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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( July 9, 1982 )

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
July 9, 1982

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00081

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
July 9, 1982

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00081

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
tJem'stj Fieridiairj
Number 24
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, July 9, 1982
afmastocit*
Price 35 Cents'
Will the Truth Ever be Told?
V
zretary of State Alexander Haig
ultz Bad Ne ws
irael Dismayed By
iaig's 'Resignation*
) A V1D FRIEDMAN
YORK (JTA) -
>rise resignation of
try of State Alex-
Haig and President
'8 appointment to
him of George
president of the
i\ Corp., the giant
Francisco-based
engineering and construc-
tion firm, is causing great
concern among friends of
Israel in the United States.
Compounding the concern over
the naming of an official of a
company that does billions of
dollars of business annually with
the Arab countries, and Saudi
By JAMES B.BAER,
President, South County
Jewish Federation
Listening to, watching, and
reading the news on American
radio, TV, and newspapers makes
me wonder if the Lebanon and
Israel that I just returned from is
the same Lebanon and Israel to
which these distorted, unfair and
nearly anti-Semitic re ports refer.
There is hardly any basis for
comparison. i
Where in the American press
does it mention all the Israeli
lives lost, the Israeli wounded
preceding Israel's swift attack
into Lebanon? Where does it
mention the PLO shelling of Kir-
yat Shmona, Nahariyah and
Metulla, where over 700. shells
alone were counted crashing into
these Israeli civilian villages on
Shabbat (Saturday) preceding
Israeli's attack?
Where does the American
press mention the hundreds of
wounded and killed Israelis,
deaths and mannings caused di-
rectly by the PLO since the last
ceasefire was established in July
of '81, murders of children and
adults that the PLO pointed to
with pride, shelling of people that
the PLO promised, time and time
again, to kill or push into the sea.
Yes, where has the American
press been and just how much did
the Israelis have to take before
they flexed their muscles and in-
stigated operation "Peace in the
Galilee ".
By the way, you will note that
just by the name of the operation,
"Peace in the Galilee," the total
difference in the attitude between
the Israelis and the PLO who
want to eliminate forever, every
Jew in Israel. Israels effort is to-
wards a lasting peace, living to-
gether in brotherhood; the PLO's
is total extermination of Israel.
Why isn't the American press re-
Bobick Chairs Federation CRC
Continued on Page 3
fficial Update
Israel Takes Lead In
Iping Lebanon Rebuild
Following is the latest update on Israel's
humanitarian aid to Lebanon as compiled by
the Consulate General of Israels Information
Department in Miami. Consul General is Joel
Arnon.
ael's Ambassador to the United Nations revealed
jeting of the Security Council that direct contacts
jn established between Israel's Economic Minister,
[Meridor, and his Lebanese counterpart, to coor-
I recon struct ion efforts in Lebanon.
jael's Minister of Energy has instructed the Fuel
rity to enter into discussion with the American
j of the Zaharani refinery on repairing the damage
[ occurred in the course of the recent fighting with a
Continued on Page 3
James B. Baer, president of the
South County Jewish Federation,
announces the appointment of
Marianne Bobick as chairperson
of the Community Relations
Council for the 1982-1983 season.
The Community Relations
Council is comprised of represen-
tatives of the more than 60 inde-
pendent Jewish organizations
within South County, and is co-
ordinated and financed by the
Federation.
The Council deals in the areas
of Israel and the Middle East, In-
ternational Jewry and domestic
issues, and is the coordinating
body for community actions and
policies. Its purpose is to enhance
conditions conducive to secure
and creative Jewish living.
Mrs. Bobick has continually
demonstrated leadership and
dedicated activity within South
County Jewish Federation. She
was president of South County
Jewish Community Day School,
this past year, chaired the Soviet
Jewry Resettlement program for
South County and was the recipi-
ent of the 1981 Community Serv-
ice Award of the Federation. Mrs.
Bobick is a vice-president of
Marianne Bobick
South County Jewish Federation.
"Under Marianne Bobick's
leadership, I know that we will
have a vigorous and active year
for the Community Relations
Council. Her administrative
ability and her commited leader-
ship are almost unrivaled in the
Jewish Community," said Baer.
porting the difference in ideo-
logy?
One has been killing since
1948, the other, Israel, has been
working for peace. Who gave up
the Sinai, the oil, Yam it, for
merely a promise of peace from
Egypt? Thank God for the
Egyptians and the Israelis who
had foresight, the love of life and
the desire for brotherhood to
gamble on a lasting peace. .
And, it has held, for the good of
Both!
Where was our American press
in praising Israel when they gave
up everything in the Sinai for
peace?
Where in our press does it
mention that the American
Lebanese on June 13th, in Wash-
ington, D.C. adopted a resolution
that, in part, asked the United
States to assist the Lebanese in
forming a free government for
Lebanon and to help in having all
foreign forces, Syrian and PLO
withdrawn. The resolution also
made mention of the tragic loss of
life, limb and property in
Lebanon because these two fore-
ign forces have made the Leban-
ese citizens refugees in their own
homeland.
Amazingly how the very next
day our American press and the
British press, using practically
the same words as the Lebanese
Resolution, blamed Israel for all
the damage, loss of life, etc.
which, in actuality, was done by
the PLO and Syria. There is no
doubt that Israel, for its size,
probably has the best army in the
world. However, no army could
have inflicted one-quarter of the
damage or deaths that our press
and other world organizations
tried to blame on Israel. Why
can't Israel be treated fairly and
the truth be told?
Yes, I was in Lebanon! No one
has covered all of Lebanon, but I
was on top of Beauford Castle,
from which the PLO shelled
Israel for years. We saw all the
vacated villages and homes in
this area and the Litani River
Valley. Vacated yes, but not as a
result of the present operation.
Vacated when the PLO was
thrown out of Jordan and Syria.
Continued on Page 5-
abbi Sacks Joins Anshei Emuna
regation Anshei Emuna
iy Beach announces that,
Dr. Louis L. Sacks has
1 the position of rabbi.
>i Sacks received his BA
from the University of
and went on to obtain a
r>d ThD from the Universi-
itral Indiana. He was or-
es a rabbi following his
at Hebrew Theological
' in Chicago, in Skokie, I1L
bi Sacks is a former pro-
of Talmud at the Hebrew
agical College and the basal
Kehillah in Chicago. Ha is
kuthor of the classical two-
volume "Menachem Zjon, ana
also published the Rashbo on
Avoda Zora-Mossad Harav
Kook.
Rabbi Sacks has held pulpits in
Alberts, Canada; Chicago, and
Philadelphia.
Among his many credits.
Rabbi Sacks participated as a
delegate to the World Zionist
Conference in Jerusalem in 1977,
and represented Pennsylvania at
the White House for the signing
of the Camp David Accords by
Carter, Begin and Sadat in 197a
Hs is the grandson of the
world-renowned Rabbi Peeach
Tzvi Frank, who served as chief
rabbi of Jerusalem and the Rosh
BesDin of Israel for over 50
years.
Congregation Anshei Emuna
was started in 1974 and has
grown to 268 members. They ere
now building their own synago-
gue in Delray Beach, which will
be located on Carter Road, one
block south of Linton Blvd. It is
within walking distance of Kings-
point, Coco Woods and Village of
Oriole. Artifacts for the interior
of the synagogue are now on sals
for those interested. High Holy
Day Services will be held in the
new structure, the first Orthodox
synagogue in Delray Beach.
Rabbi Louis Sacks


Take U"
Page2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, July 9,1982
Texas Legislator
Wilson Wants to Tell the Real Story
Following is the official trans-
cript of an interview with U.S.
Rep. Charles Wilson (D., Tex.)
broadcast on Kol Israel on June
26. Reporter was Kol Israel's
David Easing.
Eiwing: Charles Wilson is the
first American Congressman to
visit South Lebanon and Beirut
since the Israeli operation,
"Peace for Galilee," began.
Wilon: The biggest surprise
that I had was the enthusiasm
was the Universal enthusiam
with which the Lebanese
welcomed the Israeli army.
How was this ex-
pressed?
Wilaoo: Many ways, but that
was my primary purpose for
spending two days up there. So, I
spent a lot of time just searching
out. I would leave my Israeli
guides in a car around the comer
and just walk down the street
and search out English-speaking
Lebanese. And I would ask them,
and thev would tell me. And then
a crowd would gather, and the
unanimity of opinion was over-
whelming.
Easing: What do these people,
these Lebanese that vou met with
today want from Israel, from the
United States of America?
Wilson: Well, from the United
States they want money. And I
guess the easiest way to describe
what they want from Israel is
security. They, I think, have
some self-doubts perhaps about
their ability to get their act
together assuming that the Is-
raelis and Syrians and PLO
leave. But their main emotion
now is an immense relief to get
rid of the PLO. and I just found
that everywhere-and I didn't go
expecting that. They would say,
"Now we're safe Now we can
go home."
Reagan Sends Tuition Bill to Hill
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan Ad-
ministration has sent its
controversial tuition tax
credit bill to Congress. It
would allow parents of
children attending parochi-
al and other private schools
to deduct up to 50 percent
of each child's tuition from
their taxable income.
The measure, similar to one in-
troduced early this year by Sens
Daniel Moynihan (I)., N.Y.),
Robert Packwood (R., Ore.) and
William Roth (R.. Del.), would
allow a maximum deduction of
$100 per child in 1983, $300 in
1984, and $500 in 1985 and there-
after. The cost to the Treasury by
1987 is estimated at $1.5 billion.
THE BILL was expected to be
introduced in the Senate by
Robert Dole (R., Kan.) and in the
House by Reps. Willis Gradison
(R., Ohio) and Mario Biaggi (D.
N.Y.). It is strongly opposed b>
civil liberation and civil rights
groups which question its consti-
tutionality. It is equally strongly
supported by Roman Catholic
and Orthodox Jewish groups.
Under the Administration bill,
the maximum deduction would
be phased out for families with
annual incomes over $50,000 and
would not apply to those with in-
comes over $75,000 or to collegt
students The Administration
measure also contains an anti-
discrimination provision which
has come under attack by civil
rights groups.
The latter contend that it is
without substance because it
would place the burden of proof
of discrimination on individual
complainants rather than on
schools accused of racial or reli-
gious discrimination.
Rabbi Menachem Lubinsky,
director of government and pub-
lic affairs for Agudath Israel of
America, who attended the cere-
mony at which President Reagan
announced his transmittal of the
tuition tax credit proposal to
Congress, said he told the Presi-
dent that "Orthodox Jews, re-
gardless of background, are
united in support" of the mea-
sure.
HE ALSO said the "Reagan
initiative" finally recognized "the
rights of parents of children in
private schools instead of treat-
ing them as second class citi-
zens."
He said Agudath Israel plans
to mobilize its "network of com-
mittees and coordinators in 31
states," organized as the "Cam-
paign to Relieve Independent
Education" for an intensive cam-
paign to win support for passage
in the Congress.
In a statement. Agudath Israel
said the Reagan proposal met all
the objectives Agudath Israel es-
tablished "when it first became
one of the leading advocates for
tuition tax credits 15 years ago."
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The Orthodox agency rejected
arguments that tax credits would
encourage parents to shift to non-
public schools, calling it "in-
conceivable" that parents of
public school pupils would give
up the benefits of a free education
"for a minor tax credit."
THE AGENCY also asserted
that the "strict" anti-discrimina-
tion enforcement expected for the
measure also guaranteed that the
proposed tax credit measure
would not support racially
segregated schools. The agency
also said its attorneys were confi-
dent that the measure, if
adopted, would be upheld as con-
stitutional.
Rabbi Moshe Sherer, Agudath
Israel president, expressed the
hope that secular Jewish groups,
which have consistently opposed
such tuition tax credits, would
recognize that such credits did
not pose a threat to the constitu-
tional separation of church and
state. He said the relief which
would be provided to parents was
"a recognition of their legitimate
rights" in no wav meant "to
change the role of religion in our
society."
Easing: There have been re-
ports that thousands of Lebanese
are now returning from the
Beirut area to southern Lebanon
under Israeli control. Did you see
this?
Wilson: Yes, I saw countless.
It was just astonishing. And
there were traffic jams, big traffic
jams. I'd get out of the car and
talk to them. But the friendliness
towards the Israelis is, I mean
it's almost like a liberating army.
One fellow in our car was sick.
Our car was obviously and Israeli
car, marked so. One old Arab got
out of his car to come back and
hold a wet rag on his head. And
one fellow got out of our car, and
the kids brought him lemons. It
was astonishing. I expected this,
somewhat, from the Christian
population. But I didn't expect
it from the Moslem population.
Easing: Mr. Wilson, you are
now going back to Congress.
What are you going to be taking
with you?
Wilson: Well, I'm going to
take that message. I'm not pre-
pared to pass judgment in my
own mind on the wisdom of the
invasion, at this point, because
it's a funny thing there's no
doubt it was good for the Leba-
nese. It remains for history to de-
cide whether it was good for the
Israelis or not. It was good for
the Lebanese. But I'm going to
try to off-set some of the unfair
nublicitv that has accrued in the
United States basically on tele-
vision.
I stopped in Sidon, where as
you know, the damage was severe
Sidon and Tyre probably the
most severe. And in talking to a
group of people, some of whom
had los>t their homes, some of
whom had lost relatives, they
said that all in all to be free of the
PLO, it was worth it. And that
was profound realization to me.
Rep.Charles Wilson
And I intend to try to get that
word out at home. That the
citizens, that the Lebanese them-
selves are glad it happened.
I had an argument last night
with a French reporter As I
usually do withFrench reporters.
And he was saying, "Well yes"
that he admitted that the people
he had talked to were glad that
the Israelis came, but he said
they should have come another "*
way. And I said, "how's that?"
And he said, "without bombs."
And I said, "yeah, and I suppose
in 1944 we could have invaded
Normany without bombs, too,
you know."
Easing: What was your im-
pression of the situation of the
people with regard to health care,
food, water, that sort of thing?
Wilson: No problems. The Is-
raelis are doing a good job in that
regard. A lot need to be done, and
I hope that my country can help
in preparing the war damage and
rebuilding the homes. But as far
as food and water are concerned,
I don't believe there is a problem.
It was interesting to note too,
that in East Beirut, old damage
was just as severe as this new
damage. Maybe more so. It
might be more widespread, the
damage that east Beirut incurred
in the war between the various
Lebanese factions, and the Syr-
ians and PLO since 1975.
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Friday, July 9,1982
ThtJewiih Floridian of South County
4
Shultz Bad News
Haig 'Resignation' Dismays Israelis
Page 3
Continued from Page 1
Arabia in particular, is that
Haig's resignation Friday came
as Israel was consolidating its
victory over the Palestine
Liberation Organization in
Lebanon.
HAIG HAS supported Israel's
contention that the results of the
"Peace for Galilee" operation
provides an opportunity to re-
unite Lebanon with a stable
government in charge and with
all foreign troops Syria, the
PLO and Israel off its soil. But
the reaction of joy at Haig's
resignation in the Arab world
shows that there is a perception
there that United States policy in
the Middle East will harden
toward Israel and thus it will be
more difficult to get Arab sup-
port for a solution in Lebanon
that will exclude the PLO and the
Syrians from that war-torn
country.
In fact while both the White
House and State Department are
maintaining a diplomatic public
silence about the reasons for
Haig's sudden decision, reports
are circulating that one of the
major causes is his clashes with
National Security Advisor
William Clark, who has been ad-
vocating that the Administration
take a harsher line with Israel
over Lebanon.
Haig was considered bv the
American Jewish community and
by Israel as "a true friend of Is-
rael." This was the sentiment
voiced after the resignation by
both members of Premier Mena-
chem Begins government and
opposition Labor Alignment
leader Shimon Peres. Haig
always considered Israel a strate-
gic ally and the U.S.'s most im-
portant ally in the Mideast.
THIS IS NOT the view of
Shultz who has had dose ties
with the Saudis during his years
with Bechtel. While Shultz has
not expressed many views on for-
eign affairs, he has spoken out on
the Mideast. In an interview dur-
ing the 1980 presidential cam-
paign, he said the only differ-
ences he had with Reagan were
on the Mideast and specifically
referred to a speech then candi-
date Reagan made to B'nai B'rith
International in September, 1980
supporting Israel.
In that speech Reagan called
Israel "a major strategic asset to
America"; labelled the PLO as
"terrorist," and said "Jerusalem
is now and will continue to be one
city, undivided."
The 61-year-old Shultz was be-
lieved to be Reagan's first choice
for Secretary of State in 1981.
But he withdrew when it became
apparent there was strong oppo-
stion to the naming of two high-
ranking Bechtel officials to major
Cabinet posts. Caspar Wein-
, berger was an officer of Bechtel
when he was named Secretary of
Defense.
WEINBERGER has been con-
sidered the leading critic of Israel
in the Administration. His views,
that while supporting Israel's
security, the U.S. must seek
other friends in the Mideast, is
one that Shultz is expected to
share.
The strongest public statement
so far against the appointment
has come from Sen. Alan
Cranston (D., Calif.), who called
it "bad news for Israel" and "bad
news potentially for the cause of
peace and stability in the Middle
East." A member of the Foreign
Relations Committee which is ex-
pected to begin confirmation
hearings on July 12, Cranston
said he will question Shultz
closely about his business ties to
Saudi Arabia.
However, there is little ques-
tion in Washington about
Shultz's integrity. He served in
the Nixon Administration as
Secretary of Labor, director of
the Office of Management and
Budget and finally Secretary of
Treasury and is highly regarded
by both Democrats and Repub-
licans.
While Shultz is almost certain
to be confirmed by the Senate,
there will be questions about his
attitude. He is expected to sup-
port the tilt away from Israel and
toward Saudi Arabia and other
"moderate" Arab countries that
Weinberger advocates. He will
presumably support Wein-
berger's proposed sale of arms to
Jordan and the Saudis.
PERHAPS EVEN more im-
portant will be the change in the
operations at the State Depart-
ment. Haig kept Mideast policy
under his own tight control keep-
ing the Department's Middle
East experts on a tight rein.
Shultz is expected to give them
more leeway which, if past ex-
perience is any indication, should
lead to a pro-Arab tilt.
Meanwhile, Haig is still silent
about the reasons for his resig-
nation except for his remarks in
his letter that the Administra-
tion's foreign policy has moved
away from the "careful course"
he and the President had
originally planned.
But it is clear that Haig who
has had well-publicized clashes
with such people as Weinberger,
United Nations Ambassador
Jeane Kirkpatrick, Vice Presi-
dent George Bush and others
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finally could take no more when
he saw that Clark, his former
Deputy Secretary, was now over-
ruling him on matters of foreign
policy Haig had always main-
tained that he should be the Ad-
ministration's voice on foreign
policy.
Haig lost out to Clark last
week when the Administration
decided to tighten economic
sanctions against the Soviet
Union. Ironically, Shultz sees to
support Haig on this issue.
BUT HAIG was also losing
out on the Mideast to Clark. At
the end of Reagan's trip to Eu-
rope, Clark overruled a decision
by Haig to go to Jerusalem even
though it had been announced by
Israel earlier in the day. White
House Counselor Edwin Meese
pointedly told reporters at the
time that the President's special
envoy, Philip Habib, was already
in the Mideast and was doing a
good job.
Haig seemed to be winning
against Clark and Weinberger,
who wanted Reagan to get tough
with Israel over its continued
fighting in Lebanon, when
Reagan met with Begin at the
White House last Monday and
then issued a conciliatory state-
ment.
But later in the week things
went against Haig. He was re-
portedly angered that Clark ap-
peared to be sending messages to
the Saudis that Begin has
assured Reagan that Israel would
not take west Beirut. White
House deputy press secretary
Larry Speakes made these assur-
ances public
Helping Lebanon Rebuild
Continued from Page 1
view to making them operational as soon as possible.
Thousands of Lebanese have been returning in recent
days to villages in the South, from where they were up-
rooted by the PLO during the Lebanese civil war of 1975
-1976. The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) are allowing the
returnees to pass through checkpoints and are also sup-
plying them with water and food. Approximately 2,500 of
the returnees were living in one of the PLO strongholds in
Beirut.
In the last ten days, 436 people have been brought
from Lebanon and hospitalized in Israel. The majority of
them are civilians and the remainder 159 Syrian and
PLO prisoners, as well as a few wounded members of the
Lebanese Army.
The Director General of the Ministry of Commerce
and Industry stated that his Ministry will assist in the re-
construction of light industires in Lebanon. Two teams
from the Ministry are already in Southern Lebanon and
are concluding a survey of the factory infrastructure with
a view of its reconstruction. The Ministry is also prepared
to assist in marketing the products.
The special IDF unit which was set up to provide aid
to Lebanon has launched a comprehensive survey of the
civilian economic infrastructure in Lebanon, which could
serve as a basis for the speedy and full reconstruction of
the local system of commerce.
DPT and polio vaccines are being sent to Lebanon by
the Ministry of Health. Immunization will be given to
children who have not been receiving regular medical care.
The Bank of Israel is in touch with the Central Bank
in Lebanon regarding the opening of branches of Lebanese
banks in Tyre, Sidon and Damour.
The Governor of Nabatyeh province, representing the
Central Lebanese Authorities, met with the Commander
of the IDF Civilian Assistance Unit of June 21 and
promised to assist in renewing the functions of the
Government offices in the area.
The independent Israeli newspaper Hooretz reported
on June 23 that the fishermen of Tyre, who for years have
been unable to fish freely and have been victims of extor-
tion and maltreatment at the hands of the PLO terrorists,
will from June 23 be able to resume fishing.
Join Us On The UJA Federation
Mission To Israel
October 21-31
Ethel & Milton Kretsky
We are signed up because a UJ A Federation
Mission is More than just a tour. It is an in depth
study of the country and our people.
$1,000 per person-mission cost.
$2,600 family gift or $1,300 for a single to the 1983 UJ A/Federation
campaign will be required of all participants on the mission.


Page 14
Page 4
Friday, July 9,


Whole Story Untold
The departure of Secretary of State Alexander
Haig from Israel's point of view is devastating
enough. The arrival on the scene of the Bechtel Corp.
magnate George Shultz is even more devastating.
But the problem behind this exit and entry is no
different from any other with which Israel has had to
grapple since 1979, when it signed a peace treaty on
the dotted line with Egypt, and that is a terrible
press, to say the least.
In the case of the Haig departure, the fact is that
Israel is not alone in feeling particularly saddened.
The European Community is just as concerned
perhaps more so. Haig understood the EEC and its
fears of President Reagan's penchant for operating
cold wars. In the end, Shultz understands these fears
too; but as a good company man is likely to repress
them and go along with the President's anti-Russian
hardline.
Little if any of this attracts the attention of the
media. What the Haig "resignation" means to the
media is a blow to Israel. Period. And that is how it is
presented. Ergo, there is universal delight in the
change at the State Department helm or so the
media would have us believe.
The interpretation here is the same as it has
been generally in the media with respect to Israel's
life-and-death struggle against the PLO. The media
image of the PLO and Yasir Arafat is of the freedom-
fighting variety. The Israeli lives the PLO has
snuffed out, PLO terrorism abroad, the Arafat-
Moscow connection these are slighted as of little
consequence.
On the other hand, there is a wild exaggeration
of the figures documenting the dead and wounded in
the Lebanese campaign. These International Red
Cross figures are based on Red Crescent figures
given the IRC by its Moslem counterpart and taken
at their face value. Nowhere do the media suggest
that this is so, or remind readers and TV viewers that
the International Red Cross is a startlingly politi-
cized organization that has for years refused the
Magen David Adom, Israel's counterpart of the Red
Cross, admittance to membership.
Pointing the Finger
The fact is that Israel did not invade a sovereign
state, but a country under occupation by Syria and
the PLO. In 1976 Lebanon ceased to exist as a state
when it was partitioned de facto by the PLO and the
Syrians.
Israel entered Lebanon to defend Israeli citizens
from PLO terror. And itself from PLO terror in the
form of rockets aimed at the Galilee. It will return to
its own border as soon as effective measures will en-
sure that the terrorists do not attempt a comeback in
Lebanon.
The fact also is that many of the villagers in
southern Lebanon, and yes even in Beirut, welcomed
the Israel Defense Forces as liberators. For years,
they had been living under the terrorists' thumb.
Many are asking Israel to help them join Major
Sa'ad Haddad's Free Lebanon Forces.
None of this is mentioned in the media, in-
cluding the fact that Israeli troops have done every-
thing possible to keep civilian casualties to a mini-
mum, often at the risk of their own lives. Or that they
could have taken Beirut ten times over in the past
week were they not concerned about civilian casual-
ties.
And so, in the end, why should one expect a
measured view of the departure of Secretary of State
Haig? That, too, was Israel's fault. Naturally.
Jewish Floridian
FREO SMOCMET
Editor and PuMienar
**
ofSouthCounty FfadShocnaT
SUZANNE SMOCHET MILTON KRETSKY
Eiacutive Director Nm Coordinator
r>riaeil6Ma|,BleealdTea.eoeo
> **M at Soca Raten. FU. IMPS MO2S0 ISSN 0274-41M
BOCA RATON OFFICE 2200 N Fadaral Hwy Suite 208. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 366-2001
Mam Ottice Plant 120 N E. 6th St Miami. Fla 33101 Phooa 1 373-4605
Poaimaatar Send address changes h jaatan ntwun. p.o. saa 01-2173. mumm fu nii
Combined Jawiah Appeal South County Jih Fadaori. inc Olficeri Praaidant Jamee B Baar
Vica Preeidents Mananna Book*. Eric Oackmgar. Norman Stone Secretary Gladys Wemsnant
Treaeurer. Margaret Kottief F.-^i'ive Director Rabbi Bruce S Warehai
Jeeneh Floridian does not guarantee Kaahruth of Merchandise Advartiaad
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area S3 SO Annual (2 Year Minimum ST), or by membership South
County Jewish Federation 2200 N Fadaral Mary Suite 206. Boca Raton. Fla 33432 Phone 368-2737
Owl ol Town. Upon Request
18TAMUZ5742
Number 24
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin
presents the Anti-Defamation League "Jab-
otinsky Award for Courageous Jewish Lead-
ership" to New York City Mayor Edward I.
Koch. Left is Abraham H. Foxman, ADL's
associate national director. Right is Kenneth
J. Bialkin, ADL's national chairman. Begin
made the presentation during his visit to the
U.S. last month.
Headlines
NJCRAC Criticizes Refugee Detention
Friday, July 9.1982
Volume 4
Sharp criticism of U.S. detention of Haitian
refugees has been expressed by the Executive
Committee of the National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council in a statement in New
York.
"The continued detention of Haitian asylum
seekers in Miami and elsewhere violates funda-
mental principles of concern for human rights,
fairness and due process," the NJCRAC Execu-
tive Committee stated as it called for the
Haitians' release into the "temporary custody of
reputable voluntary agencies and individuals"
while awaiting determinations of requests for po-1
litical asylum in the United States.
The NJCRAC, coordinating body for 111 local
and 11 national Jewish agencies in the commu-
nity relations field, acted after its Executive
Committee received a report that it later adopted
of a special investigatory delegation which visited
and inspected the Krome Avenue detention
facility in Miami on May 18.
American imports from Israel totaled SI.26 bil-
lion in 1981, jumping nearly 30 percent over the
previous year's total of $977 million, according to
figures released by the Government of Israel
Trade Center in New York.
The total was a record for Israeli exports to the
United States and marked the first time the dollar
value of such exports had exceeded SI billion in a
single year, continuing the sharp upward trend of
Israeli sales to the U.S., the report said.
The fastest-growing category of Israeli exports
to the U.S. continues to be electrical and elec-
tronic products, which registered a rise of some 89
percent in 1981 over the 1980 total. Much of this
gain came in the form of high-technology
products researched and developed by Israeli sci-
entists and engineers, it was noted. Transporta-
tion equipment rose 79 percent in 1961 over 1980.
A major factor in this increase, according to the
report, was the success of the Westwind business
jet manufactured by Israel Aviation Industries
and sold in the U.S. by Atlantic Aviation of Wil-
mington, Del.
Dr. Isaac Chessar Michaelson, one of the
world's outstanding authorities on the eye has
died in Jerusalem at the Hadassah-Hebrew Uni-
versity Medical Center. His textbooks on the eye
have been used by medical students throughout
the world.
Dr. Michaelson headed the Department of
Ophthalmology at Hadassah from 1964 to 1975,
when he retired to devote himself to international
programs for the prevention of blindness.
Born in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1903, he gradu
lated from the Royal College of Physicians and
Surgeons, Edinburgh and Glasgow, in 1926.
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee is making an immediate emergency rebel
commitment of S 100,000 in support of humanitar-
ian assistance in Lebanon, it was announced by
JDC President Henry Taub.
The announcement was made following a
meeting of a Jewish communal task force com-
prising representatives of national Jewish organi-
zations, including the Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, National Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council, B'nai B'rith Anti-Defamation

league, American Jewish Committee, the Ameri
can Jewish Congress and the World Jewish Con-
gress. It followed consultations with the United
Jewish Appeal and the Conference of Presidents
of Major American Jewish Organizations. The
meeting was chaired by JDC Executive Vice
President Ralph I. Goldman.
According to Goldman, the JDC action
parallels that of Catholic, Protestant and non-sec-
tarian voluntary agencies in America, which have
alreadv announced Lebanon relief programs.
The first International Jewish Theater Con-
ference and Festival will be held at Tel Aviv Uni-
versity on July 3 to 9, 1982. The Conference and
Festival will include performing troupes from
such countries as the United States, Norway.
Germany. France, and Israel, and participants
from as far off as India, Venezuela, and Madrid.
Famed performer Joseph Buloff will star in
"The Price," by Arthur Miller, whose sister, Joan
Copeland. will also star in the production.
Private philanthropy in America today is in a
state of shock and dismay at the destructively
crippling threat to tis programs by cuts in the
budget adopted by the House of Representatives
on June 10, says Dr. Jane Evans, president of the
Jewish Braille Institute of America.
One of these threats is dropping subsidies for
third-class, non-profit mail utilized by non-profit
agencies and organizations, according to Evans.
Evans stresses that "at a time of severe duress
for the economically disadvantaged, the
physically handicapped, the ill and the elderly, in
whose behalf the efforts of the private philan
thropy sector are crucial, the House-adopted
Federal budget, perhaps inadvertently, has aimed
a lethal torpedo at the heart of American philan-
thropic endeavor. If this meets with the approval
of the Administration, then President Reagan
who formerly proclaimed himself to be our ad-
vocate, has instead broken his promise."
aBVaa>^alB^Hka*^HB>aBVaVHBMBVaVaVaV^BlBtaBWBa
The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith is
charging that a regulation proposed by the Office
of Personnel Management totally abrogates merit
as a hiring qualification for many federal
positions.
According to Justin J. Finger, director of
ADL's national Civil Rights Division, approval of
the regulation would eliminate the Professional
and Career Examination Test and substitute
"subjective, standardless criteria" for merit-
based hiring.
Intermarriage is a "logical and inevitable con-
sequence of living in two civilizations, the Jewish
and the secular," and the problem should be ap-
proached with "optimism and honesty," Dr. Carl
Sheingold, executive director of the National
Havurah Coordinating Committee, told leaders of
the Reconstructionist movement at the Concord
Hotel. NY. last weekend
Dr. Sheingold was one of three leaders who ad-
dressed several hundred members of the Jewish
Reconstructionist movement at the opening
meeting of the 22nd annual convention of the
Federation of Reconstructionist Congregations
and Havurot


Friday, July 9.1982
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
Will the Truth Ever be Told?
Continued from Page 1
Vacated when the PLO ravaged
the area and took it over for it-
self I was in LebanonI talked
u, the families as they returned
after 7 years from the North.
They greeted us with glee and
thanked us for liberating them.
Where is the American press?
Why is it not reporting the posi-
tive reactions of the thousands of
Lebanese that the Israelis are
freeing?
Yes, I was in Nabatiyeh, and
saw homes damaged and des-
troyed by the Israelis, but only
those that the PLO occupied and
used in resisting the Israeli's
advance. I also saw the inoper-
ative electricity and water sys-
tems being repaired by Israelis,
in some cases restoring to work-
ing conditions systems that
hadn't functioned since the PLO
Filling m Background
Begin Reports on Meeting With Reagan
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Cabinet met for
more than three hours to
hear Premier Menachem
Begin's report on his visit
to the U.S. and to consider
the current situation in
Lebanon. The ministers de-
liberated under the cloak of
secrecy and no details of
their discussion were re-
leased.
Cabinet sources said earlier
that the decision taken a week
ago not to have Israeli forces oc-
cupy west Beirut where Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
and Syrian forces remain en-
trenched, is still valid. The de-
cision was taken while Begin was
in Washington against strong
opposition from Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon.
THE SOURCES defined west
Beirut as including the Pales-
tinian refugee camps bordering
the Lebanese capital. There had
been reports that Sharon was
pressing for an attack on the Burj
el-Barajneh refugee camp. The
sources explained that Israel has
not repeated its decision to exer-
cise restraint because to do so
would have weakened the psy-
chological and military pressure
on the PLO.
Labor Party Chairman Shimon
Peres warned on a television in-
terview that any attempt by the
Israel army to enter west Beirut
would be a "dreadful risk." He
said "Everyone should think
more than one step ahead." In
that connection, he warned that
an attack on the PLO-held, large-
ly Moslem quarter of Beirut
would exact a heavy toll of
casualties, both Israeli soldiers
and Lebanese civilians.
Peres warned that Israel
should not be the party that sets
up a srong Lebanese central
government lest it give the im-
pression that it intends "to stay
Lord Weidenfeld of Chelsea (center), president of the Ben
Gurion Foundation of Great Britain, is shown with host, Robert
II- Arnow, president, American Associates, Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev (left) and television commentator,
Martin Agronshy, at a recent dinner in New York.
Flaglei;
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forever" in Lebanon. For Israel
to occupy any Arab capital, he
said, would antagonize and unite
the entire Arab world which is
now seriously divided.
U.S. SPECIAL envoy Philip
Habib has been in Beirut at-
tempting to negotiate a compro-
mise that would disarm the PLO
and pave the way for a Lebanese
government to assume authority.
Habib was also expected in Jeru-
salem with new proposals from
the seven-man Committee of
National Salvation set up by
Lebanese President Elias Sarkis.
Meanwhile, a well placed
Cabinet source told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that there
was "just no basis" for mounting
charges in government and
Knesset circles that Sharon has
been conducting the war in Leba-
non as he chose, misleading his
Cabinet colleagues and MKs
alike or providing then* with only
meager information.
THOSE CHARGES have been
widely reported in the press in re-
cent days. But according to the
Cabinet sources, the majority of
ministers are fully satisfied with
Sharon's briefings and are confi-
dent of their ability to control the
military situation in Lebanon. An
aide to Begin denied vehemently
that the Premier felt Sharon was
"leading him on," a suggestion
voiced recently by some politi-
cians and media commentators.
"Begin is not naive," the aide
said.
Moreover, according to the
aide, Begin and Sharon "share
the same basic goals." He said
both saw the destruction of the
PLO in Lebanon as a possible
lever to advance Begins
autonomy scheme on the West
Bank and Gaza.
damaged them years ago. Where
is our press? Why doesn't our
American press show the delight
that the Southern Lebanese,
Christians and Moslems have for
the Israelis? Why doesn't our
American press tell about the
thousands of Lebanese that were
treated in Israeli hospitals during
the past years? Yes, the border
has been open into Israel for
many years. The Lebanese came
in, worked, received medicine,
clothing, water, all types bf aid.
Why hasn't this love and com-
passion for their fellow man by
the Israelis been mentioned by
our press? Why?
The truth has been so distorted
by the press. For example, they
showed pictures of a few Arabs
in Miami demonstrating against
Israel and claimed it was the
whole community. Christians,
Moslems and Jews alike in
America cannot have a clear
understanding of what is hap-
pening now, or through the years,
because of the media's insistence
on exploiting sensationalism.
We, as Americans, must all suffer
because we do not get the truth
about the Lebanese and Israeli
situation nor possibly other news
around the world. Yes hundreds,
maybe thousands of innocent
men, women and children have
been killed in Lebanon by the
Israeli Defense Forces but only
because the PLO would shoot at
Israelis and then hide behind the
Lebanese civilians. Israel has
taken every precaution possible,
deluding the loss of Israeli life,
to avoid killing the innocent. But
war is hell and unfortunately
people do die.
Israel has given the PLO every
opportunity, now and through
the years, to live in peace. Israel
has been even offered to help the
Palestinians even though their
brother Arabs have not lifted a
finger to help them since 1948.
The Syrians and the Jordan-
ians have killed the Palestinians
since 1948. The Israelis have
offered to live in peace with them
and are willing to do so now just
as they are doing with the
Egyptians. Why won't the
American and world press give
them a chance? When, yes when,
will the truth be told??
tP
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Page 14
.. .---------
Aorkrft.
T^L T- I rti

Page6
The Jewish Flondian of South County
Friday, July 9,1932
Kottler Honored at Federation Annual Meeting
Amidst much applause at the
annual meeting of South County
Jewish Federation, Margaret
Kottler accepted the James and
Margie Baer Young Leadership
Award.
Mrs. Kottler is the first reci-
pient of this honor, which will be
annually given to the individual
in the community who has dem-
onstrated the highest quality of
young leadership for the year.
The Leadership Award fund
was initiated by friends of James
and Marjorie Baer in their honor
as an incentive to young leaders
in the South County area.
In addition to receiving the
award, the recipient is given
round-trip air fare to the Council
of Jewish Federations General
Assembly. This year it is being
held in Los Angeles.
Mrs. Kottler's efforts on behalf
of the Jewish Community and
Federation are many. Coming to
Boca Raton from Charlotte.
North Carolina in 1977, she im-
mersed herself in a myriad of ac-
tivities which have had an effect
on all those who have had the
privilege to work with her. She is
a member of Temple Beth El,
Hadassah, the National Council
of Jewish Women and Temple
Margaret Kottler, recipient of the James and Margie Baer Young
Leadership Award, is pictured with the couple in whose name the
award was established.
Beth El Sisterhood.
Mrs. Kottler is treasurer of the
South County Jewish Federation
and is on the Federation's Wom-
en's Division Board, and was
chairperson for Update '82. In
addition, she is a member of the
UJA National Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet and the Gov-
ernment Affairs Committee for
Florida Council of Jewish Feder-
ations.
She has assumed the position
of associate chairperson for 1983
Women's Division Campaign and
is overall coordinator of Update
'83.
Mrs. Kottler is a member of the
South County Jewish Federation
Career Women's group, and she
is a full-time professional real es-
tate salesperson.
What Israel Has Gained I
By Lebanon Campaign
JERUSALEM-(ZINS)- Following are the results of
the Israeli action in Lebanon, according to political
analysts here:
The Syrians have lost a dominant role in Lebanon. The
Soviet Union's clients in the region have been weakened.
The PLO may be forced to move its military headquar-
ters to Damascus. This is one of Israel's primary object-
ives. Since the war of attrition in 1974 between Israel
and Syria in the Golan Heights, the Government of
Assad has refused to allow the Palestinians to carry out
raids from Syria. If Israel can drive the PLO into Syria's
grip, it could severely constrict the guerilla room for
manuevers while at the same time holding Syria respon-
sible for any guerilla attacks.
Tension between the PLO and Syria are already boiling
to the surface. Khaled al-Hassan, a key political adviser
to Arafat, issued a statement in Jordan criticizing the
Syrians for agreeing to a ceasefire, charging that they had
"fallen into an Israeli trap."
The Soviet position in the Middle East has been under-
mined by the events of the last week. Moscow's two
important Middle East clientsSyria and the
PLOhave been badly hurt by the Israeli action. The in-
fluence of Syria and the PLOand through them the in-
fluence of the Soviet Unionhave been curtailed for the
immediate future.
It is now the Israelis along with the Christian allies in
East Beirut who will have the decisive voice in Lebanese
politics.
Jewish Agency Board Digs
Deep for Peace Program
JERUSALEM (JTAI -
The members of the Jewish
Agency Board of Governors,
both rich and not-so-rich, dug
deep into their pockets this week
and came up with $10 million as
the kickoff contribution to the
special "Peace for Galilee" fund
announced by the government
and the Jewish Agency in the
wake of the war in Lebanon.
The collection, which was made
in an emotional atmosphere, fol-
lowed the Board's two-day tour
of the northern Israeli settle-
ments and the Lebanese front,
including the captured Palestin-
ian stronghold of Nabatiya.
THE BOARD resolved that
the special campaign would aim
at $300 million in addition to reg-
ular United Jewish Appee)-
United Israel Appeal contribu-
tions and contributions to "Pro-
ject Renewal." It was the first
time funds were raised at a
session of the Board of Governors
and it was the occasion for some
remarkable expressions of soli-
darity.
One member pledged half of his
year's pension as a Holocaust
victim from Germany. Another
said he would give half of savings
he had set aside to buy his
daughter a flat in Israel.
Other Board members, among
them some of world Jewry's well-
known philanthropists, gave
sums running into hundreds of
thousands of dollars.
The main challenge, highlight-
ed by the present emergency sit-
uation, was aliy a. Dulzin
stressed. For Jews to come to
Israel at this time was the most
meaningful expression at solidar-
ity, he said.
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Friday. July 9,1962
ThtJtwiah Floridian of South County
V f
Robert Segal
Leaders Have Always Tilted With Press
Margaret Thatcher, loaded
down with the burden of counter-
ing Argentina's aggression on
the Falkland Islands, has been
terribly upset with the British
Broadcasting Corporation. She
urged her countrymen to protest
BBC for its "evenhandedness in
reporting the fight with Argen-
tina.
Richard Francis, a British
radio news executive made an in-
structive reply: "The BBC needs
no lesson in patriotism from the
present British Government," he
said. "The widow of Portsmouth
is no different from the widow of
Buenos Aires."
President Reagan, a powerful
communicator in an era of instant
communicstion, has also been
upset with the media. In a March
interview with the Daily Oklaho-
man, he complained that the net-
works were holding up an
economic recovery by screening
"constant downbeat" atoriea^
HE VOICED his dismaj thus:
"Is it news that some fellow out
in South Succotash someplace
has just been laid off that he
should be interviewed nation-
wide, or someone's complaint
that the budget cuts are going to
hurt their present program?"
This didn't tame the media. A
.cod guess is that a day or two
later, the President realized that
press and television have a duty
to report the plight of this jobless
man or that a widow now hard
pressed to beat inflation or a
child adversely effected by the
government's cut in funds for
vaccines for serious diseases.
Biography is the prism through
which the bright or combre colors
of history are reflected.
In a valuable book, "The Pres-
idents and the Press," by the lee
James E. Pollard, that able
chronicler reminds us that an
early President, Thomas Jeffer-
son, fought throughout his career
for the press. He championed
that ideal even when he suffered
from it Newspapers assailed his
public acts and private life, but
Jefferson never once complained
publicly. In Jefferson's view, to
be informed was more important
than to be governed. .
SOME PRESIDENTS have
benefited considerably by
putting high value on freedom of
expression as a bulwark of demo-
cratic government. More than a
century ago, Abraham Lincoln
offered future governments
model lesson in dealing with the
press. He governed long before
the presidential press conference
became s Washington institu-
tion; but he kept the White
that he got much from "public
opinion baths." He kept in doss
touch with Horace Greeley, Wil-
liam CuUen Bryant, William
Dean Howella, and other media
giants of his days. He proved
himself much more sagacious
than a number of news men who
belittled or gave scant notice to
bis Gettysburg address, a state-
man's gem you can behold carved
in stone in England.
Pollard singles Teddy Roose-
velt out as one who appreciated
keenly the importance of a free
press. "Earlier president* were
concerned with editorial
opinion," Pollard writes. "TR
saw the importance of news and
its effect upon public opinion." In
the earlier Roosevelt's view, the
competent newspaper man was
perhaps the nation's moat impor-
tant profession.
Teaching and writng helped
mold Woodrow Wilson into an
adept manager of dealing with
the media. By nature cool and
reserved, he worked hard to put
relations between the Whits
House and the press on a per-
manent basis by instituting the
first formal and regular press
conferences.
SOME PRESIDENTS triad
and failed. Herbert Hoover,
cordial in his relations with news-
men when Secretary of Com-
merce, proved inept as s presi-
dential press handler, especially
when beset with the challenge of
conveying the true measure of
the depression. And Warren
Harding, despite long experience
ss an editor and publisher,
foolishly tried to muzzle the press
and failed
Pollard's account of Frank-
hn Roosevelt's relations with the
media is perhaps the brightest
text. FDR knew well that much
of the fire aimed at him consisted
of ammunition put together not
by the reporters but the publish-
ers. One brilliant White House
reporter said: "If the newspapers
opposed him, he felt he must be
generally correct; if they were
with him, he became a bit suspi-
cious."
PUBLIX ANNOUNCES
A delicious, nutritious, new bread
KASHA and HONEY BREAD
Made with Wolff's Kasha*, the roasted heart of the
buckwheat kernel, it has a slightly nutlike flavor and texture.
great for sandwiches or toasting, or just with butter
or your favorite spread. Buckwheat as you may know.
is the highest in balanced protein of anything in the
vegetable kingdom, just slightly less than eggs
Wild Winds Farms with it's Bakery, Gourmet Restaurant.
from
FARMS
Maple Sugar House, Barbecue Pavilion, Gardens,
Country Stores and Nature Center, is located in the heart
of the buckwheat growing country in Naples. New York.
The recipe for Kasha and Honey Bread was developed in the
country bakery at Wild Winds Farms and visitors to the two
restaurants on the Farm enjoyed it so much that
we at Publix felt you would enjoy it, too.
We hope you will try this new Wild Winds Kasha and Honey bread
and that you will visit the Farm if you are in the beautiful Finger Lakes area
south of Rochester, New York.
You'll find this fine loaf in our bakery department along with other premium breads.
SPECIAL COUPON
Without coupon 99*
ft
I Publix
Wild Winds Farms
KASHA and HONEY BREAD
Made with Wolff's Kasha (Roasted Buckwheat Kernels)
(Limit one coupon par loaO Exp. December 31,1982 Southeast Coast only (3)
Wolff's Kashs. known for over fifty years as the standard of excellence in buckwheat products, is sold in the Jewish Food Section
of our Publix Supermarkets.


Pave 14
Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, July 9,1962
1982 Campaign Efforts Lauded
Annual Meeting Recognizes Dedicated Workers
The annual meeting *of the
South County Jewish Federation
was recently held.
As illustrated in the photo-
graphs, certificates, awards and
plpques were bestowed upon the
Norman Stone, campaign chairman, presents an award to Milton Kre
Family Division co-chairperson. &~ l. "*
James Boer, president, presents an award to Norman Stone, campaign chairman.
Rabbi Merle Singer delivers the
Dvar Torah.
Margie Boer, Women's Division chairperson, presents an award to Arlette Baker,
associate Women s Division campaign chairperson.
Phyllis Charme delivers a cam- #,, n
paign poem Margie Boer, Women s Division chairperson, presents the Shah
' South County Award to Steve Melcer, co-chairperson of Shalom Sot
County. w *>.
Special awards presented by Milton Kretsky (center). Men's Family Division co-
chairperson, to (left to right) Rabbi Sam Silver, A mold Rosenthal, Rabbi Bernard Silver
and Joe Schenk.
Men's and Family Division plaque recipients standing (from left to right) are Hyman
Folkman, Ben and Evelyn Bussin, Al Bagus, Isabella Fink, Julius Friedlander.
Kneeling (left to right) are Gene Braun, George Goldstein, Mike Dworkin and Elliot
Adler.
Kneeling are Margie Boer, Women's Division chairperson and Arlette Baker, associate
Women's Division chairperson, who presented Women's Division plaque award's to
(standing left to right) Barbara Lein, Berenice Schankerman, Margaret Kottler, Phyllis
Helens Eichler, assistant executive director, presents the Special Volunteer Award to
Eleanor Jontiff. ,
Mi
Do
rig
Cohen and Esther Omansky.


Prkky.Jdly9.1962
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
KA'^S many dedicated individuals who
-of the gave of themselves on behalf of
the 1982 campaign. For
deration
those
i photo-
irds and
ipon the
UK 1 W *K~------. i m
who were unable to attend, their
awards will be distributed at a
later date.
The State-of-the- Federation
address was delivered by Presi-
dent James Baer.
The final campaign figure for
1982 was $2,060,000, which rep-
resents a 54 percent increase over
lasty<
It is reported that South Coun-
ty Jewish Federation is the
fastest growing campaign in the
United States for the third con-
secutive year.
Milton Kretsky, Men's and
Norman Stone, campaign chairman, presents an award to Margie Baer, Women's
Division chairperson.
Rabbi Bruce Warshal. executive director, presents an award to James
Baer, president.
Receiving awards are retiring board members (left to right) Donald Berger, Margie
Baer, Rita Bogus, Phyllis Cohen and Milton Kretsky.
ts the Shalom
'Shalom South
, *---> v James Baer, president, presents awards to Margie Baer (left) and Phyllis Cohen, (right)
^_ fou nders of the Federation.
yman
mder.
Elliot
Men's and Family bivision plaque recipients are t^fnalnglep To ngm) Ll'"J"]
Charles Ostrow, Joe Master, Sara Schiller, Milton Ma^nfeUandljingKnsburg.
Kneeling (left to right) are Morris Morris, Steve Melcer, Sol Laptdus, and Rudy Lidsky.
Presenting Women's Division awards (kneeling in center) are Margie Baer, Women's
Division chairperson; Arlette Baker, Women's Division associate chairperson. Also
kneeling are Phyllis Charme and Rita Bogus. Pictured (left to right) are Shirley Cohen,
Shirley Enselberg, Rose Rifkin, Diane Deckinger, Gladys Weinshank and Betty Stone.
\rd to
Men's Family Division certificate recipients (standing left to right) are James Singer,
David Perlberg, Ed Kingsley, Ben Kideckel, CoL Jerome Hurwitz. Kneeling (left to
right) are Bernard Person, Harry Roeberg and Leo Silk.
Margie Baer, Women's Division chairperson, and Arlette Baker, Women's Division
associate chairperson, presented certificates to (left to right) Dena Man, Fredi Sandel,
Helen Perlberg and Ida A brahams.


Pave 14
Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, July 9,1962
Mobutu Says
Africa Confused About African Goals
Black exclusively againat a Black state.
KINSHASA, Zaire Since
Friday, 14 May, the date of the
announcement of the renewal by
Zaire of diplomatic relations with
Israel, "not a single day has
passed without us in Kinshasa
noting reactions to Zaire's deci-
sion reactions from a view-
point unfavorable to our coun-
try's sovereignty," President
Mobutu Sese-Seko declared here.
In the Republic of Zaire itself,
there have been, to date, no reac-
tions either from the authorities
or from the press, since the Presi-
dent asked the press to abstain
from any polemic with the foreigr
media organizations that disap
prove of Zaire's initiative.
The agitation outside the
country surrounding this initia-
tive has taken on the character
"of a crude, inflammatory cam-
paign aimed at misleading
opinion in the Third World and in
Africa, and we are obliged to
reply in order to give the facts
and principles involved their true
dimensions and significance," ac-
cording to Mobutu.
ON HIS return from Gemena,
where he participated in the
ceremony marking the 11th an-
niversary of his mother death,
Mobutu summond to his resi-
dence at Camp Tshatshi the
deputy-general of L'Agence
Zaire-Presse, Commandant
Kande Dzambulate. in order to
offer his reaction to world opinion
critical of Zaire's renewal of rela-
tions with Israel.
"No state in the world has the
right to prevent Zaire, a free and
sovereign state. from fully
xercising its sovereignty in both
he national and the international
arenas." he said.
"On October 4, 1973, at the
United Nations, this sovereignty
was solemnly and publicly af-
firmed when the people of Zaire
announced their decision to break
off relations with Tel Aviv.
THIS SOVEREIGN decision
was occasioned by the fact that
the African lands of Egypt had
been occupied by the Jewish
state. It was a reaction of the
African lands of Egypt which
slighted African dignity and the
rights of the African peoples on
their soil."
Mubutu said that "Supera-
bundant praise was then
lavished, not only on Zaire's poli-
tical sense and the correctness of
its analysis, but also on the cour-
age and clear-sightedness of its
leader."
After April 26. 1982, however,
Zaire, following the same logic,
declared that the reasons that
had prompted it to break with
Israel no longer applied, "since
the Jewish occupation has come
to an end, and the African terri-
tories of Egypt have been restor-
ed to his brother-country. It must
also be pointed out that, in
Zaire's historic stand in 1973,
there was never a question of
Arab lands as such, but rather of
the African lands of Egypt, al-
though Egypt is an Arab state.
This point must be clearly
stated."
. \IRE, therefore, "can only
deplore the reaction in African
capitals following its decision to
reestablish diplomatic relations
with the State of Israel."
Said Mobutu: "Naivete, or
sheer cowardice, coupled with so
much incoherence, will not induce
anyone to take Africa serious-
ly-poor, discredited Africa which
does not know whether to choose
the stick or the carrot, whether to
accept a carrot or a good thrash-
ing, or how to decide between
cholera and the plague."
He continued: Zaire abaervea
with sadness the childish as-
surance of all those who yester-
day cried colonialism or neo-co-
konialism whenever the attitude
of a Western nation appeared
equivocal or betrayed the
smallest sign of real or imagined
interference and yet today, faced
with massive Arab interference in
criticism of a sovereign country,
have no other reaction than to
follow the slave-caravan with its
whips and turbans.
"Have we fought European co-
lonialism and neocolonialism
only to bend our necks beneath
the yoke of Arab neo-colonialism?
Have we stood up to the mighty
ambassadors of the industrial
powers only to tremble before the
intimidation and pressures of the
turbaned emissaries who run
back and forth across
Africa?"
And. finally, "can a worthy son
of Africa or a sovereign nation
accept the infamous horse-trad-
ing that is proposed to us or the
slogan of Arab-African solidarity
which has been dinned into our
ears since the 26th of April?"
ASKED MOBUTU: "Moreov-
er, what does this "solidarity"
amount to? The people of Zaire
will not be taken in. In the light
of the reactions we have received,
we know that Arab-African soli-
darity is a decoy, a trap. This sol-
idarity is a beautiful policy of a
wagon and locomotive which
tKey wish to impose upon us, the
Arab countries being the locomo-
tive, and we the wagon. In this
relationship, in which we shall
have no initiative, when the loco-
motive stops, the wagons also
stop; and when the locomotive
starts again, the wagons start
moving blindly along the rails.
"Unfortunately, for those who
still had any illusions on this
point, Zaire is no wagon. We have
proved this sufficiently in the
recent past. Where American aid
has not made us bend our knees
in homage. the ignoble
maneuvering with petro-dollars
which is going on before us will
not succeed either, for Zaire's
policies are not tied to the oil
barrel. Zaire says aloud what
others think but do not have the
courage to express.
"These others ought not to lose
sight of the fact that the Arab
'reprisals' against what they
consider a blow to their interests
are, curiously enough, directed
Throughout the world, doxena of_
states run with the hare and hunt*
with the hounds, maintain good
relation with both Arab and
Jews, without incurring any
'sanctions.' On the contrary, the
Arabs pour their endless flood of
petro-dollars into these countries,
making huge investments, build-
ing and buying up hotels, palaces
and chateaux, setting up fac-
tories, etc.
"WE DO not hear that the
good relations which these coun-
tries continue to maintain with
Israel often selling it arms or
military technology, have given
rise to so much as a sneeze or a
frown on the part of the Arab
countries, whether those of the
Gulf or of other areas. On the *,
other hand, it is sufficient cause I
for a Black state to stand up and
assert its independence, for the
old slave-traders' reflex to rise up
out of the depths of time and for a
Hory War to be declared.
"It is hard for us to understand
why all the countries in the world
have the right to cooperate freely
with whomever they wish, in-
cluding Israel, except for the
Black African states. If that is *"
Arab-African solidarity, Zaire
say 'no' to what it can only re-
gard as a masquerade and a
gigantic swindle.
"One day, perhaps far off
but one day, nevertheless the
peoples of Africa will recognize
that Zaire was right: Zaire
which, today as yesterday, does
not fear to be alone is saying
what others only think, whatever
the consequences.
Some faces are recognized
all over the world.
-pK,
Jordan Predicts New
Wave of PLO Terror
AMSTERDAM (JTA)
Informed sources in Jordan have
predicted a new wave of terrorist
activity by Palestinians in
Western Europe, directed pri-
marily against Jewish targets
but at American institutions
as well, the newspaper NRC
Handelsblad reported. The
paper's correspondent in
Amman. Harm Botje, said that
according to the Jordanian
sources, a fierce debate is going
an among Palestine Liberation
Organization and other terrorist
leaders who have taken refuge in
west Beirut after the defeat of the
PLO by Israel in Lebanon.
Community
Calendar
July 12
Diamond Club 9:30a.m. meeting
July 13
City of Hope 12 p.m. meeting
July 1*
Diamond Club 9:30 o.m. meeting
July 25
ORT-Delray Theatre Party 2 p.m.
July 26
Diamond Club 9:30 a m meeting
Avfst2
Diamond Club 9:30 p.m. meeting
August 3
AnsheiEmuna 12 p.m. meeting
Avgvstt
Diamond Club 9:30a.m. meeting
AugustlO
City of Hope 12p.m. meeting
f '
*
From New\brk to New Delhi, and throughout
the world, American Express Travelers Cheques
are known and accepted.Which isn't surprising
when you consider that American Express has
been the leading travelers cheque for years.
Or that we have 105,000 refund locations.
C Amman EipmCompmt. IW
And nearly 1000 worldwide Travel Service
Officeswhere you can get everything from
a travelers cheque refund to travel assistance
So carry American Express Travelers
Cheques. Even if you're not recog-
nized, they will be.


y, July 9,1982
The Jewish Floridian of South County

Page 11
iendship Caravan to Entertain Maccabee Campers
mp Maccabee is pleased to
Unce that on Wednesday,
I 14 at 2 p.m- the "Friendship
Lvan" will be coming to Boca
pn to perform for the cam-
he Friendship Caravan is a
[p of seven Israeli Boy and
| Scouts who travel through-
the eastern United States.
v visit various communities
I'rdi'r to share a part of their
leli culture with the people
L meet. These seven Israeli
Kits will perform many songs
i dances and will lead the en-
tire group in a variety of musical
ensembles.
"We are very excited at Camp
Maccabee awaiting the arrival of
the Friendship Caravan. The
seven Israeli Scouts will join our
own Israeli Scout on our staff in
creating a full day of exciting
events for 'Israeli Day.' Prepara-
tions are already being made to
include the entire community in
the activities," said Susan
Kerper, camp director.
An atmosphere of excitement
surrounds the arrival of the
Friendship Caravan since this
group comes only once every few
years. This year Camp Maccabee,
sponsored by South County Jew-
ish Federation, has made ar-
rangements to allow the entire
community to share in this spe-
cial treat. Please adjust your
schedule and make every effort to
join with Camp Maccabee for this
very inspiring event on the
luxurious grounds of Pope John
Paul II High School, Military
Trail and Spanish River Blvd.
For any additional informa-
tion, please call South County
Jewish Federation at 368-2737.
Temple Emeth Plans Exciting Series for '83 Season
I Joe Schenk, chairman of Tem-
k Emeth Concert Series, an-
funced the new schedule of
Iciting artists for the upcoming
I season.
All performances will be held
Sundays at 8 p.m. The first
Lsentation will be on Jaiu 9,
tturing a bright young pianist,
ris Bloch. On Feb. 6, well
jvn baritone and Metropoli-
Opera star, John Reardon
entertain, followed by the
brilliant violinist, Jody Gatwood,
on Feb. 20. Returning by popular
demand, the Hoffman Family
Players will delight all on Mar.
20.
Aa new theatre-style seats are
being installed in the Mann
Sanctuary, there will be 100 less
seats available. Those interested
are encouraged to send in sub-
scription forms without delay.
Season subscription rates for
Organizations
B'NAI B'RITH
Jaomi Chapter, Detray-
Dmen is having a Card Party
Luncheon on Wednesday,
|Iy 7, at noon at the Sun Wah
staurant. Chinese food or roast
cken and door prizes.
ation S6.50. Call Belle Eisen
?-5356 or Sylvia Kronberger
(-7179.
He Boca Raton Chapter-
lomen is having a Chinese
Inch and Card Party on
jiursday, July 15 at noon at Sun
fah Restaurant, 3010 Federal
vy., Delray Beach. Donation
[.50 per person, taxes and
Ituities included. For reser-
lions call 482-6841.
TEMPLE SINAI
Sisterhood of Temple Sinai is
[ring a Matinee Dinner Theatre
ty seeing "Milk and Honey"
Saturday, Aug. 14, at the
val Palm Dinner Theatre in
|ca Raton. Doors open at noon.
per person $21. For further
3rmation, please call Mrs.
nan Menkin or Mrs. Jack
hderman in Delray.
temple Sinai is starting their
gious School this fall for chil-
of all ages nursery
fow ORT Chapter
South Pahn Beach County
>n of Women's American
announces the formation of
chapter in the Boca Delray
jrelyn Cohen, region ex-
[ion chairperson, says this
er will meet in the evenings,
embership information can
retained by calling Hilda
arb, membership chairper-
pro-tem, at 994-2388 or
)i Beat, president, pro-tern,
^8877.
p is the largest non-govern-
[al technical and vocational
program in the world,
1800 training units operating
|countries around the world.
ter Mitzvah
NORMAN FINSTEIN
Drman Finstein was called to
lima as a Bar Mitzvah at
>le Emeth on July 3. He is
m of Mr. and Mrs. Martin
>h Finstein of San Antonio,
e proud and happy grand-
its are Mr. and Mrs. Irving
ein of Delray Beach.
through Bar Mitzvah. Special re-
duced rates for young families
with children. All their religious
membership includes High
Holiday tickets. For further in-
formation please call Tina Aaron;
Bev. Kamin; Ellen Murray or the
Temple (see listing).
HADASSAH
Ben Gurion Chapter, Delray
Beach, will hold its first meeting
of the season at Temple Emeth,
12:30 p.m. Delegates who at-
tended the Hadassah convention
in Israel will give highlights.
Refreshments. Meeting date
Sept. 16.
Ben Gurion Chapter, Delray
Beach, is planning a trip to Epcot
Center in Disney World. Please
call Bea Keller or Laura Cronin or
Lottie Neuwirth. Trip date
October 11 to 13.
ANSHEIEMUNA
The Orthodox congregation
will hold its High Holy Day
Services in the new synagogue on
Carter Road, South of Linton
Blvd. Services will be conducted
by Rabbi Dr. Louis L. Sachs and
Cantor Abraham Kiss. Tickets
now on sale at Kingspoint. Call
Ed Brown at 499-9229. Hours 7
a.m. -10 a.m. and 4 p.m. 6 p.m.
the series are. Mann Sanctuary
- 835.00, Winick Hall $27.50
(row 0-5), $22.50 (row (rows T-
JJ).
Season subscribers who order
before July, 15, 1982 will enjoy
"Priority Seating," allowing for
advance selection of seats and a
guarantee of the same seats for
the entire series.
For those who wish to be
"Special Subscribers," the rates
are $125.00 sponsor (includes 2
tickets to each performance),
$500.00 patron (includes 6 tic-
kets to each performance); and
$1,000 benefactor (includes 10
tickets to each performance).
"We are indeed proud to pre-
sent such a well-rounded and en-
riched program this year. The
1982 series was truly a success,
and with the vibrant, talented ar-
tists we have lined up, the 1983
series should prove to be an even
greater success," said Schenk.
Temple Emeth is located at
5780 W. Atlantic Avenue in Del-
ray Beach. Anyone wishing
ticket information can contact
the temple at 498-3536.
Pictured above are (left to right) Mark Bruk, Paul Jaffe, Daniel
Metsch and Robin Michel. These youths are four of the five from
South County embarking on a Teen Mission to Israel. Missing from
the photo is Sandy Rund, who will join the group at theElAl Termin-
al in New York. The Mission is an intensive six-week program
designed to enable the high school age youth to receive a thorough in-
troduction to Israel. Sponsored by South County Jewish Federation,
the five participants met with Rabbi Bruce Warshal for three consecu-
tive study sessions in preparation for their mission.
"Match-Maker! Make me a match" *
Are you waiting for that "close friend" to in-
troduce you to that special someone?
Wait no longer for disappointment! *
Serving YOUR area via Network and Temple .
Connections. WRITE: P.O. Box 3, Boca Raton,
Fl. 33432
A Proper Introduction Is Not Old-Fashioned!
An-nell &
HOTEL
Strictly Kosher
3 Full Course Meals Daily
Mashgiach and
Synagogue on Premises
TV Live Show-Movies
Special Diets Served
Open All Year
Services
Near all good shopping
Call tor rate*
700 EUCLID AVE.
MIAMI BEACH
! CALL 1-531-1191
Miami Beach's Finest Glatt Kosher Cuisine
Open Agin For The HIGH HOLIDAYS
With Your hosts Sam and Morris Waldman, Gary Sher, David Diamond
ROSH HASHANA-YOM KIPPUR
SERVICES CONDUCTED BY RENOWN CANTOR
12 Days 11 Nights (Sept. 17-28) t~.'3O0 m*m
(2 meals daily Included. 3 meals Sat. & holidays)
8 Days 7 Nights (Sept. 17-20 & Sept. 24-28> *.*250
6 Days-5 Nights (Sept. 17-20 & Sept. 26-28) **200
"SIMP at adjoining Atlantic Towere; meals at WaMman
EARLY RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED
Phone Sam Waldman: 538-5731 or 534-4751
On The Ocean at 43rd Street
a&fi*^
mV idrt*
W^*,
**.*<&*



ot*
Shipa ot Panamanian and Libenan Ragtatry


rwtemtememm
Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Fridy,July9,i9e2
News in Brief
Envoy to Zaire Presents Credentials
ByJTA Services
JERUSALEM Israel's Am-
bassador to Zaire, Michael
Michael, presented his creden-
tials Monday to the President
Sese Seko Mobutu. Zaire is the
first African country to have re-
sumed diplomatic relations with
Israel after the Yom Kippur War.
Michael handed Mobutu a per-
sonal message from Premier
Menachem Begin. And Begin
promised Mobutu to exert his in-
fluence with the Americans for
United States political and
economic aid to Zaire.
In the message delivered by
the Ambassador, Begin briefed
Mobutu on his talks in Washing-
ton with President Reagan and
with members of the Congres-
sional subcommittee dealing with
African countries. In those talks
Begin explained the importance
of supporting Mobutu's regime.
There has been Congressional op-
position to aid to Zaire.
PLO Can Qo To
Egypt, Sharon Says
JERUSALEM Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon said that
Israel wants to secure the
evacuation of Palestine Libera-
tion Organization forces from
west Beirut "without shedding
another drop of blood." He sug-
gested they might be removed tc
Egypt by sea.
Sharon addressed reporter!
after appearances before the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee where he en-
countered sharp questioning
from members of the opposition
Labor Party on Israel's war aims '
in Lebanon and its conduct of the
war.
He told the media Israel would
gladly welcome the dispatch of
ships from Egypt to evacuate the
PLO but he said he could not
confirm news reports that five
ships have already left Alex-
andria for Beirut for that pur-
pose.
U.S. Vatoas French
Resolution at UN
UNITED NATIONS The
United States vetoed a Security
Council resolution demanding the
immediate withdrawal of Israeli
forces "to a distance of 10 kilo-
meters from the periphery" of
Beirut and calling "upon all
armed elements in the Beirut area
to respect and abide by the exclu-
sive authority of the government
of Lebanon."
The veto of the French-pro-
posed resolution was cast by the
acting U.S. chief delegate Charles
Lichtenstein. It placed the U.S. is
opposition to the 14 other Council
members, including its major
West European allies who backed
the measure.
Ealier, the U.S. and Israel cast
the only votes against a resolu-
tion in the General Assembly de-
manding Israel's immediate
withdrawal from all of Lebanon
and asking the UN to consider
punitive actions should Israel fail
to comply. The measure, adopted
by a vote of 127-2, unlike
Security Council resolutions, is
non-binding.
laraal Admits Using
Deadly Cluster Bombs
TEL AVIV The army's
ranking spokesman for the war in
Lebanon acknowledged that Is-
rael has used American-made
cluster bombs there but insisted
they were employed against
Syrian military targets, not
civilians in south Lebanon.
The disclosure by Maj. Gen.
(res.) Aharon Yariv, spokesman
for the Israel army's northern
command, was the first official
confirmation of widespread re-
ports that Israel used the deadly
weapon in Lebanon. When
Premier Menachem Begin was
questioned about this by mem-
bers of the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee in Washington,
he said he did not known but
would ask Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon when he returned to Is-
rael.
There have been calls by some
American Congressmen for an in-
quiry into Lebanon. The cluster
bomb was mentioned in particu-
lar because it is an anti-personnel
weapon with devastating effects.
Pops Said Prepared
To Qo to Lebanon
ROME Pope John Paul II
said he is prepared to go to Leba-
non to participate in any peace
initiative. The Pope, addressing
Cardinals attending a meeting of
the Roman Curia, also appealed
for an end to the fighting between
Israeli, Syrian and Palestinian
troops.
He said he is praying "for an
end to the suffering of the Pales-
tinian people" and "for a just
solution to their problems."
Vatican sources, quoted by the
Italian Radio, said they know of
no concrete plans for the Pope's
departure but added, "The Holy
Father can decide to leave at any
time." The sources also said that
this declaration might prepare
the way for Vatican diplomatic
initiatives to try and save Beirut
from renewed fighting.
Hungarian Jewish
Congress Scheduled
JERUSALEM A Congress
of Hungarian Jews is being or-
ganized for Jerusalem in April,
1984.
The organizing committee here
in Jerusalem said this week the
Jerusalem International conven-
tion of Hungarian Jews would
aim "to reunite a community
shattered by Nazi persecution
and to highlight its thousand
year old heritage and great con-
tributions to European culture.
The date will mark the fortieth
anniversary of the Nazis at-
tempted destruction of all Hun-
garian Jewry.
Leading former Hungarian
Jews will be invited, famous
names in many disparate fields.
Parallel to the convention the
diaspora museum will dedicate an
exhibition on prewar Hungarian
Jewry.
World Can't Deny Israel's
Existence Bronfman
UNITED NATIONS Edgar
Bronfman, president of the
World Jewish Congress, said Fri-
day that "world peace cannot
tolerate the denial of the legiti-
macy of Israel or any other na-
tion-state." He added the
"charge that Zionism is racism is
an abomination."
Speaking before the United
Nations Special Session on Dis-
B'nai Torah
Sets Services
B'nai Torah Congregation an-
nouces that again this year they
will hold auxiliary High Holy
Day Services at Boca Teeca
Country Club's auditorium, 5800
NW 2nd Avenue, Boca Raton.
These auxiliary services are
necessary due to the rapid
growth of B'nai Torah. The pre-
sent physical facilities can no
longer accommodate all of the
non-members who wish to attend
traditional High Holy Days serv-
ices.
Anyone who wishes to make
reservations or wishes additional
information, please call the syna-
gogue office at 392-8666 or 392-
8576.
B'nai toRah ConqReqation
A Conservative Synagogue
Offers
AUXILIARY HIGH HOLY DAYS SERVICES
AT
BOCA TEECA COUNTRY CLUB
5800 N.W. 2nd Avenue
Boca Raton. Florida
Rabbi
Marvin Goodman'
1962
5743
Cantor
Philip Towsner
Roah Haahanah Friday Sapt. 17 8:16 p.m
Roah Haahanah Saturday Sept. 18 9:00 a.m.
Roah Haahanah Saturday Sept. 18 7:16 p.m.
RoahHaahanah Sunday Sept. 19 9:00 a.m.
KolNktre Sunday Sept. 26 7:00 p.m.
Yom Kippur Monday Sept. 27 9:30 a.m.
A Limited Number of
Quest Tickets available
For Information
Cell: 392-8566 or
392-6576
armament,' Bronfman lauded the
growing clamor" for peace
which he said was all to the
good." He declared that the
louder the voice of the people, the
more urgent become the priorities
of their leaders" and that "new
force is thus given to negotia-
that it supported the oris
jectivei
operati
uimi. it Bunparow me original 0k.
jectives of the "Peace for Ga operation. Wm
Addressing a press conference
in Tel Aviv, Peres said Labor
would be satisfied if lsne\
achieved further political benefits
tions already underway and those from tne war in Lebanon as long
not yet started.
The address by Bronfman
marked the only Jewish repre-
sentative organization to speak
before the UN disarmament ses-
sion.
Labor Seeking End
To Lebanon War
JERUSALEM Labor Party
Chairman Shimon Peres said that
his party would do its utmost to
prevent a resumption of fighting
in Lebanon. He stressed however
as the government worked for
them "through political and not
military means." But under no
circumstances would Labor join a
national consensus for an attack
on west Beirut to destroy the
remnants of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization forces sur-
rounded there, he said.
Peres' remarks reflected the
position adopted by the Labor
Alignment's political forum
against continuing the thw,
week-old war in Lebanon.
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Religious Directory
1401
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
N.W. 4th Ave., Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Phone 392-8566, Rabbi Nathan Zelizer. Cantor Benjamin B.
Adler. Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m., Saturday at 9:16
a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEIEMUNA
551 Brittany L., Kings Point, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446.
Orthodox. Harry Silver, President. Services daily 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Saturdays and holidays 9 a.m. Phone 499-7407
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at First Federal Savings & Loan Ai~,
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and Kiddush. Edward Dorfman, President, 6707 Moonlit Drive,
Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Phone: 499-6687. Rabbi Jonah J.
Kahn. 499-4182, Cantor David Wechsler, 499-8992.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Reform
Phone: 391-8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen.
Shabbat Eve Services at 8:15 pjn. .Family Sabbath Service at
7:30 p.m. 2nd Friday of Each Month.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 134, Boca Raton, Fla. 33432.
Conservative, Located in Century Village, Boca. Services 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m. Reuben Saltzman-*
President. Joseph M. Pollack, Cantor, 483-5667.
TEMPLE EMETH ~,
5780 West Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Conserva-
tive. Phone: 498-3536. Bernard A. Silver, Rabbi: Irving
Zummer, Cantor, Sabbath Servicee: Friday at 8 p.m.. Saturday
at 9 a.m., Dairy Minyans at 8:46 a.m. and 6 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
At St. Paula Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton Ave., Delray.
Reform. Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901, Delray Beach, Fla.
33444. Friday at 8:16 pjn. Rabbi Samuel Silver, President
Bernard Etiah, 276-Utt\


I Friday. Juy 9.1962
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 13
Filling in Background
JfBegin Claims Reagan's Support Weinberger Meets With
Bv DAVID LANDAU 1,8e'1 attacks on Tyre was a
D' tenfold exaggeration.
JERUSALEM (JTA) BEGIN CALLED his session
. Premier Menachem Be- with the Congressmen before his
in is claiming that he had departure from the U.S. "very
ined the support of the good, beneficial, and even
Euno Administration for warm: Hek8aid the ^""in'
leaga," questions he was asked did not
srael s objectives in Leba- offend him He Mid one member
on. He said the proof Of Qf the Senate committee praised
hjs was President Reag- Israel's action in Lebanon and
s DUblic endorsement of "One young Senator, who made
V principles: the **JE* Sf &?
eed for all foreign forces to operation but castigated Begins
ve Lebanon and the need west Bank policies and urged a
jr a buffer zone in south
_ebanon to protect Israel
[from future attacks.
Begin defined "foreign forces"
i the Syrians, armed elements of
Palestine Liberation Or-
jation and the Israeli army.
Jut Begins first words to Israeli
od foreign reporters after he
anded at Ben Gurion Airport
that "never has the great
American Jewish community
en more united behind the
ate of Israel, the 'Peace for
balilee' operation and the
Dvernment's policy than it is to-
He said he had stressed
[hat to Administration officials.
THE PREMIER also spoke at
length of the stormy meeting he
tad with the Senate Foreign Re-
lations Committee in Washing-
where many Congressmen
cut in U.S. aid because of it.
Begin said he had responded to
this by observing that aid "is not
a one-way street" and claimed
that Israel's incursion into Leba-
non aided U.S. interests. He said
he also reminded the Senator of
his "solemn pledge" that no
threats would ever extract con-
cessions from Israel.
Senators who participated in
the give-and-take session with
Begin were quoted as saying it
was the toughest exchange
American lawmakers ever had
with a foreign head of govern-
ment. Sen. Paul Tsongas (D.,
Mass.), a consistent friend of Is-
rael, said, "Never in my eight
years in Washington have I ever
seen such an angry session with
a foreign head of state."
Sen. Larry Pressler (R.. S.D.).
said, "This is the first time I have
seen such a confrontation be-
tween the Prime Minister of Is-
rael and Senators in terms of
head-on disagreement. He is tak-
ing question after question and
just hitting them head on. He is
not budging an inch."
Israel's policies were defended
by Sens. Daniel Moynihan (I).,
N.Y.I. S.I. Hayakawa (R., Calif.)
and Rudy Boschwitz (R., Minn.).
Senate Majority Leader Howard
Baker (R., Tenn.l observed, "I
think anytime you have a conflict
of this magnitude it puts a strain
on friendships, but I don't think
there will be a permanent disloca-
tion." Nevertheless, Begin's con-
frontation with the key Senators
involved in U.S. foreign policy
indicated to many observers an
erosion of support for certain of
Israel's actions and policies.
Jewish Leaders in D.C.
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Defense Secretary Caspar Wein-
berger told American Jewish
leaders that he favored a phased
withdrawal of Israeli forces from
Lebanon while Syrian forces also
left that country. He said he
hoped one result of the Israeli in-
cursion into Lebanon would be
the emergence of a strong, inde-
pendent central Lebanese go-
vernment.
Weinberger met for an hour at
the Pentagon with a delegation of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organi-
zations, headed by its chairman-
elect, Julius Herman. The Jewish
leaders said they told him that
the American Jewish community
is "totally united" in support of
Israel's action against the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion in Lebanon and stressed that
U.S. participation in efforts to
restore peace and security to the
area was "essential."
BERMAN was accompanied
by Rabbi Alexander Schindler,
president of the Union of
American Hebrew Congrega-
tions; Jacob Stein, President
Reagan's former liaison to the
Jewish community; and Yehuda
llellman, executive director of
the Presidents Conference.
They gave Weinberger a letter
rpm Howard Squadron, outgo-
ng chairman of the Presidents
onference, sharply criticizing
Tie Defense Secretary's remarks
i n a television appearance last
: unday comparing Israel's inva-
ion of Lebanon to Argentina's
ggression against the Falkland
stands.
Squadron, who was unable to
attend the Pentagon meeting,
claimed "The situations are not
comparable. There was no bom-
bardment of the Falkland Islands
from Argentina. The action by
Israel was for the purpose of
putting an end to such bombard-
ment of northern Israel without
any territorial claim or ambi-
tion."
tnown to be friendly to Israel
ijuestioned him sharply on Is-
rael's conduct of the war in Leba-
lon and its policies on the West
i"lk
Begin said he told Reagan at
[heir White House meeting that
[srael wanted to withdraw from
ehanon as soon as possible by
irhich he meant as soon as "ar-
angements are made" to ensure
be removal of any PLO threat to
Israel's northern towns and set-
lements and to the entire coun-
lie also claimed he had
lieved a "deep understanding"
his meetings with now-re-
igned Secretary of State Alex-
nder Haig which encompassed
["Israel's positions, its role in the
[Western camp and its require-
Iments. '
Begin said he had stressed to
I Reagan and other Administra-
tion officials Israel's opposition
to an expanded United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon on
grounds that any force under UN
authority "cannot be objective."
He said he had noted in that con-
ation that more than half of the
I current members of the Security
I Council "do not even have diplo-
matic relations with Israel."
BEGIN SIAD Reagan was
"considering" U.S. participation
in a multinational force to patrol
a south Lebanon buffer zone
which, from Israel's standpoint
would be desirable. "But we do
not demand anything," Begin
said, adding that a multinational
:e could be set up without the
wticipation of American forces.
He said Reagan began their
onversation by saying he 'had
expected" the I srael-Lebanon
LO issue, to be resolved by
lplomatic means. "But I ex
lamed the developments to the
resident... As a result, I think
e understood, the proof being
is statement to the press" en-
orsing a buffer zone and the
withdrawal of foreign forces from
ebanon.
Begin also said he tried to per-
suade the Administration and
iblic opinion that the Western
jedia were "biased" in reporting
~ war in Lebanon. He singled
H the American electronic
lia and some of the press
iich, he alleged, published
"ilian casualty figures "put out
Arab organizations" to the ef
that the Israeli action ren-
Nd 600,000 people homeless.
claimed the true figure was
),000. He in^jttffd that the
Jr' of 4,000 civilians killed in
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PruUv inrlvQ 10ft*
Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, July 9
1982
Defense Officer Sends Letter
Why Do You Criticize? Were You Here? Did You Fight Here?
Following is an extract of a
letter to the newspaper, 'Maariv,'
by an officer in the Israel Defense
Forces now serving in Lebanon.
The letter is an angry response to
the frequently-asked question,
'The War sowed death and de-
struction and claimed the lives of
innocent civilians in Lebanon.
Was this necessary V
I want to aak those who are so
free in their criticism on this,
score: Were you here? Did you
fight here? Did you see what
went on here? You know, there
isn't an army anywhere in the
world that acts with such care,
with such consideration for
human life there just isn't. In
every briefing, every talk, every
exercise and, later, at every stage
of the actual operation, even in
the midst of battle, even when
your finest men are falling in
battle all our officers keep telling
the men, and repeating over and
over: Don't touch civilians. They
are not our enemies, and we don't
want to kill them.
How cautiously we acted. In
that killers' camp down there, at
Ain Hilweh, there were terrorist-
killers who felt no compunction
about holding their own people
hostage and murdering their
children in cold blood. Five times
we sent delegations of local dign-
itaries from Sidon to ask them to
come out and hold talks with us,
to let the civilians in that camp
come out, or to give ud their arms
and none of them would be hurt.
But they refused even to listen.
Instead, they shot at the digni-
taries and drove them back,
shouting after them, "Victory or
death!"
AND STILL, we acted with
caution. Still, we refrained from
any act that was liable to harm
civilians or their property.
But when you are storming an
objective, and you see your
comrades falling around you
some of the finest of our fighting casualties
men what commander would not,
in such a situation, call for ar-
cases where we had no other
choice, this war would have
ended with incomparably more
in the ranks of the
Israel Defense Forces than the
number we actually incurred. A
Cluster Bomb Furor
U.S. Asks Israel for Explanation
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The United States
has asked Israel for an offi-
cial explanation of its use of
American-made cluster
bombs in the war in Leba-
non, the State Department
has disclosed. An Israeli
military spokesman con-
firmed for the first time
that the anti-personnel
weapons had been used but
said they were employed
against military targets,
not civilians.
State Department spokesman
Dean Fischer said "Our Embassy
in Tel Aviv requested an official
explanation from Israel. We will
not have anything else to say
until that (explanation) is re-
ceived." He expressed confidence
that Israel will respond to the
U.S. as soon as its report on the
matter is completed.
FISCHER announced mean-
while that Secretary of State Al-
exander Haig, who resigned last
Friday, would remain on duty
throughout most of this week. He
said a decision will be made by
Haig, his successor. Secretary of
State-designate George Shultz,
and President Reagan as to when
"an orderly transition can be ac-
complished."
Shultz met with the National
Security Council and with offici-
als at the State Department. The
Middle East situation was dis-
cussed, Fischer said.
With respect to the situation in
Beirut, Fischer reiterated his
statement of last week that "We
, have no information to suggest
that the Israelis have departed
from their previous assurances
that they do not intend to cap-
ture or occupy Beirut." He said
he had no confirmation of a Jeru-
salem radio report that five ships
nave left Alexandria for Beirut to
evacuate Palestinian forces there
to Egypt.
FISCHER commented at
length on the U.S. veto last Fri-
day of a United Nations Security
Council resolution, proposed by
France, calling on Israel to with-
draw its forces 10 kilometers
from the periphery of Beirut and
on all armed elements in Beirut to
respect the exclusive authority of
the government of Lebanon.
He said the U.S. had hoped
that the Security Council would
have added a series of Lebanese
amendments to the resolution
which would have served as the
basis of American policy toward
the Lebanese crisis.
He said these had called for the
restoration of Lebanon's author-
ity and sovereignty throughout
the country and the restoration of
Lebanon's territorial integrity.
"In that context, our goals with
respect to the situation in west
Beirut are the same as the goals
of the government of Leba-
non," Fischer said.
He explained that "They were
embodied in the proposed Leba-
nese amendments These
goals include the deployment of
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the Lebanese army in and around
Beirut and an end to the armed
Palestinian presence in and
around Beirut, the withdrawal of
Israeli forces from the area
around Beirut and the redeploy-
ment of all of the forces in the
Beirut area."
FISCHER ADDED that "The
U.S. has confirmation that the
position of the Lebanese govern-
ment at the Arab League meeting
in Tunis was consistent with the
proposed Lebanese amendments
to the resolution." He said he was
unaware of any response by the
Israeli government to thse goals.
He also said the U.S. has made
no specific public statement as to
whether the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization is included in
the term "all foreign forces"
when applied to Lebanon.
Fischer denied a report in the
Sunday Times of London
that Saudi Arabia had
threatened an oil embargo and fi-
nancial and diplomatic sanctions
against the U.S. if Washington
failed to prevail on Israel to with-
draw its forces surrounding Bei-
rut." No threats were made or
issued by the government of
Saudi Arabia," Fischer said.
Figures Corrected
TEL AVIV (JTA) Health
Minister Eliezer Shostack told
the Knesset Tuesday that about
400 civilians were killed in Sidon,
50 in Tyre and 10 in Nabatiye
during the Israeli drive to cap-
ture those Palestine Liberation
Organization strongholds in Leb-
anon. He denounced the Interna-
tional Red Cross for allegedly
disseminating grossly exagger-
ated civilian casualty figures.
tillery or air support to soften up catastrophe would have befallen
us. No commanding officer can
take upon himself so dreadful a
responsibility.
Let our critics put themselves
for just a few moments into our
shoes and grapple with the harsh
dilemma we had to face in the
dark hours of battle: to keep casf
ualties among our soldiers down,
to a minimum and, at the same
time, take the utmost care to
keep the civilian population from
harm. When one rights a war,
some things are unavoidable. One
cannot kill terrorists and destroy
their installations without being
there. One cannot win without
being ready to sacrifice. And,
when the fighting takes place in |
built-up and populated areas
cause the terrorists have turned
the civilian population into
hostages one cannot fight with-
out the civilian population gett-
ing hurt.
But I can assure all our critics:
We have not only gone to great
lengths to maintain a high moral
standard in a harsh and difficult
war; but, on many occasions, we
did a great deal more than what
could have been expected of us in
the circumstances. I know that
my conscience on this score as an
Israeli, as a Jew and as a soldier
is clear.
the enemy positions?
The terrorists planned their
defense at the expense of the
civilian population-deliberately,
cold-bloodedly, with no thought
at all to human life. Their
bunkers were situated under-
neath apartment-houses, so that
women and children would
"defend" them. Who, then, has
the right to tell a commanding
officer whose men are dying to
hold his fire and simply let the
carnage continue? That would be
a rank betrayal of the trust
placed in us by the mothers of
these boys.
I want to tell you in total
candor and sincerity: we suffered
losses in this war. We sacrificed
wonderful young boys. We talk
about them day and night; they
are never out of our minds. We
talk about their families and
make plans to help them. As soon
as I can make myself free, I will
go and visit every family that
had a son from my unit who has
fallen. I shall be at the bedside of
every one of our wounded. But I
want people to know this:
IF WE had
bombed certain
not shelled
objectives.
or
in
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Friday, July 9,1962
The Jewish Floridian of South County
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PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITE WALLS
SIZE PRICE F.E.T.
*A78x13 26.33 1.59
C78x13 29.39 1.80
*C78x14 30.03 1.88
E78x14 31.29 2.01
F78x14 32.80 2.12
G78x14 34.58 2.26
H78x14 36.20 2.49
G78x15 34.66 2.35
H78x15 36.44 2.54
L78x15" 38.49 279
Available in 2 Ply only
FOB FOREIGN ft MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL ft INTERMEDIATE CARS
SIZE
155SR12
155SR13
165SR13
175SR13
165SR14
175SR14
185SR14
155SR15
PRICE
29.98
32,55
35.62
37.36
38.25
39.54
42.86
F.1.T
1.53
1.61
1.80
2.02
1.85
2.04
2.28
36.04
1.82
HEADQUARTERS FOR
IRELLI
RADIALS
p.,..m, 165SR15 39.46 1 98 ^^LWi^^
iFGoodrich
v

BELTED CLM
P-WTRIC POLYESTER CORD
GLASS BELTED WWTEWALLS
SIZE
il
P155/80B13
P165/80B13
P175/80B13
f f/ f
nni
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
>(,
V1
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
P225/75B14
P155/80B15
Figerglass cord belts for strength and
stability.
Polyester cord body for a smooth,
quiet ride.
Belted construction for good mileage
and traction.
i Wide whitewall for up-to-date styling.
P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
PRICE
31.51
33.32
35.24
37.38
38.23
39.30
41.22
42.30
43.61
45.90
35.24
36.91
43.50
44.94
47.09
F.E.T.
1.44
1.50
1 63
1.69
1.70
1 79
1.95
2.07
2.20
2.35
1.68
1.83
215
2 34
246
49.38
265
LIFESAVER
XLMfflRADIALI
SIZE PRICE F.E.T.
P155/80R13 49.19 1.53
P165/80R13 51.18 1.69
P175/80R13 53.05 1.78
P185/80R13 54.45 1.92
P195/70R13 55.50 1.98
P205/70R13 57.15 2.14
P205/70R14 62.17 223
P175/75R14 51.88 1.82
P185/75R14 57.15 2.04
P195/75R14 62.17 2.18
P205/75R14 64.85 2.34
P215/75R14 66.01 2.48
P225/75R14 70.58 2.68
P195/75R15 65.20 2.33
P205/75R15 67.52 2.47
P215/75R15 69.99 2.59
P225/75R15 72.56 2.78
P235/75R15 77.83 3.01
FLORIDA
HEADQUARTERS
FORALLBFG
r/MHIGH TECH'i
I/A RADIALS
i ASK ABOUT THE
jSgSggSft T/A COMP
WE SERVICE NATIONAL. ACCOUNTS
DADS: Export/Wholesale
Wee N.W. 82 Ava. 593-7040
NORTON
since 1934-
TIRE C
MM MASTER CAM) MA
AMERICAN EXPRESS.
0INERSCIUB
* CORAL CABLES HIALEAH/PALM SPRINOS MILE
I & Douolaa Road 446-8101 1275 49th St 822-2500
NORTH MIAMI ? MIAMI AIRPORT
13380 N W. 7th Ava 881-8541 "N W 25 St. & Mam Dairy Rd 593-1191
i N. MIAMI BEACH
1700 N.E. 183rd St 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 872-5353
BOUTHDAOE
9001 S Dixta Hwy. B87-7575
CUTLER RIOOE
20390 S Oinia Hwy.. 233-5241
WIST MIAMI
* FT. LAUOERDALE
1740 E Sunrtaa Blvd. 483-7588
PLANTATION
381 N Stata Rd 7 587-2186
*TAMARAC
* LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEACH |
532 N. Lake Blvd. 848-2544
DCERFIELO BEACH
2265 W. HiHaboro Blvd. 427-
+ FT. PIERCE
Bird & Galloway Rda 552-6656 441 & W CommarciaJ Blvd 735-2772 2604 South 4th St. 464-8020
KENDALL DR./HKAATE MOUAMM HM4AWAC + VERO MMACH
13672 8.W 88th St. 387-0126 N. Urtvararty Or. at McNab Rd 721-4700 755 21at Straat 567-1174
* IH.IMMB 11*11 POMPANO MMACH OAYTONA MMACH
301O0 S Fadaral Hwy 247-1622 3151 N. Fadaral Hwy. 943-4200 907 Vokwia Ava 255-7487
W. HOLLYWOOD WEST MALM BEACH NAPLES
497 S Stata Rd. 7 987-0450 515 South D'x.e 832-3044 2085 E. Tamiami Tr 774-4443
DAVte St Rd. 84 )uat wast of Urtivaraity Or. 473-4700


Page
16
Friday. Aorljt 9.
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Fri ,J%
>
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
DECISION IN ULTRA LOW TAR.
5 rug. "V. 0.5 mg. racotm w. pt ctgartnt by FTC nwthod