<%BANNER%>

The Jewish Floridian of South County ( December 18, 1981 )

Page 10
Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
im^iP^m]
Full Text of U.S.-Israel Understanding
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Following is the text of the mem-
orandu.n of understanding
signed by Israeli Defense
Minister Anel Sharon and Secre-
tary of Defense Caspar Weinber-
ger:
PREAMBLE
address the following issues:
a. Military cooperation be-,
tween the parties, including joint
U.S.-Israeli exercises in the
eastern Mediterranean Sea.
b. Cooperation for the estab-
lishment of joint readiness
activities, including access to
maintenance facilities and other
infrastructures, consistent with
This memorandum of under-
standing reaffirms the common _
bonds of friendship between the the basic purposes of this agree-
United States and Israel and ment.
builds on the mutual security
relationship that exists between c. Cooperation in reseach in de-
the two nations. The parties rec- velopment, building on past co-
ognize the need to enhance operation in this area.
into force upon exchange of noti-
fication that required procedures
have been completed by each
party. If either party considers it
necessary to terminate this mem-
orandum of understanding, it
may do so by notifying the other
party six months in advance of
the effective date of termination.
At Unations
ARTICLE V
Nothing in the memorandum
shall be considered as derogating
from previous agreements and
understanding between the
parties.
ARTICLE VI
The parties share the under-
standing that nothing in this
lve
memorandum is intend
d5SU" ob,ialw'*
either Government*^*
Charter of the United Nt
under international L?l
parties reaffirm their
purposes and princih
Stvl0' the uni*f n
and their aspiration to
PJ- with .,, counlrie8
Palestinians Raise Their Flag Illegal!
strategic cooperation to deter all
threats from the Soviet Union to
the region. Noting the long-
standing and fruitful cooperation
for mutual security that has de-
veloped between the two coun-
tries, the parties have decided to
establish a framework for con-
tinued consultation and
cooperation to enhance their
national security by deterring
such threats to the whole region.
ARTICLE I
1. United States-Israeli strate-
gic cooperation, as set forth in
this memorandum, is designed
against the threat to peace and
security of the region caused by
the Soviet Union or Soviet-
controlled forces from outside the
region introduced into the region.
It has the following broad pur-
poses:
a. To enable the parties to act co-
operatively and in a timely man-
ner to deal with the above-
mentioned threat.
b. To provide each other with
military assistance for operations
of their forces in the area that
may be required to cope with this
threat.
c. The strategic cooperation
between the parties is not di-
rected at any states within the
region. It is intended solely for
defensive purposes against the
above-mentioned threat.
ARTICLE II
1. The fields in which strategic
cooperation will be carried out to
prevent the above-mentioned
threat from endangering the
security of the region include:
a. Military cooperation between
the parties, as may be agreed by
the parties.
b. Joint military exercises, in-
cluding naval and air exercises in
the eastern Mediterranean Sea,
as agreed upon by the parties.
c. Cooperation for the estab-
lishment and maintenance of
joint readiness activities, as
agreed upon by the parties,
d. Other areas within the basic
scope and purpose of this agree-
ment, as many be jointly agreed.
2. Details of activities within
these fields of cooperation shall
be worked out by the parties in
accordance with the provisions of
Article III below. The coopera-
tion will include, as appropriate,
planning, preparations and
exercises.
ARTICLE III
1. The Secretary of Defense
and the Minister of Defense shall
establish a coordinating council
to further the purposes of this
memorandum:
la. To coordinate and provide
-guidance to joint working
3 groups.
- b. To monitor the implementa-
tion of cooperation in the fields
agreed upon by the parties within
the scope of this agreement.
0 c. To hold periodic meetings, in
7 Israel and the United States, for
~ the purposes of discussing and
:resolving outstanding issues and
"to further the purposes of
[discussing and resolving out-
standing issues and to further the
objectives set forth in this memo
randum. Special meetings can be
held at the request of either
"party. The Secretary of Defense
~. Minister of Defense will chair
.these meetings whenever
^possible.
' 2. Joint working groups will;
d. Cooperation
trade.
in defense
e. Other fields within the basic
scope and purpose of this agree-
ment, such as questions of pre-
positioning, as agreed by the co-
ordinating council.
3. The future agenda for the
work of the joint working groups,
their composition, and
procedures for reporting to the
coordinating council shall be
agreed upon by the parties.
ARTICLE IV
This memorandum shall enter
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA} A UN spokesman
said that the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization was
not authorized to raise a
Palestinian flag in the
lobby of the main UN
building last week.
The spokesman said that ac-
cording to UN rules "no flags can
be used inside UN premises," a
rule that the PLO defied despite
strong protests and requests by
top UN officials to remove the
flag and a huge map showing a
Palestinian state within Israel's
borders.
ACCORDING TO the spokes The UN SDokesmn
man. the PLO. UN repreeen- cnmn-----^_ffman sudtt
tative, Zehdi Labib Terzi, refused
compromise'
reached after
w fin*
despite repeated requests to tweenithe'pLO a^TuNi'"!? .1
remove the Palestinian flag. The flag and map were 21
which was raised above 11 a.m., red to the Trusteeship ru !
in honor of Palestine Week which where a discussion^ P.SH
opened here Dec. 1. The spokes- rights was underwav h,,1
man added that Secretary of the ComnTteTon iK
General Kurt Waldheim himself Rights. The debate
ordered the removal of the flag reason the flag was 11!?
when the incident was brought to chamber, the s^kesrZi"
his attention. But the PLO
refused to go along with Wald-
heim's order. The PLO also re-
portedly defied six UN guards
who tried to remove the flag and
threatened to use violence
against anyone trying to take
down the flag.
Judith Dranger, lsmh
spokesperson, expressed Isr
protest over the mZ
charging that it proved that I
Chairman Yasir Arafat "*
running the UN."
Habib Back in U.S.; Made No Progress With Syria
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
told the Cabinet that U.S. special
envoy Philip Habib has made no
progress in his efforts to per-
suade Syria to remove its SAM-6
anti-aircraft missiles from
Lebanon. Habib returned to
Washington on Monday.
Shamir,.who met with Habib
here last Friday, said he informed
the American envoy that Israel
would give him more time to pur-
sue his mission but that its
patience had limits. On a radio
interview over the weekend, how-
ever, the Foreign Minister set no
deadline beyond which Israel
would take action to remove the
missiles itself. "Habib is on his
way, but the way is still long,"
Shamir said.
HABIB WENT to Jordan
after his stopover in Israel and
was in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia,
apparently trying to reenlist
Saudi support to consolidate the
shaky ceasefire in Lebanon.
Shamir indicated that he didn't
think the American envoy would
succeed in his broader objective
of bringing peace to the area, but
said he would be given every
chance, at least by Israel. He said
Habib'a trip to Amman was
connected with Jordanian efforts
to prevent terrorists from acting
against Israel from Jordan terri-
tory.
The impasse with Syria re-
mained unbroken. Habib was
first sent to the region by Presi-
dent Reagan last May to prevent
an outbreak of war over the mis-
sile deployment in Lebanon. He
returned this month to try to
convince the Syrians to offer
some minor concessions to reduce
the tension, such as replacing
Syrian unite in the Arab peace-
keeping force in Lebanon with
units from other Arab countries.
The Syrians refused and Israel,
for its part, made it clear that it
would not accept any more Arab
troops in Lebanon, even if they
replaced the Syrians.
THE SYRIANS are, if any
thing, more adamant over the
missiles since Israel signed its
strategic cooperation agreement
with the U.S. last week. Official
organs in Damascus described
the U.S. as "the number one ene-
my of the Arabs." They added
that unless fundamental changes
are made in American policy,
Habib could make "a thousand
futile trips to Damascus." The
missiles, according to the Syrian
sources, are not negotiable.
Shamir, in his radio interview,
denied that Israel had made any
"compromise" when it agreed to
a joint statement with the U.S.
on European participation in the
Multinational Force and Ob-
servers (MFO) in Sinai. He said
the agreement was a very im-
portant political achievement for
Israel.
"It made clear to the Euro-
peans and others as well that Is-
rael was a factor to be taken into
most serious consideration in any
discussions on the Middle East,"
Shamir said. He said that the
visit to Israel by French Foreign
Minister Claude Cheyason, was
in preparation for the viait by
President Francois Mitterrand
early next year. Both of those
visits and scheduled visits by
other European leaders indicated
an improvement in Israeli-Euro-
pean relations. Shamir said.
HE CLAIMED that
developments reflected the .
eign policy achievements of |
Likud government during
past four years.
Defense Minister Ariel Sh__
also met with Habib last Frida]
He complained to the Amehci
that the terrorists have violau
the Lebanese ceasefire 40 tii_
since it went into effect last July
U.S., Israel Clarify Europe's Role in Sinai
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department has re-
leased a joint statement by the
United States and Israel which
said the participation by four
European countries in the Sinai
peacekeeping force is based only
on the Israeli-Egyptian peace
treaty and cannot be linked to the
Venice declaration of the Euro-
pean Economic Community.
The statement, read by De-
partment Deputy spokesman
Alan Romberg, said that it was
being issued after both Israel and
the U.S. reviewed the "clarif-
ication" which Britain. France.
Italy and The Netherlands sent
the U.S. on Nov. 26.
The Europeans are not ap-
parently being required to re-
nounce the Venice Declaration of
June, 1980 but only not to use it
in conjunction with their par-
ticipation in the MFO. The joint
I .S Israeli statement notes:
"The United States under-
stands and appreciates the con-
cerns expressed by the govern-
ment of Israel regarding the
statements made by the four
European contributors in ex-
plaining their decision to parti-
cipate in the MFO to their own
legislatures and publics. The
United States recognizes that
some positions set forth in the
statements are at variance with
its own positions with respect to
the future of the peace process as
well as with positions held by Is-
rael as a party to the Treaty of
Peace.
"The United States and Israel
recognize that the positions held
on any other aspects of these
problems in the area by any state
which agrees to participate in the
MFO do not attect the obligatio^
of that state to comply fully wit
the terms of the protocol
was negotiated in accord
with the letter from Prow
Carter tn President Sadat
Prime Minister Begin of March
26,1979, and which is designed I
help implement the Treaty <
Peace which was concluded pur-j
suant to the Camp David ac-l
cords.
"The Treaty of Peace in ac-
cordance with which the MFO is
established represents the first
step in a process agreed on at
Camp David whose ultimate goal
is a just comprehensive, and
durable settlement of the Middle |
East conflict through the con-'
elusion of peace treaties based on
Security Council Resolutions 242
and 338.
SAVE THE DATE
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13,1982
U.J.A. Federation
Annual
DINNER DANCE
at
* wF!le Great HaU-Boca Raton Hotel
A GREAT BAND-A GREAT EVENING
*
South County Jewish Federation


Dumber 18,1981
Th* Jewish Floridian of South County
Argentines Slated to See 'Holocaust'
frTV
YOBK (JTA) The
Holocaust,'
ETl9oo U-ctin* TV chuiMl
PfariM prime tin* it wMn-
"""B by Rabbi Arthur
president of thsAieel
VrnKtoxx Foundation and
He said the deckeon
rimJy conveyed to him by
lAr|mtine Charge d-Affabrea,
r Gustavo Figueroa.
Ischnder headed an intarfaith
(.finding mission of the Ap-
I of Conscience Foundation to
on Aires tost August. At th*
, President Roberto Viols and
or Minister Hondo Tomae
assured the delegation
tk TV series would bo
a before Jan. 15,1982.
|-| AM encouraged that 'Hok>
will be shown one month
rlier then anticipsted,"
oaer said. "It certainly
good will on the part of the
lent Argentine government,
u attempt to resolve in-
. and human rights vio-
. during the yean of an-
iv and chaos known aa the
War," which took place
j 1976 and 1979.
| Sehnaer. who is also chairman
(the World Jewiah Congress
Section, said the Ap-
of Conscience Foundation
also been advised by
jrca that 11 men and woman
had been held aa prisoners
by order of the National Execu-
tive Power (PEN) had bean re-
leased Nov. 18. The Foundation
delegation had, during vheir visit
last August, requested an early
resolution of the state of PEN
. and the fate of the
thousands who had disappeared
during 197V1979. Viola assured
the daiegatioo of an ongoing re-
view of all PEN cases. Schneier
said
State Dep't. Won't Say
What New Memo Means
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State De-
partment is vague over the
specifics of the meaning of
the memorandum of under-
standing signed by Israel
and the United States, in-
chiding the outline of the
"region" it is designed to
defend and which country
besides the Soviet Union it
is aimed at.
Department spokesman Dean
Fischer stressed that the United
States-Israeli atratagic
cooperation implemented by the
memorandum is "not aimed at
any country or groups of coon-
tries in the Middle East." He said
it waa aimed at a threat to the
'region" from the Soviet Union
or "Soviet-supported forces from
outside the region."
The "region,'* and not the
Middle Eaat, is a term used
throughout the memorandum of
understanding signed by Israeli
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon
and Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger.
riet Emigration Figures Down
NEW YORK (JTA) "A devastatingly low number
[Soviet Jews only 363 were permitted to leave the
viet Union during the month of November," reported
rlotte Jacobson, chairman of the Soviet Jewry Re-
ch Bureau of the National Conference on Soviet
| Jewry.
"THE DRASTIC SHRINKING in the number of emi-
Ipation visas granted," stated Jacobson, "further vali-
lutes the sharp change in Soviet attitude toward Jews
land leaves the Soviet minority virtually helpless against
Ilk authorities' campaign to virtually halt all emigration
Ifom the USSR."
GREAT PERFORMANCES
from the company that bust its "quality first" reputation with an
impeccable performance record and an "I care" attitude. Wte
provide the ultimate in stereo components, fine custom cabinetry.
and installation.
SOUND WOOD
20 N. Federal Highway- Boca Raton. Florida-3V1S43
TWO WEEKS ISRAEL
March 16-30
days i
SiwamotslAw*
laajM Haifa
1
t
5864670
p.i .
wenaTigs
M6-2920
1575.00
COSMOS TRAVEL 12&DWeHwy.
Lake Worth
For Sale
Century Village/ W.P.B.
1 Bedroom 1V. Baths Lower Floor
Furnished or Unfurnished
NEAR TEMPLE
$30,000
financing Arranged '
Available Immediately 686-6685
FISCHER REFUSES to
define the region, nor will he list
any of the Soviet-supported
forces from outside the region
that are considered a threat. He
refuses comment on a suggestion
that one such force might be
made up of Cubans in South
Yemen or Soviet troops in Af-
ghanistan.
The memorandum does not list
any specific joint Israeli-US. ac-
tivities except for naval and air
exercises in the eastern Mediter-
ranean. Fischer said that this is
"an overall agreement within
which certain specific details will
be worked out" by the working
groups that will begin meeting in
January.
The agreement is not s treaty,
and Fischer notes that it doss not
need approval of Congress.
However, he stresses that Ad-
ministration officials will
probably discuss the details of
the agreement when they appear
before congressional committees
during the next few months.
FISCHER SAID that the
strategic cooperation waa
"wholly consistent" with the
U.S. policy of preserving Israel's
security. He said there waa no
attempt to down play the agree-
ment by not allowing photo-
graphers to take pictures of the
ijpiing by Weinberger and
Sharon.
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig said the same thing when he
waa asked about the signing after
his one and a half-hour meeting
with Sharon. He said the U.S.
waa pleased by the.
State Dep't. Denies Memo
Bars U.S. Mediator Role
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
De-
WASHINGTON
(JTA) The State
pertinent strongly
that the memorandum of
understanding the United
States has signed with Is-
rael bars tha U.S. from
being either a mediator or
arbitrator in the Middle
East peace process.
Syrian Foreign Minister Abdel
Halim Kheddam reportedly made
this charge to Philip Habab,
President Reagan'a apodal
envoy, after the U.S. diplomat
arrived in Damascus. "The Unit-
ed States no longer has the right
to play any mediation or arbi-
tration role in the Arab-Israeli
conflict because you heve become
a direct party to this conflict."
Khaddem reportedly told Habsb.
STATE DEPARTMENT
countries m the region.
Romberg said it waa "expitaft"
in the mamorandnm. signed by
Secretary Casper Wefcv
and Israeli Delenee Min
Ariel Sharon that it wee not
I "any state k*
Both Sharon and VS. officials
hie weak that the co-
ition agreement is not
t Israel's Arab enemiee but
only a threat to th
from the Soviet Union
'Soviet-supported
the region."
into the
State
Dean Fischer wee
which countries fall
letter category But
ayft Henry Cetto
that Cuba and Eaat Oei
were among the countries
and the U J- ware referrinc to hi
thai
spokesman Alan Romberg aai
ha had no comment on the Habib
mission which started in
last woshsnd Bot he said the
memorandum of understanding
which impleneenta the strategic
cooperation between the United
States and Israel does Sot
"affect" the U.S. "ability to deal
in the peace making process He
noted that "we have a variety of
rakwkmahipa with a variety of
ROMBERG
that there are no _
in the iiiiiniim He seed that
Sharon made it dear before
hastily returning to Israel to vote
that only'some details which wil
be worked out by the
------ to impawns
memorandum might be
fisd."
Qmat&i Association. 3*c.
PRESENTS
By Popular Demand
The Fourth Return Engagement of
THE REKNOWNED ISRAELI PIANIST
I LAN AVER ED
Performing Rachmaninoff's
monumental
Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor
With The Greater Palm Beach Symphony
Conducted by
KENNETH SCHERMERHORN
WEST PALM BEACH AUDITORIUM
THURSDAY, JANUARY 7,1982 8 P.M.
I Greater Pwhw Reach tyiwphowy Aooootetton inc. *"? *" at** AuorromuM
Box 2232 Palm Beach, Florida 33480
| For ReeervetfOne, Cask
666-2667 or 666-2703
ii7ii su
urn seat no
Hunan sa
tiMinaaaw *
eeawMsueuu sa
stuochts
waoaalwilii i 01.00
zDm^
my check tor
I Name


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
December 18, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00056

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
December 18, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00056

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
tlewislh FloridIhn
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
lire 3 Number 27
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, December 18,1981
6 frtdShochu
i Price 35 Cents
ederation Dinner Dance to be Held Jan. 13
wo outstanding pieces of art
be given away at the gala
leration Dinner Dance to be
J on Wednesday, January 13
Lie Great Hall of the Boca
Ton Hotel and Club.
orman I. Stone, General
bpaign Chairman indicates
, the Patricia Judith Art
ery and the Gallery Camino
. have generously donated
j pieces of art to add to the
pve occasion. The lucky recip-
s will be chosen by a random
wing of lots during the night
pinner and dancing.
itimc indicates that the
Patricia Judith Gallery has do-
nated a landscape valued at
$1,800 by the noted artist Joao
California. The oil painting is en-
titled "Barcos de Recreio."
Joao California was bom in
1932 south of Portugal. He
studied under Silvo Lino, Por-
tugal's leading landscape and
marina artist. California is well
known in his native country and
Spain. Many of his works are on
exhibit in the United States.
The Patricia Judith Gallery
has obtained the exclusive distri-
bution of his works for the United
States. Mr. California paints
fc
mountains, landscapes and sea-
scapes.
His works are found in such
noted private collections as Jean
Claude Givenchy, Morris Baron
and Victor Richenstein.
Stone indicates that the
Gallery Camino Real has donated
a sculpture valued at $1,500 by
Eichengreen-Gensburg. The
sculpture is unique in that it is
the creation of two artists who
have combined their talents.
Both women have been pain-
ting and sculpting for a number
of years. Nancy Gensburg
studied at the School of the Art
Institute of Chicago and is a
nationally recognized sculpter.
Arleen Eichengreen attended the
Art Students League, where
John Hovannes critiqued her
>me Pankin
Arnold Rosenthal
Pankin, Rosenthal to
Co-Chair Campaign
nit Kretsky, co-chairman of
Men's Division of the 1982
deration UJA Campaign, an-
ces the appointment of
ome Pankin and Arnold
senthal as Co-chairmen of the
ca I.ago Campaign.
making the appointment,
etsky emphasized the im-
tance of the Boca Lago Cam-
to the Federation Drive,
indicated that an Advance
I t Cocktail Party will be held in
I home of Arnold Rosenthal for
ntributors over $1,000 as well
| the annual dinner dance to be
in the Boca Lago Country
Jerry Pankin moved to South
nnty from New York City after
ing lived in Roslyn, Long
and, for 20 years, where he was
member of the Presidents
uncil of the American Institute
Management. He lived in
tin from 1969 to 1977 where he
a Director of the Spain-US
iiber of Commerce, heading
Footwaar Division. He was
active in UJA, Histadrut
the American Jewish Com-
ee in New York City within
the shoe industry.
In South County, Pankin is a
member of the Board of the Jew-
ish Federation and was active in
the 1981 Campaign.
Rosenthal moved to South
County from Pittsburgh, Pa.
where he was treasurer of the
American Fields Service and was
treasurer and president of Pitts-
burgh's Golden Triangle Asso-
ciation. He was also active in
civic affairs with Mayor David
Lawrence.
In South County, Rosenthal
was chairman of the Israel Bonds
Boca Lago Campaign in 1979 and
was chairman of the Federation
UJA Boca Lago Drive in 1981.
He is also a board member of the
South County Jewieh Federation.
Jim Nobil, Co-chairman of the
Men's Campaign commented, "If
all of our campaigns were as well
organized as Boca Lago, we
would far exceed our goal of
$2,000,000 for the 1982 drive. I
feel very good that Jerry Pankin
and Arnold Rosenthal are at the
helm in Boca Lago."
work. She studied drawing and
design at the prestigious Par-
son's School. Both artists worked
together at the Pietrasanta
Foundry in Italy, studying mold
making and metal casting.
These two women share a
working studio and share mutual
compatible vibrations that allow
them to express their art with a
clean simplistic quality that dis-
tinguishes today's design and
architecture.
Their sculpture is found in
many corporate collections in-
cluding the executive offices of
the Honeywell Corporation, the
San Francisco Forty-niners, the
office of the president of United
Airlines, and the home office of
Marshal Fields and Company.
Examples of their unique
sculptures can be seen at the
Gallery Caminc Real.
In making this announcement
Stone said. "We are genuinely in-
debted to both the Patricia
Juditu Art Gallery and the
Gallery Camino Real for their
interest in promoting the 1982
UJA Federation Campaign and
in their generosity in providing
these works of art to be given
away at the dinner dance. I
believe that the distribution of
this art will enhance what already
will be an evening of good food,
fine music and congeniality."
A minimum contribution of
$1,250 to the Men's Division
Campaign has been established
for attendance at the Dinner
Dance. Reservations can be made
by contacting the South County
Jewish Federation offices.
JNF Chief Believes
Reagan 'Infatuated' With
NEW YORK The president
of the Jewish National Fund
warned here that the Reagan Ad-
ministration is "infatuated" with
the Saudi regime and that a ma-
jor nationwide campaign "equal
in intensity to the fight against
the AW ACS deal" would be
necessary to stop the Fahd Mid-
east plan and prevent "a disaster
for I srael and for America's own
security."
Rabbi William Berkowitz
spoke at a meeting of the JNF
New York Council honoring Rep.
Jack Kemp, Republican of New
York. In his address. Rabbi Ber-
kowitz declared:
"SINCE PRESIDENT Rea-
gan committed his prestige, his
power and his personality in sup-
port of the $8.5 billion arms sale
to Saudi Arabia, the royal family
can do no wrong in his eyes.
"Thus, when the Saudis raised
the price of their oil by $2 per
barrel within 24 hours of the pas-
sage of the AW ACS deal, an Ad-
ministration spokesman said the
effect would be to 'moderate' the
oil bills we might otherwise have
to pay. When the Saudis cut back
their oil production the day after
that, the Administration was
silent.
"Can any one imagine what
would have happened if the
AW ACS sale had been defeated?
Israel would have been held di-
rectly responsible for both the
rise in the price of oil and the cut-
back of Saudi production. The
accusations and recriminations
would have been devastating.
"AFTER THE AW ACS, the
Administration discovered the
so-called Fahd 'peace' plan,
which contradicts Camp David in
Saudis
every respect. Yet the President
and Secretary of State, who insist
they love Israel and stand by
Camp David, welcomed the pro-
posal and found 'positive ele-
ments' in it.
"If the Reagan Administration
believes Saudi Arabia is a mod-
erate, if the White House believes
that raising oil prices leally
makes oil cheaper, it is no
surprise that the President and
his advisers should persuade
themselves that a plan which
contradicts Camp David some-
how is another version of it.
"The Fahd plan is supposedly
a breakthrough because it affirms
'the right of all countries of the
region to live in peace.' But the
proposal does not recognize the
State of Israel, nor do the Saudis
call for negotiation as Camp
David does. Indeed, Israel is not
a country' at all as far as the
Saudis are concerned. It is an
illegal 'Zionistentity' which must
one day be replaced by a
Palestinian state.
"On this very point former
Prime Minister Rabin, on the
ABC-TV Nightline show the
night of the AWACS vote, en-
gaged the Saudi Ambassador to
the United States in debate. (It
was, of course, on a split screen.
The Saudi Ambassador would
hardly sit at a table with any rep-
resentative of the Zionist en-
tity.')
"Mr. Rabin asked the Saudi
Ambassador whether his country
was prepared to sign a peace with
Israel. No one who saw the show
Continued on Page 4
Rabbi Berkowitz


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Frida
y.
Full Text of U.S.-Israel Understanding
WASHINGTON -
Following is the text of the mem
orandu.n of understanding
signed by Israeli Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon and Secre-
tary of Defense Caspar Weinber-
ger:
PREAMBLE
This memorandum of under-
standing reaffirms the common
bonds of friendship between the
United States and Israel and
builds on the mutual security
relationship that exists between
the two nations. The parties rec-
ognize the need to enhance
strategic cooperation to deter all
threats from the Soviet Union to
the region. Noting the long-
standing and fruitful cooperation
for mutual security that has de-
veloped between the two coun-
tries, the parties have decided to
establish a framework for con-
tinued consultation and
cooperation to enhance their
national security by deterring
such threats to the whole region.
ARTICLE I
1. United States-Israeli strate-
gic cooperation, as set forth in
this memorandum, is designed
against the threat to peace and
security of the region caused by
the Soviet Union or Soviet-
controlled forces from outside the
region Introduced into the region.
It has the following broad pur-
poses:
a. To enable the parties to act co-
operatively and in a timely man-
ner to deal with the above-
mentioned threat.
b. To provide each other with
military assistance for operations
of their forces in the area that
may be required to cope with this
threat.
c. The strategic cooperation
between the parties is not di-
rected at any states within the
region. It is intended solely for
defensive purposes against the
above-mentioned threat.
ARTICLE II
1. The fields in which strategic
cooperation will be carried out to
prevent the above-mentioned
threat from endangering the
security of the region include:
a. Military cooperation between
the parties, as may be agreed by
the parties.
b. Joint military exercises, in-
cluding naval and air exercises in
the eastern Mediterranean Sea,
as agreed upon by the parties.
c. Cooperation for the estab-
lishment and maintenance of
joint readiness activities, as
agreed upon by the parties.
d. Other areas within the basic
scope and purpose of this agree-
ment, as many be jointly agreed.
2. Details of activities within
these fields of cooperation shall
be worked out by the parties in
accordance with the provisions of
Article III below. The coopera-
tion will include, as appropriate,
planning, preparations and
exercises.
ARTICLE III
1. The Secretary of Defense
and the Minister of Defense shall
establish a coordinating council
to further the purposes of this
memorandum:
* To coordinate and provide
address the following issues:
a. Military cooperation be-,
tween the parties, including joint
U.S.-Israeli exercises in the
eastern Mediterranean Sea.
b. Cooperation for the estab-
lishment of joint readiness
activities, including access to
maintenance facilities and other
infrastructures, consistent with
the basic purposes of this agree-
ment.
c. Cooperation in reseach in de-
velopment, building on past co-
operation in this area.
d. Cooperation in defense
trade.
e. Other fields within the basic
scope and purpose of this agree-
ment, such as questions of pre-
positioning. as agreed by the co-
ordinating council.
3. The future agenda for the
work of the joint working groups,
their composition. and
procedures for reporting to the
coordinating council shall be
agreed upon by the parties.
ARTICLE IV
This memorandum shall enter
into force upon exchange of noti-
fication that required procedures
have been completed by each
party. If either party considers it
necessary to terminate this mem-
orandum of understanding, it
may do so by notifying the other
party six months in advance of
the effective date of termination.
ARTICLE V
Nothing in the memorandum
shall be considered as derogating
from previous agreement* and
understanding between the
parties.
ARTICLE VI
The parties share the under-
standing that nothing in this
SttasH
parties reaffirm their '. 1
*nd their aspiration^M
At Unations
Palestinians Raise Their Flag Illegally
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) A UN spokesman
said that the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization was
not authorized to raise a
Palestinian flag in the
lobby of the main UN
building last week.
The spokesman said that ac-
cording to UN rules "no flags can
be used inside UN premises," a
rule that the PLO defied despite
strong protests and requests by
top UN officials to remove the
flag and a huge map showing a
Palestinian state within Israel's
borders.
ACCORDING TO the spokes
man, the PLO's UN represen-
tative. Zehdi Labib Terzi, refused
despite repeated requests to
remove the Palestinian flag,
which was raised above 11 a.m.,
in honor of Palestine Week which
opened here Dec. 1. The spokes-
man added that Secretary
General Kurt Waldheim himself
ordered the removal of the flag
when the incident was brought to
his attention. But the PLO
refused to go along with Wald-
heim's order. The PLO also re-
portedly defied six UN guards
who tried to remove the flag and
threatened to use violence
against anyone trying to take
down the flag.
The UN spokesman ^ J
compromise" wag f -H
reached after negotiate'"'
Sf" the PLO and UNo?
The flag and map were tn
red to the Trusteeship n
where a discussion on Palest
riht8 ws underway by maah
of the Committee on Patat
Rights. The debate wT,
r-aon the flag was allowed J
chamber, the spokesman**
Judith Dranger. 1,,^,
spokesperson, expressed I
protest over the in-a
charging that it proved tS
Chairman Yasir Arafat "ii
running the UN."
^(guidance to joint working
3 groups.
- b. To monitor the implementa-
tion of cooperation in the fields
agreed upon by the parties within
the scope of this agreement.
p c. To hold periodic meetings, in
Israel and the United States, for
Z the purposes of discussing and
resolving outstanding issues and
- to further the purposes of
discussing and resolving out-
standing issues and to further the
objectives set forth in this memo
randum. Special meetings can be
held at the request of either
"party. The Secretary of Defense
.: Minister of Defense will chair
these meetings whenever
^possible.
' 2. Joint working groups wiUj
Habib Back in U.S.; Made No Progress With Syria
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTAI -
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
told the Cabinet that U.S. special
envoy Philip Habib has made no
progress in his efforts to per-
suade Syria to remove its SAM-6
anti-aircraft missiles from
Lebanon. Habib returned to
Washington on Monday.
Shamir, who met with Habib
here last Friday, said he informed
the American envoy that Israel
would give him more time to pur-
sue his mission but that its
patience had limits. On a radio
interview over the weekend, how-
ever, the Foreign Minister set no
deadline beyond which Israel
would take action to remove the
missiles itself. "Habib is on his
way, but the way is still long,"
Shamir said.
HABIB WENT to Jordan
after his stopover in Israel and
was in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia,
apparently trying to reenlist
Saudi support to consolidate the
shaky ceasefire in Lebanon.
Habib could make "a thousand
futile trips to Damascus." The
missiles, according to the Syrian
sources, are not negotiable.
Shamir, in his radio interview,
denied that Israel had made any
"compromise" when it agreed to
a joint statement with the U.S.
on European participation in the
Multinational Force and Ob-
servers (MFO) in Sinai. He said
the agreement was a very im-
portant political achievement for
Israel.
"It made clear to the Euro-
peans and others as well that Is-
rael was a factor to be taken into
most serious consideration in any
discussions on the Middle East,"
Shamir said. He said that the
visit to Israel by French Foreign
Minister Claude Cheysson, was
in preparation for the visit by
President Francois Mitterrand
early next year. Both of those
visits and scheduled visits by
other European leaders indicated
an improvement in Israeli-Euro-
pean relations. Shamir said.
HE CLAIMED that _
developments reflected tail
eign policy achievement* oft
Likud government durinf i
past four years.
Defense Minister Ariel L
also met with Habib latFri_,.u
He complained to the America!
that the terrorists have vnlatail
the Lebanese ceasefire 40 tinal
since it went into effect hut Jar/.
U.S., Israel Clarify Europe's Role in Sinai
Shamir indicated that he didn't
think the American envoy would
succeed in his broader objective
of bringing peace to the area, but
said be would be given every
chance, at least by Israel. He said
Habib's trip to Amman was
connected with Jordanian efforts
to prevent terrorists from acting
against Israel from Jordan terri-
tory.
The impasse with Syria re-
mained unbroken. Habib was
first sent to the region by Presi-
dent Reagan last May to prevent
an outbreak of war over the mis-
sile deployment in Lebanon. He
returned this month to try to
convince the Syrians to offer
some minor concessions to reduce
the tension, such as replacing
Syrian units in the Arab peace-
keeping force in Lebanon with
units from other Arab countries.
The Syrians refused and Israel,
for its part, made it dear that it
would not accept any more Arab
troops in Lebanon, even if they
replaced the Syrians.
THE SYRIANS are, if any-
thing, more adamant over the
missiles since Israel signed its
strategic cooperation agreement
with the U.S. last week. Official
organs in Damascus described
the U.S as "the number one ene-
my of the Arabs." They added
that unless fundamental changes
are made in American policy.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The State Department has re-
leased a joint statement by the
United States and Israel which
said the participation by four
European countries in the Sinai
peacekeeping force is based only
on the IsraeliEgyptian peace
treaty and cannot be linked to the
Venice declaration of the Euro-
pean Economic Community.
The statement, read by De-
partment Deputy spokesman
Alan Romberg, said that it was
being issued after both Israel and
the U.S. reviewed the "clarif-
ication" which Britain. France,
Italy and The Netherlands sent
the U.S. on Nov. 26.
The Europeans are not ap-
parently being required to re-
nounce the Venice Declaration of
June, 1980 but only not to use it
in conjunction with their par-
ticipation in the MFO. The joint
U.S.-Israeli statement notes:
"The United States under-
stands and appreciates the con-
cerns expressed by the govern-
ment of Israel regarding the
statements made by the four
European contributors in ex-
plaining their decision to parti-
cipate in the MFO to their own
legislatures and publics. The
United States recognizes that
some positions set forth in the
statements are at variance with
its own positions with respect to
the future of the peace process as
well as with positions held by Is-
rael as a party to the Treaty of
Peace.
"The United States and Israel
recognize that the positions held
on any other aspects of these
problems in the area by any state
which agrees to participate in the
MFO do not attect theobugitw'
of that state to comply fully wtt
the terms of the protocol wbia
was negotiated in accordua
with the letter from Preside*
Carter to President Sadat ai
Prime Minister Begin of Mia
26,1979, and which is desigMdu
help implement the Treaty of
Peace whkh was concluded pa-
suant to the Camp David t>
cords.
"The Treaty of Peace in ac-
cordance with which the MFOia
established represents the tint
step in a process agreed on a*
Camp David whose ultimate goal
is a just comprehensive, and
durable settlement of the Middle
East conflict through the con-
clusion of peace treaties based m
Security Council Resolutions 241
and 338.
SAVE THE DATE
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13,1982
U.J.A. Federation
Annual
DINNER DANCE
at
The Great Hall, Boca Raton Hotel
A GREAT BAND-A GREAT EVENING
.South County Jewish Federation


, December 18,1961
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
Argentines Slated to See 'Holocaust1
NEW YORK (JTA| The
C-TV aeriee, "Holocaust,"
be shown in Argentina Dee.
I to 19 on leading TV channel
1 during prime time, it was in-
here by Rabbi Arthur
eier, president of the Appeal
Conscience Foundation and
ritual leader of the Park East
agogue. He acid the decision
i officially conveyed to him by
Argentine Charge d-Affairae,
ster Gustavo Fijrueroa.
Schneier beaded an interfaith
,-finding mission of the Ap-
| of Conscience Foundation to
tuenos Aires last August. At the
President Roberto Viola and
rior Minister Horacio Tomas
ado assured the delegation
it the TV series would be
vn before Jan. 15,1982.
"I AM encouraged that 'Holo-
st' will be shown one month
irlier than anticipated,"
thneier said. "It certainly
ows good will on the part of the
ent Argentine government,
an attempt to resolve in-
tices and human rights vio-
itions during the years of an-
chy and chaos known as the
Dirty War,' which took place
etween 1976 and 1979.
Schneier, who is also chairman
the World Jewish Congress-
Lmerican Section, said the Ap-
of Conscience Foundation
id also been advised by
figueroa that 11 men and women
had been held as prisoners
by order of the National Execu-
tive Power (PEN) had been re-
leased Nov. 16. The Foundation
delegation had, during vheir visit
last August, requested an early
resolution of the state of PEN
prisoners and the fate of the
thousands who had disappeared
d* 1975-1979. Viola assured
the delegation of an ongoing re-
view of all PEN cases, Schneier
said.
State Dep't. Won't Say
What New Memo Means
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State De-
partment is vague over the
specifics of the meaning of
the memorandum of under-
standing signed by Israel
and the United States, in-
cluding the outline of the
"region" it is designed to
defend and which country
besides the Soviet Union it
is aimed at.
Department spokesman Dean
Fischer stressed that the United
States-Israeli strategic
cooperation implemented by the
memorandum is "not aimed at
any country or groups of coun-
tries in the Middle East." He said
it was aimed at a threat to the
"region" from the Soviet Union
or "Soviet-supported forces from
outside the region.''
The "region," and not the
Middle East, is a term used
throughout the memorandum of
understanding signed by Israeli
Defense Minister Arid Sharon
and Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger.
Soviet Emigration Figures Down
NEW YORK (JTA) "A devastatingly low number
\i Soviet Jews only 363 were permitted to leave the
oviet Union during the month of November," reported
Charlotte Jacob son, chairman of the Soviet Jewry Ke-
rch Bureau of the National Conference on Soviet
Jewry.
'THE DRASTIC SHRINKING in the number of emi-
ration visas granted," stated Jacobson, "further vali-
dates the sharp change in Soviet attitude toward Jews
id leaves the Soviet minority virtually helpless against
authorities' campaign to virtually halt all emigration
jmthe USSR."
GREAT PERFORMANCES
from the company that built its "quality first" reputation with an
impeccable performance record and an "I care" attitude. We
provide the ultimate in stereo components, fine custom cabinetry,
and installation.
SOUND fWOOD

20 N. Federal Highway-Boca Raton, Florida-391-1843
TWO WEEKS ISRAEL
March 16-30
fwnlfMlWuiSMCl
.adsyaatoMaeetng '1 . BMfMaTelAirh nkphfc.torvealem
might Haifa aatealedelly
Option to Egip*
M 878.00
5864670 COSMOSTRAVEL 12&DWeHwy.
Lake Worth
For Sale
Century Vfflage, W.P.B.
1 Bedroom 1 tt Baths Lower Floor
Furnished or Unfurnished
NEAR TEMPLE
$30,000
Financing Arranged aaa-tkBAK,
^Available Immediately________P8D-0OO0
FISCHER REFUSES to
define the region, nor will he list
any of the Soviet-supported
forces from outside the region
that are considered a threat. He
refuses comment on a suggestion
that one such force might be
made up of Cubans in South
Yemen or Soviet troops in Af-
ghanistan.
The memorandum does not list
any specific joint Israeli-US. ac-
tivities except for naval and air
exercises in the eastern Mediter-
ranean. Fischer said that this is
"an overall agreement within
which certain specific details will
be worked out" by the working
groups that will begin meeting in
January.
The agreement is not a treaty,
and Fischer notes that it does not
need approval of Congress.
However, he stresses that Ad-
ministration officials will
probably discuss the details of
the agreement when they appear
before congressional committees
during the next few months.
FISCHER SAID that the
strategic cooperation was
"wholly consistent" with the
U.S. policy of preserving Israel's
security. He said there was no
attempt to down play the agree-
ment by not allowing photo-
graphers to take pictures of the
signing by Weinberger and
Sharon.
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig said the same thing when he
was asked about the signing after
his one and a half-hour meeting
with Sharon. He said the U.S.
was pleased by the agreement.
proMtm
ii-
State Dep't. Denies Memo
Bars U.S. Mediator Role
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State De-
partment strongly denies
that the memorandum of
understanding the United
States has signed with Is-
rael bars the U.S. from
being either a mediator or
arbitrator in the Middle
East peace process.
Syrian Foreign Minister Abdel
Halim Khaddam reportedly made
this charge to Philip Habib,
President Reagan's special
envoy, after the U.S. diplomat
arrived in Damascus. "The Unit-
ed States no longer has the right
to play any mediation or arbi-
tration role in the Arab-Israeli
conflict because you have become
a direct party to this conflict,"
Khaddam reportedly told Habib.
STATE DEPARTMENT
spokesman Alan Romberg said
he had no comment on the Habib
mission which started in Lebanon
last weekend. Bat he said the
memorandum of understanding
which implements the strategic
cooperation between the United
States and Israel does not
"affect" the U.S. "ability to deal
in the peace-making process." He
noted that we have a variety of
relationships with a variety of
countries in the region."
Romberg said it was "explicit"
in the memorandum, signed by
Defense Secretary Caspar Wein-
bertrer and Israeli Defense Min-
ister Ariel Sharon that it was not
aimed at "any state in the
region."
Both Sharon and U.S. officials
stressed this week that the co-
operation agreement is not
against Israel's Arab enemies but
only a threat to the "region"
from the Soviet Union and
"Soviet-supported forces outside
the region. '
State Department spokesman
Dean Fischer wan vague about
which countries fall into the
latter category. But Pentagon
spokesman Henry Catto said
that Cuba and East Germany
were among the countries Israel
and the U.S. were referring to in
the memorandum.
ROMBERG REITERATED
that there are no secret annexes
in the agreement. He said that
Sharon made it clear before
hastily returning to Israel to vote
against no confidence motions
that only some details which will
be worked out by the working
committee to implement the
memorandum might be "classi-
fied."
Qmat&i QaflM ^Bcacfc Symphony
Association. Ac.
PRESENTS
By Popular Demand
The Fourth Return Engagement of
THE REKNOWNED ISRAELI PIANIST
ILANAVERED
Performing Rachmaninoff's
monumental
Piano Concerto No. 3 in D Minor
With The Greater Palm Beach Symphony
Conducted by
KENNETH SCHERMERHORN
WEST PALM BEACH AUDITORIUM
THURSDAY, JANUARY 7,1982 8 P.M.
I Greater Palm Beach Symphony Association Inc.
Box 2232 Palm Bsach, Florida 33480

WEST PALM BEACH AUDITORIUM
MM
I For Reasrvetiona, Call:
656.2667 or 665-2703
Enclosed is my check- tor S
iName--------------------------
Mn Floor a Section*
4.S.S.7.S.S *12
Section* S5 a T 10
Section* sen
Section* itm as
Section* O S OU *S
STUDCN7S
lecood Bataonv 2.00

K-:
(Address
_ Stats
Zip
Phone


Page 4
The Jewish FlprUUqn ofSouth County
F^y. December iM
Jewish Flor idian
agas __iSSr
W"OM0*nMt.ia0N.E. Mh M..MMnN.Fta. 33101 Men* 1474Ht
JA/F C/i/ef Believes
MH.TON KfKTSKY
Reagan 'Infatuated' With Saudi
. -r-.,r,2"l_- fffiSLrrtS'S LaURL='-ft
l.tHC
Caftan;
Sam*
xa-tm
Friday. December 18,1961
Volume 3
21 KISLEV 5742
Number 27
Israel Bonds Investment
Buying Israel Bonds is not rightly philan-
thropy. Your purchase of Israel Bonds yields in-
terest. Still, you come away feeling that you have
made a critically important contribution to Israel's
development needs. And to proving to others that
Israel has a solid foundation of financial backing
from American Jews and their friends now, more
than ever.
With the advent of shifting political tides as the
year 1981 comes to a close, there is deep concern in
the American Jewish community about the strains
on Israel's development budget. This has set the
scene for a receptive and productive cash effort.
A top-level campaign is on to convert ail unpaid
Israel Bonds commitments into cash for Israel's de-
velopment needs before the magic New Year's Eve
deadline. The Israel Bonds cash countdown was
actually targeted through mid-December.
But individuals can show their concerns in a
very practical way. They can convert their commit-
ments to purchase Israel Bonds into cash by extend-
ing the cash countdown 'til the very anticipatory
hours before "Auld Lang Syne." They can invest in
the Jewish State's future.
will ever forget how the Saudi
diplomat sought to aquirm hie
way out of answering the ques-
tion. And the more he squirmed,
the more his answer was
revealed: Saudi Arabia does not
want to negotiate with Israel and
has no intention of making peace
with Israel.
SOME DAY, we all pray, the
Arab world and the richest Arabs
of all the royal family that
holds away in Saudi Arabia
will change their minds and ac-
knowledge the proper and right-
ful place of a Jewish state in the
Middle East. That day must
come.
"But it will not come as long aa
our country appeases Arab de-
mands for arms to attack Israel.
It will not come as long as our
State Department is afraid to
criticize and reject Arab military,
political and economic demands
that damage the cause of peace. It
will not come aa long as our
government gives encourage-
the foundations of peace lor
which Israel has made such eacri
ficea and auch.huge conceeaiooa.
It will not come aa long as Preai-
dent Reagan fears to call the PLO
what candidate Reagan did -
terrorists, killers of innocent
women and children.
"And it will not come until the
United Statee insists that coun-
tries which seek the protection of
the United States must behave in
such a way aa to deserve that
protection by acting in concert
with American policy, not
against it; by endorsing Ameri-
can strategy, not blocking it; by
befriending America's allies, not
attacking them.
"Within the past few weeks.
the slow drift toward Saudi Ara-
bia as the pillar of American
Mideast policy has become a tidal
wave, threatening to engulf Is-
rael and threatening to drown
hopes for a just and lasting peace
in the i
Sharon Visited Africans
Before Going to U.S.
JERUSALEM (JTA) Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon visited several African countries before he flew to
Washington to sign the strategic cooperation agreement
with the U.S., it was disclosed here. Informed sources
have linked the two visits.
THEY SAID Israel's cooperation with several Afri-
can countries would increase, due partly at least to the
"new and enhanced standing" conferred on Israel by
entering a formal strategic relationship with the U .S.
The sources said it was "no coincidence" that Presi-,
dent Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire spoke of the possibility of
resuming diplomatic ties with Israel when he was in
Washington last week. Mobutu said, however, that he
would not act until he saw how other African countries
treated the issue. Zaire broke relations with Israel after
the Yom Kippur War.
Blum Meets 'Palestine Question'
Head On in United Nation Debate
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Israeli Ambassa
dor Yehuda Blum said, in
remarks prepared for
delivery to the General As-
sembly, that the Camp Da-
vid framework is "the only
practical way to progress
towards a comprehensive
solution of the Arab-Israel
conflict, in all its aspects,
including the question of
the Palestinian Arabs."
Blum, who was scheduled to
address the Aseambly in its de-
bate on the "Question of Pales-
tine," said the Camp David
framework "invitee the Palestin-
ian Arab residents of Judaea,
Samaria and the Gaza District to
play an active role in shaping
their future, by calling on them to
participate not only in the cur-
rent negotiations, but also m the
negotiations which will determine
the final status of the areas they
live in, aa wall aa in the eventual
negotiations on a peace treaty
between Israel and Jordan, in
which the delimitation of
boundaries between the two
countries will be agreed."
THE ISRAELI envoy claimed
that the autonomy plan "is the
first practical proposal to be
advanced to provide a a^Psaaea1
solution for the needs of the Arab
population of those areas."
Blum said that the Pales
tiniana in the Weat Bank and the
Gaza Strip who are prepared to
live in peace with Israel "have
been steadily terrorized and in-
timidated by the PLO which has
been conducting, without letup, a
campaign of political assassi-
nation against them."
Draft to Tighten Laws Against
Neo-Nazis Completed by Justice
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Draft
legislation to tighten laws
against neo-Nazi activities has
been completed by Justice Min-
ister Juergen Schmude and sent
to all state governments in the
Federal Republic and to various
ministries and major social or-
ganizations for review. The mea-
sures will be submitted to the
Cabinet next April.
would also ban the Import and
distribution of Nazi emblems and
other propaganda material la
West Germany.
THE NEED to close loopholes
in existing anti-Nazi laws waa
stressed in a statement by Sch-
mude released Nov. 8 by the
press service of the ruling Social
Democratic Party (SPD).
The release coincided with
charges bv Heinz Galinaki, chaa*-
Tbey would empower state man of the Jewish community in
prosecutors to bring to trial any
person who denies publicly that
the Holocaust occurred or that
the Nazis committed genocide. It
SSBook
Called Menace
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A book ex-
tolling the Waffen SS, written by
a former member of the notorious
Nazi security police, has been
branded a menace to West
German youth for spreading neo-
Nazi ideas Not surprisingly, it
has been praised in neo-Nazi pub-
lications.
The angry controversy sur-
rounding Ich War Dabei ("I Was
At It") by Franz Schoenhuber
has put it on the best seller list.
The publisher, Langen-Mueller
Verlag, said the first two editions
have sold better than expected
and a third edition is in prepara-
tion.
2 KKK'ers,
Neo-Nazi Guilty
NEW YORK (JTA) Two Ku
Klux KJanamen and a neo-Nazi
were found guiltv by a federal
grand jury of plotting u> blow up
a synagogue, a television trans-
mission tower and Jewish owned
buaineaaea in Nashville, Tenn.
The jury deliberated eight
hours before convicting Gladys
Girgenti. 50 yean old, and Bobby
Joe Norton, 32, both members of
the Confederate Vigilantes of the
Ku Klux Klan, and William
Foutch. 48, a member of the
American Nazi Party.
Girgenti and Norton ware
found guilty of transporting ex-
plosives and two counts of con
piracy and Foutch waa found
guilty on two counts of con-
spiracy.
The defendants were impli-
cated in what prosecutors des-
cribed aa a "bizarre" scheme mo-
tivated by hatred and bigotry.
Weat Berlin, that the Federal
authorities were not taking suffi-
cient measures to combat neo-
Nazi activity.
The draft bill does not include
a ban on the distribution and sale
of Nazi books and records origi-
nating in Germany, such as Hit-
ler's 'Mem Kampf." The SPD
wanted such a ban but dropped it
under pressure from its junior
coalition partner, the Free Demo-
cratic Party (FDP) and various
lobbying groups.
they will be tempted to urn
g^itto that, new KjSaH
*"*-** rwolutfena*
a to overthrow the en
Sfi'SM!*? W dnunio?
the oil-drenched randTof
Arabia.
"We must atop the
Administration from
ardhang our national securitvl
this headless infatuation wait
royal family. We must Pnn
our country from abandoniai i
principles in exchange for
oil.
"The AW ACS struggle M I
skirmiah. The next battle will I
the effort to protect our i
from its passionate at...
with the Saudis and to prevenS
acceptance of the Fahd plan ,
the basis of new Mideast r
tiationa.
"That battle must be wand I
as we waged the AWaqI
struggle for a stronger AnwiJ
ca, for a peaceful Middle East, far I
a secure Israel, America'i ami
democratic ally in the regfon.
"I BELIEVE the AmerioaJl
people are fed up with the Sandal
and with the Reagan Ail
ministration's foolish belief thatl
the Saudis can do no wrong. Thai
is why I am confident that wee
win the struggle that local
before us.
"It ia a straggle to prevent the I
Camp David peace process from
being abandoned by the Reigu
Administration. It is a struggle
to prevent the redivision of Jeru-
salem, the holy citv It is i
struggle to prevent the so-called
European peace initiative from
imnoeing a PLOdominued [
Palestinian state on Israeli
border. It is a struggle, in short,
to protect our country's interests,
to protect the peace, to save Is-
"The struggle has only just
begin. It will make the AWACS i
struggle pale into insigruficana.
But it can be won. It mint hi
won. It will be won.
Japanese Envoy Vows Arafat's
Visit to Tokyo Changed Nothing
NEW YORK (JTA1 -
Japan's Ambassador to the
United Nations, Masahiro
Nisibori, has told the
World Jewish Congress
that, in the aftermath of
the visit to Tokyo by Pales-
tine Liberation Organiza-
tion Chief Yasir Arafat,
"Japan has not in any way
changed its policy toward
the PLO" and it "does not
intend to grant diplomatic
status to the PLO office
inTokyo."
Nisibori met privately with the
WJC North American Interna-
tional Affairs Committee where
the issue of Japan'a policies
toward the Middle East were the
subject of an in-depth exchange
of views with leaden of two
dozen national Jewish organisa-
tions at a session which lasted
more than two hour*.
ARAFAT8 VI8IT to Japan in
October was raised aa a principal
nttar of concern. Niaibori said
that the invitation lor the viait
was extended not by the govern
ment but by a group of firmness
parliamentarians. However, the
occasion waa viewed by the
government as a good oppor-
tunity to exchange views^and
clarify positions."
He added that in the meetings
that took place, the Japanese
Prime Minister and Foreign
Minister "strongly urged that
the PLO recognize Israel's right
to exist and emphasized the need
to settle any problems by con-
ducting talks in a peaceful miu-
ner without recourse to the thnat
or uae of military force" At these
meetings, according to Nisibori,
Arafat waa urged to moderate the
practices and policies of the ?w
and Japan hoped that this would
be a result of the Tokyo visit
Nisibori noted that Jtaa
"does not support the one-awi
recognition of the PaJastinisi
people's right of aelfdeUrmni
tion." Japan continued to usat
that another principle muatito
be recognized, namely, "raipw
for an acknowledgement of tat
sovereignty, territorial tatafnff
and the political mdepenoenaot
every stats in the area," hv ma.
. .WHEN QUSnONED ai to
whether he could therefore *M
on behalf of his govenunentm
there would be no possibility
dtolomsrir recognition of
PLO untfl such time thatue
PLO formslly recognize* Ibsb"
right to exist. Nisibori ssidtas
his response wsa "definitely
the affirmative."
In outlining hia country 'ipc*
tion on the Arab-Israeli questt*
Niaibori made three poinu: row.
Macs tat*. Middle East rnuftbi
juet. lasting and comprehenaw.
second, such a peace muaj"
baaed on Sscurky Coued
Resolutions 242 and 338-


December 18,1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Pmgtb
1
mtmswmsmim


/
i Community Day UPDATE *82
almost 400 women from Sooth County
the President* of the Jewish Women*
.jiitions were honored. Above, at the head
[. from left to right Handing: Hctene Eichler,
nt Executive Director of the Federation.
Adell. representing the South Broward
, it ion. Ted Comet, guest speaker, Mrs.
pJt, Eleanor Kupperman, Publicity Chairper-
MwKif Baer, President of the Federation,
Gloria Roaenthal, Co-chairperson, Arietta Baker,
Coordinator, and Rabbi Bruce Warahal, Execu-
tive Director of the Federation. Seated, from left
to right, Barbara Stain, Co-chairperson. Ruth
Gruber, noted author and keynote speaker. Dr.
Florence Kazlow, speaker, Phyllis Cohen, Co-
chairperson, Margaret Kottier, Co-chairperson
and Berenice Schankerman, Florida Regional
United Jewish Appeal Board member.
BSsV ^^SBSl Lsm +m La. H *laam^^^srBs^Lr%a Ksnr^ssTVBTlP* eisfl L^___sL__ W sW m m i Wt-4 VKM
Murray Siegel Named Chairman
Of Boca Del Mar Campaign
|hmes Nobil, Co-chairman of
Men's Division of the 1982
IA Federation Campaign, an-
fcnees the appointment of Dr.
prray Siegel as Chairman of the
ka Del Mar Campaign.
iegel was born in New York
ly. and is a graduate of Cornell
Iversity Veterinary School. He
d in Nyack, New York prior to
wng to Florida ten years ago.
While in New York, he or-
Bized the Nyack ZOA chapter
I was president of Temple Is-
I in that city. He served on the
tack School Board, was presi-
Bt of the Rotary Club and was
live in the United Jewish
eal Campaign.
ISiegel lived in Fort Lauderdale
lor to moving to Boca Raton
| and one-half years ago. He
i chairman for the 1981 Fed-
Btion campaign for Boca Dal
Dr. Murray Siegel
Mar.
Siegel stressed that last year's
Campaign was the first year of a
concerted drive in this geo-
graphical area and that he ex-
pected this year's Campaign to
be much broader in scope. He in-
dicated that he wants to see an
organized United Jewish Appeal
presence in many more of the
many villages that comprise
Boca Del Mar.
Eata Goldfine, Staff Associate
of the Federation, said "Boca Dal
Mar may be the hardest geo-
graphical area within our region
to organize because of its lack of
a core community. The villages of
Boca Del Mar are many and also
widespread. Given this task, I
have not worked with anyone
more dedicated than Murray
Siegel, who is accepting a diffi-
cult assignment and is doing a
fantastic job. It baa really been
\ my pleasure working with him."
Women's Division
Appoints Chairperson
Margie Baer, Chairperson of
the Women's Division of the 1982
Federation UJA Campaign, an-
nounces the appointment of
Esther Omanaky as Outreach
Chairperson.
In making the appointment.
Mrs. Baer indicated that the
Outreach Chairperson has the
responsibility to organize the
regional chairpeople throughout
South County. Mrs. Omansky
alao has the responsibility with
these regional chairpeople to cre-
ate coffees and other educational
programs to expose new resi-
dents of South County to the ac-
tivities of the Federation.
Esther Bain Omansky comes
from Columbus, Ohio where she
was a real estate broker. She was
involved with Federation for 40
years. She chaired Bonds for Is-
rael. Esther has been in South
County for six years and is a
member of the Board of South
County Jewish Federation, and
also a member of the Women's
Division Cabinet, having chaired
the Educational Program for
three years.
In accepting the position, Mrs.
Esther Omansky
omansky indicated bar belief
that education is the key to more
widespread involvement. She
said. "We cannot automatically
expect people to be involved
unless we let them know the im-
portant work the Federation does
here in South County and for the
State of Israel. That is the reason
that I have accepted this
position."
WANTED!
Temple Beth El is looking tor sn instructor to teach an Adult
Education Class. Title of course is, "Ma|Of Trends In Jewish
Mysticism."
For mors Information pleas* call Rlts
391-8900
r
---.:.-. s*
BILL MARKHAM
CANDIDATE FOR U.S. SENATE
To All My Friends
My Best Wishes For A
HAPPY HANUKKAH
Paid By Bill Markham For U.S. Senate Campaign Committee
*******
6
i
WISH k
OERATKM ? BOCA RATON
oar
LRAY BEACH
HIGHLAND BEACH
FLORIDA
WANTED
NAMES OF NEWCOMERS
[SHALOM SOUTH COUNTY NEEDS YOUR HELP.
Do you know anyone who has recently
moved to South County?
We want to Invite them to a Welcome Supper.
ft
ft
i
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
1
ft
ft
ft
ft
ft
fLEASE CALL THE FEDERATION OFFICE, 368-2737. $,
^t \%%!AlA'4J4/4'4J4'4'4'm'mjl,'t'm!m'm!l
"'""WiWiWiWiWtWiWiWiWiWiwiWiWiWil
I
Rely on
Firat Federal of Delray
professionol financial mm
4 4 t
Delroy Deoch
645 Easr Arlonnc Avenue
4999 NWesr Arlonnc Avenue
6464 \Mesr Arlonnc Avenue
Norrh Polm Dooch 737-1234 Q South Polm D*och 276-6311
_______ Droword 426-1100


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, DcBob
18.
Simon Wiesenthal Center paid tribute to
j Raoul Wallenberg by presenting its Simon
Wiesenthal Humanitarian Laureate, in
absentia, to the non-Jewish Swedish diplo-
mat who rescued 100,000 Hungarian Jews
from extermination at the hands of the
Nazis. At a tribute dinner in Los Angeles
(left to right! are Simon WiesenthaL Mrs.
Nina Lagergren, Raoul s sister: Jon Voight
who will portray the herxnc Swede in an
upcoming motion picture, and Rabbi Man in
Hier. dean of the Wiesenthal Center.
Headlines
Babi Yar Documentary Distorts History!
A new Soviet documentary film on the Nazi
Massacre at Babi Yar "distorts history" by vir-
tually ignoring the murder of approximately
100.000 Jews, according to the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith
ADL associate national director Abraham H.
Foxman said the 70-minute film, like the Soviet
memorial at the massacre site near Kiev, neglects
the principal victims of the World War II
slaughter.
The Ukrainian-produced documentary a'
description of the 1941-42 German invasion of the
Ukraine, which focuses on Babi Yar was
screened recently for an audience of diplomats at
the United Nations in New York. Prepared for
Soviet television, it may also be exhibited
throughout Western Europe and entered in film
festivals in the United States, according to
Ukrainian officials.
"Cherishing Faith, Affirming Freedom" was
the theme of the 33rd biennial assembly of the
National Federation of Temple Sisterhoods st the
Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston over the weekend.
Some 1.000 delegates participated in the
assembly of the NFTS. which represents 100.000
members of sisterhoods in 650 Reform syna-
gogues affiliated with the Union of American
Hebrew Congregations and its international
branch, the World Union for Progressive
Judaism.
Among the concerns explored during the NFTS
assembly were world peace, women's rights, civil
liberties, separation of church and state,
pluralism in Israel, Israel among the family of na
tions, and economic justice and social welfare-
Pioneer Women-Na 'amat. the 50,000-member
Women's Labor Zionist Organization of America,
is expressing its opposition to a proposed Consti-
tutional amendment that would outlaw abortion
and to Senate legislation that would permit the
reinstatement of voluntary prayer programs in
the public schools.
The actions came in the form of resolutions
adopted unanimously at a three-day BatlaTaal
board meeting in New York City, the first held
under the kisukasliiii of Phyllis Sutker of Skokie,
111., who was elected president of the organization
in September
National board member. Mildred Weiss of!
Deerfield Beach, Fla.. took part in the masting.
She is s member of the city's Pioneer Women-
Na amat Gila Club.
at Arlington National Cemeterv on Pearl Harbor
Day.
"We commemorate the heroism and patriotism
of all American soldiers who responded quickly to
the dastardly air strike on the Hawaiian naval
base," said Zweiman. He recalled particularly
some of the Jewish heroes of that infamous day
including Ensign Stanley Capian, who had to
take command of the destroyer USS Aylwin for
33 hours: and Sgt. Meyer Levin, who served as
bombadier for Captain Collin Kelley s bomber
attack on a large Japanese naval craft in Phillip
ine waters.
Jewish War Veterans of the USA. National
| Commander Robert M. Zweiman recalled the sig-
' nificance of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor
four decades ago. Dec. 7. 1941, at mam
! services prior to the organization's present at ion
j of s wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier

Morton Goodman has been appointed regional:
director of the Southeast region. American
Friends of Bar-Han University in Israel, Victor B.
Geller. executive vice president of the American
Friends announces
A native New Yorker and a graduate of Hunter
College. Goodman has been active in Jewish
communal affairs in Florida and Texas for the last
two decades. Prominently identified with the
activities of the United Synagogue of America, he
has developed educational and fund-raising pro-
grams for congregations throughout the South.
He is currently executive committee chairman
and a member of the board of trustees of Temple
Ner Tamid. Miami Beach.
Located at Ramat Gan. Israel, and with
outreach campuses in Safed. Ashkelon. and Beit
Shaan. Bar I Ian University recently marked its
silver jubilee. It is the only institution of higher
learning in Israel to combine secular studies with
an extensive program of Judaic courses as an
academic requirement.
Sergio Nudelstejer. director of American
Jewish Committee operations in Mexico and
Central America, has been named an Academic
Member of the Mexican Institute of Culture, one
of the most prestigious literary-intellectual
organizations in Mexico.
Nudelstejer, a native of Poland, has lived in
Mexico since early childhood. A graduate of
Mexico s National University, he founded the
first Spanish language Jewish newspaper in
Mexico, Prensa ItrneUta. Before coming to AJC
as head of its Mexico office, he worked as a
reporter on several Mexico-based magazines and
newspapers, and as press attache7^ the Israel
Embassy in Mexico.
Yeshiva University will salute Jeane J Krk-
petrick. Ambassador of the United States to the
fi y*t^U?T?"a MW,y*l mem-
bers of its Board of Trustees at the 67th annual
Chanukah dmner Dec. 13 it has been snnounced
by Chairman Stanley E Stem. The afJau^wulbe
held at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City and
will also highlight the third year of Yeshiva Uni-
versity's $100 million Century Campaign
%
Community Calendar
Dm. II
Hodassah Shabbat, 8 p.m. Brandeis Women Boca I
Duney World B'nai B'rith Women Naomi, Trip N p *
Council of Jewish Women, 10 o.m. meeting Temol\n
Women's American ORT Shabbat. p's
Ns.1t
B'nai B'rith Women Noomi,
Dinner Theatre Party.
Trip Temple Sinoi
S met ho
Dm. 20
EREV CHANUKAH B'noi B'rith Olympic XI, 9:30 o.m meet
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi, Trip Women'. American'notl
Delray, Caldwell Theatre.
Dm. 21
CHANUKAH l*tDoy Diamond Club, 9:30 a.m. meeting.,
B'rith Women Noomi, 12 noon meeting Women's Americ
ORT North Pines, Paid up Membership Luncheon 12 noon*
Hadassah Delroy Shalom, Card Party 12 noon.
Dec. 22
CHANUKAH 2nd Day B'noi B'rith Women Genesis. 10:30 am
meeting Pioneer Women Zipporah, 12:30 p.m meeting*
Yiddish Culture Club Boco, 7:30 p.m. meeting Temple Anshe
Shalom Sisterhood, meeting 1 p.m. City of Hope, 12 noon
meeting.
Dec. 23
CHANUKAH 3rd Day Women's American ORT Delroy, 12:30
meeting Women's American ORT Sondlefoot, 1 p.m meet
ot Watergate Country Club.
Dm. 24
CHANUKAH 4th Day ORT Oriole. 1 2:30 p.m meeting
Dm. 25
CHANUKAH 5th Day
Dm. 26
CHANUKAH 6th Day
Dm. 27
CHANUKAH 7th Day SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH COMMUNITY
DAY SCHOOL. Concert ot Temple Beth El Temple Erne*
Brotherhood, 930 a.m. breakfast ARMDI. 8pm meeting*
Isroel Bond Roily at Temple Emeth honoring Abe Yormok.
Dm. 21
CHANUKAH 8th Day D.amondClub. 9:30 a.m. meeting ORT
Boco East. 12:30 p.m. Board Meeting SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH
FEDERATION CRC. MEETING 8 p.m. Pioneer Women Boca, 10
am meeting Temple Sinai Sisterhood, 12noon meeting.
Dm. 29
Jewish War Veterans Auxiliary New Years Weekend Yiddiw)
Culture Club Boca. 7 30 p.m. meeting Anshei Emuno Israel,
Bond Drive 7 p.m.
Dm. 30
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION, Board Meeting 8 p.m.*
Hadassah Ben Gurion, Trip to Tampa Pioneer Women Boca, 10 j
o m meeting ORT All Points, Trip B'noi B'rith Women Naomi, j
Trip Temple Sinai Sisterhood, Trip.
Dm. 31
Hodossoh Ben Gurion, Trip to Tampa ORT All Points. Trip Frsi
Sons of Israel. New Years Weekend to Tampa Temple Emeth,9
p m New Yeors Ewe Party Jewish Wor Veterans Auxiliary New
Yeors Party Temple Sinai Sisterhood. Trip.
Jm. 1
new years day
ot Temple Emeth.
ORT All Points, Trip FEDERATION SHABBAT
J*. 3
Temple Beth El, 8 p.m. Annual Lecture Series, Ruth W.sse.
Jw. 4
Brandeis Women Boca Board Meeting SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH
COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL. 8 p.m Board Meeting Diamond
Club, 930 am meeting B'nai B'rith Women Naomi, 12 noon
meeting Hodossoh Ben Gurion, Current Events Study Group?:
30a m.
Jm.S
B'noi B'rith Boco Teeca Lodge. 9:30 o.m. meeting SOUTH
COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION BOCA LAGO COCKTAIL PARTY
($1,000 minimum gift)* Temple Emeth, 7 p.m. Board Meeting *
Yiddish Culture Club Boco, 7:30p.m. meeting.
Jw.4
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION. Breokfost ot Tempi*
Emeth honoring Joe Steinberg 9 a.m. Hadassah Boco Moon*.
I p.m. Board Meeting SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION
WOMEN'S DIVISION. Cabinet Meeting 9:30 o.m. Hodossoh
Menachem Begin. 9:15 o.m Board Meeting Notional Council
of Jewish Women, p.m. Board Meeting.
Jan. 7
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION $500 FAMILY DIVISION,
Cockto.l Party 4 p.m. Temple Beth El Board and Execute
Board Meeting 7:30 p.m. Jewish War Veterans. 10 o m
meeting Brandeis Women Boca. 6 p.m. Theatre Porty Tempi*
Beth El Sisterhood. 8 p.m meeting
Jm.9
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION $100,000 DINNER


LflDber 18.1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 7
Jewish Cultural Festival to be Held
[jtviih Community Center
wot of the South County
Federation announce*
re has been an over-
response to the recent
inent for the 1982 Jew-
nraJ Festival to be held in
to with FAU-Hillel
on at the Univereity
.ontheFAUCampua.
.United supply of ticket*
LeD made available to the
Jewish Community of
j County The remaining
jfcve been held tor FAU
[festival will feature three
nations. The first will be
[Tuesday. January 26 and
I present the production
,in Your Eyes: A Portrait
U,MeirThis is aapecial
, of the recent Broadway
Golda by William Gib-
i second production of the
i Cultural Festival will be
oo Thursday, March 25 and
ent Felix Fibich. Fibich
J dancer, choreographer,
and authority on Jewish
The Amranim Brothers
The third presentation will be
on Tuesday, April 27 presenting
the Amranim Brothers. The
Amranim Brothers are third
generation Israelis of Yemenite
descent. They have been singing
together since childhood, and are
now specializing in concerts of
authentic folk music of Yemenite
and other ethnic groups now
living in Israel. The Amranim
Brothers have performed at Cae-
sar's Palace in Las Vegas
together with Alan King, Jerry
Lewis and a host of other cele-
breties and were part of Frank
Sinatra's Caravan to Israel
Limited seats are available.
Based on last year's experience,
many people were turned away
for a lack of capacity at the FAU
Theatre. Tickets can be obtained
at the South County Jewish Fed-
eration, 2200 N. Federal Hwy .
Suite 206. Boca Raton on a first
come, first served basis. The cost
for all three performances as
series is S21 per person.
There are no reserved seats
since the FAU Theatre holds 560
people and every seat allows a
choice and close access to the
stage.
The Jewish Community Center
Department of the Federation
will accept checks through the
mail and tickets will be returned
to the subscribers by the first
week in January.
Temple Emeth Annual Concert Series
Schenk. Chairperson for
ISecond Annual Concert
at Temple Emeth an-
i that there are still some
i available for the series.
tnk emphasizes that with
anding program and un-
reasonable ticket prices,
ts the series to sell out in
t too distant future.
ascriptions for the three
i are $16 and $20.
first performance of the
I will he on Sunday, Januarv
10 and will feature Nancy
Williams, one of America's ac-
claimed singing actresses. The
second performance will be on
Sundav. February 8 and will
feature Michael Ponti, hailed as a
super virtuoso pianist by the
New York Times. The third con-
cert will be on Sunday, March 21
and will feature Ani Kavafian,
violinist of international note.
Tickets can be obtained from
Temple Emeth at 5780 West
Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach.
Michael Ponti
m ^ss aTaem asaV 1 saV ^aT mtr
I recent Soviet Jewry Rally held at Congre-
i B'nai To rah by the Community Relations
til of the South County Jewish Federation a
on to President Leonid Brezhnev was distri-
The petition called upon the Soviet Union
ow free immigration lor its Jewish citizens.
ag the petition above is Saul Gleuckman,
dent of Congregation B'nai Torah. Looking
om left to right. Rabbi Braes S. Warabal.
Executive Director of the South County Jewish
Federation, James B. Bear, President of the
Federation, Rabbi Merle Singer, Temple Beth El,
Helen* Eickler. Assistant Executive Director of
the Federation, and Abe Bayer, guest speaker lor
the occasion and head of the international desk of
the Council of Jewish Federations. Petitions are
available at the Federation office.
foiyop iAe fittest C4u '/utirA
Wituna
44:30-2:30
6- 40 &*A(
&u*t. SButncA 44.-00-2:30
@U*e**4*/4>n*- 737-2236
4730 jVoUA Smimtd'ettfay.
l6
Organizations in the News
For Further Information on
Area Organizations, Call
South County Jewish Federation,
in Boca Raton, 368-2737
HADASSAH
The Deb-ay Shalom Chapter of
Hndaaaah will have a luncheon
and card party, complete with
door prizes, on Monday, Dec. 21
at 12 noon at Pompey Park Rec-
reation Center, 1101 NW 2nd St..
Delray Beach. Donation is $3.50.
TEMPLE EMETH
An Israel Bond Rally will be
held at Temple Emeth honoring
Abe Yormak. past B'nai B'rith
president on Dec. 27 at 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Sisterhood's January meeting
will be held on Thursday, Jan. 7
at 7:30 p.m. in the Social Hall.
Guest speaker Albert Vorspan.
topic: Jews and Anti-Semitism in
America. All past presidents will
be honored.
A reminder to reserve Thurs
day. Feb. 4 for the Sisterhood's
CANDLELIGHT LUNCHEON
to be held at the Coral Ballroom
of the new Sheraton Hotel.
TEMPLE SINAI
Sisterhood will have their next
meeting on Dec. 28 at 12 noon at
the American Savings and Loan
Bank Bldg., Atlantic Ave at
Kings Point entrance. Program
will consist of Dingo for
Donor. Guests are invited.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The general meeting of the
Sandlefoot Boca Chapter will be
on Dec 23 at 1 p.m. at the Wa-
tergate Country Club. 10680
Sandlefoot Blvd. Guest speaker
will be Evelyn Bond, of the "Slim
You" Corp.
The Delray Beach Chapter will
hold its regular meeting on Dec.
23 at Temple Emeth. Paid up
membership party. Chanukah
celebration-refreshments and en-
tertainment.
Brandeis University
To Hold Seminar
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee of Boca
Raton and Delray Beach Chap-
ters welcomes members, friends
and husbands to its annual "Uni-
versity on Wheels." an all day
Seminar with three Brandeis pro-
fessors. It is being held at
Broward Community College,
located at North Campus. 1000
Coconut Creek Blvd. in Pompano
Beach, on Tues. Jan. 12 from
9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Members are
requested to "Brown Bag" it but
dessert and coffee will be served.
Donation is $8.
The traveling faculty
bera, often from different aca-
demic departments, present their
varying perspectives on one
central theme. At this session
they will speak on "The Ameri-
can Dream."
Jacob Cohen. Prof, of Ameri-
can Studies, will focua his re-
marka on what he terme
'America-Future Tense."
Laurence Pulley. Assistant
Professor of Economics, will talk
about ''Economic Conflicts in
the'80s" and Jonathan Woocber.
Assistant Professor to the
Hornstein Program on Jewish
Communal Service, will lead the
discussion on "The Community
of Paradox: Challenges to
American Jewry in the '80s."
For further information,
contact Fritzie Feldaher or
Marda Roeenfaki.
WHO?
Ha i a mon who think t about
lwiry ot il it wre th mot
importont thing in th wo'Id
Now he i m Bo< o Roton
Van Dell
Jewelers
VilLtgc Sqtir Bo-ciRiton
O IO IO S IO rt >ur
1680/00

J got 1 [ willpower! ] 1 rrnRw to wixnc future ar LtAve3iK>ACYTotettaaaaiiTorMV' 1 MAS. TO HADASSAH waxa a bequests deft 0 wan Ska Save, Na.Vork.NV tOO't saaaararwaj 8M a* RiiiianaaiiwRwaa.'
L M^ A BRTJOE BETWEEN 7 DECADES m SaV Of FAST ACMeVEMENT N SSVEL M Tarn, AND A TOMORROW OF OUTSTAMDM aaaal
PJW HADASBArl SERVCE M ^k PJ^MEOCaC. YOUTH RESCUE AND .^fl ^^CAREER EDUCATE ^^ 1"" ""*
*..- j


Pages
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Pridlly,D"Wi
Sam Cohen Who?
Unknown Father of Xcuiron
By TOM TUGfeND
London Chronicle Syndicate
LOS ANGELES Samuel T.
Cohen is sipping his hinchtimc
martini at a Los Angeles beach-
front restaurant, watching the
yachts gliding across the sun-
flecked waters of the Pacific
Ocean.
Cohen is a friendly, relaxed
man. who likes to pepper his con-
versation with anecdotes. He
ruminates on the meaning of hie
Jewish identity and chats about
the lives of his father and grand-
father in the East End of London.
He talks easily about his work.
which, for 38 of his 60 years, baa
bain developing nuclear weapons
and analysing t heir effects.
More precisely. Cohan is the
"father of the neutron bomb."
according to the opinion of his
fellow weapon experts and by his
own quiet concurrence. He thus
shares the paternity of Ameria s
nuclear arsenal with the late J.
Robert Oppenheiraer. key
developer of the atomic bomb,
and Edward Teller, the progeni-
tor of the hydrogen bomb.
THERE IS an obvious point of
difference between Cohan and his
two faHow-physicists. WhOt
heated public controversies and
intense media attention, fueled
by their own personalities, raised
Professors Oppenheimer and Tel-
ler to the rank of familiar house-
bold names, not one person in a
million marching in massive pro-
teat demonstrations against the
has ever beard of
I T Cohen
However, the three
admired or archs of the prohfetating nuclear
family. share one obvious
sumlantv All three are Jeers, a
fact which Cohan accepts without
surprise, apology or pride. He is.
by his own siialjeja. not much
given to philosophical itaipiaH
uons. viewing himself more the
pragmatist than the intellectual
His general attitude was sum-
marised some years ago in an in-
Bomb
formal talk at a local university,
entitled "Jews and the Bomb."
The talk remains unpublished
(the university official asked to
approve publication "turned it
down in horror." wrote Cohen u.
sending me the uttered trans-
cript) and its opening paragraph
reads:
"My theme ... is that Jew?
have been ueaantisl, even pri
man.. in the development of no
clear weaponry and policy. I do
not know why this is so. I feel
that it is so."
BUT THERE are some clues
to the predominant role of Jews
in the birth of the atomic age.
whose midwives were mostly
theoretical physicists.
"There has been a great pro-
pensity for theoretical physicists
to be Jewish." Cohen told the
university students "Not ex-
clusively, or anything lite that,
but somehow like violinists used
to be. or maybe still are. Great
violinists by and large turn out to
be Jewish. So are most theoreti-
cal physicists, far and away. I
don't have a reason. Perhaps just
some freak of nature.
Pressed for a more incisive ex-
planation. Cohen shrugs his
shoulders. I told you I'm not a
scholar or even a scientist." he
says. "I pick up challenges in a
narrow area. I learn what I need
to about the problem, and try to
solve it."
One such prohWm faced Cohen
in 1968 while working as a senior
scientist for the Rand Corpora-
tion, then s top think tank for the
Air Force.
The mihtary asked Cohan to
look into the design of tactical
nuclear weapons as part of the
then evolving scirio for fight
mg a limit an one leaf war. most
probably in Southeast Asia.
AT ABOUT the name tine.
opponents of nuclear testing were
focusing on the lingering effects
of radioactive fallout and calling
for the development of dean fis-
sion (atomic) and fusion (hydro-
gen) bombs
With both the tactical and
clean weapon problems in mind.
Cohen cakulated on the back of
an envelope' that the answer lay
in a "device" that would drasti-
cally reduce the blast, beat and
radioactivity from existing
bombs in Americas nuclear ar-
senal. Such a reduction would, in
turn, raise the proportion, or "en-
hance' the neutrons emitted.
Wkhin year, the "back of the
envelope" scribblings evolved
into Cohen's full blown "techni-
cal-military" conception of the
neutron bomb, but his paternity
was not to become public for
innther two decades
Perhaps the pragmatic ap-
proach to life and his work is part
of Cohen's inheritance from his
ancestors. His grandfather.
Samuel emigrated from
Lithuania to London as a youth
and plied his trade as a black-
smith in the East End.
Grandfather Samuel's son.
Lazarus, was apprenticed to a
London cabinetmaker at the age
of 10. and worked as a carpenter
for the rest of his life. At the turn
of the century, the Cohen clan
picked up and took ship to New
York, where Lazaurs tried to get
a job as a carpenter.
FORTUITOUSLY, the 1906
earthquake struck San Francisco
a short time later, opening up
high-paying jobs for skilled car-
penters to rebuild the devastated
city Lazarus headed for the West
Coast and. after saving a respec-
table amount of money, returned
to New York.
His son. Samuel, was born in
1921 in Brooklyn. Two years
later. Lazarus and his wife. Jen-
nie, decided to settle in Los
Angeles, where he found work as
a carpenter in the burgeoning
film industry at the Warner Bros,
studio.
Young Samuel attended Holly-
wood High School and earned a
Bachelor of Science degree in
phvsics at the University of
California. Los Angeles (UCLA).
That, except for a few scattered
graduate courses a few years
Inter, ended his formal education,
making him somewhat of a rarity
in a profession which considers
the Ph D as the basic trade union
card.
A few days after receiving his
university diploma in 1943. the
newly-minted physicist was in-
ducted into the US. Army,
launching him inadvertently on
his future life
N aasj -
In Israel
Rape Victims Encouraged
To Report to Police
JERUSALEM iJTAi The police department
has launched a new campaign to encourage victims erf rape
and other sex offenses to report these crimes to rise
DEPUTY POLICE Commissioner Meir Kaplan of
the Criminal Identification Department told a press
conference here that the police are cooperating with hos-
pitals treating victims of sex offenses. He said police have
a special kit supplied to doctors in 15 hnapfeaU
the country for the cofiection of physical evidence
of a sex offense.
Kaplan' said there were no statistics to prove an
to im-
prove
with the
bat police are
of tracking and
of victims
11 HIS A few months, ha
found himself in the New Mexico
desert, at a spot called Los
Alamos. He was now part of the
Manhattan Pro)ect. the then top-
secret project for the develop-
ment of the first atomic bombs.
Private Cohan was aaaignad to
a practicaUy all Jewish group of
afMswjata immkij im fk_ j
bfe trnrfemj of the bombs and he
was green the task of exploring
The war over. Cohen joined the
Rand Corporation for what wee
to be a 2S-year stretch, first
to be
on the battlefield. a
to the strategic bombs dee-
to be dropped on enemy
-. Itwsedurmgthaphaeeac
work that he de\ wed the i
In 197V he left the Rand Corp
fie staff of a ssnaB Lee Aaaafea
research firm.
Report Warns
-Decemfc
Hope Fadinj
For Peace
In Mideast
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) A four-man
private study group that
includes Philip Klutznick. a
prominent American Jew-
ish leader, and former
Assistant Secretary of
State Harold Saunders, has
warned the Reagan Ad-
ministration that hopes for
a negotiated peace in the
Middle East "are fading"
and urged the U.S. to
broaden and intensify its
role as an impartial media-
tor in that region.
The report, released by the
Seven Springs Center of Mt.
Kisco. NY., an organization spe-
cializing in scholarly studies,
stressed that Palestinian national
aspirations, including the desire
for an independent state, "must
be fairly faced and dealt with in
negotiations in ways consistent
with the rights and security of
their neighbors or the prospect
for peace will be radically di-
minished."
THE REPORT also stated
that "no peace will be possible
without the Palestine Liberation
Organization being involved in
the process." Its conclusions
were based on a visit to the
Middle East last summer by the
four co-authors. In addition to
Klutznick and Saunders. they are
Merle Thorpe Jr.. president of the
Foundation for Middle East
Peace; and John Greene Jr..
president of the Seven Springs
Center.
According to their report.
Philip Klutznick
" Hopes for a negotiated peso{
fading just at a moment wh
ceptance of Palestinian na
identity in the Arab work) i
growing Arab willingness to i
cept the Israeli state havec
the best possibility of in
Palestinian-Israeli negotiate
since Israel was established."
Opinion Poll Shows Most
Israelis Favor Sinai Force
no. and 4.3 percent were
Mai
Those replying affinnati
were then asked whether
thought Israeli soldiers sh
fight skMigTK** .Americans, tots
fend Saudi Arabia against
USSR if necessary. nd 64.41
cent said yea, with 32.9 pert
saying no and 2.7 percent
.Support for strategic <
in cut across all
operatic
of the t
. the public of both sexes,
ages and al ethnic beckgroundi|
and aah and social strata.
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
public opinion poll published in
the Jerusalem Post says that
some 70 percent of the public
favors strategic cooperation with
the U.S.. and about 46 percent
would be in favor of Israeli sol-
diers fighting alongside Ameri-
can soldiers to keep the Soviets
out of the Middle East, even it it
involved defending Saudi Arabia.
ANSWERING IF they were
for or against strategic coop-
eration with the VS.. 70.6 per-
cent said yea. 24.3 percent said
High Court Tells Bechtel
To Shun Boycott Listing
WASHINGTON (JTA) Bechtel Corp..
giant engineering and construction company,
required by the Supreme Court to honor an agre
that it not boycott firms blacklisted by Arab countries!
cause the firms do business with Israel.
THE SUPREME COURT refused to review an ap-1
peal by Bechtel Corp. which claimed that it did not hattj
to abide by a consent decree agreed to by the coropanjj
and the Justice Department in 1977. According to Be*|
tel. before the decree was signed the Justice Departffl"*]
modified the decree, changing its meaning.
rive years ago. the Justice Department
Bechtel of violating anti-trust laws by refusing to
with American companies blacklisted by Arab nations!
doing business with Israel. The Justice Department r
said Bechtel refused to deal with ^r^WK*^ persons)
obtained blacklists to help with the boycott.



Lwnber 18.1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page*
i/i/s in Brief
acobson Elected to JNF Presidency
just solution of tlM
problem toenetol u> MiddtoEaat
peace, sms expressed by Simrna
Flapan. editor of Now Outlook
in II
IjTA Win Service*
TOM chMlotu J*
i leading American
[_* been etoctod prsei-
the Jewish National
paling Rabbi William
* Stow the first woman
I (be 80-year-old Ztootot
ion end land develop-
y. Prior to her election
rBosrd of Directors st
J meeting bore, Mre.
m chairman of too
"Zionist Organkation-
0 section. Her two-year
_ office as JNF leader
|aunediately.
. of New York City,
b,on has been active in
[Activities for more than
in various poets in
1 organizations. In Had-
aba was ite national vies
president and national treasurer
before serving as president from
1964 to 196S.She earved as chair-
man of the Medical Building and
Development Campaign until
1976 and was responsible far the
rebuilding of the Hadaaaah
Hospital on Mt. Scopus after the
Six-Day War.
JERUSALEM Premier
Menacbam Begin transferred the
full powers and authority of his
office to Deputy Premier Simcha
Ehrlich last weak, three days
after be was hospitalized for a
broken hip, it waa disclosed in a
lengthy totter the Premier dic-
tated to HaartU columnist Yoel
Marcus published in that news-
paper.
jcration Service at Beth Torah
Torah Congregation an-
that it will hold its
Family Service in con-
with a Consecration
on Friday evening
r 18, at 8:15 p.m.
h Werner, Director of
[Torah Religious School
\\l is a very special service,
time we welcome and
lition to our beginner
These children have
hard and learned an in-
credible amount of Hebrew
language and prayers. Now they
are proud to "Show Off' what
they have learned in a few short
months. You are all invited to
join us in 'sheping naches
(bursting at the seams with
pride). You will be listening to
young voices singing ancient
prayers. In other words, you will
be witness to the reaffirmation of
faith which is our hope."
[Wall Scroll to be Dedicated
> Scroll will be formally
by Temple Sinai at ite
|place of worship, St. Paul's
opal Church, 188 S.
|tn Ave., Delray Beach, at
egation's Sabbath Eva
i, Dec. 25,8:16 pm.
i Scroll is a gift from Dr.
i Levitan, of Dayton, Ohio
Beach Gardens. Col.
now retired, was the
ranking rabbi in the US.
At the service the congregation
will observe Chanukah, the
festival of lights
Dr. and Mrs. Levitan will be
guests at a reception after ser-
vices. In a letter to Rabbi Samuel
Silver, of Temple Sinai end its
president, Bernard Etish, Rabbi
and Mrs. Levitan termed the
scroll as "Our Chanukah gift to a
congregation which holds aloft
the torch of liberal Judaism in
South Palm Beach County."
For Advertising
Call Susan
at 734-3222
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
pi N.W. 4th Ave.. Boca Raton. Fla. 33432. Conservative Phone 392
Rabbi Nathan Zeliser. Cantor Benjamin B. Adler. Sabbath Ser-
: Friday at 8:16 p.m. Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
Brittany L.. Kings Point. Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Orthodox.
y Silver. President. Services daily 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Saturdays and
iya9 a.m. Phoos 499-7407.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OP WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
vaUve 8arvioss st First Federal Savings 4 Loan Association
. West Atlantic. Corner Carter Road, Delray Beach. Fridays. 8
4 Ones, Shabbat. Saturdaya, 9 A.M. 4 Kiddush. Edward Dor
^President. OlOTMooolit dh^ d,^ Baaeh, Fla. 33448 Phone:
*87. Rabbi Jonah J. Kahn, 499-4182. Cantor Davad Wecketor, 499-
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
S.W Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, PL 33432. Reform. Phone: 391
"> Rabbi Maria E. Singer. Cantor Martin Rosso. Shabbat Eve Ser-
i 8:15 p.m. FamflyjSabbath'Service at 7:30 p.m. 2nd Friday of
b Month. TEMPLE BE1H8HALOM
I Address: P.O. Box 184. Boarttaton. Fla. 88481. Conservative.
htW i? C*nt^?r VU1**- Be Services 6:80 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.
*4MViU,Se AvV D-r*jr Bmeh- "" "^ Conservative.
tfc u BtnMri A 8Uv*' ***** ,rvin *". Cantor.
li-u.. "?? Frid"y mt 8 D m~ Ssturdsy at 9 am Daily Minyans
I""* and 6 p.m.
L TEMPLE SINAI
' R*bbl Smm- ** Presktant Bernard Etish ITggTIfc
Ehrhch, a leader of Likud's
Liberal Party wing, chaired to-
day's Cabinet meeting Accord
ing to officials be remains to
charge of ths government for the
Palestinians, including the
Palestine Liberation Organise
tton.
That view and the belief that a
Magazine, pubhehed
and Raymooda Tawil, a Palestin-
ian feminist and journalist,
Mpanto mterviaws with the
Bruno Krsisky Foundation
The unusual 3,000-word letter
Begin dictated from his bed in
Hadaaaah Hospital described to
detail how his hip joint wea free
turad when he (all to hie bath-
room and the subsequent surf)
and other treatment. He said he
transferred his authority to Ehr-
hch because ha waa to too much
pain to exercise his duties
WASHINGTON Shimon
Peres, chairman of Israel's op-
position Labor Party, aaid he told
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig Monday that Israel does
not want to "harass" U.S.
relstions with Saudi Arabia but
wants to be assured that they will
not be at the expense of U.S. re-
lstions with Israel.
Day School to Feature
Rimma Sushanskaya
told reporters after a
more than 30-minute meeting
with Haig that he also stressed
that the US-Saudi relationship
should contribute toward
in the Middle East.
coming to the State Department,
Peres met with Vice President
George Bush.___________
PARIS President Mobutu
Seae Sake of Zair aaid here that
all obstacles for the resumption
of diplomatic relations with Isra-
el have been lifted. Mobutu, who
had earlier conferred with French
President Francois Mitterrand,
aaid Zair will first consult,
however, with other African
countries to try and iron out a
joint approach.
The Zaire leader said, "We
attach great value to our rela-
tions with the Arab states, but I
Zaire is an independent state, and
I shall act as the President of an
independent country."
NEW YORK A leading Re-
?iblican Congressman from New
ork said here that "as a Chris-
tian, I'm glad Jerusalem is in the
hands of Israel. There is no other
nation on earth I would entrust
Jerusalem to more than Israel."
In his address to some 600 peo-
ple attending the Zionist Orgsxii-
taton of America's Brandeia'
Award Banquet at the New York
Hilton, Rep. Jack Kemp also
called for the immediate
resumption of the Camp David
negotistiona, calling them
"Camp David II," and said he
would request that President
Reagan appoint Sol LinowiU,
former special U.S. representa-
tive to the Middle East during
the Carter Administration, to get
the talks going again between
Israel and Egypt.
VIENNA An Israeli editor
and a Palestinian author both
maintained hare that there to
rising tide of opinion in Israel and
among diaspora Jewry favoring a
dialogue between Israelis and
Aruhei Emuna to
Hold Bond Drive
The Congragatton Anabei
Emuna is having their Israel
, Bond Drive on Dec. 29, Tuesday
et 7 p.m at the American
Savings Bank (Function Room).
Mr. Samuel Robinson "Special
Gifts Chairman" of Anabei
Emuna has taken the chairman-
ship of the Bond Drive. The
Women's Division Chairmen are
Mre Helen Laser and Mrs.
Muriel Segelnick Israel needs
the support of every member of
our Congregation We are pleased
to report that the well known
Night Club Entertainer Eddie
Sheefer' will be with us to help
celebrate the 30th Anniversary of
State of Israel Bonds
Marianne Bobick, President of
the Sooth County Jewish Com-
munity Dey School announces
that seats are still available for
the Sunday. December 27 Con-
cert presented by the noted Sovi-
et emigre violinist, Rimma
Suahanakaya to be held that eve-
ning at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth El
in Boca Raton.
Also appearing for the evening
of ctoseical music will be Gene
Rape, concert pisnist. Bud Lenor,
tenor, and Kay Bees, Soprano,
accompanied by Eleanor Greif at
the piano.
Tickets for this benefit per-
formance will be sold for 86 and
87 general admission and 826
patron.
Tickets may be obtained from
the Day School at 414 NW 36
Street and Pot Pourri Boutique
at the Glades Plaza West
Rimma Suahanakaya to an in-
ternationally acclaimed violinist
whose unique artistry has been
beard throughout the Soviet
Union, Europe, the United
States, and most recently, South
America, where aba performed
soloist with Eduardo Rahn and
the Maracaibo Symphony Or-
chestra.
Born in Leningrad to a family
of muekiane, Rimma Suahan-
akaya entered the Leningrad
Conservatory of Music where she
won numerous awards and dis-
tinctions including a special prize
hi Use all-Soviet Violin Com-
petition, and the privilege of con-
certiring throughout Finland
under the suspices of the Soviet
Gwernment Concert Bureau
Upon graduation from the Con-
servatory she continued her
studies with David Oistrakh in
Moscow.
After warning First Prise in
the Prague International Com-
Ctition in 1972 and the Years
dallton to Brussels, Ms.
Sushanskaya toured Cascho-
slovakia both as soloist and
recita'.ist for two consecutive see-
sons. Additional concert tours
throughout the Soviet Union ea
well as numerous recordings
followed thereafter
Rimma Sushanskaya ami-
grated to the United States in
1977 and has since been featured
es soloist st Carnegie Hall with
Laser Goeman and the Soviet
Emigre Orchestra-
Mrs Bobick indicates that
tickets are selling at a brisk pace,
but that she hopes that the entire
concert hall will be sold out by
December 27. She stresses that
ss well as an evening of beautiful
music, those to sttandsneo will
receive the pleasure of snowing
they support the South County
Jewish Community Day School
which' provides an intensive all
day Jewish education for children
in grades one through fourth.
For advertising information
please call:
Laura Goldman
392-5172
=
Attention
Israel Bond Holders
You do not help Israel by keeping your Israel
Bonds after maturity.
Israel must place the proceeds at the Chase
Manhattan Bank. Israel prefers you reinvest
your mature bonds into new bonds or file with
the Chase Manhattan Bank to collect your
principal plus interest.
For Infortnstioa Call the
Israel Bonda Office
669-1445
David G. Hirsowitz, D.D.S.
Announces the opening of hit office
for the practice of
ORTHODONTICS
1309 S.Flagler Drive
(905)669-7660
Weat Palm Beach, Fla. 33407


Pag. 10
The Jewish Fhridian of South County
^D^
Fulbright's Presence Was Painful
THE INAUGURAL address
of the new president of the Uni-
versity of Miami beara-out the
belief that the university's name
does not properly describe its
role. Nobody can deny that the U
of M is situated in Miami, but
that is not the same thing as
saying that the U of M is truly of
Miami.
What began as an academic
center and a focus for cultural
interaction open to the total com-
munity became over the years a
closed corporation intent on its
own expansion. The university
didn't lose its roots. In a rathei
studied way, it said farewell to
them,
ONE REASON for this, I have
always suspected, is that it
considered these roots as being
too provincial. If it were to make
an international mark, then the
university would have to turn its
back/l on the small-time com-
munity that spawned it. Or so the
reasoning seemed to go
When Edward Thaddeus Foot*
tailed as the U of M's
president last Friday, his
that under his tenure
will offer its assistance
to help solve local prob-
apparently, a testa-
awareness that the
t turn homeward again.
said that "our uni-
specisl resources that
helpful in a coordinated
ty effort to return this
ours to a balanced
he was suggesting that
versity of Miami must
me to recognize that it is
in fact as well as in
t -an institution apart
community can not long
nd then of what avail
splendid academic
and achievements he
in the office of presi-
him have envisioned
beginning?
VIEW of President
inaugural words hiailsji
the heartening. I need
use of all the public
hoopla preceding the
that went in precisely
its direction that
so characteristic of{
M all those previousi
miry, I have in mindi
about "Senator J.I
Fulbright (who) will!
delegation representing
than 150 other colleges,
and learned
societies." at the Friday inau-
gural
And the stuff about The dele-
gates two) will march according
founding date of their
with the oldest going
Itor Fulbright received
r's and Master's
Oxford, which was
I in 1167." Which came
first, the genesis of the ceremony
or the choice of the guest? The i
to this is important
sine
the
because what the hoopla does not
tell you is that Sen. Fulbright is a
registered foreign agent for Arab
governments.
As chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee in
early 1973, he pressed for a Unit-
ed Nations-imposed solution to
the Middle East impasse. Just
prior to the Yom Kippur War,
Sen. Fulbright offered his own
version of the William P. Rogers
Plan, which would have
required Israel to withdraw from
all Arab territories occupied in
the 1987 war.
On May 30 and 31 of that year,
his Committee held hearings
under his aegis to determine
whether the Middle East problem I
wasn't due primarily to "thai
refusal of the U.S. Administra-
tion ... to modify its commit-
ment to the present policy of Is-
rael, which ha described as
"already a garrison state."
FOLLOWING THE Yom
Kippur War, which ended in mid-
October, 1973, Em. Fulbright
warned the nation that the U.S.
could "expect mounting threats'
to its oil requirements, and that
one way to diminish the es-
calating danger was to bring into
proper focus our "exaggerated"
emotional commitment to an
"arrogant" Israel. He was
consistently quoted as believing
that "The question is whether it
is not our own policies (an im-
prope.- focus on our emotional
commitment to Israel) which are
driving America's Arab friends
toward radicalize tion and revolu-
tion."
Aa early as 1963, Dr. Emanuel
Neumann, chairman of the Jew-
ish Agency American Section,
charged that it was Sen. Ful-
bright who demanded an inquiry
into the organization's activities
in the cause of Israel against a
background of what Dr. Neu-
mann said ware "certain
notorious elements claiming
credit for directing the attention
of official agencies to 'the Zionist
conspiracy' part of their re-
peated attempts to denigrate and
discourage pro-Israel efforts in
the United Statee."
In that same year, after
questioning David E. Bell, then
administrator of the Agency for
International Development, on
the subject of American loans
and credits to Israel, Sen. Ful-
bright observed that these loans
were "not very good business."
Much of the questioning of Bell
was later deleted from the avail-
able transcript, including Ful-
bright's dubious contention that
Israel has "one of the highest
gross national product rates per
capita" in the world. The deletion
was requested and agreed to for
"reasons of national security."
IN HIS May, 1974 primary
campaign against Arkansas Gov.
Dale Bumpers, the Senator con-
ceded that his record of voting
aiAAeWaV*
9
Camp Maccabee
Camp Maccaoee is looking for Junior
Senior counselors interested In working
with children within a Jewish atmosphere In
Boca Raton.
.Counselors should bring with them
various talents In sports, swimming, arts and
crafts, dance music and Judaica studies. Ex-
perience helpful.
South County Jewish Federation
368-2737
Jewish Community Center Department
President Foote
against civil rights legislation in
tneearly 1960s hurt him serious-
ly, but that "Since 1966, my
record has been as good as any-
body's." Such reconstruction of
his recalcitrant self as he afforded
civil libertarian idealism at home,
Fulbright denied to Jews abroad.
The 1966 Senate Concurrent
Resolution 17, which put on
record the Senate's protest
against the Soviet Union's at-
tempts to destroy the cultural
and religious life of Jews in the
Soviet Union, had been killed in
1964 in the form of a bill issued
by Sen. Abraham Ribicoff, when
Sen. Fulbright joined forces with
the State Department to white-
wash the problem of Soviet anti-
Semitism.
Resurrected in the form of
Resolution 17 a year later, it met
with Fulbright's continuing fire
when Ribicoff told the Senate
that in the Soviet Union "the Jew
has stamped on his passport
'Jew,' representing his national-
ity. A Russian Catholic does not
have 'Catholic' stamped on his
passport."
TO THIS, Sen. Fulbright
replied that "the idea of Jews
be^.g a nationality is not con-
fined to the Soviet Union .. .
(Prime Minister) Ben Gurion
regards the Jews as a nation."
All of this explains Fulbright
as a foreign agent for Arab in-
terests today .The question then is
why, if U of M President Foote
hopes to help Miami address the
community's major problems, he
invited Sen. Fulbright to par-
ticipate in his inaugural.
The answer, most likely, is that
Sen. Fulbright is President
Foote's father-in-law. This apart,
Fulbright most assuredly has a
long and vigorous record in tne
United States Senate. He also
has some good academic cre-
dentials, no doubt, including the
fact that one of the most coveted
scholarships for American stu-
dents abroad bears the Fulbright
But the Senator's record on
Jews and Israel is, from the Jew-
ish community's point of view, a
mean and aMrw thing. Par-
ticularly during his last two
terms in the Senate, he gave con
cemed American Jews just cause
to be both enraged and
humiliated by him
THE SENATOR may have
owned up to his weakness on civil
rights in the early 1960s, but his
current activities as a rogsrtated
foriegn agent show no equivalent
review of his previous injustices
Far from being able to boast of an
improved record later on "as
rl as anybody's" he seems on
contrary committed to even
further level* of, anti-Israel
ectrvity than before
Were those considerations
weighed in President Foote's
decision to give Sen. Fulbright so
suspicious a send-off at his
inaugural? If they were and than
set aside as unimportant, then
why? If they were not weighed at
all, then why not?
Miami today is a community
polarised to the hilt to a great
extent spurred on to this un-
enviable condition by the selfish-
ness and obtusenees of public
figures, including politicians,
both locally and nationally. In
the struggle for power and pres-
tige, the Jewish community has
simply lain down and died, sub-
mitting to the onslaught of
latinism specifically and phony
mternationahsmgewt
f*HAP8 this nJ*
"^fcy' toifferSS'
k* senaitrvitie,
emmpuB stand facilitWi
U pUknthropy o, ^
&!*!&!!**>
roote truly meant h
WMiamUtia'Jj*
he should have avoided^!
*> -void rnsiunTuI
polarization evenrnor* enJJ
hi the form of an i
States Senator is not 1]
Thetaeueisthefutur.o(
end whether, in the Ij
^racaoea scheme of thin
Jewish community sw>S
be humiliated yet ag4 I
bright attitudes seeded
heart end mind.
[thou
[thai
tths
U.S. VISA OFFICE
-iPortrottEisiwEi
ANyTrwNG-rTONiyqor
MeouroFRuasiA!
TENTS
CHAWS TABUS
OtASSWARf
ero
rMVTME
RfMTAl
HATWAM
CHINA
rOCXrlOOBl
my 1 "H
Children. Adolescents and Adulu
Psychotherapy and letting
|XKW7S777b
GARY M. EISENBERG, PH.D.
Clinical and Consulting INvchoJony
u U Lake Ida Road
Suite ID-Delray Medical Complev
Defray Beach, ft J344S
It**!*
vw
Camp Maccabee
An exciting Summer experience within a
Jewish atmosphere.
Varied activities include:
ft *Aeatt4SBB\ssla wwmrwntj iimuimjuuii
Free Swim OeNy
Arts and Crafts
rleM Tripe
I Mheeett-eatteiM
For Information call
South County Jewith Fadoratlon
369-2737
Jewlah Community Centef Depertmnt


-DecnberUUM
Mb*Oil fc%e*^%* i
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Pag* 11
^Jewish Agony in
a Dying Detroit
Ghorbal Urges Israel to Change Attitude
,, few Jew* among
[rr^ds of assembly line
Bering lengthy layoffs
M ,uto iwlustry struggles
rnprecedented problems of
ZT its products to a new
E( record high charges for
L and credit, according to
Jrt by the Jewish Welfare
rion of Detroit.
,irly, there are few Jews
r production workers in the
fsteel industries, equally
1^_ by the ripple effect of
nharp cuts in auto output.
^ that does not mean that
lii Detroit and other auto
ition centers have not been
(in many cases seriously
REPORT in the Jewish
of Detroit, by Esther
jrt of the Federation,
_, Margaret Weiner, direc-
U\professional services at the
\ Family Service, as de-
j that while Jews '.'are not
illy on the line." within six
I months "after the initial
undinis impact of maaaive
Is,' the Jewish community
lit"
nuel l^rner, JFS executive
.or, said small businessmen,
filing small Jewish business-
i, "are just not doing aa much
ss because their clients are
j working." He aaid such
professionals as doctors
dentists also have been
_ by the layoffs. When
my financed health in-
ace is lost by laid-off
nbly workers, they some
cannot afford to pay for
I and dental care and this
the Jewish doctor and
," Lernersaid.
Uhert Ascher, executive direc-
i if the Jewish Vocational
rce. said the agency became
re of a jump in Jewish job-
less in Detroit in January
. producing a backlog of
_j for the agency, which seeks
[help persons find and keep
table jobs.
.CHER ASSERTED that
was "structural unemploy-
at" in the auto industry,
ning that the non-Jews dis-
. by that process "will be
eting with Jews for jobs in
ted or other fields." He re-
J that, in recent months, the
had been helping formerly
Mrorking wives now seeking
i to supplement the principal
dwinner's income.
ne effect, it was reported, has
_ "an alarming increase" in
r breakup of Jewish families in
oit. as an increasing number
|divorced women can no longer
, home with their children
Muse they must look for work.
|The Federation reported that
sian Jewish newcomers also
suffering more joblessness,
ny having lost jobs the JVS
nd for them when they first
Hied in the Detroit area.
icher said the jobs held by non-
dish sneaking immigrants
factory work, light assembly
are directly affected by the de-
pressed Detroit economy.
MRS. WEINER said under-
employment, in which an em-
ployee takea a salary cut or a
demotion rather than lose the
job, also is a problem for many
Detroit Jews. Ascher said Jewish
workers are working fewer hours
than they would prefer, or they
are in jobs which do not fully
utilize their educational back-
ground and work experience.
Mrs. Weiner also reported that
existing problems in the family
such as handling teenagers or
marital difficulties may
worsen when a breadwinner loses
his or he/ job or when inflation
forces a reluctant housewife to
enter the job market.
She also reported that a grow-
ing number of jobless Jews have
been seeking counseling at the
JFS because they have lost the
insurance, formerly a job fringe
benefit, which allowed them to
get private psychiatric coun-
seling.
The slump has meant increased
demands on the Hebrew Free
Loan Association, said executive
secretary Florence Schwartz. She
said some borrowers are finding
it hard to repay the interest-free
loans. She added that while the
agency "may have to call people
more and keep after them," the
loan association was not "ex-
periencing any real traumatic
problems. The majority are
paying" back their loans.
BOSTON (JTA) -
Ashraf Ghorbal, Egypt's
Ambassador to the United
States, said here that Israel
should "change its atti-
tude, doing away with its
image as an unhappy occu-
pier and create a relaxed at-
mosphere that would in-
duce Palestinians to join
the autonomy talks."
Ghorbal said that "despite
three decades of fears, doubts
and misconceptions, Egypt can
fill the role of bridge between Is-
rael and the Palestinians Ha
also urged that the ceasefire
across the Israel-Lebanon border
be expanded into a peace treaty
"as the first step toward mutual
recognition by Israelis and
Palestinians."
THE EGYPTIAN Ambsaeey
dor's remarks wan part of an ad-
draaa to 4.000 delegates attend
ing the Union of American
Hebrew Congregation 66th bien
nial convention bare. Ghorbal
accepted a poahumous award
from the UAHC to the late
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat, for "sarvicee to the world
community."
Ghorbal called Sadat a
of great viaion" and said Sadat's
successor, President Hosni
Mubarak, is a "man in Sadat's
image" who is committed to
strengthening relations with Ia-
rael while at the same time ful-
filling the commitments of the
A void Elitism
And Be Kind to
Non-Orthodox Jews
LERNER SAID the JFS has
hired a social worker, Esther
Krystal, to implement an effort
to actively seek out the jobless,
the underemployed and the
working poor in the Jewish com-
munity. He said there may be
such Jews having emotional
crises related to their unemploy-
ment and that "we would like to
talk to them."
Lerner said help will be tailored
to special need. Persons whose
jobless benefits have expired will
be informed about which public
agencies can provide financial aid
and whether the JFS can provide
emergency help. He said that, in
some cases, JFS staff members
will discuss with the client the
possibility of relocation to
another state where jobs in his or
her specialty may be more plen-
tiful.
JTA News Feature
AN AGENCY OF SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION
. he Jewish Family & Children's Service offers
Ifflarriage & family counseling, individual counseling,
Senior citizens program, help with readjustment
Problems, parenting skills, & referrals. The fee is on a
tiding scale, office hours are Monday through Friday
Tom 9 to 5, evenings by appointment.
jS
3200 N. Federal Hwy.
Suite 226
Boca Raton, Fl. 33431
(305) 395-3640
PORT CHESTER, N.Y.
(JTA) A dean of a
Rabbinical seminary and
two leading Orthodox
rabbis warned "a rapidly
growing American Ortho-
dox Jewish community to
avoid the attitude of elitism
in its relationship with
Jews."
Addressing more than 3,000
Orthodox Jews from this country
and abroad attending the three-
day 59th convention of Agudath
Israel of America here, Rabbi A.
llenoch Leibowitz. dean of the
Chofetz Chaim Rabbinical
Seminary in Queens, N.Y., called
on Orthodox Jews to "attract
unaffiliated Jews by setting an
example of superior moral stand-
ards."
IT IS ESSENTIAL, he aaid,
"to address our alienated
brethren as our equals rather
than talking down to them." At
the same time, Leibowitz called
on Orthodox Jews to "perfect
their own religious observance
before reaching out to others
not as an act qf self-centeredness,
but as a means of being worthy of
helping others."
The spiritual leaders of
Agudath Israel chapters called
on Orthodox Jews to re-examine
their observance of such religious
standards as kashruth and ethics
in business. Rabbi Moshe Heine-
man of the Agudath Israel in
Baltimore said that the Jewish
community "should be ap-
plauded for its success in making
kosher food so widely available,"
but he criticized those who
"make summary judgments
about the validity of kashruth
supervision without knowing the
facta."
Heineman also congratulated
rabbinical authorities in Israel for
cracking down against fraudulent
religious articles, such as tefillin
and mezuzos exported to this
country.
RABBI NISSON Alpert of the
Agudath Israel of Far Rockaway,
N.Y., condemned the "abuse of
specific religious laws pertaining
to business ethics." He added:
"We cannot accept that Jewish
businessmen should conduct
their business in an atmosphere
where a word la not a word and a
promise is not a promise.
At a session marking the 60th
anniversary of Agudath Israel of
America.a leader of the organiza-
tion's Council of Torah Sages and
the president of the organization
agreed that Orthodoxy's goal
was "nothing abort of a complete
revival of its pre-Holocaust
strength."
Rabbi Mordechai Gifter, dean
of the Telahe Yeshiva in Wick-
> liffe. Ohio called America "the
* last Torah station." adding: "We
muat seek to introduce Torah
values to all Jews aa a guide for
their lives." He criticized "the
synthetic Judaism promulgated
by some secular Jewish leaders."
PICKING UP on this theme
wss Rsbbi Moshe Sherer. presi-
dent of Agudath Israel of
America and chairman of its
world organization. Calling "the
trauma of the three wings of
Judaism" the biggest problem
for world Jewry, he urged Ortho-
dox groups to leave religious um-
brella groups which include Re-
form and Conservative represen-
tation. He added: "How much
longer will they continue to sin
by being part of this soap bubble
of synthetic Judaism?"
Camp David agreements.
Meanwhile, Samuel Lewis.
U.S. Ambassador to laraa*.
inching s rare eppearance before
o^* defacto retationship a.
symbolized by the signing of the
memorandum of understating
last week by U.S. Defanae Sec-
retary Caspar Weinberger and
Israeli Defense -Minister Arts*
Sharon. .____.
LEWIS ADDED that Israel
was "more powerful than any
time in her hiatory thanks to the
help of the United States. He
said the Csmp Dsvid process was
the only agreed upon solution to
the problem of the Palestinians.
While scknowledging past
differences because of ''differing
rolce. responsibilities, assess
menta and expectationa." Lewis
aaid. "There has been no erosion
in the deep historic, bipartisan
American commitment to I arael a
security and permanence.
Also addressing the UAHC.
the central body of Reform Juda-
ism Li the U.S.. wss Ephraim
Evron, Iarael's Ambassador to
the United States. In one of hie
final appearances before retiring
aa the Israeli envoy. Evron ssid
V S Israel relations were even
closer today than they were three
veers ago. when he assumed his
pst. He predicted that "this
closeness will continue.'"
Citing Israel's growth and de-
velopment, Evron ssid Israel a
security and the chances of peace
depend on four fundamental con-
siderationa: the strength of Is-
rael's defense forces; Israel's
economic viability and social co-
hesion: the commitment of world
Jewry to Israel's security: and
the apecial and unique relation-
ship between Israel and the U.S.
Boca Raton Laundry &
Dry Cleaners
30 SE1 Street
Boca Raton
Happy Chanukah
Ieu.ai
S4>
Elegant Distinctive, and
Personalized Catering
Complete Party
Coordination
Kosher Catering
Available
P.O. Box 187 Wast Palm Baach
6556161
NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINING
Buying Silver, Gold and Coin*
Paying Areas Highest Prices
Spencer Square
2550 Ofcsechobee Blvd
West Palm Beach
(305)684-1771

Volunteer Help Wanted
I wish to volunteer any services for
. Stuffingo...
. Writing invitations (I havs a nice handwriting)
Typing
Ns
Wa thank you. Ws could not run Federation without your volunteer
heap. Piaaaa return Una form to:
Sooth County Jewish Federation
2200 N. Federal Highway
Suite 206


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of South County
/^r-D^J
' >l
?'*

fens I
.iW}^M-^; .
~ .
s**i
^^BJ
\. '. ^Sr-^^pa^ flBnHHHn KB
hi


**
\"<
z'

' .-- ,
?1Sfa
&





v
Doctor, Lawyer, Rabbi, Chief.
It shouldn't surprise you that a number of our
students become rabbis. After all. we are the only
Yeshiva University.
But doctors and lawyers? And business
chiefs, too?
Yes.
Yeshiva Universitywith its 15 schools,
divisions and affiliatesis an extraordinary, one-of-
a-kind learning, service and research institution.
Dedicated to keeping the tradition of Judaism alive.
And committed to giving men and women, of all
religions, the finest higher education available today
On our campuses. youTl find a faculty which
includes one of the world's outstanding Talmudic
scholars and the only female Nobel Prize Laureate
in the United States. YouTl learn about on-going
research projects in the fields of solar energy, elec-
tronics, and gerontologyas well as Holocaust
and Sephardic studies. And youTl come across spe-
cial seminars on subjects ranging from "Antiques
and Judaica" to "Financial Planning for Women."
We have seven specialized libraries, hous-
ing some 850,000 volumes. A fascinating museum
devoted to ancient and contemporary Hebraica
and Judaica. An expert who investigates commu-
nication among dolphins. And that's only the
beginning.
Practically everyone in the world has heard
about the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. (But
how many know that it's part of Yeshiva University?)
Rated among the top medical schools in the na-
tion, Einstein has graduated almost 3.000 brilliant
physicians and scientists. It has been applauded
as a medical research center-with life-saving pro-
grams in cancer, heart disease, liver and kidney
ailments, neurological and brain disorders, diabetes,
and more.
Only five years old, our Benjamin N. Cardozo
School of Law has already made a name for itself.
A member of the first graduating class was appoint-
ed clerk to a United States Supreme Court Justice.
And right now at our Wurzweiler School
of Social Work a Protestant minister, a Roman
Catholic priest, and eleven rabbis are getting their
masters in a program that is the first of its kind
for clergy.
If all this comes as a surprise to you. there
should be one thing that doesn't. Tuition alone can-
not possibly finance and maintain our present
programs. Tuition alone won't provide the kind d
higher education Yeshiva students demand and
deserve.
We need your support
The Century Campaign aims to raise
$100 million for the UiTrverstty's immediate and
long-term needs. Please join our list of
distinguished donors.
Your grft-whether big or small-will truly
make a difference to our future doctors, lawyers,
rabbis, and chiefs.
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY CENTURY CAMPAIGN
PImm Mad your taxdaductibiacontribution, payable to Yaahiva Univaraity Uy Flactaa --- mt i
71at8tt-t.8afc.iaM IB, *ag41Jay, 11 Drhr O^y f>-b f^d. f ^J^xSmSm^llS^
talHk.MarMteBeQBtMt Mr. Mi-Mr f^**^8tt'^+
Dfc-actorSouthaaatRagkm.