The Jewish Floridian of South County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00105

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
frJemst? F/endfi&n
jlume 5 Number 4
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Defray Beach and Highland Beach
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, January 28,1983
fiMMI
Price 35 Cents
Joint Venture Between
CRC and Holocaust Center
{President von Hindenburg (right) congratulates Adolf Hitler,
\whom he has just named chancellor. January, 1933.
50 Years Ago
his Month
How Hitler Took
Over Germany
By HENDRIK PETERS
BONN (DaD) January 30, 1933, the day Adolf
Hitler came to power in an economically and socially
disrupted Germany, was the blackest day in recent
-German history. But few realized its importance 60 years
ago. Everyone had false hopes.
Among conservatives. Hitler was felt to be a useful
idiot whose Utopian ideas might enable the Reich to regain
imperial power. Left-wingers, including Social Democrats
and many outside observers, felt the Nazi regime
wouldn't last. Hitler, they imagined, would be here today
and gone tomorrow.
THEY WERE all wrong. The Nazi minority in the
conservative Hitler-Papen Cabinet were soon in control,
and 18 months later, when Hindenburg died, Hitler took
over as head of state too. That was exactly a decade
before the unsuccessful July 20, 1944 bid to assassinate
Hitler, which came 10 years too late.
In retrospect a number of unfavorable factors can
be said to have been to blame. Historians nowadays
particularly emphasize the following:
The Weimar Republic, a democracy backed by
Continued on Page 11
The Holocaust committee of
the Community Relations
Council of South County Jewish
Federation announces a new
program to create oral and visual
histories of survivors, protectors
and liberators of the Holocaust.
The Community Relations
Council is doing this as a joint
venture with the Southeastern
Florida Holocaust Memorial
Center. Testimonies are being
used in an educational curriculum
for the study of the Holocaust.
The oral history library is housed
in offices located at the Bay Vista
Campus of FIU in North Miami.
They are in search for anyone,
Jewish or non-Jewish, who has
had any experience with the
Holocaust. Time is of the essence.
This organization, in cooperation
with the Federations on the
Southeastern coast, are seeking
to create a verbal and visual
record before it is too late. In a
few short years there will be no
one left who remembers!
To date, approximately 170
testimonies have been ac-
cumulated. People are being
trained to serve as interviewers
through a 50 hour intensive
course. Many more testimonies
are needed.
The Holocaust center is at-
tempting to educate the popula-
tion about the, meaning of the
Holocaust, how it scarred the
conscience of the world and why
such an event must never happen
again. This is being done through
the educational and administra-
tive skills of college presidents
and school officials, the
theological and philosophical
insights of clergymen, the
community awareness of civic
leaders and the financial ex-
pertise of business men and
women.
This is an endeavor for which
this entire region can be proud.
Each and every individual that
has had an experience during the
Holocaust and who wishes to
share it for the benefit of future
generations, would be an ex-
cellent candidate for participa-
tion in this program. Please
contact the South County Jewish
Federation, at 368-2737 for
additional information, or to
arrange an appointment.
EEC Declaration Recognizes PLO 'State'
By EDWIN EYTAN
STRASBOURG (JTA) -
The European Parliament, the
legislative body of the 10
members-state European Eco-
nomic Community, called on
Israel and the Palestinians "to
recognize each other's existence"
and start peace negotiations. The
Parliament also adopted by a
large majority a resolution call-
ing on Israel "to stop at once the
creation of new settlements in the
occupied territories."
The European Parliament, for-
merly headed by Simone Veli of
France, used to be one of the
staunchest pro-Israel interna-
tional forums. However, since the
start of the war in Lebanon last
June, the climate has changed,
diplomatic observers say. The re-
solution submitted by the
Socialist group, were the most
anti-Israeli yet to be adopted.
One of the resolutions asserts
the Palestinians' right to self-
determination "which could lead
to the eventual creation of a Pale-
stinian state." This is the first
time the EEC Parliament has
mentioned this possibility which
all previous joint European com-
muniques, such as the Venice De-
claration of 1980, have systema-
tically avoided.
The Parliament also agreed
that a "favorable political
climate" now prevails and paid
special tribute to the Venice De-
claration, President Reagan's
peace proposals and the Arab
League plan drawn up at their
summit meeting in Fez, Morocco
last September. The Parliament-
arians also stated that the PLO
should normally and legally take
part in future Mid-east peace ne-
gotiations but affirmed that the
PLO must first remove from its
convenant all articles which call,
directly or indirectly, for Israel's
destruction.
The Strasbourg-based body
has only an advisory role but its
resolutions generally influence
the EEC's governments and also
tend to reflect public opinion in
the member states. The
Parliament's deputies are elected
by popular vote in the 10 nations.
Day School Art Exhibit
Not To Be Missed
A special night is in store for
those attending the annual
champagne reception, art exhibit
and sale on behalf of the South
County Jewish Community Day
School. The show will be held at
Temple Beth El, 333 S.W. 4th
Avenue in Boca Raton on
Thursday, Feb. 3 at 8 p.m.
There will be selections from
the works of Boulanger, Brague,
Alder, Chagall, Dali. Miro,
Vasarely and others on display.
One half of the tax deductible
admission charge of $50.00 per
person may be applied toward the
purchase of any art item beginn-
ing at $500.00.
This is one of the major fund-
raising events of the Day School,
and an effort is being made to
reach as many members of the
community as possible.
It is an unsurpassed opportun-
ity in South Florida to purchase
quality art at more than
reasonable prices.
Invitations have already been
mailed. If you have any further
questions, please call the Day
School at 395-3212.
Syria's SAM-5 Missiles Cause Alarm
By YORAM KESSEL
London Chronicle Syndicate
JERUSALEM Moscow's renewed
supply of high-quality weaponry to the
Syrians as part of the Soviet reequipment of
the Syrian armed forces is viewed in Irael as a
serious development.
It is being taken here as a clear signal to the United
States that the Russians have no intention of giving up
their close involvement with Damascus.
AMONG THE arms in the pipeline are long-range
SAM-5 ground-to-air missiles, and this build-up could
adversely affect the outcome of the current talks with
Lebanon about the withdrawal of all foreign forces from
Lebanon and the normalization of Israeli-Lebanese
relations.
If, as some officials here believe, the Soviet intention
is to encourage the Syrians to back-track on their
l.previously stated readiness to withdraw from Lebanon,
this would put in jeopardy the entire effort put
together by the United States to produce a stable
situation by bringing about the withdrawal of all
foreign troops from Lebanon.
Another reason for the Soviet Union's willingness to
supply SAM-58 to the Syriana, it is thought here, is the
Are They Only
Taper Threat?
desire to counter the impression given by the fighting
in Lebanon last year that Soviet weaponry is inferior to
that of the West.
ISRAEL'S CONCERN was underlined recently
when an Army spokesman gave the first public in-
dication that the Russians plan to deploy SAM-5s in
Syria the first time that they will have been sent
outside Russia.
The spokesman said that two SAM-5 sites were being
prepared deep inside Syrian territory. ,
The missiles, first displayed in Moscow in the mid-
1960s, have a sufficiently long range and a high enough
operational ceiling to 'eused by the Syrians to attack
Israeli aircraft in Israeli air space.
Expert sources here have noted the possibility that
the Russians may be planning to man the sites
themselves.
THE SOURCES have also pointed out that the
accelerated rate of the Soviet build-up of Syria's forces,
after the mauling they received during the fighting in
Lebanon, means that these forces will have been fully
reequipped and retrained by 1984.
A spokesman for the International Institute of
Strategic Studies said in London that the SAM-5,
known as the "Gammon," was "a bit of a paper
threat."
The 54-foot long SAM-5 is the Soviet Union's biggest
surface-to-air missile.
It is a medium-to high-level weapon with a maximum
slant range of 155 miles and an effective ceiling of
almost 100,000 feet.
THE SPOKESMAN, Col. Jonathan Afford, said that
there had been "a lot of teeth-sucking" about the
performance of Syria's Soviet weapons after the war in
Lebanon.
Syria has evidently complained to the Russians, who
had offered them the Gammon.
However, it was "totally inappropriate against very
low-level attack." It was unlikely, therefore, that the
Israelis, once having discovered the Gammon's
frequencies, would fly at high levels.


axelO
mdian of South founty
***
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, January 28, igg.
News in Brief
Ford, Carter Rap Israel for Settlements
By JTA Services
WASHINGTON Former
Presidents Ford and Carter have
called Israel's settlement policy
on the West Bank the "major ob-
stacle" to moderate Arab coun-
tries joining the Middle East
peace process.
"Israel must halt its settle-
ment policy a move that alone
might break the diplomatic log
jam," the former Presidents said
in a jointly copywritten article in
the forthcoming February
Readers Digest.
Ford and Carter, bitter rivals
in the 1976 Presidential "Cam-
paign, became friends when they
went to the funeral of Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat. They
have issued several joint state-
ments on various subjects but
this is their first on the Middle
East. Their article was in re-
sponse to a request from Readers
Digest for their analysis on how
to achieve peace in the Mideast.
The two former Presidents also
called on the Arab countries to
demonstrate "the courage to step
forward to negotiate for a Pales-
tinian homeland with an Israel
that they recognize as a fellow
nation." In particular, they urged
King Hussein of Jordan to join
the autonomy negotiations which
they said would be a "dramatic
gesture" that could put the
government of Israeli Premier
Menachem Begin "under im-
mense pressure to reciprocate."
Panel of Inquiry
Holds Final Session
JERUSALEM The com-
mission of inquiry into the Beirut
refugee camps massacre held its
final session The panel,
meeting behind closed doors,
heard attorneys for six of the nine
witnesses who had been warned
last November that they might
be harmed if certain conclusions
were drawn on the basis of their
original testimony.
Since the warning was issued,
six of the nine senior political and
military officials either reap-
peared before the commission,
were represented by legal counsel
or submitted written responses to
questions posed by fellow wit-
nesses.
Premier Menachem Begin,
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
and chief of army intelligence
Gen. Yehoshua Saguy did not
avail themselves of the oppor-
tunity to reappear, examine evi-
dence and question witnesses.
Each submitted letters to the
commission essentially reaffirm-
ing their original testimony with-
out explanation or embellish-
ment.
The commission will now have
to sift through 12,000 documents
and other evidence collected over
the past 2'/j months. There was
no indication as to when its final
report and recommendation will
be ready.
Bolivia May Kick Out
'Butcher of Lyon'
PARIS The Bolivian public
prosecutor. Hernando Acha Siles,
has asked the Supreme Court to
extradite Klaus Altmann, who as
Klaus Barbie was known as the
"butcher of Lyon" during the
Nazi occupation of France, to
West Germany, according to
French radio reports from La
Paz.
Acha Siles told the court that
West Germany had demanded
French Protest Anti-Israel Bias
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The Representative Council of
French Jewry protested against French policy in the Mid-
dle East and against Foreign Minister Claude Cheysson's
recent declarations which are perceived to have a strong
anti-Israel bias.
CRIF ALSO CALLED on the French government to
close the PLO office in Paris and to expel its representa-
tive.
The CRIF, in a communique, charged that Cheysson's
statement last week in Cairo claiming "there is no Israeli
peace plan" was tantamount to a denunciation of the
Camp David agreements.
FLY FREE
TO SAN JUAN
And see more of the Caribbean on Costa's
Carla C, World Renaissance & Daphne.
We can show you how free and easy it is to spend 7 days sailing
the Caribbean on a Costa Cruise You'll sail Irom San Juan in the
heart of the Caribbean so you II see more portsup to a port a day
Sail to Caracas St Maarten. Guadeloupe. Barbados. St Lucia
Antigua and St Thomas among others
Combine any two 7-day cruises for a luxurious 14-day vacation
and visit up to 12 ports at a special low price
Ask us about our special fall offers. Good space is still available
for Christmas and New Year's sailings
Call and let us help you select the Costa cruise that's right for you
FROM
per pe'son OouWe OCCuoancy Round lr,p o elective 12 19 82 Peak mun and noway onci ~~, ffc\ tK/ 5
slightly higher
OlJ.lftli
his extradition for war crimes and
genocide and that the extradition
request should be honored be-
cause the two countries have an
extradition treaty.
Barbie, who fled to South
America after the war and ob-
tained Bolivian citizenship under
the name of Altmann, has been
accused of the deportation and
death of thousands of Jews and
French resistance fighters.
The French government, which
sentenced him to death in absen-
tia after the war for crimes he
committed while he served as a
gestapo chief in Lyon, has several
times asked for his extradition.
Panel Recommends
Palestinians' Release
TEL AVIV A special ap-
peals committee recently set up
by the Israel army has recom-
mended the release of 150 Pales-
tinian prisoners of the 5,400 de-
tained for the past eight months
at Ansar camp in south Lebanon.
Army sources said some of the
detainees have already been
turned over to the International
Red Cross for return to their
homes. The appeals committee so
far has heard the cases of only
1,100 detainees.
Leah Tzimel, a Jerusalem
lawyer who frequently defends
members of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization, charged that
the army established the appeals
committee only under interna-
tional pressure and just a day be-
fore the Israel Supreme Court
was to hear an appeal against the
Ansar detentions last November,
six months after the war in Leba-
non started.
Thousands Demonstrate
Against Settlements
JERUSALEM Thousands
of demonstrators protested Sun-
| 'mm Miami Tl
Just call your travel agent
Than take it easy Take Costa
1
ACosta Cruise is easy to take.
day against settlements in
Judaea and Samaria. The protest
rally took place in the brand new
partially completed town of
Efrat, halfway between Bethle-
hem and Hebron.
Peace Now activists joined
forces for the first time with
activists from poverty neighbor-
hoods who charged that the
government was taking money
away from public housing
projects and investing it in West
Bank settlements.
The demonstrators arrived in
about 20 buses and more than
100 private vehicles from all over
the country. Organizers kept the
protest top secret and staged a
diversionary demonstration in
Elkana near Nablus to prevent
pre-emptive action by the
security forces. The Efrat protest
ended without incident.
Mitterrand Enjoys
Goldenberg's Deli
PARIS President Francois
Mitterrand returned last week to
the Rue des Hosiers restaurant
where an Arab hit squad killed
six people last August. Mitter-
rand this time came just for the
pleasure of a typical Jewish meal
at Jo Goldenberg's deli where the
attack had taken place.
The President, accompanied by
his Jewish brother-in-law, Roger
llanin. and a young Jewish poli-
tician, Roger Gerard Sch-
warlzenberg, arrive unannounced
and unexpected. Last time Mit-
terrand visited the Rue des
Hosiers was on the day following
the attack when he attended
funeral services for the victims.
This time, the President, in a
good mood, chose a shmaltz her-
ring, piroshkis and boiled beef
with horseradish, washed down
with a glass or two of vodka.
It was not just a gastronomic
treat. Eyewitnesses told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency, Mitter
rand also wanted to show ha
solidarity with the people in tk.
"Pletzel." the old Jewish ghetto
He sat for close to three hour,
with Jo Goldenberg and some of
his customers to "chew the fat"
and discuss the situation.
Israel, Lebanon
Hold Parallel Talks
JERUSALEM-The negot*
tions between Israel, Lebanon''
and the United States switched
to a double track over the week-
end. The official talks being held
alternately in Kiryat Shmonaand
Khalde will continue on the basis
of the agenda agreed to last
Thursday. But parallel negotia-
tions involving U.S. special Am
bassador Philip Habib with Is-
raelis and Lebanese apparently in
shuttles between the two coun-
tries will proceed apace.
Premier Menachem Begin, who
announced the scheme at Sun
day's Cabinet meeting, appointed
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, Defense Minister Arid
Sharon and David Kimche, diret.
tor general of the Foreign Mini*
try, to comprise the negotiating
team with Habib.
Begin explained that the
Shamir-Sharon-Kimche team
would seek to reach agreements
in principle with Habib. The de-
tails would be worked out at the
official talks at Khalde and Kir
yat Shmona.
An-nell
Hotel
3 Full Course Meals Daily
Mashgiach & Synagogue
on Premises
TV Live Show-Movies
Special Diets Served
Open All Year Services
Near ail good jnoppmu.
W-ite lo> Season Rales
700EUCLIDAVE/ CALL
MIAMI BEACH /i 531 1191
Our tantalizing torte,
a mouthwatering
addition to the
delicious AldenMerrell
collection of cheese-
cakes, carrot cakes
and chocolate cakes.
Tantalicious!
^
amen merreu
ChESECAKE COMRWY
Next to Pubiix in the Village
Square Shoppes. St. Andrews
Boulevard (adjacent to Town
Center) just south of Glades
Road m Boca Raton. Hours:
Mon.Sat. 8 30 a.m. 9:00 p.m.
Sunday 9:00 a.m. 5:00p.m.
if
Amerikams and World Renaissance ol Greek registry Carla C o( Italian registry
NEVER AGAIN
A Jewish Motto With Many Meanings...
^^M^t^^ "" g to another Jewi9h 8ingle
JS&^aS^iSSSkl Costume p^111 Bash.A Road *"*A
toartS 2S2 Senunars' Law for the Layman Seminars,
1 neatre Parties and Athletics events sound? Just to mention a few!
Choose your area of interest. Maybe this time you won't say never again!
o ,?i^ou,,tyJewi8h Singles
Call 368-2001 For Dates And Details
* Join us on 1/30/83 for a SUPER SUPFR rowt gt Txrr* a v i ~,
TV, food and drinks! NUFBB BOWL SUNDAY, large screen
m


Friday. January 28, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
Lion of Judah
Luncheon
At Cache
Amidst the elegance of exquisite clothes being
modeled, the ladies of South County Jewish
Federation Lion of Judah Women's Division
recently enjoyed a delicious luncheon and
magnificent private trunk showing by designer
Kina de Montella through the courtesy of Cache
at Town Center.
Guest speaker Ruth Dayan apprised the
women of Israel's needs.
Lion of Judah Division has raised $232,300
plus $17,466 for the Special Fund for the 1983
United Jewish Appeal-Federation Campaign.
This represents more than a 100 percent increase
from the same contributors over last year.
Inside Cache Lion of Judah Women enjoying luncheon and fashion show.
Left to right: Margie Boer, Campaign chairman. Women's
Division; Edda Rubinson, owner of Cache; Betty Storx,
co-chairman. Lion of Judah Division; Ruth Dayan, guest r_ r~i.. n i c- r, D- n-.
l A4-U jf l r- rrj*""* Left to right: Carole Siemens, Florence Riesberg, Rita
speaker: Mildred Levine. co-chairman. Lion of Judah. Bogus. Lois Romanoff.
Left to right: Ruth Dayan, Mildred Levine, co-chairman:
Betty Stone, co-chairman; Edith Abramson, co-chairman,
not pictured.
Left to right: Lillian Newman, Jeanette Moldow, Rosa
Titelman.
Left to right: Shirlee Cohen, Phyllis Miller, Florence
Fuller, Gert Seeman.
Eleanor Wolf, Marianne Bobick, Leolin Orefice, Shirley
Cohen.
Vv
Left to right: Mildred Levine, Fanne Pelavin, Betty Stone.
Berenice Schankerman, Rose Levis, Florence Melton, Rose */* ,v *** Anne Brenner. Irma Fier, Dorothy Delbaum,
HrOtin rlorence aaumntter
-....... ..,,.,-.-. .-..,.-,.-........v.- ...:: ::.....' -' -':''' '' -.'


Pa*e 10
Th^JewishT
MitMMHftPniUlll*il
Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. January 28,1983
The Party in Beirut to Which Israel Wasn't Invited
/ .......,.__ vniino Phriitian man nnH wnman fa
Nobody trusts anybody else. Least of all,
do the Israelis trust either the Syrians, or
the Lebanese, or the United States. And
why should they?
There was a party thrown by Lebanon's
Amin Gemayel in Beirut the other night.
Everybody was there, including the
French, Italians and Americans, all of
whom are part of the UNIFIL forces in that
beleaguered country. The party was in
celebration of the unification of Beirut and
the new independence of that nation.
Naturally, the Israelis weren't even
invited. Who liberated the city from the
clutches of the PLO and the Syrians? Who
created the circumstances that led to
Gemayel's presidency? As one Israeli
newspaper editorialized: The French? The
Italians? The Americans?
And yet, Israel wasn't invited. Why
should the Israelis trust anybody? The
victory they forged is being turned into a
defeat. President Reagan's own peace ini-
tiative of Sept. 1 will assure the ultimate
triumph of Yasir Arafat. Even skilled
Israeli observers are finally coming to
realize that few of the objectives envisioned
at the time of the start of the war have been
realized.
Israeli-Syrian Partnership?
But all this is from the Israeli point of
view. In what sense do the others not trust
the Israelis? One obviously is that the
Israelis are insisting upon the exit first of
the Palestinians, followed by the Syrians,
after which the Israelis themselves say
they will depart.
Another is Israel's call for Early Warn-
ing Systems to be set up in southern
Lebanon and the exclusion of UNIFIL
forces within the 25-mile area north of the
Israeli-Lebanese border.
This is a demand that suggests especial-
ly to the Arabs that Israel has secret ambi-
tions for a chunk of Lebanese territory.
Both together were the substance of the
bruhaha surrounding the early stages of
the negotiations which the Lebanese found
absolutely unacceptable.
In the face of all of this suspicion, do the
talks as they now shape up seem destined
for success? Hardly, for new rumors seem
to be brewing of the most impossible
alliance of all.
Monday, the Israelis found it necessary
to deny reports that they have arrived at a
secret agreement with the Syrians no less,
an agreement establishing spheres of in-
fluence in Lebanon for each.
Why not such a rumor? It establishes for
the Arabs the credibility of their belief that
the Israelis have wanted a chunk of
Lebanon from the beginning. In the end,
the negotiations hardly matter, since
events will take their turn in Lebanon in
the same way that they took their turn in
Egypt following the Camp David accord.
Despite the talk to the contrary. Despite
the rumors.
Happy State of Affairs
In Dallas, Tex., the other week, there
was a real breakthrough in relations
between Jews and Christians. Site was a
conference bringing together seminary
students and faculty from major Catholic,
Jewish Florxdian
Protestant and Jewish institutions
throughout the nation.
By all accounts, the results were
phenomenal. It turned out that not one of
the Christian seminarians had ever talked
in any meaningful way with a Jew before
a pretty dismal state of affairs for future
leaders of American Christendom.
By the end of the two-day seminar spon-
sored by the American Jewish Committee,
young Christian men and women testified
that this had been one of the most
important religious experiences of their
lives. They were, they declared, now
determined to wash themselves clean of the
negative stereotypes they held about Jews
and Judaism.
They were, they asserted, now
determined to develop a positive apprecia-
tion of Judaism and the Jewish people. If
true, this is indeed a happy state of affairs.
FREDSHOCHET
Editor ind Publiahe
of South County
SUZANNE SHOCHET
Executive Editor
" Fred Shoehel
QERI ROSENBERG
uMiahed Weekly MlS||||Hi| .hrouoh Mtd-Mty. Bi-Weekly taim, of njfiu Coo'<"ni,'
second ci.m Po.t.0. P.td m b. kito'fc'ittiiJZSSwmiXiu"*
BOCA RATON OFFICE 2200 N Federal My Suit. 206 Boc. R.ton Fl. 33432 pWnMS2001
Main Office Plan. 120 N E 8th St .Miami. Fla 33101 Phone l^TM^^
FelmaalrFurnfom3579loJewlrtFlortd(an.P.O.oi017J,JIm( Fla 11101
- Adverting Director, Steel Leeeer. Phone SM-1882
Combined jewiihApoeaiSouth County Jenh Federation. Inc.. OffICere Preaident J.met B Bear
Vice Pr.a.denla. M.n.nn. Bobick. Eric Deckinger. Norman Stone. Secret." Glady.^einahank
Treasurer. Margaret Kottler. Executive Director, Rabbi Bruce S Warahai vveinenank
SOBSCRtPTIO^^E^r; Zl9MS^SSSS!!S^^mf ^
Journalism's Arrogance of Power
Friday, January 28, 1983
Volume 5
14 SHE VAT 5743
Number 4
THE FINDINGS of the com
mission of inquiry into the
Shatila and Sabra massacres
have yet to be published. But
ABC-TV has already produced
and rushed into an airing of its
own verdict in a program called,
Oh. Tell the World What Hap-
pened.'"
This means that ABC-TV has
acted as both judge and jury in
the tragic event, short-circuiting
the conclusions of the commis-
sion of inquiry as if it were an ir-
relevancy to its own "findings."
Furthermore, "Oh, Tell the
World What Happened" com-
pounds its chutzpah with the
kind of defective, one-sided re-
porting of the events that led up
to the massacre reminiscent of its
fictional treatment of the war in
Ix-banon in the first place.
IT IS a case of crippled jour-
nalistic standards not unique to
ABC-TV throughout the war, but
characteristic of the electronic
and printed media in general.
"An arrogance of power," is
how Phil Baum puts it in his dis-
cussion of the media as they have
evolved over the past two
decades. Baum is associate
executive director of the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress, who was in
Miami last week to discuss with
editors and TV newscasters the
quality of their reporting of the
recant Lebanese agony
Speaking of the arrogance of
the media's power. Baum says
thai "it gnefl beyond Lebanon.
America is a news-hungry nation
interested in information as
quickly as possible. The tragic
informational distortions we be-
came aware of in Lebanon exist
in too many other areas of news-
gathering also ."
ARGUES BAUM: 'The
American people want to know.
The increasing question is: what
are they being given as fact?"
With respect to the printed
word. Baum points out the para-
dox in a country proud of the
speed and presumable accuracy
of its reporting. "In too many
cities, there is only one news
paper," he says. Times are hard,
and the number of newspapers, in
some cases major newspapers,
that have gone bankrupt is le-
gion.
"I'm not offering any J'accuse
here," says Brown, referring to
the recent indictment by Norman
Podhoretz of the media's han-
dling of the war in Lebanon. "But
the truth is that as the number of
newspapers decline, their power
tends to concentrate."
Baum is quick to explain: "We
don't have to look to deliberate
editorial malice to understand
what is happening. In any given
newspaper, there is a limit dic-
tated by the availability of space
to the amount of information that
can be presented. Even if an
editor or reporter sincerely be-
lieves he is being objective in his
reporting, the fact is that he must
choose between what will be
printed and what lack of room
forces him to leave out."
THE CATCH here is "objec-
tivity" because, as Baum sees it.
editorial discretion in the choos-
ing process is by its nature sub-
jective. If there were no other
reason to level a charge of bias,
PHIL BAUM: Monopoly of 'truth1
::
Maudlin
----........--.....njuvmnf
the choosing process in itself
opens the door to bill
"Hut for people at home," says
Baum. "When they read their
papw, that is the whok of reality.
For people at home, there is little
awareness that what they have
been reading is what some editor,
some reporter would like them to
read, which is merely a part of a
larger whole reality."
I remind Baum that this has
always bean true. "Yes," he
agrees. "But it has grown much
worse since the '60's. Today's
media, especially the electronic
media, are both sanctimonious
and arrogant.
"Their rise to these heights of
power began with the civil rights
movement and the burning of the
major cities. From there, the
journey took the media through
Vietnam and the Watergate era."
SAYS BAUM: In each case,
the media did more than report or
even interpret the meaning of the
news. In each case, the media
preached they reported the
news selectively as they saw it,
and then they editorialized.
The method caught on like
wildfire. It developed, says
Baum. "the world of personal
journalism, the new journalism"
of word practitioners like Nor-
man Mailer, who reported more
how thev felt about events than
the events themselves
In terms of Israel and its
"Iteration in Lebanon, this has
"dlo devastating oiiuequences.

Says Baum: "The American
media have fallen for the
mythology that the Palestinians
have never had a fair shake
that Israel has preoccupied them
for far too long. And so in Leba-
non, they began 'repairing their
earlier preoccupation. Now, they
are redressing' the 'imbalance'
- their belief that Israel has had
it too good in the past."
I ASK Baum: How do you
reconcile freedom of the press
with calling upon editors and re-
porters to be less self-righteous,
less sanctimonious?
Says Baum: "That depends
u|>on how you view the First
Amendment protection clause
within the limits of your own per-
spective."
He adds: "I was in Vietnam
during the war with Clark Kerr,
former chancellor of the Univer-
sity of California and later presi-
dent of the Carnegie Endowment
Fund. Our backgrounds and
viewpoints had their clear dif-
ferences, but we both arrived at
the same conclusion: The ac-
counts of the war in the news-
papers and on television simply
didn't square with what both of
us agreed we saw."
In the end, both Baum and
Kerr were persuaded that the
media reports from Vietnam were
personal and private. "They were
not objective and valid," Baum
believes. "They were not in-
tended to inform public opinion
so much as to mold it"
HOW DOES Baum see jour
nalism shaping up now?
"Particularly in the electronic
news media," he answers. "I
foresee an increasing collision be-
tween those who purvey the news
and those who read it. Or watch it
and listen to it.
"As this grows, the problem
will grow, and not just for readers
or listeners. I mean," says Baum,
"the lack of diversity. It's more
Continued on Page 6


Friday, January 28,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5

Rabbi Silver To Speak At Pines of Defray North
A recent article in the Monday
Paper described Rabbi Silver in
vivid terms:
"Talk to Rabbi Samuel Silver
for any length of time and you
may come to wonder if he likes
anything that goes in a single di-
rection even one way streets.
The personable Delray Beach
clergyman makes it clear that he
prefers dialogue to monologue,
colloquay to soliloquy, and ecu-
menism to sectarianism.
In simpler terms, he is willing
to talk, but he is also willing to
listen, and feels that an exchange
of ideas is often more rewarding
than singlehandedly trying to
drive a point home.
f'X
People Focus
By GERI ROSENBERG
Sol Richmond, an artist and
part-time resident of South
County offers a unique service to
the 55 Jewish organizations in
our community.
He has compiled a slide show
of his own paintings, 50 percent
of which are Israeli oriented. In
his northern residence, he volun-
teers his time to present his 100
slides at meetings of Jewish or-
ganizations and wishes to con-
tinue this service in South Coun-
ty. The paintings are not for sale,
but the entertainment in viewing
his works have been enjoyed by
hundreds of people.
Sol Richmond was born in the
Ukraine in 1908 and came to the
U.S. in 1913. He studied life
drawing at the old Copley Society
and painting at the School of
Practical Art in the late 20's. He
worked as a commercial artist
and a sign and poster designer in
the 30's, during which time he
studied architecture at the old
Boston Architectural Club on
Somerset St., now known as The
Boston Architectural Center. He
was the winner of the Analytique
Prize, a Bronze Medal, anc
received a Scholarship A ward for
each year of attendance at the
B.A.C.
Richmond started his profes-
sional architectural career by do-
ing freelance industrial design-
ing, architectural drafting and
renderings for the architectural
profession. He opened his office
for the practice of architecture in
1945. He was a member of the
American Institute of Architects,
Boston Society of Architects,
American Registered Architects,
and the Society of Architects and
Engineers of Israel. Richmond
retired in 1975 in order to devote
all his time to painting. Sol Rich-
mond has signed his paintings
with the pseudonym Zayda since
1966, at which time his first
grandchild was born. Zayda in
the Yiddish language means
grandpa. He is the Zayda of five
grandchildren. His first one-man
show, at the age of 69, was select-
ed by Robert Taylor, art critic of
the Boston Globe as the "Critics
Choice" of the week.
If you are interested in having
Sol Richmond as a guest at your
organizational meetings, please
contact him directly at 499-0113.
You can get a pretty good idea
of what makes Rabbi Silver tick
just by scanning a list of bis ac-
tivities. He has been a guest on
numerous talk shows, hosts two
radio talk shows of his own,
travels all over the country to
perform interdenominational
marriages, lectures on numerous
topics, and is pastor to his flock
at Temple Sinai in Delray."
This same Rabbi Sam Silver
will be the featured speaker for
the South County Jewish Feder-
ation-UJA complimentary "Is-
raeli Breakfast" for the residents
of Pines of Delray North.
This stimulating experience
will be held at the North Club
House on Sunday, Feb. 13 at 9:30
a.m. and guests will also enjoy
entertainment by the Kings
Point Glee Club.
Chairmen Charles and Lillian
Ostrow in cooperation with
Benno and Lillian Wetzstein, co-
chairmen, are taking reservations
for what promises to be an excep-
tionally interesting morning.
Last year's breakfast was noted
as a huge success, enjoyed by all,
and with Rabbi Silver as their
guest, this year's event will no
doubt be most memorable.
For further information, please
contact either Mr. and Mrs. Os-
trow or Mr. and Mrs. Wetzstein,
at Pines of Delray North.
Scott Kleinman & David Yourish
Borrow Bros. Rent All
We Rent Everything From:
Beds, Cribs, & Chairs To:
A Complete Line Of
Contractors Tool & Equip.
Located At: ,'
320 N. Congress Ave. V
Delray Beach #'
278-8108
The State of Israel Bond office has
relocated to new quarters at 2300 Palm Beach
Lakes Blvd., Suite 216. The new phone num-
ber will be 686-8611. The new office will com-
bine Palm Beach-Florida Region and National
Israel Bond operations. The move was
necessary due to the tremendous increase in
sales of Israel Bonds by people in the State of
Florida.
The Israel Bond organization expresses its
most sincere gratitude to the many people
who have made the Florida Region one of the
most successful Israel Bond sales areas in
the United States. Please come by and say
hello and have a glass of Sabra. We will be
open normal working hours, 9 am to 5 pm.
Bert Sales. Florida Regional Manager
State of Israel Bonds
Chief Rabbi Says Plastic Heart
Patient Forfeits Status as Human
TEL AVIV weekly journal, Koteret Rashit, Chief Rabbi Goran said
that an individual who receives a plastic heart forfeits his
status as a human being as the artificial device cannot
fulfill the symbolic functions of the living organ. He said
that someone who kills an individual with a plastic heart
could not be accused of homicide. But he emphasized that
the recent operation in the United States in which a man
received an artificial heart was justified, for the Jewish
law required that everything be done to save a life.
Jewish Homes Escaped Flood Damage
estimated
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) The
president of the United Jewish
Charities of Northeast Louisiana
in Monroe, Morris Mintz, said
that the UJC had no information
that any Jewish homes, factories
or institutions in the area had
been damaged by the floods
which have ravaged the area last
week, causing
damages of $100 million.
Mintz told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, in a telephone
interview, that the UJC had
learned of one case in which a
Jewish-owned home in the Mon-
roe area had come close to being
damaged by the rampaging flood
waters but actually was not
damaged.
ftUflVTlME
HENTAl
CfNTCt
HINTS
CMAHS, TABLES
1 DANCE R.OOtS
4927 NtHai Dr.
Boca Raton
994-8252
CHINA, FLATWARE
UMRCUASfTS
root FLOORS
99wG fw9\9w, I Ml-
Palm Beach
734-4320
INVESTORS
Richardson Greenshielda Securities, Inc., a member of the
New York Stock Exchange,
Offers huge commission savings plus an incredible array of
full and complete services. There's a NYSE tape and a board-
room with a complete investment library.
Call, write, or stop in for your free brochure which describes
commission schedule and numerous other advantages of
using Richardson Greenshields Securities.
Rate Comparison
Richardson
Greenshields
500 Shares at 58
100 Shares at 37
1,000 Shares at 16 $126.00 $322.00 $332.00 $138.00
Bache
Merrill
Lynch
$123.00 $415.00 $410.00 $128.00
$ 40.00 $ 78.00 $87.00 $45.00
Alan
Bush
We charge only 14* per share for utility and
telephone common stocks, $40.00
minimum, SIPC
Richardson Greenshields Securities Inc.
Est. 1857
ArnuATfOf
Richardson Greenshields of Canada Limited
BOCA RATON
855 So. Federal Hwy., Suite 115
Boca Raton, FL 33432
(305) 392-2002
i .


Pa*e10
)ridian of South County
,A~..
Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, January 28,1983
Journalism's New Rise
To Arrogance of Power
Continued from Page 4-
than that, in some towns, there is
only one newspaper and that
elsewhere newspapers are going
under with regular frequency."
He adds: "I mean, there are
only three networks in the elec-
tronic media. I mean ugly feel-
ings about monopoly and
thought-control."
DO AMERICAN Jewish Con-
gress and other organizations
meet with the major news execu-
tives to discuss this?
"Yes. Mainly, we try to meet
with them as action rather than
reaction when there was
nothing recent in the newspapers
or on TV to complain about
only essentially to discuss our
views."
Haum describes a Catch-22
situation. "You meet with an
editor. He regards you sus-
piciously as having a Bill of Com-
plaints against him. Either he
raises the banner of freedom of
the press, which he sees you as
attempting to violate.
"Or else, he says: 'We merely
report the news; we don't create
it. The message of the news may
Ik* bad for you, but you're blam-
ing the messenger for the bad
message. We have no control
over the message."
BUT OF COURSE, he does
have control over the message, I
observe. And in many cases, he
isn't reporting the news; he may
deny it, but he is making it.
Baum agrees: "There are many
in America today who believe it is
chic to stand up for the 'little
guy.' There is a romantic sym-
pathy for anti-Establishment
sentiments, just like in the Viet-
nam era, and the media are to a
great extent responsible for this.
'' Even when it comes to terror-
ists such as the PLO," says
Baum, "the media tend to inspire
a sense of apology in their behalf.
For example: What else can these
poor people do. if not shake the
world by the scruff of the neck?
How else will anyone listen to
them?"
The result is that, in the new
world order of terrorism, raised to
greater glories by the media, all
of society is hostage, and each of
us is at hazzard.
"In the past" he says, "terror-
ism seemed 'acceptable' against
the established order only,"
Baum asserts. In that sense, ter-
rorism was an act of war, "but
today, there are no innocents. No
one can claim immunity."
I WONDER out loud: Do the
media really romanticize terror-
ism?
"In the case of the Pales-
tinians, no doubt," declares
Baum.
Then what to do about the
media? English-language Jewish
journalism apart, can Jews open
up a shop of their own with
equivalent national coverage to
disseminate the truth as they see
it?
"In the case of the electronic
media, nothing can be done. I
said before," Baum opines, "that
the electronic media constitute an
absolute monopoly over the air-
waves which, presumably, are
owned by the people a
monopoly sanctified by the
federal government. In the case
of the printed word, little more.
Newspapers are going out of
business every day. The cost of
starting a new one would be pro-
hibitive. And who would invest in
one these days?"
REMINISCES BAUM: "In
the old days, there were other
forms of encounter, but in our
own times, given the heights of
unexpected importance they have
never experienced before, the
media are a grave cause for con-
cern.
"They must reacquire some
sense of obligation to accuracy
l>eyond what they believe is the
certainty of their own view be-
cause it is this certainty that can,
and does, also lead to terrible
mistakes in fact"
In the end. the media must
come to regard complaints
against them as more than a hos-
tile act. It is not, says Baum, "an
invasion of a TV or a newspaper's
right to see another view. Offer-
ing another view is not neces-
sarily censorship."
I ask: Do you think these
arguments have some future?
SAYS BAUM: "What we are
talking about is journalistic arro-
gance, sanctimoniousness,
omniscience. This pretty much
spells monopoly also."
He does not say so, but Baum
is talking about bleakness, too,
an era of managed news sanc-
tified by First Amendment
guarantees to the boardrooms of
cartel journalism enterprise.
Flagler
National
Bank
Mtmtwr FDhC
Your Locally Owned and Operated
IndependentBank
P.8.A.MMM8 CENTER
CornefutPGA Blvd and Prosperity Firms Rd
0EIMTMM0M CENTER
Corner of Atlantic Ave am) MiMary Trait
uw worth mmonq center
Comer of Lake Worth Rd and Jog Rd
juptterianknm center
Corner ot Indiantown Rd and Military Trail
CalliH-zm
HIM CENTER- DOWNTOWN Wfl
SOI S Flagler Or WPB .
FOREJT MM.I IAMKWC Cf K R
Comer of Forest HiN Blvd andFlorida tngoRd
PAL* KACH LAMS MNMNG CMTT.P,
Corner of Okeecnobee Blvd and
Palm Beacti Lakes Blvd
NORTNLAKE BANKNW CENTER
Northlake Blvd Across from K-Mart
Organizations in the News
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Women-Naomi
will be taking a cruise to Nassau
Feb. 4-7. The cost is $295. For in-
formation, please call 499-1382.
B'nai B'rith Boca Teeca Lodge
will hold their next meeting on
Tuesday, Feb. 1 at 9:30 a.m. in
the activities building. This
meeting will be a breakfast
meeting. Their speaker will be
Rae Brody on the subject "Better
Living bv Being Young thru As-
sertive Communication."
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel, Delray
Lodge No. 224 will hold their
next meeting on Monday, Feb. 7
at 7 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank, Atlantic Ave.,
Delray Beach. Being honored at
this meeting wilrbe the founders
of the lodge. The Free Sons of Is-
rael will also hold their Annual
Dinner and Dance on Sunday,
March 6 at the Poinciana Coun-
try Club in Laka Worth. The cost
is $29 per couple. All are invited.
Plan to attend.
JEWISH WAR VETERANS
Jewish War Veterans-Snyder
Tokson Poet No. 459 Auxiliary
will hold their next meeting on
Thursday. Feb. 3 at 10 a.m. in the
Administration Building, upper
level, Century Village West, Boca
Raton. The Royal Palm Polo
Club will present slides and speak
on the fundamentals of Polo. For
further information, please call
483-1029, 483-1513 or 482-1030.
ZIONIST ORGANIZATION
OF AMERICA
The Zionist Organization of
America will hold their next
meeting on Monday, Jan. 31 at
7:30 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank, Kings Point, At-
lantic Ave. The speaker will be
Honorable Oded Ben Hur, Assis-
tant Consul General, State of Is-
rael on the topic "Israel Update."
All are invited. For further infor-
mation, please call 498-7070 or
498-7012.
TEMPLE SINAI
Temple Sinai-Brotherhood will
hold their next meeting on Tues-
day, Feb. 1 at 7:30 p.m. at the
American Savings Bank, Kings
Point. Dr. Michael Leinwand, Di-
rector of ZOA will speak on "Is-
rael and the American Jewish
Community." Discussion will
follow. Guests are invited. Re-
freshments will be served.
Temple Sinai Sisterhood will
be going to Musicanaon Sunday,
Feb. 6 at 6 p.m. Dinner and
Show. The cost is $17.50 per per-
Does Your Group
Need A Speaker?
Call The South County Jewish Federation
SPEAKERS BUREAU
368-2737
WE'LL HELP YOU FIND ONE!
Speakers available for both Jewish and non-Jewish groups.
son which includes taxes and
gratuities. This will be the com-
plete three act play of South Pac-
ific. For your reservations, please
call Sylvia 499-3829 or Shirley
499-2530.
Temple Sinai-Singles will hold
their next meeting on Tuesday,
Feb. 1 at 1 p.m. at the home of
Gittle Roth. For information,
please call 499-8933.
ANSHEI EMUNA
Anshei Emuna Sisterhood will
have their paid up membership
luncheon on Tuesday, Feb. 1 at 1
p.m. in the Synagogue, 16189
Carter Rd., Delray Beach. Also
plan to attend the Purim Party to
take place on Sunday, Feb. 27 at
1 p.m. at Congregation Anshei
Emuna.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth Sisterhood will
be holding a night at the "Miami
Opera" on Sunday, Jan. 30. For
details, please call Anne Katz
499-9838.
HADASSAH
Hadassah-Menachem Begin
will have a luncheon at the Crys-
tal Lakes Country Club on Tues-
day, Feb. 1. For details call Hen-
rietta 499-3236. Also note that
they will be hosting an all day
bus trip to Coconut Grove on
Wednesday, Feb. 9. For details,
please call Henrietta 499-3236.
CORRECTION NOTICE
B'nai B'rith Women of Boca Raton will honor Louise Cohen at
the Israel Bond drive on March 6 at the Sheraton Hotel, (Glades
Road) in Boca Raton.
PASSOVER PACKAGES FOR
OUR SOUTH FLORIDA FRIENDS
11 Days -10 Nights
March27-Apnl6
From
'650.
DouDie
Occupancy
Includes Room And Meals
At Waldman Hotel

Holiday Services Conducted
By
Cantor Rueven Blum
10 Days-9 Nights
March 28 April 6
*575.
Pet Person
Double
Occupancy
*850. Single
Room At Adjacent Atlantic
Towers Hotel-Meals At
Waldman
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt
Kosher Cuisine Included
Every Oceinlroni Facility
i Dally Raligioui Service*
> All Special Diets
i Full Entertainment Program
i Sedurlm and Holiday Service*
WALDMAN hotel
ON THE OCEAN AT 43 ST.
PHONE: 538-5731
SUPER SAVER
It's cheaper to ship your car via
trans Auto and fly ...than it is to drive! I
FLORIDA AUTO TRAIN
Florida Reservations: 1-800-432-9989
_. .. ?*t,ont,R#Mrvoni 1-800-327-5353
Orlando 1-305-62S-9797 N.w J.r.y 1^oW*426
See your Travel Agent
I.C.C.F.F. 565
*r
r -
<
T<


Friday, January 28,1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 7
Israel-Lebanon Unit Will Deal With Ways Of Ending State of War
By DAVID LANDAU #
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A subcommittee to deal
with ending the state of war
between Israel and Leba-
non was set up by delega-
tions of the two countries
^ meeting in Khalde Monday
morning. It is the first of
several subcommittees
which will negotiate the va-
rious items on the agenda
agreed to by Israel and
Lebanon last Thursday, an
Israeli spokesman said.
The state of war subcommittee
is headed jointly by the chief
Lebanese negotiator, Antoine
Fatale and Elyakim Rubinstein,
legal adviser to Israel's Foreign
Ministry. Israel Radio said that
the subcommittee might meet
more frequently and on a differ-
ent sequence of days than the full
negotiating teams. The latter
have been me<' ing twice weekly
for the past tnree weeks, alter-
nating between Khalde, just
south of Beirut, and the Israeli
border town of Kiryat Shmona.
AS THE talks got underway,
U.S. special Ambassador Philip
Habib waited in Jerusalem for
word of any substantive pro-
gress. He met at length earlier
with Israeli Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir, Defense Minis-"
L ter Ariel Sharon and David Kim-
che, director general of the For-
eign Ministry who heads the Is-
raeli negotiating team.
According to Israeli sources,
Habib said he thought agree-
ments in principle could be
worked out within a week. The
sources said Habib would try to
persuade the Lebanese govern-
ment to accept an agreement he
worked out with the Israelis.
The negotiations are now pro-
ceeding on parallel tracks. The
Israeli, Lebanese and U.S. dele-
gations continue to meet regular-
ly, while Habib talks separately
with the Shamir-Sharon-Kimche
team and with Lebanese officials
in an effort to bring the two sides
together. The American diplomat
has already impressed on the
Israeli ministers President Reag-
an's urgent desire that progress'
be achieved without delay.
OBSERVERS HERE said
that Habib's presence in the area
and the fact that he derives his
authority directly from the Presi-
dent will spur the Israelis and
Lebanese to make swift progress
toward an agreement. Habib is
said to be waiting for the oppor-
tune moment to draw Syria into
the negotiating process, utilizing
shuttle diplomacy for the time
No Exit
TEL AVIV (JTA) For-
mer Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin said last week that the La-
bor Party was firmly opposed to
any withdrawal back to the 1948
"green line" which served as the
Israeli border up to the 1967 Six-
Day War.
Kabin said he would be
very pleased if Jordan joined the
peace talks on the basis of the
Camp David accords.
being rather than direct talks be-
tween the three countries.
Syrian cooperation is the pre-
requisite for the early withdrawal
of all foreign forces from Leba-
non. Reports from Damascus said
the Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation leadership there has begun
r
f
Camp Maccabee
An exciting Summer experience within a
Jewish atmosphere.
Varied activities Include:
Swimming Instruction
Free Swim Dally
Art* and Craft*
Music
Drama
Dance
Field Trips
Two four-week sessions
Pre school division
School division
Mini bus pickup to and from camp
For information call
South County Jewish Federation
368-2737
Jewish Community Center Department
T<
March 20
On the phones with
Norman I. Stone
Gladys Weinshank
Hundreds of other volunteers in South Palm Beach
County telephoning to help Jews in need everywhere.
To reserve a phone call 368-2737.
Sign Up Now!
UJA Federation Campaign
practical discussions on the
removal of the estimated 6,000
PLO fighters from Lebanon. Is-
rael insists that the PLO forces
pull out first to be followed by the
simultaneous withdrawal of
Israeli and Syrian forces.
At the opening of Monday's
negotiating session, Kimche rei-
terated Israel's denial of Beirut
press reports that the Israelis
and Syrians had reached a secret
understanding to partition Leba-
non into spheres of influence.
Fatale thanked Kimche for
clarifying that matter.
(305)3*1 1113
New Hours
Mon.-Thura.11-0
Frl.* Sat. 11-11
Sun. 10-0
n
-Daily Lunch Specials
11:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Potato Pancakes with Sour Cream
or Apple Sauce........................$3.45
Bagel with Cream Cheese and Lox.......4.95
Two Jumbo Specials with French Fries
or Baked Beans.........................4.25
Deluxe Hamburger......................4.25
Junior Chef Salad.......................4.45
Cottage Cheese & Fruit.................4.45
Sandwich of the Day.........................
Soup and Coffee, Tea or
Fountain Soda included
with above
------------CHILDREN'S MENU------------
(Children under 6 years of age)
Hamburger.............................1.95
Hot Dog with French Fries...............1.95
Junior Sandwich with French Fries......2.95
7146 Beracasa Way
Del Mar Shopping Village
(corner of Powerline A
Palmetto Park Roads)
Boca Raton, Fla. 33433
----------Dinner Specials-
Monday: Boned Stuffed Brook Trout
Tuesday: Stuffed Rock Cornish Hen
Wednesday: Prime Rib
Meat Loaf
Thursday: Roast Duck with
orange sauce
Stuffed Peppers
8.25
7.95
10.95
6.95
11.95
6.95
All Dinners Include Appetizer (choice of Fruit
cup. Juice or Chopped Liver) Soup. Entree with
Potato Pancake and Vegetables. Coffee or tea
and Dessert.
All Items on our regular menu also available for
Take-out and Table Service. Featuring a Com-
plete Line of Delicatessen and Appetizing
Sliced to Order. Complete Catering for Home
or Office.
Traditional
Friday Night Dinner
Choice of Entree:
HALF ROAST CHICKEN $7.45
BROILED BEEF FLAKEN S7.S5
BRISKET OF BEEF $8.25
BROILED FISH OF THE DAY $8.25
(All Dinners Include)
Glass of Wine. Challah. Gefllte Fish. Matzo
Ball Soup. Pickles & Sour Tomatoes. Home
Made Cole Slaw. Entree with Potato Pancake
and Vegetable. Coffee or Tea. And Dessert.
AXSWEIl THE CALL TO LIFE.
Please reserve a telephone for me
Name--------------------------------------
"Super Sunday" marks the pinnacle of the
1983 United Jewish Appeal Campaign. It Is your
chance to make fund-raising history.
Join thousands of volunteers In federations
across the country In an all-out telephone drive
to reach more people and raise more money In a
single day than ever before.
Give us two hours of your time on March 20.
To call your friends and neighbors.
To ask them to join you In helping our fallow
Jews at home, in Israel and around the world
through our community campaign.
The calls you make may determine the quality of
Jewish life In this decade.
Reserve your "Super Sunday" telephone now.
TO LIFE
* ipin ItI HjaeSsJ
TEAR OFF ANO MAN.---------------------
Address
Telephone # (Home)
(Bus.)
Affiliation
I will be able to staff the telephone from:
C 9i30aa to ll30a D l:30p to 3:30p
D 11:30a* to l:30pa
D 3:30pl to 5:30p
Q 5i30f to 7:30pei
0 7:30p to 9>30pa
NOTE: You will be requested to be at the phone oentor tor Orientation and Training 46 minutes before your
esston begins it you have not made your 1963 pledge, you will be given the opportunity to do so at
the cloee of your Orientation A Training session
Phone South County Jewish Federation at 368-2737 or Mail Coupon to:
2200 N. Federal Hwy, Suits 206, Boca Raton, PL 33432
__________________ To Reserve Your Telephone_________________


Page 10
)Hdian of South L'ounty
Pages
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, January 28,1983
Obican, Amen, Kupperman,
Lattimer, Dorst, Jaffe, McCoy,
Galerie J. Lovigne, the New Art
Gallery, and more will exhibit
and sell their art at the First An-
nual Art Show and Sale of the
Zionist Organization Of America.
All the artists will be present
for a Special Artists Preview and
Champagne Reception from 7-8
p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 5 to be
followed at 8 p.m. by the Gala
Art Show and Sale. The sale will
cover two days and will be held at
Congregation B'nai Torah, 1401
NW 4 Ave., Boca Raton.
Our artists have received both
international and local acclaim,
and most recently, Sam Kupper-
man, of Boca Raton, received a
first prize award from the Profes-
sional Artist's Guild. William
Lattimer, the sculptor whose
work is presently being featured
at the Gallery Camino Real, has
ZOA Looking
For Singles
The Zionist Organization of
America is looking to form a new
chapter for singles only in the age
group of 35 to 55. Those who are
interested in becoming active in a
group dedicated to the cause of
Israel, intellectually inclined,
professionally oriented and
desirous of meeting people with
similar interests should contact
Ms. Anita Frank at ZOA head-
quarters in Fort Lauderdale
566-0402. This promises to be a
different type of singles organi-
zation in South Florida.
On Feb. 1 at 8 p.m., Temple
Emeth will host an Outreach
Program with Dr. Mater Rabin-
owitz. Dean of the Graduate
School of the Jewish Theological
Seminary, the featured speaker.
The topic will be, "Conservative
Judaism Confronts the 21st Cen-
tury." Everyone welcome.
The Honorable Linda Elowitch
Abromson, the first Jewish wom-
an mayor ever elected to that of-
fice in all of the New England
states, will be the guest speaker
at the Temple Beth El, Boca-
State of Israel Bond dinner on
Jan. 30 at the Temple. The dinner
is in honor of Mr. and Mrs. David
Krainin, leaders in the South
Palm Beach county Jewish com-
munity. Mrs. Abromson is the
Mayor of Portland, Maine, and
serves on the National Council of
Jewish Women in Portland, the
Greater Portland Council of
Governments, the national Board
of the UJA, and she is also on the
Board of Directors of the Jewish
Community Center in Portland.
ZOA Art Show
been acclaimed by the critics in
the local media.
Obican, whose charming
figures and scenes are so popular,
will present a signed and num-
bered lithograph to all sponsors
who attend the Special Artist's
Preview and Reception.
The Art Show is being given
for the benefit of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America which is a
B'nai B'rith Honors Rabbi Silver
non-profit Organization whose
purpose is to encourage political
support of Israel by American
and world leaders.
Sponsorship donations are S50
per counle and admission to the
art show is $2 per person. Spon-
sors are admitted free. All dona-
tions are tax deductible.
For information call 482-7021
or 392-7276 (evenings).
Rabbi Samuel Silver of Temple
Sinai in Del ray Beach will be
honored with a Man of the Year
award by Delray Lodge B'nai
B'rith on Tuesday. Feb. 15 at
7:30 p.m. at Temple Emeth, 5780
W. Atlantic Avfi,, Delray Beach.
The program will have as its
guest speaker Dennis P. Koehler,
Palm Beach County commis-
sioner. Dr. Donald MacKay of
the Cason Methodist Church in
Delray Beach will deliver the in-
vocation. A choral group con-
ducted by Izzy Siegel will present
a musical program and the bene-
diction will be made by Monsig-
nor William Lester of St. Vincent
DePaul Seminary, Boynton
Beach.
For additional information call
Lewis Peck at 499-8091. /
Community Calendar
January 28
B'nai Torah Federation Service Women's American ORT-
Sandalfoot Study Group Community Relations Council, 12
noon meeting.
January 30
Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood Benefit Concert, 2 p.m. Temple Beth
El State of Israel Reception, 7:30 p.m. South County Jewish
Singles, 5 p.m. B'nai Torah Single Parents, 11:15 a.m.
February 1
Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood, 12 noon meeting Hadassah-Boca
Teeca Lodge, 9:30 a.m. meeting Brandeis Women-Boca, 10
a.m. meeting Temple Beth El-Solos, 7:30 p.m. Board meeting
Temple Sinai-Men's Club, 7:30 p.m. meeting Temple Emeth,
10 a.m. Board meeting Temple Sinai-Sisterhood, 1 p.m.
meeting
February 2
Temple Beth El Distinguished Artist Series, 8:15 p.m.
Hadassah-Menachem Begin, 9:30 a.m. Board meeting
National Council Jewish Women, 8 p.m. Board meeting
Women's Division Cabinet meeting, 9:30a.m.
February 3
Jewish War Veterans-Snyder-Tokson Post 459, 10 a.m. meeting*
Hadassah-Sabra Board meeting, 8 p.m. Temple Emeth-
Sisterhood meeting, 12 noon Women's American ORT-Region,
9:30 a.m. Executive meeting Jewish War Veterans-Snyder-
Tokson-Auxiliary, 10 a.m. meeting B'nai B'rith Women
Genesis, 10 a.m. Board meeting South County Jewish Com-
munity Day School, 7 p.m. Art Show at Temple Israel Bond
Parlor meeting with Rabbi Sacks, 7:30 p.m.
February 4
B'nai Torah Congregation Joint Service at Temple Beth El, 8 p.m.
February 5
Zionist Organization of America Art Show, 7 p.m. B'nai Torah
Congregation Joint Service at Temple Beth El, 9:30 a.m.
February 6
Temple Beth El-Brotherhood Breakfast, 10 a.m. Temple Emeth,
8 p.m. Concert Israel Bond Parlor meeting, 7:30 p.m. Israel
Bond Breakfast, Century Village Boca, 9:30 a.m. Women's
American ORT-North Pines Rummage Sale, 9 a.m. Temple
Beth El Young Artist Series, 3 p.m.
February 7
Brandeis Women-Boco, 9:30 a.m. Board meeting Diamond
Club, 9 a.m. meeting Women's American ORT-Boca Glades,
10 a.m. Board meeting Women's American ORT-North Pines,
10 a.m. Board meeting Temple Beth El Forum Lecture Series, 8
p.m. Women's League for Israel, 10 a.m. Board meeting
Boca Logo Women's Lunch, 12 noon Hadassah-Ben Gurion,
9:30 a.m. meeting Free Sons of Israel, 7 p.m. meeting
February 8
Zionist Organization of America, 8 p.m. meeting Hadassah-
Aviva, 10a.m. meeting Hadassah-Shalom-Delray, 9:30 a.m.
meeting B'nai Torah Congregation Board meeting, 7:30 p.m.
Temple Emeth-Brotherhood, 7:30 p.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Region District Board meeting, two days Israel
Bond Parlor meeting, 8 p.m.
February 9
B'nai Torah-Sisterhood, 7:30 p.m. Board meeting Women's
American ORT-Region District Board meeting.
February 10
Project Renewal Dinner Hadassah-Ben Gurion Board meeting,
9:30 a.m. Hadassah-Aviva Education Day Central Regional
Chapter Brandeis Women-Delray Breakfast Fashion Show, 8:45
a.m. Temple Beth El-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting
Israel Bond Parlor meeting, 7:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans-
Synder-Tokson Post-Auxiliary-lnstallation-Officers, 7 p.m.
meeting B'nai B'rith
12
B'nai Torah Men's Club, 9:30 a.m.
Integrity Council, 9:30 a.m. meeting.
February 13
Temple Emeth Bazaar, 10 a.m. Israel Bond Parlor meeting
Delray Orioles, 4 p.m. Israel Bond Parlor meeting Chalfonte
So., 7:30 p.m.
February 14
Temple Emeth-Singles, 12:30 p.m. meeting Diamond Club, 9
a.m. meeting Hadassah Association of South County, 9 a.m.
meeting.
February 15
B'nai B'rith Delray Lodge, 7:30 p.m. meeting '.Pioneer Women-
Zipporah, 10 a.m. meeting Women's American ORT-Delray,
12 30 p.m. meeting Hadassah-Shalom-Delray, 10 a.m. Board
meeting Women's American ORT-All Points meeting.
February 16
B'nai Torah Congregation-Sisterhoodi Purlm Ma* wWj music
7 30 d m Women's American ORT-Region, 10 a.m. Board
meeting Hadassah-Menachem Begin, 12 noon meet.ng
Hadassah-Boca Mooriv, 12:30 p.m. meeting.
February 17
Temple Emeth-Sisterhood, 12:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah-
Menachem Begin-All day Regional Board meeting Jewish
Community Day School-Purim Special, 7 p.m. Hadassah-Ben
C-urion, 12:30 p.m. meeting Women's American ORT-Onole, 1
pm Board meeting Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 12:30 p.m.
Board meeting American Mizrachi Women-Kfar, 10 a.m.
meeting Israel Bond Parlor meeting, 7:30 p.m.
February 20
B'nai B'rith Olympic-XI, 9:30 a.m. meeting Temple Beth El-
Solos, 7:30 p.m. meeting Israel Bond Breakfast-Century
Village, 9:30 a.m. Temple Beth El-Forum Series, 8 p.m. Coco
Woods Lakes Breakfast, 9:30a.m.
February 21
B'nai B'rith Women-Naomi, 12:30 p.m. meeting Diamond
Club, 9 am. meeting Women's American ORT-Boca Glades, 1
p.m. meeting Women's American ORT-North Pines, 12:30 p.m.
meeting B'nai B'rith Women-Ruth, 1 p.m. meeting Women's
League for Israel, 10 a.m. meeting B'nai Torah Congregation-
Breakfast, 9:30 a.m.
February 22
Pioneer Women-Zipporah, 12 noon meeting Hadassah-Aviva,
12:30 p.m. Board meeting.
February 23
Women's American ORT-Sandalfoot, 1 p.m. meeting Women's
American ORT-Delray, 12:30 p.m. meeting National Council of
Jewish Women, 8 p.m. meeting.
February 24
Jewish War Veterans-Auxiliary, 7 p.m. meeting Anshei
Emuna-Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting Temple Beth El, 8
p.m. Board Meeting Jewish War Veterans, 7 p.m. meeting
B'nai B'rith Women Boca meeting, 1 p.m. Women's American
ORT-Oriole, 12 p.m. meeting Jewish War Veterans-Snyder-
Tokson Post, 10 a.m. Board meeting Temple Emeth-
Brotherhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting Temple Emeth-
Sisterhood, 10 a.m. Board meeting B'nai B'rith Women-
Genesis meeting, 1 p.m.
February 25
Community Relations Council meeting, 12 noon.
February 27
Temple Beth El Distinguished Artist Series, 8 p.m. B'nai Torah
Men's Club, 9:30 a.m. Temple Emeth-Singles, 9:30 a.m. Board
meeting.
February 28
Pioneer Women-Kinneret, 12:30 p.m. meeting Diamond Club,
9 a. m. meeting B'nai B'rith-Shomer Lodge, 2 p. m. meeting.
FEDERATION UJA CALENDAR-CAMPAIGN EVENTS
January 31
$100-plus Family Division Luncheon Women's Division Del Aire
Event, 12 noon.
February 7
Boca Logo Luncheon and Fashion Show, 12 noon
February 9
Keynoters Committee Meeting
February 10
Project Renewal Dinner
February 13
Pines of Delray North Breakfast
February 16
Women's Division Pacesetters Luncheon $500-plus,10:30 a.m.
February 17
S10.000-plus National UJA Dinner Palm Beach
February 19
Boca Logo Dinner Dance Sheraton Boca
February 23
UJA National $10,000-plus Mission to Washington


Friday. January 28. 1983

The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
Reagan is Key
Experts Differ
Press for Normalization, Hussein May/May Not Join Peace
Jews Plead With Shultz
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
IWASHINGTON -
TA) A group of
lerican Jewish leaders
Secretary of State
>rge Shultz to put the
kited States behind Is*
el's efforts to normalize
itions with Lebanon in-
id of op posing it.
Julius Rerman, chairman of
Conference of Presidents of
Ijor American Jewish
Jan izat ions, also said that
jltz was told that while it was
Arab countries that were
Dcrastinating" on President
Igan's Middle East peace ini-
Eve, Israel was being blamed
\he lack of progress.
kERMAN SPOKE to re
rs after he led a group of 14
ibers of the Presidents con-
ice and leading Jewish Re-
licans in a two-hour meeting
[he State Department with
ill/.. Deputy Secretary Ken-
Dam; Nicholas Veliotes,
Jstant Secretary of State for
Eastern and South Asian
^irs: and Richard Fairbanks,
special envoy for the
knomy talks, were also in at-
Jance. The meeting was re-
Jtod by Shultz.
\V would hope it (the meet-
was helpful to the Secretary
emulating the future policy
State Department and the
undulations to the Ad
1st ration and to the Presi-
[," Rerman said. But he noted
before judgment could be
on whether the comments
be Jewish leaders had any af-
i they would have to see what
losais are offered by special
east envoy Philip Habib in
it.
.rinan stressed that he could
[reveal what Shultz and the
r Administration officials
but could only report on
the Jewish leaders told the
lals. He said there is a "per-
pon" in the community that
IS. is "not helpful" in the
Its to achieve normalization
lalions during the negotia-
te on the withdrawal of foreign
ps from lA'banon.
NORMALIZATION is a step
twurds from the peace treaty
Israel initially wanted."
nan said. "But it is the type
lormal izat ion that leads to an
late peace."
|e said that "Lebanon is
lable for such relations (with
b1) and we believe it is very
jrtant that the United States
>rt that approach and
st to the Lebanese govern-
that they will back them in
further discussion."
the Reagan peace initiative,
in said it is "clear to us that
Irab leaders are not prepared
(come to the (negotiating)
He said the Arab
ie's Fez communique of last
[ember offers peace based on
JO Palestinian state, in the
|9ti7 borders with East Jeru-
as its capital. Rerman said
"is the heart of the Reagan
tavid U. SeMgman|
A.S.I.D.
Interior Design
Commercial
and Residential
368-0882
Secretary Shultz
proposals thrown into the gar-
bage." He said "no indication of
any forward movement" was
given on Jordan entering the
peace process.
HOWEVER, Rerman stressed,
Israel repeatedly has said "It is
prepared to go to the table with-
out any preconditions whatso-
ever." He said despite this, "the
impression is conveyed in the
community, not only in America,
but in the world, that somehow it
is the intransigence, or the
alleged intransigence, of Israel
that is the stumbling block." He
said Shultz was told this is
"clearly not the case."
Rerman said there was no dis-
cussion of the possible visit of Is-
raeli Premier Menachem Regin to
Washington. Begin had to post-
|M>ne his meeting with Reagan
last November when his wife,
Aliza, died while he was in Los
Angeles. The visit was reportedly
to have been rescheduled for
February.
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Twoforeign affairs
experts differ on whether
the United States can ex-
pect King Hussein of Jor-
dan to join the Middle East
peace process.
Richard Allen, who was Presi-
dent Reagan's first National
Security Adviser, and Edward
Luttwak, a senior fellow at
Georgetown University's Center
for Strategic and International
Studies, presented their opposing
views during a roundtable dis-
cussion on "Looking Ahead in
the Middle East, sponsored by
the Heritage Foundation at the
University Club here.
"I feel that Jordan has come a
long way and is moving in the
right direction," Allen said. He
said Hussein's meetings with
Reagan at the White House last
month were "productive."
ALLEN, now a distinguished
fellow at the Heritage Founda-
tion and a senior foreign policy
counselor for the Republican Na-
tional Committee, said he be-
lieves that Hussein realizes that
the U.S. is an "important gua-
rantor" of his and his country's
security and continuing supply of
urms.
But Luttwak disagreed, saying
he admired Hussein because of
his "ability to attract the atten-
tion of successive foreign suitors
without actually ever delivering
anything." He listed these
suitors as first the British, then
the Israel Labor Party and now
the U.S.
"I can't be hopeful, I can't see
him delivering." he said. "If he
does, it will be a real departure of
character."
As for Israeli Premier Mena-
chem Begin. Allen predicted a
"difficult" meeting when the Is-
raeli leader sees Reagan at the
White House next month. He
said the President should reaf-
firm the U.S. relationship with
Israel and stress that it still con-
siders it a "strategic ally "and an
"asset."
ALLEN SAID Reagan should
also tell Regin that the U.S. will
not take any steps to endanger
Israeli security. But he also said
Regin should be told a freeze on
, building any new settlements on
the West Rank is the best way to
achieve progress toward peace.
On the Lebanese situation,
Allen said the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon
Israeli. Syrian and the Palestine
Liberation Organization is
urgent for the reconstruction of
Lebanon Rut he noted that the
Israeli troops will not leave until
the others do and that Lebanon
does not want them to do so.
He stressed that Israel should
be assured that "we will not exert
undue pressure" unless there is a
dear indication that the Syrians
and PLO are willing to leave and
Israel refuses.
THE FOLLOWING HAVE JOINED THE
WINNING TEAM'
FOR SUPER SUNDAY '83
pryrrrrrTi''rBTni'yTB'iT"BTn>TB iimnre'ivrroTrrrQ
CAMP
MACCABEE
is looking for
Sensitive and caring counselors and Junior
Counselors interested in working with
children in a Jewish Day Camp setting.
Please call South County Jewish Federation
at 368-2737 for an application and interview.
aUULI.tl.Mt.IM
SUPER SUNDAY
MARCH 20
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION
IS PUTTING
YOU ON THE LINE
James B. Baer. Federation
Margie Baer. Federation
Dr. Arnold Berliner, Federation
Tonl Berliner. Federation
Ed Boblck, Federation
Marianne Boblck. FederaUon
Mr*. Irving Burglaaa. FederaUon
Irving Burglaaa, FederaUon
Doris Cantor, Boca Lago
EatrellaCaaea, FederaUon
Molaes Case a, FederaUon
Hloaaom Cooper. Temple Sinai
Eric Decklnger, FederaUon
Jay Elchler. FederaUon
Eliaaa Ellant, Federation
Marlon Engle, Federation
Daniel Freed. FederaUon
Harriet Freed. FederaUon
Sylvia Gardner. High Point W
Betty Uoldenberg. Chalfonte
Robert Goldman. No. 3144
Harvey Grossman, FederaUon
Roi Grosaman, FederaUon
Esther Hotf eld, Boca West
Dr. Nathan Hoffeld. Boca West
Alfred Horowitz. B'nal Torah
Eleanor Jontlff. B'nal Torah
Sheldon Jontlff. B'nal Torah
Dr. Dalla Kalal. FederaUon
Dr. Ury Kalal, FederaUon
Tom Katz, FederaUon
Karen Kaufman. FederaUon
bee Kaufman, FederaUon
Edward Klngaley. Oriole
Margaret KotUer, FederaUon
???????
If
NTY -+
SOUTH
COUNTY
If WISH
FEDERATION I BOCA RATON
DEL RAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIOA
I I
1 I
ft I
Milton Kretaky, FederaUon
Barbara Leln, FederaUon
Abner Levlne. Federation
Deborah Levlne, FederaUon
Jack Levlne. Oriole
Dr. Danny Man. FederaUon
Dena Man. FederaUon
Sanford Meade. Federation
Sherrl Meade, FederaUon
Linda Melcer. FederaUon
Steve Melcer, FederaUon
Dr. W. Meyerson. FederaUon
Roberta Meyerson, FederaUon
Elaine Roberts. Temple Beth El
Naomi Sachs, FederaUon
la Slgel. Free Sons of Israel
Berenice Schankerman. Federation
Joe S. Schenk. Temple Emeth
Eve Steinberg. Coco Wood Lakea
Lenore Steinberg, FederaUon
Mark Steinberg. B'nal Torah
Paul Steinberg. Federation
Roberta Steinberg. B'nal Torah
Joe Steinberg, Coco Wood Lakea
Eric Warshal. FederaUon
Lynne Warshal, FederaUon
Rabbi Bruce Warshal. FederaUon
Miriam Welner. Temple Beth El
Gladys Welnshank, Federation
Mayer Welnshank. FederaUon
Eleanor Wolff. Federation
Morris Wolff. FederaUon
Dr. Joe Zlnna. Federation
Marilyn Zlnns, FederaUon
as******
i W* ._v*\C
Sa^
id*.
******
tof *.., the to* r^avs ands,_.^\\ncj


Ships of Panamanian and Libarian Registry


Pae 10
iridian of South County
KrH., Ji
1 4 inoi
I'age 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. January 28, 1983
Boca BarwOod Rises to 1983
Chaim Potok at FAU
"Boca Barwood is lucky to
^ave Colman Hanish return as
as chairman again this year,"
announced Milton Kretsky, 1983
Chairman, Men's and Family
Division. Hanish successfully
chaired the 1982 UJA-Federation
Campaign drive at Boca Bar-
wood. It was the first year that a
campaign had been run in that
area and Hanish was instrument-
al in it's success.
Colman Hanish isn't a stranger
to the work of Jewish organiza-
tions. Before moving to Florida
in 1980 with his wife Florence,
Hanish worked with many Jew-
ish services in Cincinnati, Ohio.
Belonging to the B'nai B'rith on
both the local district and nation-
al level, Hanish was President of
his B'nai B'rith Lodge, a member
of the B'nai B'rith council and
the District Board of Governors.
Colman Hanish
He is a past president of the Jew-
ish Vocational Service and a
member of two synagogues in
Ohio. He has always been either a
chairman or a member of various
committees of the Cincinnati
Federation and continues this
tradition in South County.
A recipient of B'nai B'rith's
Man of the Year Award, Colman
Hanish is one of the founders of
the new B'nai B'rith Lodge in
Boca Raton.
His emotions run high on his
position in the South County
Federation Campaign. "I feel it's
very important for any newcomer
to become part of the communi-
ty." He explains, "I live here
only part-time, but I must
contribute to the community to
help maintain the way of life we
want to exist here."
After Faltering Start, El Al Back in Skies
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
After a faltering start last
week. El Al appeared to be
back, in business following
an unexpected agreement
between the pilots and
management. A scheduled
flight took off Monday
morning for Zurich and
Rome. The airline manage-
ment expressed hope that
schedules would be
'completely back to
normal" by Passover.
El Al. grounded for the last
four months and facing liquida-
tion, resumed service last week
with a return flight to Nairobi
and Johannesburg on Wed-
nesday. But 73 passengers
lx>oked on Friday's flight to
Istanbul had to be placed on a
chartered aircraft because El Al
pilots refused to fly under the
new contract recently concluded
between the company and
Histadrut.
BarMtzvah
Kirk Slobody
KIRK SLOBODY
On Saturday, Jan. 29, Kirk
Andrew Slobody. son of Davida
and Kenneth Slobody, will be
called to the Torah of Temple
Beth El of Boca Raton as a Bar
Mitzvah. Kirk is a student of
Potomac School and attends the
Temple Beth El religious school.
Family members sharing in the
simcha are grandparents, Max
and Mitzi Millman of North
Kingstown, R.I., and sister,
Tara. Out of town guests include
aunt and uncle Mr. and Mrs.
Irwin Slobody of New City, N.Y.
and Mr. and Mrs. Michael Mill-
man of Fairfield. Conn.
Kirk's hobbies are swimming,
and collecting of beer cans and
baseball cards.
Following services, Mr. and
Mrs. Slobody will host a recep-
tion in Kirk's honor.
THE PILOTS announced
Monday that they ended their
strike at the urging of Finance
Minister Yoram Aridor. They
said they were promised special
Rabbi Alexander M.
Schindler, president of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, will be
honored by having a Jewish
National Fund forest planted
in his name by the UAHC
near the ancient city of Safad
in the Galilee. Rabbi Schindler
has headed the synagogue
movement of Reform Judaism
in the United States and
Canada since 1973.
tax rebates on severance pay to
pilots who are dismissed. They
agreed that six pilots would be
dismissed and 15 others would
take early retirement. El Al is
reducing its personnel in all
categories by about 10 percent as
an economy measure under a re-
organization scheme approved by
the government.
The pilots have other disputes
with management which they say
are safety related. But they
promised today to pursue them
without interrupting flights.
Meanwhile, the Knesset
Finance Committee agreed to
give the new El Al management
another $15 million to allow for
payment of the increased separa-'
tion compensation for El Al
workers to be dismissed under
the reorganization plan.
SOME COMMITTEE
members objected to the piece-
meal payments to the national
airline and said it should either be
brought back to good health im-
mediately or sold off to private
entrepreneurs.
Transport Minister Haim
Corfu said there was now no in-
tention to sell the company, say-,
ing this had only been a "sug-
gestion" put forward at one point
in the negotiations with the staff.
The Finance Committee is to
meet again in a month's time, to.
reconsider El Al's financial!
position and government
promises to provide it with
further funds under the reorgani-
zation plan.
Presenting the most
talked about Israel Tour
In the country.
THE HAS
HILTON
ISRAEL
TOUR
A group designed (or mature
adults for the best years of
your life1 Travel with your
contemporaries see Israel
in luxury'
APRIL 25 MAY 9
MAY 23 JUNE 6
JUNE 13-27
SEPT. I9-OCT.3
NOV. 6-20
Cost
$1,545.00
with full Israeli breakfast
$230.00
UNLIMITED A LA CARTE
DINNERS THROUGHOUT
$140.00
rounc trip air from Miami
International Airport
K3KI
vm
Including
1 Round-trip Bus to Miami
International Airport
Round-trip jet flight (optional
Miami connection)
' 5 Star super deluxe hotels
1 Hilton Jerusalem. Plaza
Tiberias. Hilton Tel Aviv
1 Israeli breakfast throughout
OPTIONAL UNLIMITED A LA
CARTE DINNERS (Grill
rooms m Hilton Hotels
included)
1 In depth itinerary via private
deluxe motorcoach
Licensed Israeli guide
Porterage entrance fees,
transfers, hotel taxes
VIP receptions (see places
usually not on tours and meet
the people of Israel in the news)
Special arrangements lor baths
at spa in Tiberias
Optional extensions in Israel
Egypt and/or Europe
Revisited people optional
substitution of Eilat lor Tiberias
DEPOSIT $100 00 per person
(Make check to Temple
Israel) 45-day cancellation
provision
Mail to Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Drive
West Palm Beach Fi
For more information call
Temple Offices
622-1435 W Palm Beach
753-409" Coral Springs
893-9882 N Miami Beach
Florida Atlantic University,
Student Government Program
Board, in cooperation with Hillel
Foundation, proudly presents
"An Evening With Chaim
Potok" on Sunday, March 13 at 8
p.m. in the University Center
Auditorium. Tickets are $8 and
are available Monday through
Friday 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., in the
Student Activities Office, Uni-
versity Center, Room 201. Tick-
ets will also be available the eve-
ning of the show.
Chaim Potok's novels have
won critical as well as popular ac-
claim. Their universal appeal has
made them international best-
sellers and contemporary clas-
sics. Some of Potok's novels in-
clude: The Chosen, The Promise,
My Name is Asher Lev, In the
Beginning, Wanderings, and
most recently. The Book of
Lights. The author will talk
about themes in his books that
bear upon contemporary issues
and then will respond to ques-
Chaim Potok
tions from the audience.
For further information, please
call 393-3735.
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION BOCA RATON
OELRAY 8EACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
WANTED
NAMES OF NEWCOMERS
Shalom South County Needs Your Help.
Do you know anyone who has recently
moved to South County?
We want to invite
newcomers to a Shalom
South County event.
Please Call The Federation Office,
368-2737
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m.. Saturday at 9:30 a.m. Family Shabbat
Servkre 2nd Friday of each month. Minyan on Monday and
Thursday mornings at 8:15 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
M ISSPfLKfi' S^Lk south of Linton Blvd. Delray Beach
a m and^m 4d?X JtabboiuDr ^ L' Sacks Services daily 8
a.m. and 9 a.m. Saturday. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at First Federal Savings & Loan Associa-
tion Off.ces, West Atlantic, Corner Carter Road. Delray Beach
P'w ySu vPa m J"S S"eg Shabbat. Saturdays, 9 am. and
Kiddush. Edward Dorfman. President, 6707 Moonlit Drive
SSffj.'SSl'&lS448- "-*.*" Emeritus
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
Phone;W8m3S w23\5?*& Fla' 33432' K**0
Richard i.wT ,Rab^' Mer'e E' S^- Assistant Rabbi
?rMl^fig?Mfrt Month y Shabbath Serv,ce 8 P-m. 2nd Friday of Each
Month. TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
rnning Addrf98: P- Box 134, Boca Raton. Fla. 33432.
Conservative Located in Century Village, Boca. Services 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 8:45 a.m. Reuben Saltzman
President, Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-5557. 3aJlzm*n-
TEMPLE EMETH
rilS? Ph? AtlZ,tlAeVe'^Ddn|y B^"*- Fla 33446 Conaerva-
Zisook Can,nrT2K3\ 2** A ?" ""* Seymour
fiZm n Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at
8.45 a.m., DadyMmyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Lar.dltdl "Khd? 2W'342 N' Swinton Av*"> 'Comer
Box mi RDeVa^lriyaBheaFla ^^ST^^i tdd"*a: P0
Samuel Silver. V^'&$![ **

vwv\



mm


[.January 28, 1983
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
eqotiations With PLO
>kayIf Charter Changes, Says Navon
Jy KEVIN FREEMAN
{W YORK (JTA) -
lent Yitzhak Navon
ited that Israel may
ier negotiating with
'alestine Liberation
ition if the PLO
change the article in
tenant which calls for
jtruction of the Jew-
Mate. But until such
is taken, Navon said
[consensus opinion
Israel remains that
LO is "an organiza-
>f terror" with which
will not conduct no-
tions.
[>rding to Navon, who ad-
some 500 people at a
Jewish Appeal luncheon
Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
st week, Israel would have
ce into consideration" any
in the PLO covenant. The
J3 articles of the PLO cove-
call for the "liberation of
line" and the "elimination"
[nism in Palestine through
6d struggle" and
lution."
K ISRAELI leader, whose
is to the UJA luncheon was
^f a four-day visit to New
j reiterated what he termed
|the "common denominat-
or the political platforms of
farious parties in Israel.
|ghout his visit to the
States, during which he
.-ith President Reagan in
fngton and with Jewish
there, in Boston and New
Navon spoke of consensus
and dealt gingerly with
>versial topics affecting
li-U.S. relations.
I his address to the UJA
|ring, Navon said both the
Likud coalition govern-
and the opposition Labor
Iment share the same views
following:
Jt a return to the pre-1967
frs is unacceptable; that the
Us a terrorist organization;
Ithe establishment of a Pal-
Ian state on the West Bank
Id pose a security threat to
itate of Israel and also act as
JM for Soviet intervention
[the region; and that Jerusa-
1 will remain the undivided
il of Israel.
THE subject of Israeli-
man relations, which he de-
ns "frozen," Navon
jed that Egypt has reneged
agreements signed with Is-
ha part of the Camp David
ess. He indicated that these
ments include normalize-
issues such as trade and
jm.
Ovsishcher
lead in Minsk
IEW YORK The National
kference on Soviet Jewry has
learned of the death of Nade-
|a Ovsishcher in Minsk, on
12. Mrs. Ovsishcher, the
of former Soviet Army Colo-
and Jewish activist, Lev Ov-
icher, suffered from a deterio-
ig heart condition and had
hospitalized several times in
I past year.
The Ovsishchers applied to
ite to Israel in 1972. Since
^t time, they have been singled
for special harassment by
il authorities. Col. Ovsishcher
^s deprived of his rank and mil-
pension, and had been re-
itedly attacked and maligned
! the Soviet press as a "Zionist
avocateur."
Beyond normalization, Egypt
recalled its Ambassador to Israel,
Saad Mortada, last September
following the massacre of Pales-
tinians at the Shatila and Sabra
refugee camps by Christian Phal-
angist forces, and, coupled with
the continuing dispute over the
Taba region on Sinai, relations
between the two countries have
deteriorated significantly, the
President noted.
Navon affirmed, however, that
he thinks Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak "basically"
seeks peace. But he said that if
the accords between Israel and
Egypt represented a "model for
peace" that Israel can expect
with its other Arab neighbors in
the future, then, he added, "I
don't think it will be a very en-
couraging example." He said
that just as there can be cold war
policies between two nations,
there can also be a state of "cold
peace."
BEFORE ARRIVING in New
York. Navon spoke to some 2,500
people at a suburban Boston syn-
agogue, where he informed the
audience he had told President
Reagan earlier that the consensus
in Israel is that Israel cannot re-
turn to the pre-1967 borders be-
cause they presented a risk to the
safety and survival of the state.
Navon, accompanied by Isra-
el's Ambassador to the United
Nations Yehuda Blum and
Israel's Ambassador to the
United States Moshe Arens, also
spoke to some 1,200 students and
faculty members at Yeshiva Uni-
versity. He stressed.the theme of
Jewish unity and the continued
importance of education to help
resolve some of Israel's pressing
problems.
Navon was presented with a
leather-bound copy of a catalogue
from the university museum's
current exhibit, "Raban Remem-
bered," which includes some 300
works of the long forgotten Jeru-
salem artist, Zeev Raban.
Mounted on the catalogue was a
mother of pearl medallion made
by students of the President's
father, Yosef Navon, who taught
handicrafts at the Alliance Israe-
lite Universalle schools in Jeru-
salem in the early 1900s.
ALSO LAST week, Navon ad-
dressed some 500 high school and
college students at the Roosevelt
Hotel here in a meeting spon-
sored by the University Service
Department of the American
Zionist Youth Foundation.
Earlier, he addressed faculty,
students and lay leaders on the
relationship between American
Jews and Israel at the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
eligion's Brookdale Center.
Navon was awarded the Presi-
dent's Medal of the Citv Univer-
sity of New York Graduate
School. The medal, inscribed
"Yitzhak Navon, President,
State of Israel, Scholar,
Humanitarian, Statesman," is in
recognition of Navon's accom-
plishments as an author, scholar
and linguist, in addition to his in-
ternational stature as an Israeli
leader, according to the Graduate
Center.
How Hitler Managed
To Take Over Germany
Continued from Page 1
workers and many liberal members of the bourgeoisie
after the First World War, was felt to stand little chance
of success because of the burden of reparations imposed
on Germany at the Treaty of Versailles.
The hard-hit economy staggered from hyper-
inflation to the Depression. Mass unemployment made
many people support the Nazis and Communists, who
made democratic coalition majorities in the Reichstag
impossible, the Nazis emerging as the largest single
party.
* Many farmers and industrialists felt the new
regime would mean government orders and contracts.
Hitler had the capitalists on his side, which was most
important.
HITLER EARLIER speculated that an ad-
ministrative and Army elite, frustrated by the weakness
of the Weimar Republic, would fall for his Reich idea,
which was long sold abroad as a national working class
movement.
He fostered disintegration among the bourgeoisie
and the working class, enabling the Nazis to establish a
feeling of total power that horrified first Germany, then
the World, until the end of the Second World War and
Hitler's suicide. After a mere 12 years of self-destructive
power, the Nazi dream of a 1,000-year Reich ended in
ruins.
Prisoner of Conscience Shnirman
Must Serve Time Again
NEW YORK Simon Shnir-
man, a 25-year-old Soviet Jew
who served two and half years in
a labor camp for alleged draft
evasion, was rearrested on Jan.
12 on similar charges, the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported. If tried and con-
victed Shnirman faces up to five
years in a labor camp.
Shnirman, who lives in the
small Ukrainian town of Kerch
applied to emigrate to Israel in
1977, to join his father, but was
denied permission on the pretext
that "he did not work long
enough to pay for money in-
vested by the State in his
studies." When called to serve in
the army, he refused on the basis
of his pending emigration ap-
plication.
On June 27, 1978, he was tried
and sentenced to two and half
years in a labor camp. During
that time, he worked with com-
mon criminals and was singled
out by camp authorities for spe-
cial punishment non-delivery
of mail and food parcels and
denial of visits from his mother.
After serving his term, Shnirman
was released on November 29,
1980.
In a town with few Jews and no
other refuseniks Shnirman and
his mother live day-to-day,
waiting for permission to join his
father and sister in Israel. His
application to emigrate was offi-
cially refused just a week before
this latest action.
Shnirman is now the second
former Jewish prisoner under ar-
rest. Iosif Begun, who served two
sentences in exile, is being held in
a prison in the city of Vladimir.
COMPUTERS at CAMP
professionally designed and conducted course
available for children of all ages enrolled at our
eight-week camps
CAMP WOHELO for girls
CAMP COMET for boys
12811 Old Route 16, Waynesboro, PA 17268
SSth Year of Quality Camping
High In The Blue Ridge Mountains
Contact: Owner-Director, Morgan I. Levy, C.C.D.
Winter Address:
1531 S.W. 82nd Court, Miami, FL 33144
Telephone: (305) 261-1500
-_-, A Well Balanced Summer Program
SPORTS NATURE ARTS SCIENCE COMPUTERS
3t] Large Florida Enrollment-Staff Inquiries Invited, Mln. o* 19
SOUTH FLORIDA REUNION
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13,1983 1P.M.-4 P.M.
Tropical Park Shelter #8,7900 S.W. 40th St., Miami
Enrolled campers, former campers, prospective campers and staff
LUNCH-FAVORS-GAMES-FAMILY FUN-SLIDE PRESENTATION '
OUR CAMPS. ,
Call 261-1500 In Miami for a reservation to join us.
These outstanding camps have been owned and directed by a Miami
family since 1929. We will be happy to call on you In person If you
cannot make the reunion.
OF
B
DRY CLEAN
YOUR
CLOTHES
MUMS
*KDSPK4DS
*tUGS COME If
AMD GET TO (NOW USI
We're fe* service aVy decaer
ef w*k eeae m ereaiises
WE DO ALTERATIONS, iEPAS, PILLOW ItEMOVATING
*UUNDIT SlfVKE AVAHAilE *SAME DAT HI VICE
Family Owned I Oetrefee'
Hamkt (HitmttB fife. ., _
For AN Your Dry Cleqning Needs j>
4051 W. Attewtk
Defray leech
lliai ConfrvM a MHittrvl
Atlwifc Am a>|
c Ave. M f I
MOUM:
Maa.-Frl. Til
St. 1
499-4435
v*
Working Together
Traditions established through
four generations of family ownership
.. careful attendance to the family's
wishes dedication to the time honored
customs of lewish law compassionate guidance
when the hour of need arises.
mm
in Florida
BtuMine Bl\xi and 2(W(h SI N MsM Braft FL 11I HO
10S 94S-1Q19
210S W Hittshw BAtf DrrrMd Bra ft. FL 1144 I
K)S 427-47(X)
SQIS Parft Drhr m U.S 44 I Margate Ft 1K)t>1
WS -427-4700
MOB w Oakland P Ft Laudcrdalt iSimnsrl. FL 111 11
10S 742-6000
Palm Braft 10S 811-0887
GRATCM MANOEl
HARIMAN MILLfO
MfRSMt-
JOEl A BOHfRT


Puxe 10
Page 12
he Jewish Floridian of South Uountv
The Jewish Floridian of South County
V-U ----- -
Friday, January 28, 1983
Jk
NORTON
SINCE 1924-
SAFETY
SERVICE
CENTER
IS MEASURED BY MORE THAN PRICE
YOU'LL FIND IT ALL AT NORTON!
IFGoodrich
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC POLYESTER CORD
FIBERGLASS BELT WHITES
P155/80B12
Plus 1.49 F.E.T.
SIZE
P155/80B13
P165/80B13
P175/80B13
PRICE
31.97
F.E.T.
33.81
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
P225/75B14
P155/80B15
P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
35.75
37.93
38.79
39.88
41.82
42.92
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
45.60
47.78
50.10
1 44
1.50
1.63
1.69
1.70
1.79
1.95
207
2.20
235
1.68
1.83
2.15
234
246
265
NORTON TIRE COs LIMITED WARRANTY
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED
II lor any rtiwn you are nol completely salislied with any new
passenger mi lire you buy Irom Norton Tire Co relum il
along with your original invoice within 30 days ol the dale ol
purchase and your money will he relunded in lull no oues
lions asked1 Road haiards and commercial vehicles ei
eluded
W\i
MAXI-TRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
P165/80R13
Plus 1.67 F.E.T.
SIZE PRICE F.E.T.
P175/80R13 38.39 1.64
P185/80R13 40.09 1.78
P185/75R14 41.25 1.93
P195/75R14 42.62 2.06
P205/75R14 43.90 2.31
P215/75R14 45.89 2.47
P215/75R15 46.28 2.49
P225/75R15 48.77 2.70
P235/75R15 53.61 2.89


-jr.****
MB***!
itFGoodrich
UFESAVER XLM
STEEL BELTED RADIALS
P155/80R13
rPlus 1.53 F.E.T.I
SIZE
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P195/70R13
P205/70R13
P205/70R14
P175/75R14
P185/75R14
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
SALE PRICE
46.86
48.57
F.E.T.
1.69
1.78
49.85 192
50.82 1.98
52.32
56.92
47.50
52.32
56.92
59.37
60.45
64.62
59.70
6T.73
64.09
66.44
71 ..26
2.14
2.23
1.83
2.04
2.18
2.34
2.48
2.68
2.33
2.47
2.59
2.78
3.01
IIRELLI
RADIALS
Low Cost
'High Mileage
Outstanding Value
SIZE PRICE fIT
155SR12 41.51 1 19
145SR13 36.63 1 15
155SR13 43.35 1.24
165SR13 47.01 1.53
175SR14 53.72 1 81
185SR14 56.78 2.11
165SR15 54.95 1.71
THE SOUTHS MOST
COMPLETE INVENTORY
SPECIAL
PURCHASE
FOR LUXURY
SIZED CARS
P235/75-15
8695
V W Plus
BE SURE TO GET OUR
PRICE ON ALL SPORTS,
PASSENGER OR TRUCK
TIRE REPLACEMENTS.
PREMIUM
GRADE
HIGHWAY
FOR TRUCKS, VANS, RVs
SIZE
700x15
0 ply lutoi.ts
700x15
B ply lutxtyp.
750x16
8 ply lutx-typ.
800x165
8 ply lutxl.il
875x16 5
8 ply luMI.it
950x16.5
8 ply IiMii
PAKE
51.80
45.05
57.42
58.05
61.83
68.18
F.E.T.
3.07
281
354
3.34
3 78
PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
SIZE
A78x13
*C78x13
*C78x14
E78X14
F78X14
G78x14
H78x14
G78X15
H78x15
L78x15
-PB!CE_
25.01
27.91
28.53
29.73
31.16
32.85
34.39
32.93
34.61
36.56
4.21 Available in 2 Ply only
fJi
1.59
1.80
1.88
2.01
2.12
226
249
235
254
2.79
WE SERVICE NATIQIIAL ArpQlj^TS
NORTON
S'NCE 19Sa-
TIRE C
SAWT
cmtir
We honor MASTER CARO VISA
AMERICAN EXPRESS
DINER S CLUB
.CORAL GABLES
Bird A Dougus Road 446-8101
HOHTM MIAMI
13360N W 7thAve 681-8541
N MIAMI BEACH
1700 N E 163rd St 945 7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH DADE
9001 S Oi.ieHwy 6677575
CUTLER RIOOE
20390 S DuieHwy 233-5241
DADE: tuport/Wholesale
1R66NW 82 Ave 593-7040
HtALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
1275 49th SI 822 2500
MIAMI AIRPORT
N W 25 St & Milam Dairy Rd 593-1191
WEST MIAMI
Bud 4 Galloway Rds 552 6656
KENOALL OR./HtQATE SQUARE
13872S W SBthSl 387-0128
'HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal Hwy 247-1622
W HOLLYWOOO
497 S State Rd 967 0450
FT LAUOEROALE
1740E Sunrise EUvd 463 7568
PLANTATION
381 N State Rd 7 587 2186
TAMARAC
4414 W Commercial Brvd 735-2772
TAMARAC
N University Dr 1 McNab Rd 7214700
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N Federal Hwy 943 4200
WEST PALM BEACH
515 Soutti Owe 832 3044
DAVTESt Rd 84 iust west ol Urnversrty Or 473-4700
LAKE PARK N PALM (EACH
532 N lakeBtvd 848 2544
OEERFN-LD BEACH
2265 W HillsBoro Brvd 427-8800
'FT. PIERCE
2604 Soutti 4th St 464 8020
VERO BEACH
7552lslStreet 567 1174
DAYTONA BEACH
907 Volusia Ave 255-7487
NAPLES
2065E TamumiTi 7744443
P~
T
I


Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID EJQDBQI3K_6B6PHE INGEST_TIME 2013-06-05T22:37:26Z PACKAGE AA00014304_00105
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES