"Auschwitz was invented by the
Jews." On the bulletin board of
the medical school faculty, some-
one wrote: "Jews, sons of prosti-
tutes, out of here."
State Dep't. Worried
By Sidon Killings
WASHINGTON The State
Department said that reports of
Palestinians being killed in the
Sidon area in south Lebanon
"concerns us greatly."
State Department deputy
spokesman Alan Romberg said
the U.S. cannot confirm or deny
the reports. He added that in the
last several days the U.S. has
urged Lebanon. Israel and others
"to fulfill their responsibility for
protecting the lives of the inhabi-
tants of Lebanon."
The United Nations Relief and
Works Agency said last Satur-
day that 15 bodies were found
near the Ayn Hulweh Palestinian
refugee camp outside Sidon.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat
Service 2nd Friday of each month. Minyan on Monday and
Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
16189 Carter Road, 1 block south of Linton Blvd. Delray Beach,
FL 33445. Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Services daily 8
a.m. and 9 a.m., Saturday. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at First Federal Savings & Loan Associa-
tion Offices, West Atlantic, corner Carter road. Delray Beach.
Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m. and
Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President, 6707 Moonlit Drive,
Delray Beach. Fla. 33446. Phone-499-6687. Rabbi Emeritus
Jonah J. Kahn, 499-4182.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform.
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at 8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
Month. J
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 134, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432.
Conservative. Located in Century Village, Boca. Services 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 8:45 a.m. Reuben Saltzman,
President, Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor. 483-5557.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach. Fla. 33446. Conserva-
tive. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A. Silver, Rabbi: Seymour
Zisook. Cantor. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday at
8:45 a.m., Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
?TnMUnu^ff ?*e,thodi8t Church- 342 N. Swinton Ave. (corner
Lake Ida Rd I Delray Beach. Fl. Reform. Mailing Address: P.O.
Box 1901 Delray Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi
bamuel Silver, President Bernard Etish. 276-6161.
\
f4
....

.,
.. ... .


Friday, February 25,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 15
o-Arab Propaganda Campaign is Aimed At American Public
NEW YORK A pro-
rab propaganda network
more than 30 organiza-
)ns is engaged in a
wily-financed campaign
change American public
>inion and policy on the
liddle East and curtail
IS. economic and military
to Israel, the Anti-
?famation League of
lai Brithdiscloses.
The structures, backgrounds
and activities of the organiza-
tions are detailed in a 100-page
handbook entitled "Pro-Arab
Propaganda in America: Vehicles
and Voices." The ADL publica-
tion also identifies dozens of in-
dividuals some closely linked
to the Palestine Liberation Orga-
nization as spearheading the
campaign which escalated sharp-
ly since the Israeli military action
in Lebanon last summer.
ACCORDING to Abraham H.
Foxman, ADL's associate
national director and head of the
League's International Affairs
Division, "the attempt to under-
mine support for Israel, Ameri-
ca's only reliable ally in the re-
gion, is a threat to basic U.S. in-
terests." He points out that since
its founding 35 years ago, sup-
port for a strong, secure Israel
has been American policy
through eight U.S. Administra-
tions.
Foxman says that, in addition
to the well-organized campaign to
curtail U.S. support for Israel,
Uiyah Center Chief:
'Melting Pot' Just Beginning
By LISA RUBENSTEIN
?wish Floridian Staff Writer
or the safety of Israel, we
1,000,000 more Jews living
," Moshe Shechter declares.
need at least 5.000,000 Jews
srael."
Argentine-born attorney
Tel Aviv is general director
srael Aliyah Center of North
krica, the organization pro-
|ng, processing, and helping
|bsorpi ion of American and
Jan Jews emigrating to
)uesu't view his task light-
melting pot is only in its
Knases." he says in an in-
at the Jewish Floridian
last week.
nature of Shechter's busi-
is sales, and at that he ap-
well-seasoned. He's quick
til American Jews why Israel
Is them but perhaps more im-
|antly. in his view, why they
lit.
Americans may view life in
as a challenge, but in
ty. the quality of life is better
^rael than here." he asserts."
Jewish life can only be
in Israel."
ind the only way American
can save themselves from
assimilation now occurring is
[loving to Israel."
iding work in one's field
Shechter says, is simple.
aliyah centers located
itfhout the United States,
t'd by 'shlichim,' provide in-
bat ion on all pertinent aspects
lakes into account when
ling anywhere.
jl's no different than moving
Miami, say. to New York,"
^hter states. "Locating job?
irospective 'olim' is our toj
fity. We need more people to
borne our economic prob-
^e also teach all olim Hebrew
|l>sorption centers upon ar-
in Israel," he continues.
unique because Jews from
different countries and of
different languages learn
rew together. And within six
ths, they speak the lan-
Ke."
response to some American
[Canadian criticism that Is-
does not provide the suppor-
Iservices to them that it pro-

Moshe Shechter
vides to other olim, such as So-
viet and Oriental Jews. Shechter
states, "Oriental Jews face other
problems than American Jews.
The needs are different." He also
claims there is fairness in the
l>enefits offered to all.
"In fact," he adds, "we try
harder with Americans. We know
we must change their mentality.
Others may not have a choice in
selecting Israel. Americans can
choose, so we must convince
them."
Three thousand, one hundred
American Jews made aliyah last
year, 100 of which were from
South Florida, ranking it third in
the nation after New York and
California.
Shechter admits those figures
do not signify success. "We be-
lieves we can reach 10,000 a
year," he states. He is confident
that once those numbers arrive,
most will stay. "Only eight per-
cent of those moving to Israel
leave."
Since 60 percent of Americans
moving to Israel are under 30 and
single, according to Shechter, his
organization is planning strate-
gies to reach older, retired
Americans. He sees a potential
advertising campaign along the
w lines of "Instead of Florida, retire
in Israel."
Shechter is in South Florida to
promote a large Aliyah Con-
ference scheduled to take place at
Temple Israel March 20. Five
hundred people will attend, ac-
cording to Shechter, including
shlichim from local aliyah centers
and Benjamin Netanyahu, First
Secretary of the Israel consulate
in Washington, who will address
the gathering.
"Each shaliach will be an ex-
pert on one subject of concern,"
Shechter says, "and they will
head workshops on issues such as
medical programs in Israel, hous-
ing, intergration, and jobs."
"There are never enough Jews
in Israel until all Jews are in Is-
rael." he adds with a smile.
the handbook documents a paral-
lel effort to secure American
recognition of the PLO "despite
the fact that the PLO remains a
terrorist group committed to the
destruction of Israel."
Foxman notes that Palestinian
leaders held a private, three-day
conference in London in July,
1982 to plan and implement an
anti-Israel propaganda cam-
paign, described as the "Pales-
tine battle in the United States."
HE SAYS that $100 million
was reportedly allocated for a
plan approved by PLO chieftain
Yasir Arafat which includes
making contact with persons
close to, or inside, the U.S.
Administration who are per-
ceived as pro-Arab. While the
meeting was taking place, Fox-
man said, pro-Arab propagan-
dists "were already engaged in an
intensive effort to exploit exag-
gerated casualty reports and dis-
torted coverage of the Lebanese
fighting."
The handbook, prepared by
ADL's Civil Rights Division
under the supervision of Justin J.
Finger, its director, cites five or-
ganizations as being in the fore-
front of the pro-Arab propaganda
effort:
Publish Finding on Nazis,
Wiesenthal Urges Historians
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Nazi hunt-
er Simon Wiesenthal called on
historians and archivists to pub-
lish their findings on the rise of
Hitler and the Third Reich in
order to counter various pro-
paganda campaigns to misinform
the public about the true mag-
nitude of the Holocaust and to
raise doubts that it even took
place.
Wiesenthal. who heads the
Nazi war crimes documentation
center in Vienna, addressed a
"ATTENTION"
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499-8000/732-3000
The National Association of
Arab Americans (NAAA).
Founded in 1972 and the main
political action and lobbying or-
ganization among the five, the
NAAA has 20 chapters across
the U.S. and claims political ac-
tivists in all 50 states.
The Association of Arab-
American University Graduates
CAAUG). Founded in 1967 and
for many years one of the most
active pro-PLO propaganda
groups on the American scene, it
has strongly opposed American
aid to Israel. AAUG professors
and legal representatives have
appeared as witnesses before
Congressional committees deal-
ing with Mideast issues.
The American-Arab Anti-
Discrimination Committee
(ADC). Founded in 1980 by
former U.S. Sen. James
Abourezk and James Zogby, a
leading pro-PLO activist, ADC
has emerged as one of the most
visible pro-PLO propaganda
groups in the U.S. ADC now
claims 41 regional chapters
across the country. During the
Lebanon action, ADC placed 64
advertisements in U.S. news-
papers calling for a cutoff in
American aid to Israel.
The Palestine Human
Rights Campaign (PHRC).
Created in 1977 by the AAUG,
the group has sponsored speak-
ing tours in the U.S. for PLO
supporters and critics of Israel.
PHRC seeks to forge a coalition
of church, "peace" and black
groups in support of the PLO.
The Palestine Congress of
North America (PCNA). Found-
ed in 1979 as an umbrella group
for more than 50 North American
based pro-PLO organizations,
PCNA leaders have organized
rallies and "demonstrations and
have had frequent contacts with
Administration officials and
members of Congress. At PC-
NA's second annual convention
in 1980, the keynote speaker was
Farouk Kaddoumi, head of the
PLO political department.
THE MOST prominent of the
individuals named as being in-
volved in the pro-Arab network
are:
Dr. Hatem I. Hussaini,
deputy permanent observer of
the PLO at the United Nations;
Hasan Abdel Rahman,
director of the PLO's Palestine
Information Office in Washing-
ton;
Ibrahim Abu-Lughod, a
member of the Palestine National
Council, the policy-making body
of the PLO and a professor of po-
litical science at Northwestern
University;
Edward W. Said, a member
of the Palestine National Council,
the policy-making body of the
PLO, and a professor of English
at Columbia University;
Former U.S. Sen. James
Abourezk, co-founder of the ADC
and a leading Arab-A merman
spokesman;
Dr. Clovis Maksoud, the
permanent observer of the Arab
League at the UN and a leading
Arab propagandist for more than
two decades;
James Zogby. a former vice
president of the AAUG, co-
founder of the PHRC and pres-
ently a leader of the ADC.
FOXMAN NOTES that the
current expansion of pro-Arab
propaganda in the U.S. is the
latest in a series of escalations
that have marked the campaign
in this country dating back to the
years after Israel was established
in 1948.
two-day conference here on the
Third Reich and its crimes. The
conference, attended by Alan
Poher, president of the French
Senate, and Simone Veil, former
president of the Parliament of
Europe, was convened on the
50th anniversary of Hitler's
ascension to power. He was ap-
pointed Chancellor by President
Paul Von Hindenberg on January
30. 1933.
Wiesenthal declared that the
appellation "war criminals" was
far too noble and too good for
the Nazis still at large. They
should be called what they are.
"plain assassins." he said. Me
also maintained that current
legislation is inadequate to deal
with the hundreds of surviving
"Nazi murderers who spilled the
blood of countless innocent vic-
tims without actually dirtying
their own hands."
Wiesenthal referred to one of
the most wanted Nazi killers, the
notorious Auschwitz doctor,
Josef Mengele. He said Men
gele's whereabouts have been
located. He was hiding on the
Uruguay-Paraguay border as re-
cently as last December, Wiesen-
thal said. He would give no
further details but said the facts
have been brought to the atten-
tion of the proper authorities.
Working Together
Traditions established through
four generations of family ownership
. careful attendance to the family's
wishes, dedication to the time honored
customs of lewish law compassionate guidance
when the hour of need arises
in
Florida
Bkuiiim- Blni and 2(Wt SI N Mkimi Bc.kli Fl 111 80
KM Q4S-1Q1Q
2KS W rUfefam Bin! DeerIM Beaih. FL 1144 I
10S 427-47(X>
S91S Park Dmr M
HW 427-47(X>
<>8 Fl LtmdenUc iSwtmti, Fl nm
WS 742-MXX)
Palm Beach 'JOS 831-0887
5/ii!tStW
GRAICHMANOEL
HARTMAN MILLER
HERSht-
JOEl A ROW R1

it*


Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of South County
FViHnv .Tunnnrv 7 -1ft3
Friday, February 25,1983 1983j
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imin **oi('oucoco
VANTAGE
THE TASTE OF SUCCESS
U
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f .
Great Taste
with Low Tar.
Thafs Success!
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
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ULTRA LIGHTS: 5 mg. "tat". 0.5 mg. nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method.
FILTER: 9 mg. "tar". 0.7 mg. nicotine ft. per cigarette. FTC Report DEC. '81.




Full Text
February 25,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
THE FOLLOWING HAVE JOINED THE
WINNING TEAM'
FOR SUPER SUNDAY *83
; SUPERSUNDAY
MARCH 20
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION
IS PUTTING
)U ON THE LINE
******
NTY ZlZ.'''
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION BOCA RATON
OELRAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
llowlng have Joined the 'Win- FLORIDA
am' for Super Sunday '88
20 South County Jewish
Iton la putting you on the line
1 '
I I
1 I
1 I
liam, BocaTeeca
m, BocaTeeca
[man. Kings Point
knapolsky. Temple Emeth
Dlaky. Temple Emeth
(Aunenbllck.
inshel Shalom
is. JWVA
er, Federation
aer. Federation
, Federation
rnea, Federation
i Bamett. Kings Point
^ld Berliner, Federation
liner, Federation
rk, Federation
I Boblck, Federation
anwlt. Temple Emeth
nwlt, Temple Emeth
(Brand, Federation
(Brtggln, JWVA
jrglaaa, Boca Wast
f Burg lass. Boca Weat
i. Temple Sinai
jatin, Temple Slnal
ntor, Boca Lago
ICaaea, Federation
bs, Federation
tiler. Century Village
h, Temple Slnal
en
r, Temple Slnal
b. Temple Emeth
e. Temple Emeth
ngar. Federation
pnney, Century Village
an, Federation
tier, Federation
iler. Federation
, Federation
nt. Federation
fle. B'nal B'rlth
, Federation
ildman, Federation
an, Temple Emeth
Ik. Hadaaaah
reon, Federation
eaon, Federation
ieon, Federation
led, Boca Weat
Bed. Boca Weat
lr. JWV
er, JWVA
tier. High Point W
flnkel. Kings Point
|d, Hadaaaah
Dldman, No. 8144 B'nal B'rlth
iger. JWV
|lger. JWVA
eckman, B'nal Torah
ickman. B'nal Torah
, JWVA
I Federation
iild. Oriole
reenwood
Ireenwood
Iroaaman, Federation
man, Federation
r, JWV
Her. JWVA
Bl. Federation
pan. Temple Emeth
Brman. Temple Emeth
irakowltx. JWVA
I, Temple Emeth
Weld. Boca Weat
i Hoffeld. Boca Weat
bow. Boca Teeca
rowltz. B'nal Torah
icobson, Boca Lago
|acobon. Boca Lago
Jontlff, B'nal Torah
ronUff. B'nal Torah
iKalal. Federation
ilal. Federation
i, Temple Emeth
I. Federation
Hufman, Federation
nan, Federation
lan. Century Village
ay. Temple Emeth
ler, Temple Emeth
Br, Temple Emeth
ckel. Century Village
iKlngaley, Oriole
t Kottler. Federation
taky. Federation
koff. Kings Point
rdus. Temple Emeth
i. Temple Emeth
Ehtanberg, Federation
ian. Boca West
I Lain. Federation
stner. JWV
Bvln, Federation
Ivln, Federation
svlne, Federation
I Levine, Oriole
| Le vine. Oriole
| Ll peon, Century Village
i Llttman, JF8
IM. Lowe, Century VUlagt
enbraun, Temple Emeth
f Lowenbraun. Temple Emeth
jcker, Temple Emeth
eker, Temple Emeth
IttdtVratoeration
i. Federation
1, Temple Emeth
Sanford Meade, Federation
Sherrl Meade. Federation
Louis Medwln, Temple Emeth
Rose Medwln. Temple Emeth
Linda Melcer, Federation
Steve Melcer, Federation
Roberta Meyerson, Federation
Dr. William Meyerson, Federation
Carl Miller. Temple Emeth
Syma Miller. Kings Point
Morris Morris, Federation
Albert Omanaky. Federation
Esther Omanaky. Federation
Al Ostrlck, Federation
Hy Packer. Temple Emeth
Norms Packer. Temple Emeth
Sherle Pechenck. Temple Emeth
David Perllne. Boca Tterra
Roslyn Perilne. Boca Tlerra
Dottle Perslco, Federation
Nick Perslco, Federation
Bernard Person, Century Village
Meryle Praeger. JWVA
Lou Rlfkln, Federation
Rose Rlfkln. Federation
Elaine Roberts. Temple Beth El
Charlotte Robinson, Federation
Marcla Roff, BocaTeeca
Sylvia Rosen, JWVA
Arnold Rosenthal. Federation
Beaale Rothchlld. Temple Emeth
Eleanor Rukln. Federation
Naomi Sachs, Temple Beth El
Berenice Schankerman, Federation
Joe 8. Schenk. Temple Emeth
Albert Segal. Federation
Mollle Segal, Hadassah
Anita Shalley. Federation
Eve Shalley. Federation
Marian Shalley. Federation
Hank Shandler, JWV
Betty Slegel.ORT
Iz Slegel, Federation
Rabbi Bernard Silver. Temple Emeth
Edith Silver. JWVA
Myrna Stein. Temple Beth El
Eve Steinberg. Coco Wood Lakes
Joe Steinberg, Coco Wood Lakes
Lenore Steinberg. Federation
Mark Steinberg, B'nal Torah
Paul Steinberg, Federation
Roberta Steinberg, B'nal Torah
Mrs. Jack Stone, ORT
Jack Stone, Federation
Sara Stone, Temple Emeth
Joel Tanen, Federation
Dr. Morris Tear, Temple Emeth
Marge Tepperman, HWVA
Andrea Trlpp, Federation
Sydelle Turman, Kings Point
Grace Warner, Century Village
Seymour Warner, Century Village
Lynne Warshal, Federation
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, Federation
Fran Waterman, Temple Beth El
Miriam Welner. Temple Beth El
Gladya Welnahank. Federation
Mayer Welnahank. Federation
Dorothy Young, Atlantic Demo. Club
Tom Young. Atlantic Demo. Club
Dr. Joe Zlnna. Federation
Marilyn Zlnna, Federation _______
Tax Credits for Tuition?
Continued from Page 1
they were reportedly uncertain
whether the facts developed
during the district court trial
would provide the best vehicle for
Supreme Court consideration.
The second hearing at tne uis-
trict court level before a single
judge, dealing with Van. D.
Mueller v. Clyde Allen, et al, de-
veloped when Mueller, as a St.
Paul taxpayer, sued to overturn
the Minnesota law. The district
court ruled on May 13, 1981, that
the law was constitutional.
IT WAS THAT ruling which
was appealed by Mueller to
the EighthDistrict Circuit Court
which ruled last April 30 that the
Minnesota law did not violate the
First Amendment ban on reli-
gion.
In response to the Supreme
Court's agreement to hear the
case, the opposing sides filled
friends-of-the-court briefs. The
opponents' brief contended that
such deductions are just as un-
constitutional as direct govern-
ment grants to such schools. In
response to that brief, a group Of
Orthodox organizations joined in
a brief which argued that there is
no difference between deductions
for tuition and other related
schooling costs for pupils of
parochial schools and charitable
contributions to such schools and
other religious institutions.
The major sponsors of the op-
posing brief are the National
Committee for Public Education
and Religious Liberty (PEARL);
the National Parent Teacher As-
sociation; the American Federa-
tion of Labor-Congress of Indus-
trial Organizations (AFL-CIO);
and the American Jewish Con-
gress.
Each of the four major spon-
sors signed the brief on behalf of
itself and a number of other orga-
nizations, including eight Jewish
Federations, eight Jewish Com-
munity Relations Councils; and
two Jewish Community Councils.
THE BRIEF for the law was
written by Nathan Lewin, a
Washington attorney who is vice
president of the National Jewish
Commission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA). Joining in the
COLPA brief are nine national
Orthodox organizations.
A spokesman for COLPA said
the Supreme Court could order
and hear oral arguments and rule
on the constitutionality of the
Minnesota law during its current
term, which ends next June; or
the high court could schedule
arguments and reach a decision
during the next term, which be-
gins in October and ends in June
1984.
The latest battle on the deduc-
tions issue was sparked by a
statement from Agudath Israel
of America, one of the nine Or-
thodox agencies joining in the
COLPA brief, which charged that
the Jewish organizations joining
in the other brief were guilty of
"irresponsible behavior" because
they were "fighting the interests
of Jewish education."
THE ORTHODOX agency
added that it was "almost hypo-
critical to believe that Jewish
fund-raising agencies would deny
assistance to parents of children
in yeshivos at the same time that
they continue to keep their purse
strings knotted when funds are
needed for Torah education, for
which most of them provide only
paltry, token allocations."
The American Jewish. Con-
gress noted that the Minnesota
law grants income tax deductions
for education costs of parents of
children attending both public
and private schools. But, the
AJCongress declared, because
public schools are porhibited by
law from charging for tuition,
textbooks and transportation to
and from school, the tax deduc-
tion benefit, in reality, affects
only parents of private school
pupils.
The opposition brief added
that, in Minnesota, some 90 per-
cent of all non-public schools are
religious institutions,and that, in
1980, Minnesota taxpayers,
taking advantage of the law,
reduced their taxable income by
$32 million.
THE BRIEF asserted that
since the tax deduction benefit is
not restricted to expenditures for
secular items for religious
schools, the Minnesota law
violates the constitutional re-
quirement of church-state
separation. The brief cited earlier
Supreme Court opinions
declaring direct government aid
to religious schools unconstitu-
tional and contended the same
principle should apply to the tax
deduction option, on grounds
such deductions should be con-
sidered equivalent to government
grants.
The COLPA brief stresses that
a tax credit could arguably be
viewed as providing direct gov-
ernment financial support, while
a tax deduction or exemption did
not involve direct government
aid but represents a decision by
the government not to tax poten-
tial sources of revenue.
Congressman William Lehman presents Secretary of State
George Shultz with thousands of postcards from the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, urging help for Anatoly
Sharansky.

* .-^''ssa
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Ships of Panamanian and Libarian Registry


Page 16
Tholot,>;*u Pi.-J-- ** *
Page 10
<
The Jewish Floridian of South County
'riday, January 7,1983
Friday, February 25. 1983
Settlements Cause Problems on Bank
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
JJTA) The State
Department, in its annual
report on the human rights
situation throughout the
world, charges that Israel's
human rights problems
have been "exacerbated"
by its settlement policies in
Judaea and Samaria.
"Relations with Arabs in the
occupied territories the West
Bank. Gaza, East Jerusalem, and
the Golan Heights caused the
most significant human rights
problems for Israel in 1982," the
Department's Country Report on
Human Rights Practices for 1982
said. "These relations were
strained and the human rights
problems exacerbated as a
consequence of the (Israeli) gov-
ernment's implementation of its
declared policy of expanding and
developing Jewish settlements."
HOWEVER, Elliott Abrams.
Assistant Secretary of State for
Human Rights and Humani-
tarian Affairs, in explaining the
1.323-page report, covering 162
countries, said that the Israeli
settlements were not a violation
of human rights "per se."
Instead, he said the Reagan
Administration considers them
an "obstacle" to the peace
process.
The report, which was
presented to the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee and the
house Foreign Affairs Committee
Jan. 31, predicts no change in the
situation on the West Bank.
"Absent dramatic progress in
the peace process, confrontation
between the inhabitants of the
territories and the occupation
authorities is likely to remain at
the same level as in recent
years," the report concludes.
"Israel is likely to continue its
efforts to contain and reshape the
politics of the West Bank and
Gaza through the acquisition of
land for settlement, official sub-
sidization of population growth
in existing settlements and polit-
ical support for the Village
Leagues. '
THE REPORT labels the
leagues as "rural-based quasi-
political organizations" through
which it charges Israel wants to
"transfer patronage and
authority from elected and
established Palestinian na-
tionalist leaders whom Israel
objects to as being supporters of
the Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization."
The report devotes 21 pages to
Israel, 12 of which cover the
occupied territories. Abrams
stressed that the length devoted
to a country has no relation to the
human rights problem there but
reflects the availability of in-
formation.
Abrams pointed out that the
report differentiates between the
Stravinsky Work
Going to Library
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mayor Teddy Kollek has donated
a rare manuscript by composer
Igor Stravinsky to the music de-
partment of the Jewish National
and Hebrew University Library.
The manuscript is the only
complete manuscript version of
"Abraham and Isaac," a ballad
for baritone and chamber or-
chestra
situation in Israel, which is a full
democracy, and the West Bank
and Gaza, which is under military
occupation. He said the residents
of the occupied territories do not
have control of their government
but added that there are "a
number of military governments,
included in the Middle East
which are a good deal harsher"
than Israel.
THE REPORT expresses
concern for the some 5,400 Pales-
tinian prisoners held in Israel as a
result of its invasion of Lebanon.
Abrams said the U.S. hopes that
many of them can be released and
that those the Israelis plan to
bring to trial have their trials
soon.
The human rights situation in
Lebanon deteriorated during
1982 because of the thousands of
persons killed as a result of
Israel's invasion, Abrams said,
but he added that no one knew
the exact number of fatalities.
The report said that the
Lebanese government estimates
that 19.800 Lebanese and Pales-
tinian civilians, were killed since
last June, the majority during
Israel's siege of West Beirut. The
report notes that dozens died as a
result of terrorist bombings and
assassinations, "the most
serious" of which was the
bombing assassination of
Lebanese President-elect Bashir
Gemayel. "Doznes, perhaps
hundreds, of civilians were killed
in 1982 in clashes between militia
forces elsewhere in Lebanon," the
report adds.
AT THE same time, the report
displays the same ambiguous
attitude toward Israel's "Peace
for Galilee" operation as has the
Administration since last June.
Israel's invasion "dramatically
altered the situation" in which
"clashes among Lebanese
militias, Syrian forces in Lebanon
and the PLO created widespread
abuses of human rights," the
report said.
"PLO and Syrian influence
was eliminated in Beirut and
south Lebanon, but Israeli action
also led the abuses. In addition to
violations by the Israelis in areas
under their control, the Lebanese
government itself was respon-
sible for serious abuses as it reas-
serted its control over west
Beirut."
The report added that the
withdrawal of all foreign force."
from Lebanon and the restoration
of the Lebanese government's
authority over its territory
should lead to "an improvement
in the human rights situation."
Community Calendar
; February 25
i Community Relations Council meeting 12 noon.
| February 27
Temple Beth El Distinguished Artist Series 8 p.m. B'naiTorah
I Men's Club, 9:30 a.m. meeting Temple Emeth-Singles, 9:30
= a.m. Board meeting.
I February 28
i Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 1 2:30 p.m. meeting Diamond Club,
9 a.m. meeting Temple Beth Shalom, 10:30 a.m. meeting
; B'nai B'rith-Shomer Lodge, 2 p.m. meeting Temple Sinai-Sis-
j terhood, 12 noon meeting.
! March 1
I Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood, 12 noon meeting B'nai B'rith-Boca
Teeca Lodge, 9:30 a.m. meeting Brandeis Women-Boca, 10
[ a.m. meeting Temple Sinai-Men's Club, 7:30 p.m. meeting
! Hadassah-Boca Maariv, 1 p.m. Board meeting.
I March 2
= Women's American ORT-Region, 9:30 a.m. executive meeting
! Hadassah-Menachem Begin, 9:30 a.m. Board meeting
i National Council Jewish Women, 8 p.m. Board meeting
jS Women's Division Cabinet meeting9:30 a.m.
I March 3
Jewish War Veterans-Synder-Tokson Post, 10 a.m. meeting
i Hadassah-Sabra, 8 p.m. Board meeting 'Women's Club of Boca
Teeca-Paramedics Luncheon and meeting 12 p.m. Temple
; Emeth-Sisterhood, 12 noon meeting B'nai B'rith Women-
i Genesis, 10 a.m. Board meeting Women's American ORT-AII
== Points, 2 p.m. meeting.
[ March 6
= South County Jewish Federation Community-Wide Program on
S Cults, 7:30 p.m.
| March 7
i Brandeis Women-Boca, 9:30 a.m. Board meeting Diamond
I Club, 9 a.m. meeting Women's American ORT-Boca Glades,
10 a.m. Board meeting Women's American ORT-North Pines,
10 a.m. Board meeting Women's League for Israel, 10 a.m.
^ Board meeting Free Sons of Israel, 7:30 p.m. meeting Boca
Teeca Federation Breakfast 9:30 a.m. Brooklyn Friendship Club
S of Century Village West, 10 a.m. meeting.
| March 8
I Zionist Organization of America, 8 p.m. meeting Hadassah-
| Aviva, 10 a.m. meeting Hadassah-Shalom-Delray, 9:30 a.m.
meeting B'nai Torah Congregation, 7:30 p. m. Board meeting
S Temple Beth El-Solos, 730 p.m. Board meeting Temple Emeth-
= Brotherhood, 7:30 p.m. meeting.
| March 9
j B'nai Torah-Sisterhood, 7:30 p. m. Board meeting.
j March 10
! Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood, Movie 1 p.m. American Mizrachi
Women, 10 a.m. meeting Hadassah-Ben Gurion, 9:30 a.m.
; Board meeting Hadassah-Sabra, 8 p.m. Board meeting
H Temple Beth El-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting.
I March 12
! Hadassah-Menachem Begin, 9:30 a.m. meeting.
March 13 '
B'nai B'rith Integrity Council, 9:30 a.m. meeting B'nai Torah
Men's Club, 9:30 a.m. meeting Temple Beth El-Brotherhood,
Breakfast 10 a. m. Temple Beth El Young Artist Series, 3 p. m.
March 14
Temple Emeth-Singles, 12:30 p.m. meeting Diamond Club, 9
a.m. meeting 'Women's American ORT-North Pines, 12:30 p.m.
meeting Hodassah Association of South County, 9 a.m.
meeting Career Women 7 p.m. Brondeis-Women-Boca!
Open meeting 10 a.m.
March IS
Hadassah-Boca Moariv, 12 noon meeting and Card Party
Pioneer Women-Zipporah, 10 o.m. meeting Women's
lUfmiHUOUUWflH
I
DID WE MISS YOU?
Join Us At The Women's Divison Keynoters' Luncheon $150
minimum gift. Call 368-2737. March 16, 1983

ii
i
American ORT-Delray, 12:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah-Shalom- s
Delray, 10 a.m. Board meeting B'nai B'rith Delray Lodge, 7:30 s
p.m. meeting.
March 16
Women's American ORT-Region, 10 a.m. Board
Hadassah-Menachem Begin, 1 2 noon meeting.
meeting :
March 17
Temple Emeth-Sisterhood, 12:30 p.m. meeting "Temple Beth El-
Sisterhood, 12:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah-Ben Gurion, 12:30
p.m. meeting Women's American ORT-Oriole, 1 p.m. Board
meeting Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 12:30 p.m. Board meeting
American Mizrachi Women-Kfar, 10 a.m. meeting.
March 18
Israel Bond's, 4 p.m. Hamlet B'nai Torah Congregation
Installation of Rabbi Feldman 8:15 p.m.
March 20
SUPER SUNDAY Zionist Organization of America Polo Match
and Picnic 12 noon Young Leadership Development, 7 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Olympic Lodge XI, 9:30 a.m. meeting Temple
Emeth Concert 8 p.m. Temple Beth El Forum Series, 8 p.m.
Boca Teeca Cocktail Party, Israel Bonds 6 p.m.
March 21
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi, 12:30 p.m. meeting Diamond Club
meeting 9 a.m. B'nai B'rith-Shomer Lodge, 2 p.m. meeting
Women's American ORT-Boca Glades, 1 p.m. meeting B'nai
B'rith Women-Ruth, 1 p.m. meeting.
March 22
Pioneer Women-Zipporah, 12 noon meeting Hadassah-Aviva,
12:30 p.m. Board meeting Temple Beth El-Solos, 7:30 p.m.
meeting.
March 23
Women's American ORT-Sandalfoot, 1 p.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Delray, 12:30 p.m. meeting National Council
Jewish Women, 9a.m. meeting.
March 24
Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting Jewish War
Veterans-Auxiliary, 7 p.m. meeting Jewish War Velerans-
Delray, 7 p.m. meeting Temple Beth El, 8 p.m. Board meeting
South County Jewish Community Day School 7 p.m. Model
Seder B'nai B'rith Women-Boca, 1 p.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Oriole, 12 p.m. meeting Hadassah-Sabra, 8
p.m. meeting Temple Emeth-Brotherhood, 10 o.m. Board
meeting Temple Emeth-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting
Brandeis Women-Delray, I p.m. meeting.
March 25
B'nai Torah Men's Club and Zionist Organization of America co-
sponsor Shabbal Service, 8:15 p.m.
FEDERATION-UJA CALENDAR-CAMPAIGN EVENTS
February 28
Boca West Coffee, home of Mr. and Mrs. Jontiff, 7:30 p.m.
March 6
Congregation Anshei Emuna-Federation Breakfast, 9:30 a.m.
March 7
Boca Teeca Federation Breakfast, 9:30 a.m.
March 14
Caree Women, 7 p.m.
March 16
Women's Division Keynoter's Event $150-plus
March 20
SUPER SUNDAY

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