The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00088

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Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
^Jewish Floridiari
Volume 4-Number 32
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Defray Beach and Highland Beach
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, October 1,1982
f ill Shochur
Price 3.r)C>nt8(
W
Florence Reisberg
Lois Romanoff
Romanoff, Reisberg Co-Chair
Presidents9 Coffee Event
Margie Baer, chairman of the
Women's Division for the 1983
deration-UJA Campaign, an-
Dunces the appointment of Lois
Dmanoff and Florence Reisberg
co-chairmen for the Presi-
fcnts' Coffee.
| The Presidents' Coffee is an
nual event attended by the
sidents of each of the Jewish
lumen's organizations in South
Dimly. Its aim is to foster an at-
osphere of fellowship between
ese orgnaizations and to bind
|mmun interests. It will also
ve to prepare these leaders for
date '83, the Women's Assem-
1 scheduled for Dec. 6, at which
ne the organization Presidents
I be honored.
|Lois Romanoff, who comes to
orida from Toledo, Ohio, has
en active in the Jewish corn-
unity for many years. She was
liliated with the Collingwood
[venue Temple in Toledo and is a
|e member of Hadassah. Prior to
oving to Boca Raton, Lois and
kr family resided in Ft. Lauder-
\le where she was involved in
Dinner Committee at the Ft.
puderdule Federation.
jln the 1982 campaign Lois
pved on the Women's Division
npaign Cabinet as operation
Itreach co-chairman for
erdeen Arms, Admirals Walk
and Dalton Arms and was on the
Advance Gifts Committee. She is
a member of Temple Beth El in
Boca Raton.
Florence Reisberg is originally
from Pittsburgh, Pa., where she
volunteered her time at Federa-
tion, in many Jewish organiza-
tions, and in the hospital.
Upon moving to Boca Raton,
she joined the congregation of
Temple Beth El, Hadassah. Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women
and B'nai B'rith Women. In the
1981 campaign, Florence was on
the Pacesetter's Committee and
in 1982 she contributed her
talents to the Advance Gifts
Committee. Along with Lois, she
served as co-chairman on the
Women's Division Campaign
Cabinet as operation outreach
co-chairman for Aberdeen Arms,
Admirals Walk and Dalton
Arms.
In making the appointment,
Margie Baer said, "I am just
thrilled that Lois and Florence
are chairmen of our Presidents'
Day and hosting this very impor-
tant function. 1 know that they
will do an excellent job of making
our Presidents' Day an enjoyable
and worthwhile event."
The Presidents' Coffee will be
held on Oct. 4 at the home of Lois
and Dick Romanoff.
Temple Beth El Presents
'Sunday at Three' Jan. 23
[ Temple Beth El of Boca Raton,
333 S.W. 4th Avenue, Boca
aton, announces the third
fason of its Young Artists
pries "Sunday At Three."
hese performances bring to the
immunity outstanding young
rlists who promise to be among
I great musicians of the future.
I After each concert, there will
I a reception with opportunity
| meet the performing artist.
The Series begins on Sunday,
a. 23, 1983, featuring Dmitry
M>k>nsky, cellist. He will be c-
PPanied by his mother, Oxana
M>lonskaya, outstanding pian-
J who performed in Temple
Fh El's Distinguished Artists
pea in 1982. Following will be
Ibin McCabe, pianist on Feb. 6;
"e New York Vocal Arts En-
able on March 13, and finally
Dmitry Yablonsky
The EndeUion String Quartet on
April 3.
Tickets are available only by
subscription to all four conceits.
Subscription price is $26.
For further information, call
the Concert Office at 391 -8600.
Jews Protest Pope's Visit With Arafat
ROME (JTA) The
Jews of Rome went
on strike'. They shut
down their many shops in
the heart of the city to pro-
test the red carpet treat-
ment given the PLO chief
Yasir Arafat who had a
private audience with Pope
John Paul II, was cordially
received by President San-
dro Pertini at lunch, and
met at some length with
Foreign Minister Emilio
Colombo.
The Jewish community
demonstrated outside the main
synagogue. Italy's Chief Rabbi,
Elio Toaff, sent a telegram to the
Pope saying he was "profoundly
disturbed by the audience given
Arafat, a non-repentant per-
secutor of Christians in Lebanon,
chief of an organization' sullied
with the horrible crimes of killing
women and children; who aims at
the destruction of the State of Is-
rael. I fervidly protest against
this grave act which hurts and
disorients the religious senti-
ments of the faithful."
COLOMBO PRESENTED a
summary of his talk with Arafat
at a session of the 69th Inter-
parliamentary Union meeting
here. He spoke of Italy's position
in the Middle East conflict, ap-
proving both President Reagan's
new peace initiative and the re-
sults of the Arab League summit
conference in Fez, Morocco last
week. He maintained that both
could lead to reciprocal recogni-
tion between Israel and the Arab
states.
Colombo said, "The Italian
government will undertake, in
harmony with all the other coun-
tries of the European Com-
munity, every opportune initia-
tive to make a negotiated and
peaceful solution to the Middle
East possible; negotiations
which will lead to the recognition
of Israel's right to exist within
secure and guaranteed boundar-
ies, respecting Untied Nations
resolutions, and which is in line
with the document recently
formulated in the seat of the
European Community and with
prospects for official Italian
recognition of the PLO as repre-
sentatives of the Palestinian peo-
ple."
Colombo was referring to the
1980 Venice Declaration on the
Middle East, recently reaffirmed
by the European Economic Com-
munity (EEC). It calls for,
among other things, the "asso-
ciation" of the PLO in the Middle
, East peace process.
THE ITALIAN Foreign
Minister stressed that Italy "will
favor the reciprocal, unequivocal
and simultaneous Recognition
between the PLO and the State of
Israel."
While Italy appears to be lean-
ing toward official recognition of
the PLO, it will not move in ad-
vance of the EEC. The member of
parliaments attending the meet-
ing are not all in agreement on
this, even on the extent of de
facto recognition Italy has al-
ready bestowed on the PLO and
on the PLO and on the extremely
cordial reception given Arafat in
Rome.
There are also sharp dif-
ferences within the Italian
government and Parliament. Sig-
nificantly, Prime Minister
Giovanni Spadolini, a major poli-
tical personality, flatly refused to
see Arafat. President Pertini, on
the other hand, gave the PLO
chief a warm welcome. He also
delivered a scathing attack on Is-
rael's invasion of Lebanon in a
speech before the Interparlia-
mentary Union.
There was no immediate reply
from the Israeli delegation. But
its chairman, Labor MK Moshe
Shahal, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that he con-
sidered it improper for the Presi-
dent of the host country to single
out Israel for critism when there
are many mroe dangerous con-
flicts in the world.
SHAHAL SAID he thought
the President's remarks were
very one-sided and took no ac-
count of the history of PLO ter-
rorism against Israel and its re-
sponsibilitv for the deaths of
10,000 Christians in Lebanon.
The Israeli delegation issued a
press release detailing PLO
crimes, among them the massa-
cre of 11 of Israel's Olympic team
in Munich in 1972, the hijacking
>f an El Al plan to Entebbe,
Uganda in 1976, and the docu-
mented ties between the PLO
and other international terrorist
groups, including Italy's Red
Brigade.
Zaire Resumec Israeli Ties
President Sese Seko Mobuto of
Zaire has expressed his inten-
tions of resuming diplomatic re-
lations with Israel. The oil rich
Arab states had enticed Zaire to
suspend contact with Israel with
the promise of $4 billion in aid
back in 1973 but never fulfilled
their promise.
African students in the fields
of agriculture, medicine, den-
testry, ecology, economics, and
animal husbandry have been
trained in Israeli universities on
scholarships provided by the Is-
raeli government.
With the announcement of the
diplomatic ties being renewed,
other African states are expected
to follow suit.
The Zaire State said that Israel
offered a healthy image of pride,
ingenuity, determination and
courage for their people to exem-
plify. Now with black Africa no
longer saddled with colonialism,
they believe that they can learn
much from Israel who went thou-
sands of years without a repre-
sentative government.


Page 2
The Jewish Fioridian of South County
Friday, October 1,1382

In this article, Helen Davis speaks to two members of
the Israel Government Press Office Ze'ev Lnajets and
Steve Leibowitz about Israel's ongoing media image,
the impact of Arab terror-tactics on foreign correspon-
dents and the controversial issue of the media's coverage
of Operation Peace for Galilee. Davis is editor of 'Israel
Scene,' where the article first appeared
By HELEN DAVIS
Israel's difficulties with
foreign media have been
highlighted by the war in
Lebanon. But the issue of
Israel's image in the world
is not new, says Ze'ev Cha-
fets, director of the Gov-
ernment Press Office in Je-
rusalem.
"Israel hosts, on a regular
basis. 230 accredited foreign cor-
respondents. Another 1,500 visit
the country each year on
assignment. And the amount of
reportage they generate is
enormous, he says.
"Israel is, per capita, probably
the most heavily reported-on
country, on a sustained basis, in
history." said Chafets.
"OTHER COUNTRIES, dur
ing times of crisis, might experi-
ence or endure a greater
blaze of publicity. But the
media's hunger for news from Is-
rael is apparently insatiable.
Year in, year out, newspapers
radio and television, feature
Israel as if it were a giant among
nations instead of a mere speck
on the map.
"Everything we do here
good, bad and indifferent is
magnified. broadcast, talked
about." said Chafets, 34, who
was born in the United States
and came to Israel in 1967.
"There are times when living in
the spotlight is uncomfortable.
But we have no choice.
"Israel is an open society. That
is the nature of the people and the
country we have established. We
have a free domestic press and
will continue to have one. It is
important to remember that
everything that happens in Israel
is reported first to the Israeli
public and only second to the
world.
"WHETHER that is beneficial
or harmful, it is basically a fact of
life. You can't restrain freedom of
the press without undermining
democracy."
The great majority of Israelis
would agree that press freedom is
sacrosanct. But there is, increas-
ingly, an angry awareness in
Israel that this very freedom is
being used to harm Israel
whether deliberately or from the
point of view that bad news from
Israel makes good news in the
media abroad.
It was Ze'ev Chafets who went
into battle with the international
media when he saw an anti-Israel
Yossilioth
oias taking a more sinister turn.
Earlier this year, the ABC-TV
network in the United States ran
a feature on Judea and Samaria
(the West Bank) which, said
Chafets, was one of the "most
malicious, distorted and one-
sided programs about Israel
shown on any American network
in recent years."
THE NETWORK, he said, in
uncharacteristically harsh terms,
made and transmitted the
program in order to "pander to
Arab terror." The network also
hoped that as a result of the pro-
gram it would remain free of
further harassment from the
PLO.
To achieve all this, charges
Chafets. the network was ready
to distort the truth about Israel
on the screen "for the sake of
getting back into the good graces
of the PLO."
Chafets further charged that
other representatives of major
Western media had fallen foul of
the PLO and the Syrian regime
and had tried to hide the in-
cidents.
He cited a gun attack on the
Reuters news agency bureau
chief in Beirut, Bernard
Debusemann. He was first
threatened by a pro-Syrian fac-
tion of the PLO which did not
approve of his reporting on
Syrian actions in Lebanon and
then he was shot in the stomach
as he walked in the street, Reu-
ters played down the incident.
THE BBC's Beirut correspon-
dent, Tim Llewellyn, saw the
shooting from a window. He
himself fell foul of Syria after his
report was broadcast of an
assassination attempt on Syrian
President Hafez Assad. Threats
attributed to "pro-Syrian
elements in Lebanon" reached
him, and he was transferred to
Cyprus. The episode was re-
ported is only one BBC newscast.
Contrary to its custom, the
BBC from then on omitted to
mention what city Llewellyn was
reporting from, and it did not put
a staff man into Beirut to replace
him.
Late last year, said Chafets,
the Marxist PLO splinter group,
the PFLP abducted five
Western correspondents in Leba-
non, held them for 24 hours and
threatened to kill them. One of
the five was a New York Times
correspondent. Another was a
reporter from the Washington
Post. A condition of their release
was that their papers did not
mention the abduction. The
papers complied.
THE International Herald 7Vi-V
bune similarly failed to report on
Syrian threats to its correspon-
dent Joseph Fitchett following
his news item about Syrian polit-
ical prisoners being machine-
gunned from Syrian Air Force
helicopters.
Chafets also spoke of a Chris-
tian Science Monitor correspon-
dent bemg forced out of Beirut
after PLO threats against him
because of his social connections
with an Israel family.
Chafets describes the attitude
of the Western media involved as
"a type of self-censorship which
they want to keep secret, and as a
willingness to avoid publishing
news which the PLO and Syria
find unpalatable."
CHAFETS NOW feels that the
reaction to his charges of
deliberate self-censorship have
been, in the main, positive.
"Most of the journalists know
the situation in the Middle East
and have told me that they agree
with the main thrust of my
statements namely, that the
Arabs, particularly the Syrians
and the PLO, use nhvaical in-
timidation as a means of trying
Continued on following page
David U. Seligman
A.S.I.D.
Interior Design
Commercial
and Residential
368-0882
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Name
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Federation/UJA
Mission To Israel
October 21-31
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For Information Call Federation Office 368-2737


Friday, October 1, 1982
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
=
Continued from preceding page
to control the press corps.
"No one, in the whole contro-
versy, suggested that what I said
was wrong. Not in a single detail.
I was very cautious and. in fact,
know a great deal more than I
made public. But I cannot
support some of what I know and
I don't want to make unsup-
ported criticism.
"I WAS NOT, in any case,
critical of the journalists, but of
those who threaten and assault
them. The journalists are the
victims, not the perpetrators.
"I was critical more of the
news organizations for whom
they work. These organizations
were less than forthright about
what was happening to their
correspondents in the Middle
East.
"Since then, the subject of
press intimidation, which had not
been aired at all, has been openly
discussed in the New York
Times, the Washington Post, the
London Observer, the Boston
Globe, the Miami Herald, the
BBC, the Christian Science
Monitor, the London Times and
others.
"This in itself is important.
The issue is now being seen in a
more realistic light."
JOHN KIFNER of the New
York Times, for example, reacted
to Chafets's charge by writing
frankly of the dangers of
reporting from Beirut or the
Beirut before Operation Peace for
Galilee.
"To work here as a journalist,"
he wrote, "is to carry fear with
you as faithfully as your
notebook. It is the constant
knowledge that there is nothing
you can do to protect yourself
and that nothing has ever hap-
pened to an assassin.
"In this atmosphere, a journal-
ist must often weigh when, how
and sometimes even whether to
record a story.
"In the Middle East, facts are
always somewhat elusive. But
there is a pervasive belief among
the Beirut press corps that corre-
spondents should be extremely
wary of incurring the wrath of the
Syrian regime."
KIFNER COMPARED the
task of working in Israel -
"where journalists can receive
government press release over a
ipedal telephone line which rings
simultaneously in all correspon-
dents homes or offices" with
the Arab world, "where they
must operate in an alien and
frequently hostile environment."
* "The Arab states,** he wrote,
ire all, to varying degrees,
closed, authoritarian, repressive,
societies. Statements from gov-
ernment officials are often falla-
cious or contradictory, or prove
to be non-existent. Logistics are
maddening and nothing can be
counted on to work."
Maddening for the journalist.
certainly. But maddening also for
Israelis who believe that the
^ dosed, authoritarian Arab
regimes get the better deal in the
media war while the sheer open
nes of Israel works against her.
Can anything be done? Chafets
believes not. He takes the stoic
view that while unfair coverage is
distressing, the maintenance of a
ree press is essential and will, in
the end,
policy.
Israel and The Media
prove to be the best
A MAJOR problem is the un-
>r double standard of world
opinion "We expect more of
you Israelis than of the Arabs."
, "'think w a grossly dis-
">rted perspective and one that
Places an additional, unfair
burden on us.
ers
U is not a question of report-
the P?nng Specia, affinity for
Ju f- 1 mo8t recgi> it for
*nat it is It is simply that we are
taodard that does not apply to
nem or to any totalitarian or
authontan^ reg^ or cmuAxy
**.
Ze;ev Chafets. There will
be no threat to the press
working in Israel'
Chafets considers, however,
that Israelis and Israel's friends,
should not be unreasonably
perturbed by the anti-Israel
coverage. The main thing to
remember is that press, coverage,
whatever its nature, has little
effect on Israeli policy.
"The Government of Israel will
pursue policies based on its
perception of national interest,
not on press criticism," he says.
"Particularly not on criticism
from people with no direct stake
in the country.
Press coverage is a factor, but
not one that need be
exaggerated."
HE NOTES that a 1980 Gallup
Poll of Americans placed Israel's
prime Minister 10th in the list of
the Ten Men Americans Most
Admire. This year in the wake
of the destruction of the Iraqi
nuclear reactor and the Golan
Heights Law which both re-
ceived heavy flak from the media
the same poll placed
Menachem Begin sixth.
"It's not quite true that people
perceive the world as the media
portrays it. or in the way that re-
porters believe it is perceived,"
he said.
Chafets, together with his
highly efficient and much-praised
press office, plans to continue to
treat "journalists who like us and
those who don't in the same
way," arranging interviews and
press tours, providing a tran-
slation service of the Hebrew
press and background material to
current events.
"This government," says Cha-
fets, "has provided un-
precedented services to the
foreign press out of a deep belief
in press freedom. There will be no
threat to the press working in Is-
rael."
They came mostly from Euro-
pe and the United States, but
also from Australia and Japan
and other far-flung places 300
journalists anxious to report on a
war. And Steve Leibowitz had
the task of escorting these jour-
nalists around Lebanon, letting
them see for themselves the facts
"on the ground," hoping to shake
ne preconceptions of those who
came convinced that Israel was
the aggressor without a just
cause.
"Very few came without any
preconceptions and very few
came to report what they saw,"
says Leibowitz.
"Most had a particular view-
point, and it would be
unreasonable to expect them not
to.
"SOME, particularly among
the younger journalists, were
very committed leftists, very
anti-Israel and blind to anything
that did not fit their image of us
as a militarist aggressor.
"Some, among them a reporter
from a very respectable American
paper, started referring to their
military escort officers as the
Gestapo.' They made it clear, in
the most vicious way, that they
were enemies of Israel. At that
point we pulled their press ac-
creditation and withdrew our
facilities. Let them go through
Cyprus to cover the war.
"Other journalists were sent
by papers which have long since
stopped publishing anything
positive about Israel. And the
writers themselves were expected
to fulfill their editors' expecta-
tions by filing reports on death,
destruction and refugees.
"This attitude," says Leibo-
witz, "has become very common
in Britain particularly, where
'Israeli-bashing' in the press has
almost become the norm.
"SO WHAT we did was to take
the journalists into Lebanon and
let them see the relief of Lebanese
citizens at having the PLO off
their backs at last. We let them
see 'refugees' streaming back
into Southern Lebanon from
where theyd fled from the PLO,
we let them hear from the Leba-
nese themselves the horror
stories of murder, rape and
robbery at the hands of the
terrorists.
"A lot of journalists who'd
come expecting to see an oc-
cupied people greatly resenting
the Israeli presence, thousands of
homeless and massive
destruction, were surprised. But
I'm not sure that their stories al-
ways reflected this. Some did.
But not all.
"Most reporters came knowing
of the conflict in Lebanon. A few
- people who come frequently to
the region knew a lot about the
background to the war, the
political make-up of Lebanon, the
roots of the civil war there and
Israel's past difficulties with
terror attacks from across the
border. But some were ignorant.
They'd come to cover a war Israel
invades Lebanon. Simple.
"OUR JOB was to try to fill in
the background, and their reac-.
tions depended on how interested
they were in the boring facts as
opposed to the more exciting,
colorful media event of death and
destruction and on how far
their papers were prepared to go
for a balanced view."
recalls taking an
up to Lebanon, an
Leibowitz
"Old-timer"
American who'd covered the
Allied invasion of Italy in World
War II. The American stood
open-mouthed at the sight of
Tyre and Sidon. "Where's the de-
struction?" he asked.
"He said that before the Allies
went into a town in Europe they
flattened it first. He blamed the
young reporters for the stories of
massive destruction in Lebanon.
This was their first war and they
had no basis for comparison
and no idea what real wartime'
destruction could be like."
LEIBOWITZ agrees that one
of the most damaging war stories
for Israel was the early and
vastly exaggerated release by
International Red Cross officials
of 600,000 homeless and 10,000
dead in Southern Lebanon.
The Israelis took some time to
come up with reliable figures,
but by then the damage had
already been done. It is doubtful
whether the media, which had
screamed 600,000 homeless (a
figure that happens to represent
more than the entire population
of the region) and 10,000 dead
would carry, in similar banner
headlines, the revised number of
460 dead and 1,600 wounded.
Similarly, costly efforts made
by IDF troops to spare civilian
casualties were lost in the
barrage of horror stories.
THE IDF and the Israeli Gov-
ernment have been criticized,
says Leibowitz, for not letting
non-military correspondents into
the war zone during the early
days of the fighting. Perhaps if
they had gone with the front-line
troops they would have seen for
themselves the humanitarian
actions of the army.
"But you can't have 200 jour-
nalists floating around in a region
where fighting is going on," he
says.
"To have done so would have
meant risking the lives of
journalists and their escort of-
ficers, and to have compromised
military security.
"Most writers understood this
and were even glad of it
though they felt obliged to
register verbal complaints about
censorship. But from our point of
view, it meant that the concern
shown by Israeli soldiers for ci-
vilians went largely unreported."
LEIBOWITZ believes that, on
balance, the newspaper coverage
of the war was not too damaging
, to Israel. He cites a day-by-day
breakdown of the top 50 U.S.
newspapers compiled by Israeli
consulates. These show that,
overall, the war coverage was
positive to Israel.
"By and large, the newspapers
in the United States which is
what really matters were fair.
It was the TV crews which did
the damage. Their only interest
was in visual drama pictures
of rubble, casualties, dead bodies.
"Each network was permitted
one crew into the area and they
headed straight for Beirut. They
just weren't interested in
anything else.
"There is a kind of mob men-
tality among TV crews why
did CBS get bombing shots while
we only got an old woman
weeping with happiness because
she can now return to her home in
the south?
"The bombing of a city looks
great on TV, and since basically
the networks are selling shampoo
and toothpaste, they want the
shots that will draw the viewers.
There is no time in 30 seconds or
a minute to fill in background.
With TV we are in a no-win situa-
tion."
SO IS the hard work of the
Government Press Office and the
IDF escort officers worth it when
the results are often so negative
for Israel?
"I think we have to do all we
can to let journaliists measure
their preconceptions against the
realities," says Leibowitz.
"Sometimes it works. For
example, Roland Evans, a top
U.S. columnist who hasn't
written a pro-Israel piece in
years, came to Lebanon and
wrote a column that was ex-
tremely hostile to the PLO for its
treatment of the Lebanese. It was
remarkable from our point of
view.
"Some are going to write ma-
terial hostile to us whatever we
do. And it is frustrating. But
Israel is and is seen to be a
democratic, open society in which
the press operates freely even,
within the legitimate restrictions
of military censorship, in war-
lime.
"We value that freedom, even
if at times the result is damaging
to Israel's image. We avoid
placing restrictions on the press
not at all cost, but at consider-
able Cost to ourselves."
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1983 Booklet
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Pan 1
The Jewish Floridian of South County


Friday, October 1, 1982
Jewish Floridian
FMnyWMr, or South Count, FfMSKOCfWI
Efltor.^^ SUZANNE SMOCHET GER. OSNBG
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raasurar. Margaret Kottiar E'x-'KnvDwactor RabtxBrucaS *arsrai
-----------m i*"'th "O"**"<*>aa not guarantae Kasn'utr. ol Mercnan SOBSCO-^PTION RATES uoca. A.M 13 50 Annu ,2 Y. M ,mum tr, or ft, *.,,
otto yT^T"1fl!!^l!."OO"00N F-*"'M- So.1.206 BncaRjlon Ha 33432 Pno- .
Henry Brenner
Friday. October 1,1982
Volume 4
14 T1SHRI 5743
Number 32
Arnon Says Multinational Force
Will Be Welcome Again
Consul General of Israel Joel Arnon has issued the
following statement in Miami:
"No government of Israel, Labor or Likud, because of
our own ethics, would ever lend a hand to such a thing as
this massacre .That should be self-evident to all those who
know Israel and what Israel stands for.
"It is the only reason that we went into West Beirut,
exactly to prevent bloodshed like this between the war-
ring factions, the Moslems and the Christians, who over
the years of the PLO presence in Lebanon have created
tremendous hatred, one against the other, hatred which
came to its high point after the assassination of the newly
elected president.
"Actually, Israeli forces, when they realized the hap-
penings in the refugee camps, went into the camps in
order to disarm the Christian militia. Israel is now en-
gaged in handing over to the Lebanese army points of
control in West Beirut.
"Israel is willing to accept the return of the multi-
national force, and Israel is willing to accept an increased
number of United Nations observers. The whole of Israel
government and opposition alike is shocked and taken
aback by these happenings.*'
SS Officer's Citizenship Revoked
CHICAGO (JTA) A Federal judge has revoked
the citizenship of Conrad Schellong, a former SS officer
living in Chicago, for having made 'material
misrepresentation" of his Nazi past when he applied for
U.S. citizenship.
SCHELLONG, 71, is alleged to have commanded a
guard unit at the Dachau and Sachsenburg concentration
camps during World War II and to have trained SS
recruits for concentration camp guard duty.
His trial opened here last May 25 on the basis of a
complaint filed in March, 1981 by the U.S. Justice
Department's Office of Special Investigation. The trial
ended June 3. Judge Bernard Decker announced his
verdict last Thursday. Schellongs attorney said he would
probably appeal.
WHCKC PlPTVie BA15Y 1^0?
atfjjit TO)!/ U.
ft,
Father of 'Mobilization'
The fallowing article appeared re-
cently in "The Jewish Week."
New York's leading Anglo^Jew-
ish newspaper. Henry Brenner,
as the article indicates, is a South
County resident, a ad is a member
of the Federation Board of Direc-
tors.
The UJ A-Federation Cam-
paign makes countless awards to
its volunteer leaders, but one it
made recently was rather on the
special side. The award, a scroll,
was presented by Eugene M.
Grant shortly before be complet-
ed two years of service as cam-
paign chairman, and the recipient
was Henry Brenner.
The text of the scroll read:
"Henry Brenner Father of
'Mobilization.' This scroll is
dedicated to a respected leader
whose creative mind conceived
the program through which since
1975 we have mobilized the
strength and resources of the
Jewish community for the
survival of our people in Israel,
here at home and throughout the
world"
How did the "Father of Mobi-
lization" acquire his title? Inter-
viewed recently in New York.
Brenner, who divides his time
between his home in Plandome
Manor. L.I.. and another in
Delray. Florida, where he serves
on the Board of the South County
Federation, recalled how it hap-
pened.
1 had been going to Israel
since 1966 and on one of those
trips. I think it was in 1970.1 had
1 he good fortune to meet the new
Executive Vice- President of the
United Jewish Appeal of Greater
New York. Ernest Michel. I re-
member vividly, by the way. that
on one side of that El Al plane
there were passengers an on the
other side there were eggs. If that
plane had fallen it would have
made the biggest omelet in the
history- of the world! Anyhow,
ernie and I hit it off and when we
got bark to New York he called
me in to discuss, as I had
suggested, how the techniques of
market research might be applied
to the campaign's fund-raising
problems. We got together a
group ol top people representing
advertising agencies, marketing
firms I was an old hand in that
area and creative as well as
research people. We called
ourselves the Think Tank, but we
were actually a marketing com-
mittee, and a lot of ideas we
talked about sooner or later
became realities."
Among such ideas was "Super
Sunday," a yearly event when
volunteers from all over the New
York area gather at UJA-Federa-
tion headquarters to make phone
calls to prospective donors who
have not yet pledged their gifts.
Another campaign program
that came from Henry Brenner
as the citation for his recent
award acknowledges is the
annual Mobilization Drive to
reach large numbers of contribu-
tors who might otherwise be
overlooked as prospects, particu-
larly smaller givers.
"The problem as we saw it,"
Brenner recollects," is that a very
small proportion of people in our
area give the Biggest bulk of the
funds. We decided to institute a
marketing plan, using classic
market-research techniques, and
to test-market our ideas in Sands
Point, Port Washington and
Hempstead, all on L.I. Volun-
teers would assemble at a syna-
gogue in one of these towns on a
Sunday morning, then go and
make in-person visits to people in
.he area
Once, in Sands Point, a \n|
jnteer got a pledge lor a dollar.
Hut another lime we got a call
trom a fellow who said. 1 want a
!>ig shot to come and collect my
money. 1 was the bu: shot that
lay. and 1 went down there to
erne ho-
Henry Brenner
quarters and half-dollars. I
couldn't lift it, but when we got it
moved to headquarters it turned
out there was a total of OT80 in
the bag." These testing programs
led to the yearly area wide Mobil-
ization drive.
When the Yom Kippur war
made emergency fund-raising on
a large scale essential. Henry
Brenner was also one of the prime
movers in setting up a television
special which raised more than a
million dollars for the campaign
in a single-evening.
Consultant to firms
Formerly lounder and presi-
dent of NPD-HTI. a large market
research firm, and at present
consultant to five other such
firms. Brenner spends much of
his lime giving advice which has
proven sound to business firms
as well as to UJAFederation
cause. After the United Jewish
Appeal ol (in-dlci New York and
the Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies decided to combine their
fund-raising efiorts. Brenner con-
tinued to serve as an advisor on
the Public Relations Committee
as well as the Campaign Cabinet.
Marketing Committee. Board of
Directors. Board of The Jewish
Week and Synagogue Advisory
Council.
It was his suggestion which
prompted the preparation of a
special half-hour film, "Face to
Face." which demonstrated ef-
fective fund-raising techniques to
potential solicitors. making use
of the talents of a number of well-
known actors including Judd
ilirsch. Judv Graubart. Paul
Dooley, and Joe Silver, improvis-
ing roles as solicitors and pros-
pects.
Later Brenner helped to
change the campaign's methods
of using computers in fund-
raising for greater efficiency,
tried to persuade business people
not to hide behind company gifts
but to make their contributions
in their own names, and helped to
set up special training programs
for volunteers.
Anne Brenner, Henry's wife, is
also active in the cause, serving
on the board of the Woman's
Campaign in Delray.
Henry Brenner was born on
Avenue B on the Lower East Side
of Manhattan. "I'm one of those
rarities." he says, "a real New
Yorker." Later the family moved
to Mt. Vernon where he attended
public school. He went on to
enroll at Cooper Union, which he
had to leave when the Depression
came along. Then he attended
night classes at NYU and Colum-
bia.
When he isn't working for the
campaign, Brenner used to Like to
race sailboats, play golf and
sculpt (he calls himself a "recrea-
tional sculptor") but a heart at-
tack slowed him down a bit in the
athletic department. He now
plays golf and sculpts.
He remains active, however, al
the Community Synagogue in
Sands Point ol which he is a
founding member as well as
lormer president, and as board
members of several major Jewish
organizations including the
American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee and the New York
Federation of Keform Syna-
gogues. He was recently named
one of the founding fathers of ad-
vertising research by the Adver-
tising Research Foundation.
At 68. Henry Brenner is in
good health again, busy counsel-
ing his clients on matters of
marketing. advertising. and
merchandising, and still contri-
buting fresh ideas on the conduct
of the UJAFederation campaign.
"The problem is what it's always
been, he says, "how to raise
more money. When an idea of
mine works out it makes me
proud as punch. But the real sat-
isfaction is in knowing that
people who need help so desper
ately are going to get that help
thanks to our efforts.''
Return to Beirut
Brought Many New-
Israeli Casualties
By HUGH 0RGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Two Israeli soldiers were
killed and 42 wounded
during the first day of Is-
rael's entry into west
Beirut on Sept. 16, an army
spokesman reported. Of the
wounded, five were serious-
ly hurt. Dead and wounded
figures have mounted since
then, although Israel has
already begun a substantial
withdrawal of its forces
from the city.
The spokesman said that
Israeli troops had been in control
of all key points in west Beirut in
an apparent effort to take control
of the entire western part of the
Lebanese capital which had pre-
viously been in the hands of the
PLO tones and their leftwing
mainly Moslem allies.
RESISTANCE to tnc ad vane
ing Israelis came mainly bom
l-n wingers and PLO mem-
wh'> went underground
whei oHeagues evs
terrorists hid out inh
buildings and fired machineguns
and missiles at the Israeli
soldiers advancing slowly in
infantry units supported by
tanks.
Outside Beirut, strict curfews
were being maintained in the
coastal towns of Tyre and Sidon,
with residents allowed out of
their houses only for a couple of
hours to stock up with food and
essential supplies. Farmers kept
away from their fields again, for
the second consecutive day.
Israeli officers said the curfew
had been imposed to help calm
tempers and avoid rioting and
bloodshed in the wake of the as-
sassination of President-elect
Bashir Gemayel.
Also, at the United Nations in
New York. Lebanon asked for an
urgent meeting of the Security
Council on Israel's thrust into
west Beirut. In Washington, the
White House deputy press sec-
retary said. There is no justifi-
eatJoB in our view for Israel's
"ntmued military presence in
raat Beirut and we rail for an
immediate pullback."


Friday, October 1,1982
Letters to the Editor
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
> EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
The question that asks
whether or not the U.S.A. should
deal with the PLO is ridiculous.
It is as outrageous as asking
whether or not the U.S.A. should
recognize any terrorist group
operating here and abroad. To
point up the analogy: should the
U.S.A. deal or negotiate with, for
example, the KKK as the so-
called official representation of
the so-called superior white
Anglo Saxon both here and
abroad?
The PLO. in the first place, is
no more representative of the
Palestinian population than you
are or 1 am (witness their isola-
tion by the Palestinians them-
r selves in the recent Lebanon ex-
perience); in the second place,
notwithstanding reporting by the
media, the PLO has been des-
tructive of the very Palestinian?
they claim to represent and sup-
port by infiltrating their resi-
dences and businesses'; in the
third place, like terrorists every
where, the constituents of the
PLO, from child in the ranks to
Arafat himself, sneak their armed
- attacks on unarmed civilians, ut-
ter wild demands, and scream
about injustices to them; and in
the fourth place, that self-as-
serted and heavily armed group
of "representatives" has used,
mis-used, abused, and terrorized
into submission the very people
they claim to protect" wit-
ness, in this context, (i) the re-
ceptivity of the Lebanese (and
Palestinians) to the Israeli
liberators from oppression, and
lii) the insanity of the terrorists
Irelerred euphemistically to
fighters" by the press), who,
vanquished by the Israelis, not
only take their exit from Lebanon
as though they were victors, but
incomprehensibly fire their wea-
pons into the air as an equally in-
ciiniprehensibk1 celebration. And
lurlher in this context, not only
did I srael do tor the U SA and for
the world that which the world
did not do in the name of
humanity, but the rats who were
holed up in Beirut should crawl
out on their bellk-s with gratitude
to the Israelis for sparing their
lives.
As for the so-called homeland
issue: how many times must
these United States and the
world review the history of the
nomadic people known as the
Palestinians? Their homeland,
such as any homeland for these
people can be, is the land now
known as Jordan; but King Hus-
sein of Jordan first kicked them
off his land (their homeland), and
now gives flimsy lip-service to
the need of the Palestinians for a
"homeland." Where? We don't
have to guess long.
Back to the PLO: the whole
world, not simply the USA
should keep a critical eye on that
organized band of criminals
and ultimately eradicate that
malignancy the sooner the
better. Deal with them? Recog-
nize them as an official body? The
very thought is an insult to the
humanity that considers itself
Homo Sapiens. Smudged is the
decency of those sovereign States
that have accepted, to say
nothing of invited, the PLO, and,
thus, given station to it. The let-
ters, PLO, represent Palestine
Liberation Organization. What a
travesty! What a farce! Of what
was the band of gangsters
"liberating" the Palestinian peo-
ple? The organized gangsters
liberated the Palestinian people
of their own self-control! By im-
posing a military kind of coer-
cion, and at the same time
clamoring for political stature.
Deal with them? Does one deal
with piranhas? Negotiate with
them? Does one negotiate with a
murderer who is in the very
process of cutting his jugulars?
The animal with which we ul-
timately must deal is the Russian
bear as the encourager of the use
of Saudi petrodollars, Soviet
military material, and Arab hy-
steria. The brakes that President
Reagan applied to the Israeli
clean-out of her neighbor's
vermin, we now know, should
have been applied elsewhere. It
really is too bad for our World
that oil is more valuable than
lives.
Sincerely,
JESSV.COHN.M.D.
Rabbi Silver to be Honored
At Simchat Service
The Board of Trustees and
Ritual Committee of Temple
Kmeth in Delray Beach announce
that at the Simchat Torah Serv-
ice on October 10 at 8:45 a.m.,
Rabbi Bernard Silver will be
honored as Chatan Torah, Abe
Kisenstern will be honored as
Chatan Bereshit and Cantor
Joseph Thaw will be honored as
Kalah Mafteret.
An elaborate Kiddush in their
honor will take place immediately
following the service.
The practice of honoring mem-
bers of a congregation by desig-
nating them as Chatan Torah
(Bridegroom of the Torah) and
Chatan Bereshit (Bridegroom of
the Beginning) stems from
medieval Judaism
On Simhat Torah, the last day
of the festival of Sukkot, the
Torah cycle of the year is com-
pleted and then is begun again.
The very last section and the
very first are traditionally re-
garded as portions of honor. In
olden times it was the practice to
assign these portions to indi-
viduals, who because of their
scholarship, piety or service to
the Jewish community, merited
public tribute.
Share in the future of
Brandeis
in this unique way.
Your gift to the
Pooled Life Income Fund
will be invested
to produce for you:
Guaranteed
lifetime income
Attractive rate of
return
V
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for loved ones after
your death
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worries
V
The satisfaction
of helping
Brandeis to main-
tain its academic
leadership
Mail to:
Joseph E. CofieU
Director of
Planned Giving
Brandeis University
Wallham
Massachusetts 02254
Or call collect:
617-647-2359
Send today hn our fret brochure and
discover how the Brandeis Pooled Life Income Fund
can benefit you!
?flL
When you join the University's Pooled Life Income Fund
you invest m Brandeis' life and your own.
Zwaik Elected National
Commander of JWV
WASHINGTON Stanley N.
Zwaik of New York City has been
unanimously elected national
commander of the Jewish War
Veterans of the USA at the orga-
nization's 87th annual conven-
tion at the Concord Resort Hotel,
Lake Kiamesha, N.Y.
A practicing New York at-
torney, specializing in immigra-
tion and nationality law, Zwaik
has been an active member of
JWV since 1946. His many lead-
ership roles in JWV include
Queens County commander
(1956-57). New York State com-
mander (1968-69), National
Judge Advocate (1976-79), and
National Program chairman
(1981-82).
As JWV action chairman for
the Department of New York,
Zwaik led the New York delega-
tion in demonstrating against
French Premier Pompidou and in
boycotts of French goods when
the French refused to fulfill their
contracts to sell Mirage planes to
Israel. He was voted JWV's out-
standing Department Command-
er at the National Convention in
1969.
/.walk's military service was
marked by two years of duty in
the South Pacific as part of the
801st Military Police Battalion
He became the Battalion's com-
mander in July, 1945 and was in
Manila preparing for the invasion
of Japan when the war ended. He
later joined the active reserves,
retiring in 1964 with the rank of
lieutenant colonel.
He is a graduate of New York
University and New York Uni-
versity School of Law. '
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RETAILER This
coupon is redeem
able tor lace value
and '< handling
i harges provided as
follows M is received
on a retail sale of either
product speeded herein
You mail it to Sun-Diamond Growers of Cali-
fornia. PO Bo* 1404. Clmton. Iowa S27M
On request, you
must supply in-
voices proving
suffk ient ttoc k
purchases enng coupons
M11M3 105SED
submitted tor re-
demption .Other
use constitutes fraud
Coupon may not be
assigned or trans
" Customer must \j
pay any sales Ui Void **?
where prohibited taxed q
license required or re-
Mixtedbylaw Cash value 1/20* Goodonry
m U S A Ofler
limited to one
coupon per pur-
chase COUPON
EXPIRES De-
cember l 1963
When your family wants a snack, treat
them to the natural sweetness and wholesome
goodness of Sun-Maid* Raisins.
Sunsweet* Prunes and Sun-Maid* or
Blue Ribbon* Figs.
Enjoy. And save.
SUN-DIAMOND GROWERS
OF CALIFORNIA
KCIRTIFIEDKOSHER
O WOiimond Gnwtn ol Cjktomu. 1982


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, October 1,1982
.
An Open Letter
Te The Jewish Community
Frank Foster...a reputation for leadership, dedication
and responsiveness to the people of Palm Beach County.
Since 1969 Frank Foster has been a leader in our com-
munity, as a Commissioner and Mayor of West Palm
Beach and as a County Commissioner, fighting for issues
of importance to all citizens. His extensive record of ex-
perience and leadership is proof that he responds to
people's needs.
Experience
Record
Elected Palm Beach County Commission 1978
Palm Beach County Solid Waste Authority,
Member, 1978-82
Metropolitan Planning Organization, Chairman,
1978-1982
Palm Beach County Commission, Vice
Chairman, 1980
Palm Beach County Commission, Chairman,
1981
Palm Beach County Area Planning Board,
Chairman, 1982
State Association of County Commissioners
(Division of Aging), 1982
National Association of County Commissioners
(Division of Aging),1982
West Palm Beach City Commission, 1969-1972
West Palm Beach, Vice Mayor, 1970-1971
West Palm Beach, Mayor, 1971-1972
West Palm Beach Planning Board, ex-officio
member, 1969-1972
Economic Council, ex-officio member, 1981
Northwood Kiwanis, First Vice President, 1970
Northwood Kiwanis, Board of Directors, 1968
United States Jaycees, National Director,
1962-1963
United States Jaycees, National Vice President,
1965-1966
Florida Jaycees, State President, 1964-1965
West Palm Beach Jaycees, Member, 1956-1965
Instrumental in securing and obtaining the all emergency
911 number system and expanded medical services
Led the way for a line-by-line, critical analysis of the
county budget
Fiscal responsibility and cost efficiency in county
government
Spearheaded the relocation of Palm Beach County's
Solid Waste site
Major advocate for the newly adopted Comprehensive
Land Use Plan
An advocate of environmentally safe resource recovery
Proposed incentive plan for quieter planes tor PBIA
Leading role in solving Palm Beach County's intense
drainage problems. Supporting stricter controls.
Instrumental in securing an alternative site plan for the
Farmers' Market
Improved drinking water supplies and sewage disposal
systems
Supports development of new public parks and
recreational areas and the expanding and upgrading of
existing facilities
Supports new industry and jobs to fight inflation
Improve communication and cooperation between elected
officials and you--the community
A firm advocate of the consumer and small-business man,
fighting against needless government regulations
Supported Palm Beach County's Noise Ordinance
We Know Frank As A Friend
James Baer
Sid Breitman
Milton Ghipurnoi
Bruce J. Daniels
Julius Daroe
Maurice Klinger
Margaret Kottler
Milton Kretsky
Shepard Lesser
Stephen Melcer
Al Ostrick
George Press
Irving Rifkin
Sam Schwimer
Richard Siemens
Fred Singer
Paid for by friends of Frank Foster


Triday, October 1,1982
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Pe7
Jewish Survival is the Theme of
UJA University Essay Contest
Jerusalem 'Cold' to Hussein
NEW YORK The United
Jewish Appeal announced the
second annual University Essay
Contest, funded by the Morris J.
Kaplun Foundation. The theme
0f the contest is: "Jewish Ex-
perience as a Source of Survival
Strategies."
Robert E. Loup, National
Chairman of the United Jewish border settlements, archaelogical
guished panel of educators and
writers.
An all-expense-paid trip to Is-
rael and a $600 commendation
stipend will be awarded to the
authors of the eight winning es-
says. The 10-day trip in August
1983, will include visits with Is-
raeli heads of State and tours of
Appeal in announcing the con-
test, said: "The current voices of
dissent concerning the crisis in
Lebanon remind us of the value
of educational programs which
provide a forum for Jewish youth
to add their voices ot our con-
"timing concern for peace and the
primacy of unity for Jewish sur-
vival"
The nationwide competition is
open to any American under-
graduate or graduate student un-
der 27 years of age enrolled in an
accredited institution of higher
learning. The 1,500 to 2,000 word
essays will be judged by a distin-
excavations and other events of
historical, social, and educational
value.
According to Dr. Henry Fein-
gold of the City University of
New York, the Chairman of the
UJA University Essay Contest
Committee, the focus of the con-
test is educational. The objective
is to stimulate creative thought
on the perennial problem of Jew-
ish physical and spiritual sur-
vival. Applicants are encouraged
to interpret the theme as broadly
and critically as they wish, using
any combination of disciplines as
Organizations in the News
ORT
Women's American ORT
Delray is having a theatre party
on Thursday, Oct. 14 at 8 p.m. at
the Caldwell Playhouse, Boca
Mall, Boca Raton to see "Mass
Appeal." For reservations, please
call Sylvia Schwartz at 498-8205
or Dorothy Kirchbaum at 499-
o50ri.
Women's American ORT Ori
ole will have their annual lunch-
eon and fashion show at the Top
^ the Bridge Hotel, 999 E.
Camino Real, Boca Raton on
Tuesday, Oct. 12 at 11:30 a.m.
Donation: $9.50. For tickets
please call Rose Myers at 499-
3674, Ksther Wollman at 499-
2168. Charlotte Miller at 499-
*275 or llelene Friedman at 499-
6H94.
Women's American ORT-Re-
Kion South Palm Beach County
will hold a re-enrollment phona-
'tfijn on Sunday, Oct. 17 from
y.'30 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the
South County Federation Office,
^200 N. Federal Hwy., Boca
Katon. The ten chapters in the
Region will participate. Anyone
wishing to join an ORT Chapter
can call the Region Office, Delray
Beach at 276-2892 Monday
through Friday.
TEMPLE SINAI
Temple Sinai-Sisterhood will
_ gee Chicago" at the Royal Palm
*P rteatre, Matinee Dinner show on
Saturday, Oct. 9 at noon. The
cost is $21 per person including
lax and gratuities. For reserva-
tions, please call Mary Menkin at
499-.W4K.
Temple Sinai-Men's Club is
having their next meeting on Oct.
5, at 7:30 p.m. at the American
Savings Bank in Kings Point,
Delray. The featured speakers
will be Dr. Brian Waaserman, In-
ticnut and Dr. Andre Fladell,
Chiropractor. Their subject will
w vertigo." For more informa-
tion, please call Lou Lefkowitz at
499-2225.
B'NAI B'RITH
B'nai Brith BocaTeecaLodge
u hold its next meeting on
luesday, Oct. 5 in the activities
budding. The principal speaker
will be Rabbi Richard Agler of
'ernple Beth El, in Boca Raton.
naobi Agler will conduct an open
'orum on the subject: The
Media s Bias Performance on the
"*ent Lebanese crisis. For more
wiormation pleas call Charles
yhowitz, at 994-8676.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth-Skterhood will
5?'a their regular meeting on
inursday, Oct. 7 at noon. For
vor entertainment a "Fun Af-
^noon" with Mr. Aronson from
TAmeri-First Bank is sched-
4uqc are invited. Please call
iW--*536 for more information.
BRANDEIS
The Boca Chapter of the Bran-
deis University National
Women's Committee will hold its
Opening Showcase meeting at
Temple Beth El on Oct. 14 at 10
a.m. All old, new and prospective
members are invited to attend.
For more information please call
Norma Spector at 499-9892.
well as personal experience. "The
unforseen dividend of last year's
contest was that the muturity
and eloquence of the essays iden-
tified future of the Jewish peo-
ple" Feingold commented.
Loup added: "Last year's win-
ning essays, chosen from entries
from 79 of the finest universities
nationwide, offered creative and
novel ideas for the survival of the
Jewish people."
The Contest is being run under
the auspices of the Hon. Teddy
Kolleck, Mayor of Jerusalem.
Among the educators serving on
the contest committee's Aca-
demic Advisory Council are Pro-
fessor Alan Dowty, Notre Dame
University; Professor Jane
Gerber. CCNY; Professor Nor-
man Lamm, Yeshiva University;
and Professor Seymour Martin
Lipset, Stanford University. The
Israel Contest Committee,
headed by Avraham Harman,
president of the Hebrew Univer-
sity of Jerusalem, is comprised of
the presidents of all the universi-
ties in the State of Israel.
Issachar Miron, UJA national
director of Creative and Educa-
tional Programs, is the Contest
Coordinator.
For contest rules and other in-
formation, contestants may write
to: Contest Coordinator, UJA
University Essay Contest, 4th
Floor Room 32, 1290 Avenue of
the Americas, New York, N.Y.
10104.
JERUSALEM (JTA| Is-
rael has reacted coldly to King
Hussein's remark that it had
been 'absurd not to recognize Is-
rael for 34 years." Government
officials argued that the mon-
arch's statement, during a
British television interview, was
nothing more than "an optical
observation that Israel exists."
It contained no
negotiate, and no
readiness
readiness
to
to
live in peace and normal relations
with the Jewish State, these offi-
cials maintained.
HUSSEIN, in the interview on
BBC's "Panorama" program,
spoke of normalization once
peace had been established. He
envisaged a federation between a
Palestinian state in the West
Bank and Gaza and his own Has-
hemite kingdom.
Community Calender
(tocher 3
Pioneer Women Beershebo Club Royal Palm Dinner Theatre
fttahH
Women's Division President's Coffee 10 a.m. Brandeis
Women-Boca, Board meeting 9:30 a.m. Diamond Club,
meeting -9 a.m.
Anshei Emuna-Sisterhood, meeting 12 p.m. Hadassah-Boca
AAaoriv, Board meeting 1 p.m. B'nai B'rith Boca Teeca Lodge,
meeting 9:30 a.m. Brandeis Women-Boca, meeting 9:30 a.m.
Temple Beth El Solos, Board meeting 7:30 p.m. Temple Sinai-
Men's Club, meeting 7:30 p.m. Temple Emeth, Board meeting
7 p.m.
Women's American ORT-Regional, Executive meeting 9:30 a.m.
Hadassah-Menachem Begin, meeting 9:30 a.m. National
Council Jewish Women, Board meeting 8 p. m.
Temple Beth El-Sisterhood, Board meeting 10a.m. Jewish War
Veterans-Snyder-Tokson Post, meeting 10 a.m. Temple Emeth-
Sisterhood, meeting 12 noon
Will
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rage
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, October 1,1982
James B. Boer, President of the South County
Jewish Federation, and Phyllis and Larry
Charme, Co-chairmen of the recent Federation
Board Retreat, present a graphic provided by the
United Jewish Appeal.
Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal. Executive Director of
the South County Jewish Federation, lecturing to
assembled board members at the recent South
County Federation Board Retreat held at the
Sheraton Hotel in Boca Raton.
Israel Scene for
RECEIVING TWO (2)
"FLORIDIANS"???
Please notify the Federation office by calling 368-2737 or
mail the form below to South County Jewish Federation,
2200 N. Federal Hwy., Suite 206, Boca Raton, FL 33432!
From the address labels on your Floridian:
Label#1 Name Delete
Acct# YesD No a
Address
Label #2 Name rvtoe:
Acct# Yes Noll
Address
AST A Board
The United States' major
travel industry body. The Ameri-
can Society of Travel Agents
IASTA), will hold a board meet-
ing in Israel in December 1982.
The Israel meeting is sponsored
by Israel's Ministry of Tourism,
and has been organized by the
Ministry's New York office in
dialogue with the management of
ASTA in Washington. D.C. El Al
Israel Airlines and Trans World
Airlines will be the carriers.
The Board meeting comprises
some 100 persons and will take
place in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem
from December 1-5; pre- and
post-tours will be offered. In the
past. ASTA's decision to hold a
board-meeting in a certain coun-
try has often been the first step
towards the travel body's de-
cision to hold its annual congress
at that destination. ASTA's
World Travel Congress of 1982
will be held in Miami, and regis-
tration is expected to number
some 7,000 delegates.
f
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?
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DEPARTURE DATES:OCT. 4, NOV. 8, APRIL 6,1983
$1022 plus air
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CALL COLLECT
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ALSO WE HAVE OTHER TOURS
2 WEEKS DELUXE PACKAGE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL MIRIAM AT:
TRIANGLE TOURS '?
18407 W. Dixie Highway-North Miami Beach-931 3031 \
931-30311
Rabbi Sachs Appointed
Chairman ofKashrut Committee *
On behalf of the South County
Kashrut Committee, Chairman
Rabbi Bernard A. Silver and Sec-
retary-Treasurer Marion Tobins,
are pleased to announce the ap-
pointment of Rabbi Louis Sacks,
to be the new Chairman of the
Kashrut Committee, effective
Sept. 1.
Serving with Rabbi Sacks, will
be Rabbi Bernard A. Silver of
Temple Emeth as Co-Chairman,
and Marion Tobins as Secretary-
Treasurer.
Rabbi Louis Sacks is the Spiri-
tual Leader of Anshei Emuna
Congregation of Del ray Beach.
The South County Vaad
Hakashrut has the official en-
dorsement of the Rabbinical
Association and the South Coun-
ty Jewish Federation, as well as
the Synagogues of Delray Beach |
and Boca Raton.
We are pleased to inform you
that the Tri Kosher of the Kings
Point Shopping Plaza of Delray !
Beach, is under our supervision.
In addition to Rabbi Sacks and
Rabbi Silver, the Vaad
Hakashrut, has appointed two
full time Mashgichim, to take
care of the daily supervisory ne-
cessities on behalf of the Vaad. m
Thanksgiving at Miami Beach's
Finest Glatt Kosher Hotel
4 Days-3 Nights
Nov. 25-28 Only
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Phi* Tan
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Nov. 24-28 Only
s105
ParParaon
DoubtaOce.
PkiaTai
Room and Meals
t Waldman
Stay at adjoining
Atlantic Towers -
Meals at Waldman
INCLUDES 2 DELICIOUS KOSHER MEALS DAILY
LAVISH THANKSGIVING DINNER & ENTERTAINMENT
WALDMAN HOTEL
On The Ocean At 43rd Street
Phone 538-5731 For Reservations
SOUTH
COUNTY
JEWISH
FEDERATION | BOCA RATON
DELRAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
WANTED
NAMES OF NEWCOMERS
Shalom South County Needs Your Help.
Do you know anyone who has recently
moved to South County?
We want to invite
newcomers to a Shalom
South County event.
Please Call The Federation Office,
368-2737
^ Flaglei;
National
Bank
Mambar FDIC
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IndependentBank
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CornerotPGA Blvd and Prosperity Farms Rd
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Jctbberi! i&8i
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
M

off one of their most successful Israel
\seasons ever, representatives of the major
zations in Delray Beach met at Temple
recently to map out strategy and choose
for the upcoming 1982-83 campaign.
ding the organizational meeting were: (Top
\ right) Fran AronoviU, Mildred Schwartz,
Rita Lewitas, Blanche Carnam, Anne Fisher,
Edward Kingsley, Mrs. Bros toff and Nat Bros-
toff. (Sitting left to right) Leo Brink, Lou Med-
ium, Estelle Brink, Ben Kessler, Sylvia Breitman,
Morris Anapolsky, Evelyn Trust, Rabbi Louis
Sacks, Helen Perfmutter, MoUie Brownstein.
The South Palm Beach County Israel Bond drive, which constitutes
bond drives m Delray, and Boca Raton, inaugurated a South County
Board of Governors for the first time on Sept. 12 at the Boca Teeca
Country Club. The breakfast also officially kicked off the South Coun-
ty Israel Bond campaign. Pictured are: (L to R) Irving Goldstein,
General Chairman; Molly Brownstein, Women's Division Chairman:
Leo Brink, Delray Chairman
Europe'8 Jews, Rosh Hashanah 5743 Meant a New Surge of Unspeakable Violence
3y EDWIN EYTAN
IIS (JTA) Jews in
European countries prayed
ar behind police cordons
army snipers ready to
them after two terrorist
one in Paris and the
Brussels, marred Roan
hah observances.
faris, close to 50 people,
ng 45 non-Jewish school
Is, were wounded by an
__which blew up the car
I Israeli diplomat on New
eve.
|Bill SSK1.S, a man fired a
mhintgun at worshippers
the city's main
Jogue on the first day of
Hashanah Saturday
ng, seriously wounding
both cities several of the
are still in critical con-
most West European
als. police took stringent
lulions. Police barriers were
i near places of worship and
|e entering the areas were
hed by police officers and
[community volunteers for
pic hidden weapons and ex-
s. In spile of the Paris and
Is attacks, synagogues
^rowded in most large Euro-
n(ics.
Il'aris liberal synagogue on
pue Copernic, where four
were killed by a bomb
n Simhat Torah. in 1980,
eds of families filled the
and hundreds more stood
ie lor lack of space. The
(happened in most syna-
in Paris. Brussels, Zurich,
ind Amsterdam.
pveral West European syn-
es special services will be
or the wounded today. In
fe, Chief Rabbi Rene Sirat
lews will fast in solidarity
the wounded and to protest
[opes meeting with PLO
Jasir Arafat at the Vatican
fednesday.
PARIS explosion oc-
Friday afternoon, at 3:30,
[official of the purchasing
of the Israeli Defense
. Amos Man-El, 61,
| the ignition key in his car.
erful blast shook the entire
in a central residential
I shattering windows for
hundred yards and
ling people a block away.
*o other passengers in the
I diplomat's car, his Venez-
ausin, Zoltan Mandel, and
e, Veronica, were seriously
ng glass wounded 45 chil-
a nearby school and
passers-by. The pur-
mission had closed
I than usual to allow 100
^embers to return home to
for the Rosh Hashanah
|tion. An Israeli Embassy
ian said that had the
I' fl on time, as usual,
would have been wound-
crowds fa:.. hered
on the site and people started
demonstrating, calling for strict-
er police protection and for the
closure of the PLO bureau in
Paris.
ISRAEL'S Ambassador Meir
Rosenne blamed the attack on
the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization, quoting one of its
leaders, Farouk Kaddumi, as
having said that the Palestinians
"will make life unlivable for any
Israeli whereever he is." Rosenne
later met with Prime Minister
Pierre Mauroy to protest against
the attack.
Israeli sources said Rosenne
hinted that France's Mideast
policy has been conducive to anti-
Israeli and anti-Jewish murder-
ous attacks.
President Francois Mitterrand
chaired a special anti-terror crisis
group at the Elysee Palace and
later government spokesmen said
that security precautions will be
further tightened up.
Hours after the attack, all
Jewish community centers,
synagogues and schools as well
as many office buildings were
cordoned off by police forces,
with sharpshooters at the ready.
In phone calls to news agencies
in Pahs, a group calling itself
"The Lebanese Armed Revolu-
tionary Faction" claimed respon-
sibility for the attack. Police said,
however, that the calls were not
being taken seriously since the
calls occured long after the news
was broadcast. The underground
group had claimed in the past
that it was responsible for the
assassination attempt against
U.S. Embassy economic counse-
lor Itoderick Grant.
POLICE ALSO detained 14
people suspected of links with
the extreme left wing "action
Direct**' organization but later
said that none of those arrested
seemed to have been involved in
the blast.
The following day, Saturday
morning, a man, described by
eyewitnesses as a pedestrian,
opened fire with a submachine-
gun on a group of worshippers
entering Brussels Regency syna-
gogue in the center of the city,
wounding four. A plain clothes
detective on guard outside the
synagogue returned fire and uni-
formed officers took up a chase
but the man fled down the wind-
ing alleys and got lost in the Sat-
urday morning crowd of shoppers
and tourists.
The Israeli Embassy in Brus-
sels issued a statement blaming,
in part, the attack on what it said
were biased anti-Israeli press
reports on the Beirut fight-
ing which created an atmosphere
propicious for PLO attacks.
SEVERAL BELGIAN minis-
ters came to the site and Foreign
Minister Leo Tindenmans told
the angry crowds that the gov-
ernment will do everything it can
to ensure the Jewish commu-
nity's protection. The Jewish
demonstrations were not appeas-
ed. Many called for the govern-
ment's resignation or at least a
change in its Mideast policy.
Others assaulted Belgian and
foreign television crews and re-
porters on the spot.
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8 P.M. Daily


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. October 1,1982
As part of the daily minyan at the South County
Jewish Community Day School, it is customary
to bring a child celebrating his or her birthday
under the Tallis where a prayer is said. Recently
all children who celebrated their birthdays
throughout the summer were included in a group
ceremony. The children pictured above being
blessed by Rabbi Bruce Warshalare: Adam Bear,
Alisyn Clayman, Dara Cole, Joshua Grantz, Juli-
anne Greenberg, Penni Halfon, Lee Hall, Sharon
Levy, Uri Man, Michael Menirom, Lee Shaffer,
Joy Steinberg, Tal Zeev.
Babi Yar History's 'Memory Hole
By WILLIAM KOREY
Director, International
Council of B'nai B'rith
London Chronicle Syndicate
The UN Dag Hammarskjold
Library Auditorium is scarcely
the place for film previews at the
United Nations. But last year's
General Assembly session was
marked by a rather extraordinary
film showing to which UN
staffers were invited. A new
Soviet-produced TV docu-
mentary about Babi Yar, not yet
shown anywhere, was to be pre-
viewed.
This was, indeed, intriguing.
Had the USSR changed its per-
ception of Babi Yar, the ravine on
the outskirts of Kiev where
33,771 Jews were massacred by
the Nazis on Sept. 29-30, 1941?
The Kremlin had severely chas-
tized the poet, Yevgeny Yev-
tushenko, when he dared decry
the failure to accord recognition
to Jewish martyrdom. Similarly,
Dmitri Shostakovich's 13th
Symphony, in part based upon
the Yevtushenko poem, had gone
unperformed and unrecorded for
years.
THOSE VIEWING the 70-
minute documentary were dis-
mayed to find not only no modifi-
cation of earlier Soviet attitudes,
hut rather the extraordinary ap-
plication of Orwellian techniques.
Jewish martyrdom was plunged
down the "memory hole" of his-
tory. Only once were Jews, or
rather "mostly Jews," mentioned
as being killed at Babi Yar. This
was said to have occurred during
the first few days of the Nazi oc-
cupation.
Instead, in a remarkable
Orwellian inversion, the focus of
the documentary was placed up-
on the killing of Communists and
Ukrainians at Babi Yar. Special
attention was given to the hero-
ism of Ukrainian partisans, six of
whom were interviewed toward
the end of the film.
Strikingly, no mention was
made of the sole Jewish survivor,
Dina Mironovna Pronicheva of
the Kiev Puppet Theatre, who
had given testimony about the
Nazi Babi Yar killers at their trial
in Darmstadt, West Germany,
held in 1967-68. She had been a
central figure in Anatoly Kuznet-
sov's sensitive documentary
novel about Babi Yar and. more
recently, in the impressively
moving The White Hotel" by D.
M. Thomas.
EVEN THE film's section on
the historical background of Nazi
genocide diminished the Jewish
trauma. A list of Nazi concentra-
tion camps are read out which are
identified as murder sites of
"Ukrainians, Gypsies, Jews,
Russians," in that order. The
Warsaw Ghetto uprising was also
shown but without any reference
to Jews.
The documentary was intended
to serve political anti-Western
purposes as well. Interspersed
were film clips showing recent Ku
Klux Klan and neo-Nazi rallies in
the West. But the propaganda
also carried a distinctly obscene
edge with the narrator equating
Nazism with "militant Zionism."
One was reminded of an in-
famous Pravda article of Feb. 18,
1971 by Vladimir Bolshakov,
which spoke of Zionist "collu-
sion" with the Nazis in a discus-
sion about Babi Yar. That article,
incidentally, called Zionism "an
enemy of the people," resurrec-
ting the dangerous language of
the thirties.
THE NEW film, which was
shown on Soviet television (with
the possibility of distribution in
Western Europe and even sub-
mitted as an entry in the U.S.
film festival, according to an-
nouncements made at the UN
preview) is perhaps not too sur-
prising. When a memorial was fi-
nally erected at Babi Yar in 1976,
it carried no symbol of Jewry. In-
deed Jewish martyrdom was
totally effaced. The inscription
read: "Here, in 1941-43, the Ger-
man Fascist invaders executed
over 100,000 citizens of Kiev and
prisoners of war."
Even the Jewish memorial
prayer over the dead at Babi Yar
is now forbidden, unlike previous
years. On the 40th anniversary of
the slaughter last Sept. 29, Jews
were warned by the KGB not to
assemble at Babi Yar. Five were
arrested for trying to do just
that. Only four from Odessa did
reach the site and were allowed to
place a wreath there, nothing
more.
The past year has seen a de-
termined effort to remove the
Holocaust from Jewish con-
sciousness. On May 3, several
hundred Moscow Jews had plan-
ned, as in previous years, to hold
a memorial service, in a forest 25
miles from the city.
THE KGB threatened the or-
ganizers with 30-day jail sen-
tences stating: "We will not
tolerate them any longer."
The following week, May 10,
another group of 100 Jews braved
the hostile official attitude and
gathered at the forest. Police
units broke up the scheduled
memorial service. One of the or-
ganizers, Boris Chernobilsky,
was arrested and charged with
assaulting a militia member. He
was later sentenced to a prison
term. The warning was all too
clear: the Holocaust is to be for-
gotten.
Office Hours
By Appointment
Steven M. Croft, M.D.
is pleased to announce
the opening of his office
for the practice of
Rheumatology
Specializing in Arthritis and Rheumatism
5258 Linton, Suite 103
Delray Beach, Florida 33445
Telephone
(305)495-0600
Dr. Barry A. Kugel
Chiropractic Physician
Medicare and Insurance
Assignment Accepted
19785 Hampton Drive
Boca Raton. Fl. 33434
483-2400

Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Theodore Feldman. Sabbath Services:
Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L., Kings Point, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446.
Orthodox. Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sacks. Services daily 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Saturday and holidays 8:45 a.m. Phone 499-9229.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at First Federal Savings & Loan Associa-
tion Offices, West Atlantic, Corner Carter Road, Delray Beach,
Fridays, 8 p.m. and Oneg Shabbat, Saturdays, 9 a.m. and
Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President, 6707 Moonlit Drive.
Delray Beach. Fla. 33446. Phone: 499-6687. Rabbi Jonah J.
Kahn. 499-4182. Cantor David Wechsler, 499-8992.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Assistant Rabbi
Richard Agler, Cantor Martin Rosen. Shabbat Eve Services at 8
p.m. Family Shabbath Service at 8 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each
Month. TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 134. Boca Raton, Fla. 33432.
Conservative, Located in Century Village, Boca. Services 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Reuben Saltzman,
President, Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-5557.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Conserva-
tive. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A. Silver, Rabbi: Seymour
Zisook, Cantor, Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at
8:45 a.m.. Daily Minyans at 8:45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
Cason United Methodist Church. 342 N. Swinton Ave.m (Corner
d tffi TTJ Delray Beach' Fl R*fonn. Mailing Address: P.O.
Box 1901 Delray Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m. Rabbi
Samuel Silver, President Bernard Etish, 276-6161.
STEVEN M. MILLER, D.D.S.
Is Proud To Announce
The Opening Of His Dental Practice
415601 North Federal High way .
Boca Raton, Florida 33431
GENERAL DENTISTRY
A private Office With Affordable Care
Cleaning $19
Free Introductory Consultation
introductory Offer Good Until Oct. 30.
Phone 997-8300
Day and Evening Appointments Available
Richard E. Kowalsky, M.D., P.A.
Takes Pleasure In Announcing
The Association Of
Gary K. Schneider, M.D.
For The Practice Of
Obstetrics, Gynecology
Infertility
299 W. Camino Gardens Boulevard
Boca Raton, Florida 33432
(305) 392-4477
With Offices At
5258 Linton Boulevard
Delray Beach, Florida 33445
(305)495-0558


, October 1,1862

The JewUh Fhridian of South County.

NORTON
SINCE 192-4
TIRE CO.
Page 11
SAFETY
SERVICE
CENTER
rC?
Co.ich Howard Schnellenberget
SO. FLORID IA NS
iLFGoodrich
IIFBAVER XllWs RADIAL
SIZE
P155/80R13
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
P185/80R13
P195/70R13
t ;
\ ^ ^y
P205/70R13
P205/70R14
P175/75R14
P185/75R14

PRICE
49.19
51.18
53.05
54.45
55.50
57.15
62.17
51.88
57.15
F.E.T.
1.53
1.69
1.78
1.92
1.98
2.14
2.23
1.83
2.04
SIZE
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
P205/75R15
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
iFGoodrich
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC POLYESTER CORD. GLASS BELTS
compWeW
any
return
rJTj&*2S*~. P185/80B13
**<*" ""*
sSSffSSSs
sm
P155/80B12
P155/80B13

EXPERIENCE & INTEGRITY
THAT SAVE YOU MONEY
Since 1924 Norton Tire Co. has offered quality
brands, competitive pricing, fast & efficient service,
T/A high tech specialist store managers, certified
mechanics, personal integrity plus guaranteed
satisfaction. You pay no extra for our service and
experience.
P175/80B13
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
P225/75B14
P155/80B15
P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
PRICE
31.49
31.97
33.81
35.75
37.93
38.79
39.88
41.82
42.92
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
45.60
47.78
PORTED
FOR FOREIGN ft MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL 1 INTERMEDIATE CARS
SIZE
155SR12
I155SR13
165SR13
[175SR13
165SR14
175SR14
185SR14
M55SR15
M65SR15
PRICE
29-98
32.55
3S-32
37.36
38.2$
39-94
42.8?
3frQ4
39.46
F.I.T.
1.53
1.61
1.80
2.02
1.85
2.04
2.28
1.82
1.98
50.10
F.E.T.
1.49
1.44
1.50
1.63
1.69
1.70
1.79
1.95
2.07
2.20
2.35
1.68
1.83
2.15
2.34
2.46
raiwiffitTff
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 8 POINT SAFETY CHECK-UP
2.65
PRICE
62.17
64.85
66.01
70.58
65.20
67.42
69.99
72.56
77.83
F.E.T.
2.18
2.34
2.48
2.68
2.33
2.47
2.59
2.78
3.01
FLORIDA
HEADQUARTERS
FOR ALL BFG
.
m
:::;. ,
T/A
HIGH TECH'
RADIALS
50,60 & 70 SERIES WIDE
and the new T/A COMP
CERTIFIED MECHANICS Most of our me
chanics have been TESTED and CERTIFIED by
the National Institute for Service Excellence. They
are available at any of our stores listed below with
a star (*).
DISC BRAKE
SPECIAL
Install new disc pads
Resurface rotors Install
new seals Repack bearings
Check calipers Check system Inspect
master cylinder Add fluid as required
Adjust arid bleed as required Check and
adjust rear brakes Road test
FOR MOST
AMERICAN
FOREIGN CA
,74*
GET OUR
PRICE Of*
DRUM BRAKES
30,000 MILE GUARANTEE
OIL CHANGE, FILTER
AND LUBE
\
UP TO 5 QTS. OF PREMIUM'
OIL NEW OIL FILTER COM-1
PLETE LUBE
FOR
MOST
U.S. MS-
*12
95
CAM*
LMMT
TRUCKS
ENGINEERED FOR SMALLER CARS"
BULK
ML
WE SERVICE NATIONAL. ACCOUNTS
DAOE: Export/WhokMai*
MN.W82Avt. 503-7040
FT. LAUDERDALE
1740 E. Sunrise Blvd 463-7588
PLANTATION
381 N. State Rd 7 587-2186
TAMARAC
* LAKE PARK/N PALM I
532 N Lake Blvd 848-2544
t DEERFIELD BEACH
2265 W Hillsooro Blvd. 427-1
t FT. PIERCE
Wt honor MASTER CARD VISA
AMERICAN EXPRESS
OMf R S CLUI
* CORAL GABLES HIALEAM/PALM SPRINGS MILE
ird & Douglas Road 446-8101 1275 48th St. 822-2500
* NORTH MIAMI + MIAMI AIRPORT
13360 NW7thAvt 681-8541 N.W. 25 St & Mrtam Dairy Rd 593-1191
N. MIAMI BEACH WEST MIAMI
1700 N E 163rd St 945-7454 Bird & QaHoway Rds 552-6656 441 & W. Commercial Blvd. 735-2772 2604 South 4th St 464-8020
KENDALL DR./MIQATE SOUARE t TAMARAC : VERO BEACH
13872 S W 88th St 387-0128 N University Or at McNab Rd 721-4700 755 21t Street 567-1174
+ HOMESTEAD POMPANO BEACH DAYTONA BEACH
30100 S Federal Hwy 247-1622 3151 N Federal Hwy 943-4200 907 Voiusia Ave 255-7487
t V* HOLLYWOOD WE8T PALM BEACH t NAPLES
497 S State Rd 7 987-0450 515 South Dixie 832-3044 2085 E Tamiami Tr. 774-4443
t OAVIE St Rd 84 Just west of Urwersity Dr 473-47O0
t MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
SOUTH DADE
9001 S Dixie Hwy 667-7575
CUTLER RIDGE
20390 S Dixie Hwy 233-5241


Pg12
The Jewish Flor 'ian ofSouth County
Friday, October 1,1%2
Now
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3mg/
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