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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( September 4, 1981 )

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
September 4, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00047

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Added title page title:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
September 4, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00047

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
[_ Number 18
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Defray Beach and Highland Beach
[Federation to Participate
In Establishing
ivernmental Affairs Office
Boca Raton. Florida Friday, September 4, 1981
Fnd MM
Pace 35 Cents
Arcbishop Reborn
Capucci Said to be Prime PLO Advocate
V Baer. President of
, County Jewish Feder-
unces that the Feder-
, participate with the
i Federations in Florid*
shing a governmental
ce in Tallahassee.
n, a former State
alive from Miami has
| as the Director of that
tres9es that especially
Reagan administration
ortant social legislation
be funneled through
ernments, and it has be-
ucial that the Jewish
in this state be
epresented.
bvemment affairs office
the responsibility of
developing relationships with key
legislators and key personnel of
departments in health, welfare,
education and human services
areas. It will also be the responsi-
bility of Mrs. Bloom to track leg-
islation and other governmental
activities and to alert the Florida
Jewish communities when local
or state-wide activities is in-
dicated.
It is expected that the Jewish
governmental affairs office will
also publish a newsletter and
other informational mailings to
Jewish organizations throughout
the state. An important part of
Mrs. Blooms' responsibility will
be the offering of assistance in
the procurement of state grants
for Jewish communal organiza-
tions.
umkerman Appointed to
\da Regional Campaign Cabinet
Jean I-evy, chairperson of
rida Regional Campaign
for the Women's Divi-
de United Jewish Appeal,
es the appointment of
Schankerman as the
iiniv representative on
net.
lorida Regional Cabinet
es the Women's Cam-
the 10 Florida Federa-
acts as a liaison be-
i local campaign cabinet
National UJA office in
tCity.
Schankerman is a
of the Board of the
&unty Jewish Federation
been a committee
of the Advance Gifts
for the Women's Cam-
he has been active in the
Division since its in-
Schankerman is a
| of Temple Beth El and
i officer in Sisterhood
ember of the Temple
Eichler, Assistant Ex-
Director of the South
Berenice Schankerman
County Jewish federation said,
"I can't think of a better choice
to represent our Federation than
Berenice Schankerman. Berenice
was part of a small group of
women that started it all here in
Boca Raton and Delray Beach.
We have been fortunate to have
her as a part of our Women's
Campaign."
NEW YORK The anti-Is-
rael, pro-PLO activities of Greek
Catholic Archbishop Hilarion
Capucci are detailed by a fellow
Catholic clergyman in a report
issued by the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
The clergyman. Abbot Leo A.
Rudloff, says it is with "reluc-
tance" that he exposes "certain
discreditable characteristics" of
Archbishop Capucci, who was
imprisoned in Israel in 1974 for
smuggling terrorist arms into the
country and released three years
later, after Vatican intercession,
on condition that he refrain from
anti-Israel activity.
IN ANNOUNCING the report,
Theodore H. Freedman, director
of ADL's Program Division,
noted that the Italian Jewish
community has lodged protests
with the Vatican over Arch-
bishop Capucci'8 pro-PLO prop-
aganda activities. He said that
according to a Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency report from
Rome dated July 29, Archbishop
Capucci "has emerged as the
foremost propagandist for the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization in Italy, if not in all
Western Europe."
Italian Jews, the JTA report
continued, are concerned over the
Italian media's unquestioning
acceptance of Archbishop
Capucci's propaganda "while ig-
noring his involvement with
terrorists."
In addition to the Arch-
bishop's anti-Israel. pro-PLO
record. Abbot Rudloff's 21-page
report also points out that the
prelate supported Ayatollah
Khomeini against the United
States during the hostage crisis.
Abbot Rudloff. now living in
Weston Priory in Vermont, was
abbot of the Dormition Abbey in
Jerusalem for 20 years and was
personally acquainted with Arch-
bishop Capucci. He quotes
reliable sources as saying that
Pope John Paul II reprimanded
the prelate following his release
from an Israeli prison in 1977.
THE PAPAL criticism, ac-
cording to the sources quoted by
Abbot Rudloff. came during an
audience that the Pontiff granted
Archbishop Capucci in 1979.
After the meeting, the Arch-
bishop made a declaration to the
effect that the Pope "under-
stood" his struggle because of his
own experience in fighting the
Nazis in World War II. Abbot
Rudloff declares, however, that:
"According to reliable sources,
when Capucci told the Pope I
defenced my people just as you
did in Poland,' the Pope raised
his finger at him and said, 'In
Poland we defended morality
without engaging in politics,
whereas you engaged in politics
without taking morality into
account.' "
Abbot Rudloff recounts the
steps leading up to the agreement
between Israel and the Vatican
under which the Archbishop was
released after serving only three
years of his 12-year sentence.
Under the accord, Archbishop
Capucci was to be posted "far
from the I Middle East" and
"would not be allowed to make
anti-Israel propaganda."
ACCORDING TO Abbot Rud-
loff, the prelate first violated the
agreement by leaving his new
post in Caracas, Venezuela, and
traveling to Damascus in
January, 1979, where he attended
meetings of the Palestine
National Council.
This prompted a Vatican
statement that Archbishop
Capucci made the trip "on his
own initiative, without the
authorization of the Holy See and
without having previously in-
formed the Holy See."
Subsequently, Archbishop
Capucci was assigned by the
Vatican to new duties as a
"visitor or inspector" in connec-
tion with Greek-Melchite com-
munities in Europe, with head-
Continued oa Page 5
Pending Modifications
F16's Grounded Indefinitely
Following Crashes in UJS.
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) The F16 warplanes for
Israel, which were released from the embargo the U.S.
had imposed, will continue to be grounded for an indefi-
nite period, Pentagon officials said.
The officials told the Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
the planes are under flight restrictions because of "modi-
fications" that must be made. "We are not even in a posi-
tion to guess on when we will have them ready," the JTA
was told.
THE PENTAGON began repairs on the F16s last
week after one of the planes crashed in Utah, and its pilot
was killed. The U.S. grounded all the F16s in this coun-
try, and other countries with U.S.-made F16s did so
"voluntarily," a Pentagon official said. The problem re-
portedly is with the planes' flight control computers.
Meanwhile, Pentagon officials said that the F15s due
for delivery to Israel, now at the McDonnell-Douglas
plant in St. Louis, "will depart for Israel after the U.S.
Air Corps and tanker support have been arranged and
when all required preflight tests have been made. We do
not have an exact time yet.''
'nai Torah Welcomes New Cantor and EducutionDinctor
... u^i^ r% ^BBBBBBBa^- ssB
B'nai Torah is proud to an-
nounce the appointment of Ben
*dler as their new Cantor, and
iadassa Weiner, as the new Ed-
ucation Director.
Cantor Ben Adler, who has
erved as a Cantor in Wilmette,
II and Tallahassee, Fla., also
holds a Master of Music from
Florida State University. He has
directed and produced operas
pndsr the Florida Arts Council,
land has also appeared in several
I operas and musicals, including
[Magic Fhita" and "Fiddler on
I the Roof-
Cantor Adler. born in Israel
I came to the United States in
1969. He and his wife, Gail, are
the parents of two sons, Abra-
ham Joshua and Jeremy h
Hadassa Weiner comes to
B'nai Torah from the South
Cdunty Jewish Community Day
School of Boca Raton, where she
served as director, coordinator ol
Judaic-Hebrew studies, and
teacher during the past two
years. Her experience in Hebrew-
Judaic education includes
curriculum development, teacher
training, and classroom teaching
at a number of grade levels.
Mrs. Weiner, born in Eastern
Europe, received her elementary
and secondary education in
Israel. In addition to serving as
principal of B'nai Torah sReh-
Sous School. Hadwsa Weiner
wUl be responsible for the general
educational and cultural program
of the synagogue ?**
Adult Education and youth pro-
grams.

Cantor Bin AdUr
Hadassa Wtinsr


Page 2
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, September 4j
Temple Beth El Announces Its Young
Artists Series "Sunday at Three9 Concerts
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
announces that their second
season of the Young Artists
Series Sunday At Three" will
feature Olga Rostropovich,
cellist, on Sunday, Jan. 31, 1982.
Daughter of the renowned cellist,
Mstislav Rostropovich, she is one
of today's most promising young
performers. As soloist, she has
appeared with the Orchestre de la
Suisse Romande, the Basel Sym-
phony, The Brazil Symphony,
and at the Corcoran Gallery in
Washington, D.C.
Beverly Hoch, coloratura
soprano, and Daniel Phillips,
violinist, will be featured in the
second concert on Sunday, Feb.
21. Miss Hoch, was a regional
winner of the Metropolitan Opera
Auditions in 1977 and a 1979
winner of the Young Concert
Artists International. She was
soloist with the Oklahoma. St.
Louis, and Austin Symphonies
and has sung leading roles with
the St. Louis Opera Theatre.
Daniel Phillips was awarded
the prestigious Michaels Award
of the Young Concert Artists and
has performed in the "Mostly
Mozart" Festival at Lincoln
Olga Rostropovich
Center, the Marlboro and Santa
Fe Festivals, as well as numerous
recital appearances. On Sunday.
March 14. Ken Noda. pianist, will
be the featured artist. In 1977, at
age 16. Ken Noda made his debut
with the New York Philharmonic
followed by his London debut
with the English Chamber Or-
chestra conducted by Daniel Bur
enboim. This past summer, he
was soloist with the Chicago
Symphony, James Levine con-
ducting. He is also a composer
and has written five operas.
The final concert of the Series
will be on Sunday, March 28,
with the Cleveland Duo. Stephen
Warner, violin and viola, and
Carolyn Gadiel Warner, piano
and violin, are a young husband
and wife team. Both are members
of the Cleveland Symphony
Orchestra. They are now recog-
nized as one of the foremost
chamber music twosomes on the
international chamber music
touring circuits.
An added feature of these af-
ternoon concerts, which will be
held at 3 p.m. in the temple
sanctuary, will be a reception in
honor of the artists following
each performance. All sub-
scribers will be invited to the
receptions and refreshments will
be served.
Seats will be sold only by sub-
scriptions to all four concerts.
There will be no reserved seats.
Seating at each concert will be
first come, first seated. For
further information, please call
the Concert Office at 391-8600.
Robert Segal
More Battering for Public School System
drop-outs, the scarring of teach-
ers by blackboard jungle types all
rise to the top of public school
agendas.
America's public school sys-
tem, still nostalgically regarded
by many as the mortar in the cru-
cible of democracy, is battered
now by the newest Coleman
Report and by the concomitant
intensified demand for legislation
to provide tax loopholes for par-
ents preferring private schools.
Commissioned by one arm of
the U.S. Department of Educa-
tion, the current study by Dr.
James Coleman of the University
of Chicago gives high marks to
Catholic high schools and bul-
warks Coleman's campaign to
have government school
vouchers paid to parents, rich
and not so rich. Money flying out
of that Pandora's box may well
wreck the public education sys-
tem.
THIS DEVELOPMENT de-
lights a host of Americans. It
pleases an army of foes of school
integration. It gives muscle to
the Moynihan-Packwood-Roth
legislative proposal calling for a
tax assist of $250 the first year
and $500 thereafter for parents ol
private school students. It helps
drive another nail into the coffin
of plans for busing to achieve in-
tegration. It dispatches joy into
the hearts of New Rightists who
are pressing President Reagan to
get on with some of their pet
projects including public school
praying. It emboldens and en-
heartens managers of private
schools plagued by inflation.
On the other side of the ledger,
it dismays many citizens who see
tuition tax credit grants and
various school voucher plans as
instruments of destruction for
w the constitutional tradition and
* reality of church-state
<* separation. (It is estimated that
85 percent of children in Ameri-
can private schools are parochial
school students.)
It alarms thousands who see in
the trend to establish more
private schools a dodge to extend
<* school segregation. It makes
some economy-minded law-
makers wonder where the esti-
" mated additional schooling coat
of $4 to $6 billion will be coming
from. It disturbs public school
administrators and school board
members who see in the plan the
dumping into public schools of
problem children along with more
v responsibility to mainline handi-
? capped boys and girls.
* "THE DANGER," says a
Newsweek round-up, 'ia that
public schools could eventually
become the last resort an edu-
cational scrapheap for the
poorest and least motivated chil-
dren in the nation's underclass."
Dr. Coleman, some of whose
previous studies have stirred
storms of debate and protest, has
now said of one of his earlier
reports "what once appeared to
be fact is now known to be fic-
tion." But this time around, the
current rough political climate,
together with mounting attacks
on public education, seems likely
to leave scant room for a debate
as to what is fact, what fiction.
For public school troubles
mount daily. Imposition of tax
caps, such as Boston's crippling
Proposition 2'i. are eroding
curricula, driving teachers into
the ranks of the unemployed, and
severely damaging the structure
of the public school system.
Battles over the demand for
multi-lingual instruction induce
community quarreling.
School vandalism demoralizes
school management and weakens
school cost-effectiveness. Drug-
users, alcoholism, teen-age preg-
nancies, the problems of children
from broken homes, mounting
DR. COLEMAN'S 1966 study
on the effects of racial segre-
gation in the schools; his later
study attacking court-ordered
busing, and some of his public
utterances have fueled fierce de-
bates. Now he has startled, if not
infuriated, many with this pro-
nouncement: "The evidence is
strong that the Catholic schools
function much closer to the
American ideal of the 'common
school,' educating children from
different backgrounds alike, than
do the public schools."
Shall we then opt to send Jew-
ish children into Catholic schools
for the sake of Dr. Coleman's
"ideal" pattern? Are religious
sensibilitites to be tossed into a
new educational mixing bowl?
These are not days of sunshine
for one of America's proudest
heritages the public school
system.
Homing Starts Rise Nine Percent
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Housing starts in Israel in 1981
rose almost nine percent over the
previous year, the largest jump
since 1976, according to a report
issued last month by the Builders
and Contractors Association in
Israel. Association president
David Stern reported that 70,370
apartments were built at the end
of March 1981, compared with
around 64,000 during the sam i
period last year.
The increase in housing
construction followed four years
of sluggish building activity,
Stem said. In 1976, 76,230 apart-
ments were built; that figure
dropped to 60,130 in 1977,
slumped further to 56,480 in
1978; rose slightly to 64,410 in
1979 and remained at that level
thoughout1980.
In the third quarter of 1981,
Stern put area construction for
apartments and commercial
buildings at more than 53 million
square feet.
TEMPLE SINAI
Of Palm Beach County
A REFORM HEBREW CONGREGATION
(member U H C ,
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
RABBI SAMUEL SILVER. D.D.. officiating
CANTOR BETTY ROBBINS
LIMITEDTICKETS AVAILABLE
For Information Call:
JERRY GILBERT
499 5563
SIDPEAHCE
498 1098
SID BERNSTEIN
732 5807
Organization
In The News
For Further Information on
Area Organizations, Call
South County Jewish Federation,
in Boca Raton, 368-2737
B'NAI B'RITH
WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Woman, Naomi
Chapter, will hold its regular
meeting at Temple Emeth on
Sept. 21 at 12:30 p.m. Guest
speaker will be the esteemed
Rabbi Samuel Silver.
HADASSAH
Hadasaah Ben Gurion will hold
its opening meeting Sept. 17,
12:30 p.m. at Temple Emeth.
5780 W. Atlantic Avenue, Delray
Beach. An interesting skit is
planned, and refreshments will be
served. Please keep the following
dates open, as we are planning
some interesting trips: Nov. 3
and 4 Cost of the two-day trip
will be $110. You will stay at the
Holiday Inn, West Palm Reach.
Included Two full breakfasts,
two dinners, a visit to the Elliot
Museum on Hutchinston Island.
Two theater performances one
at the Musicana in West Palm
Reach and one at the Burt Rey-
nolds Dinner Theater in Jupiter
where you will see a performance
of Fiddler on the Roof. Call Yetta
Rosenthal or Belle Isakoff for
reservations. Nov. 8 A trip to
Deerfield Beach to see the well-
known Billie Hyman perform in,
"A Biography of a Hero." The
play will begin at 2 p.m. and the
tickets are $2.50 per person. For
reservations, call Lillian Newman
or Belle Isakoff. Dec. 30-31
Jan. 1,1962 A trip from Kings
Point to Tampa. Included will be
two dinner theaters, a New
Year's party and a champagne
breakfast. Sightseeing A trip
to Busch Gardens, African I
Safari, and a boat ride on Sarasn.
ta Bay. For reservations call
Ruth Schiller or Yetta Rosenthal
BOCA RATON AVIVA
Boca Raton Aviva Chanter! I
Hadasaah will hold its firJJ I
meeting of the season on Sent
23. 12:30 p.m. at B'nai Tofi
Congregation, 1401 N.w. 4ln
Avenue. An important con-
vention report will be given by a
member of our Florida Central
Region of Hadassah. Members |
ana guests are urged to attend.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN
ORT
OUT Delray A regular
meeting will be held Sept. 23
12:30 p.m. at a new place. Ameri-
can Savings Bank on Atlantic
Avenue just east of Kings Point
main gate. Refreshments and an
interesting program will follow.
PIONEER WOMEN
Palm Beach Council of Pioneer
Women Rae Hornstein, Presi-
dent, announces that the Council
will represent the Palm Beach
area of Pioneer Women at the Pi-
oneer Women's International
Convention which will be held
Sept. 13 through the 16th. at the
Concord Hotel, Kiameska, N.Y.
TEMPLE SINAI
Sisterhood of Temple Sinai -
The first meeting of the season
will be held Monday, Sept. 21,12
noon, at Pompey Park in Delray
Beach. An interesting program
will be provided by the Morikami
Park.
OPEN AUDITIONS
South County Jewish Federation, Women's Division, will
produce a musical entitled, "New Realities" it will require
quality voices.
If people have told you that you should be in show biz,
please call the Federation office to arrange an audition
368-2737
Announcing
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
SB
Jewish Funeral Director
Your Neighborhood Funaral Director
Providing the.Emest in Jewish Funerai Service with
7 Conveniently Located Chapels
0'*MO MACH
Hlirmo mao.
477-S544
>OWMO HtCR
oca iaion n. lAueoiAii
MS-1*00 MS-SMI
cotAi tniNOi
72-7140 7J3-060
IN COOPERATION WITH KRAEER FUNERAL HOMES
'

;^wc^vv,v*vvkv/.*/.*.'f:nrv^r.v *
mm
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Reform Congregation
Founded 1923
REGISTER NOW FOR
TEMPLE ISRAEL RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Ceceil Tiahman, Educational Director
Dynamic, Experienced Teaching Staff
Kindergarten Through Confirmation
Personalized Bar-Bat Mitzvah Instruction
Stressing the Ethics and Values
Of Reform Judaism
Music Program and Choir
Youth Group Retreats, Conclaves,
Social Activities
1901 N. Flagler Drive,
Weat Palm Beach
833-6422
Affiliated with the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
, ,- + *>+* ...... tea****** w-
.4A*'* ,
m'--


L September 4. 1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
On this an& that
By RABBI
BRUCE S.WAB8HAL
Eitctrtive Director
South County
jewUh Federation
e extremely difficult to
current news on Israel
Inmost impossible to put it in
V perspective if one reads
the local press, be it the
d, Son Sentinel or any other
I newspaper.
[course reading the Jewish
helps somewhat, but
[to space limitations we can
i do claim on the definitive
(of Israeli news.
j the New York Times,
w on Poet and some other
media helps to increase
fimount of Israeli news but
the perspective im-
i since these publications
[sot particularly friendly in
L That is why I suggest that
I informed Jew should read
; the Jerusalem Post and
Near East Report.
i Jerusalem Post is a weekly
er published in Israel.
| cin receive it at your home
Friday for S36 per year.
[ sddress is: The Jerusalem
International Edition, 110
t59th Street, New York, N.Y.
I Near East Report is pub-
in Washington and is a
] newsletter received weekly.
|s more interested in com-
than in daily news. Al-
I it is not officially a part of
f\C, the Israeli lobby in
on, its ties to that orga-
are very close. A one-
subscription costs $18. Its
address is: Near East
ort, 444 North Capitol Street,
/.. Washington, D.C. 20001.
he following is a hard-hitting
honest appraisal by the
syndicated columnist, Charlie
Reese, which appeared a few
weeks back in the Boca Raton
News. I pass it along for many of
you who may not have read it in
that publication: "U.S. Should
Stand By Begin." Poor Mena-
chem Begin. The Israeli prime
minister's predicament reminds
me of that old story about Roman
emperor who stopped his proces-
sion and ordered a Jew standing
on the edge of the street to be
executed on the spot for failing to
salute his emperor.
Another Jew, standing about a
half a block down the street,
observed this so when the em-
peror's procession reached him,
he saluted smartly. "Stop,"
shouted the emperor. "Kill that
Jew for saluting the emperor."
In plain words, Begin ia not
likely to please his critics no
matter what he does. Let us not
forget this is the same man who
did what no previous Israeli
politician had ever been able to
do. He saved Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat's life by tipping
him off to an assassination plot.
He invited him to Jerusalem. He
negotiated a peace treaty, the
first in Israel's history. He gave
up the entire Sinai which Israel
had captured twice fair and
square. But, he is accused of
being intransigent.
Of course in the matter of ne-
gotiations over autonomy for
Palestinians in Judea, Samaria
and Gaza, two of the four parties
to the negotiations the
Palestinians and Jordan's King
Hussein flatly refuse to partici-
pate, but it's Begin who's being
intransigent.
The Palestine Liberation Orga-
nization, solemnly pledged to the
destruction of Israel, has killed
hundreds of Israeli civilians. It il-
B'nai Torah Congreation
High Holy Day Services
and ritual. Cantor Philip Towsner
1'nai Torah Congregation has
ounced that High Holy Days
rvices will be held once again
i year at two locations. Service
1 be conducted at B'nai Torah
ngregation, 1401 N.W. 4th
nue, Boca Raton, as in the
frt by Habbi Nathan Zelizer
listed by the synagogue's new
nwr, Ben Adler.
Auxiliary Services will be con-
fcted at Boca Teeca Country
p's Auditorium. 5800 N.W.
1 Avenue, Boca Raton. Rabbi
chael Goldberg of Piano, Tex.
" be the guest Rabbi. Rabbi
lldberg, a graduate of The
jeological Union in Berkeley,
Til. and na8 been involved in
thing and writing in fields of
pish theology and thought;
ophy of religion; liturgy
is already known for the beauty
he has added to B'nai Torah's
High Holy Days Services. Cantor
Towsner, also an attorney-at-law.
began his musical career at an
early age and has sung as a solist
with well-known Cantors as
Yosele Rosenblatt and Mordecai
Hershman.
These Auxiliary Services are
necessary due to the rapid
growth of B'nai Torah. The
present physical facilities can no
longer accomodate all of the non-
members who wish to attend
High Holy Days Services.
Anyone who wishes to make
reservations for these services or
wishes additional information,
should call the synagogue office
at 392-8666 or 392-8576.
Reagan Gets Jump on Congress;
Opens Drive for AWACS to Saudis
[WASHINGTON -
*A) President Reagan
Qt Congress on Monday
i informal notification of
Ki Administration's
oposal to sell Saudi
five AWACS recon-
ssance planes and other
pphisticated military
lipment.
[But State Department
okesman Dean Fischer
"d last Friday that the 50-
4V period in which Con-
'8^ may reject the pro-
' sale will not actually
until after Congress
'urns from its summer re-
win September.
[FISCHER SAID he could not
whether the U.S. had conv
ita negotiations with the
on the AWACS. The ne-
reportedly concern
"turned U.S.' ctohtrdl df *'
highly sophisticated planes in
order to calm the fears of Con-
gressmen opposed to the sale.
The Aug. 24 date was an-
nounced by Max Friedersdorf.
The President Assistant for Leg-
islative Affairs, at a breakfast
meeting of the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce.
legally occupies a goodly portion
of Lebanon from which it attacks
Israel. Recently, it began to move
tanks and heavy artillery into
positions a few miles from Israel.
Israel bombed the area to break
up the concentrations. The PLO
then showered two Israeli towns
in which there are no military
targets with hundreds of rockets
and artillery rounds, killing and
wounding dozens of civilians. So
far the world is quiet. Then Begin
orders an attack on the PLO's
headquarters which the PLO de-
liberately locates in the midst of
civilians. Bingo, the world ia
howling for Begins scalp.
If this were an underground
newspaper, I could describe the
reaction with one word. Since it ia
a family newspaper, I'D have to
use two: hypocritical and non-
sensical.
First, look at the U.S. govern-
ment. Hey, guys, we are the ones
who always use strategic
bombing in righting our wars. We
are the ones who burned Tokyo,
killing 243,000 people, mostly ci-
vilians. We are the ones who
dropped a Big A twice. I don't
see how we have the gall to ex-
press concern about a few civilian
casualties in Beirut which were
incidental to an attack on a
purely military target.
Second, in case you haven't
heard, the Syrians and the PLO
are on the other side. Both are
acting as agents for the Soviet
Union in taking over Lebanon.
Both are rabidly anti-American.
Yasir Arafat, the PLO leader,
never opens his mouth (unless
he's talking to an American
journalist or politician) without
ripping American imperialism.
The PLO has murdered several
American citizens, including two
of our diplomats, and attempted
to assassinate the secretary of
state. It is as much in our interest
as it is in Israel's to prevent Leb-
anon from becoming a Soviet
satellite via its PLO-Syrian
proxies. In short, it's Begin
not Arafat who is our ally. You
would never guess that listening
to the State Department.
Then there are the American
journalists who feel qualified to ,
govern Israel. Their double
standard is showing. We have
sold many billions of dollars
worth of weapons to Saudi
Arabia but I have yet to see one
of these pundits say, "Well we're
going to have to cut off the
Saudis because King Khalid has
gone too far in declaring a holy
war in Israel, sabotaging the
peace effort, funding the PLO,
raping the American consumer,
interfering in our domestic af-
fairs, and offering to rebuild
Iraq's nuclear reactor."
Even some American Jews
have jumped on Begin. Regard-
less of how much money they
send to Israel, they should get off
his back. You want to tell Begin
how to protect three million Jews
from 130 million Arabs? Then
move to Israel. Put your body
and your family's bodies in range
of the PLO's guna. Then you
have a right. Poor Begin. If only
he hated the U.S. like the Crimean
communists, we'd be nice to
him."
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FEDERATION OFFICES MOVED
The Sooth County Jewish Federation has moved Ho
offices to 2200 N. Federal Highway, Suite 206, Boca
Raton, Florida 33432. The office* are on the second floor of
the north end of the 5th Avenue Shopping Center.
Religious Directory
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Ave.. Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative. Phone 392-
8666. Rabbi Nathan Zenser. Cantor Benjamin B. Adler. Sabbath Ser-
vice*: Friday at 8:16 p.m. Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
CONGREGATION ANSHEl EMUNA
661 Brittany L., Kings Point, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Orthodox.
Harry Silver, President. Services daily 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. Saturdays and
holidays 9 a.m. Phone 499-7407.
TEMPLE ANSHEI SHALOM OF WEST DELRAY
ORIOLE JEWISH CENTER
Conservative Services at First Federal Savings A Loan Association
Offices. West Atlantic Corner Carter Road, Delray Beach. Fridays. 8
P.M. 4 Oneg Shabbat. Saturdays. 9 A.M. A Kidduah. Edward Dor-
fman, President. 6707 Moonlit Drive, Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Phone:
4996687. Rabbi Jonah J. Kahn. 499-4182. Cantor David Wechaler, 499-
8992.
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON
333 S.W. Fourth Avenue, Boca Raton, FL 33432 Reform. Phone: 391-
8900. Rabbi Merle E. Singer, Cantor Martin Rosen. Summer schedule
Sabbath Services: Friday at 8:15 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHALOM
Mailing Address: P.O. Bos 134. Boca Raton, Fla. 33432. Conservative.
Located in Century Village, Boca. Services 6:30 p.m.. Saturday 9 a.m.
Nathan Weiner, President. 483-6667 9 a.m to 12-00 a.m
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY HEBREW CONGREGATION
6780 West Atlantic Ave.. Delray Beach, Fla. 33446. Conservative.
Phone: 498-3636. Bernard A. Silver, Rabbi: Irving Zummer, Cantor.
Sabbath Services: Friday at 8 p.m. Saturday at 9 a.m Daily Minyans
at 8:46 a.m. and 6 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI
At St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 188 S. Swinton Ave.. Delray. Reform.
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1901. Delray Beach. Fla. 33444. Friday at
8:16 p.m. Rabbi Samuel Silver. President Bernard Etish 278-3716.
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Member FDIC Member Federal Reserve System


Page 4
"<.H
\---' V -- '

v*
The Jewish Floridian of South County
^^PUoibwi,]
Confused Objectives
We can understand the Jewish Agency's Leon
Dulzin as he expresses his frustration with "drop-
outs," those Soviet citizens who leave for freedom
on an Israeli passport, arrive in Vienna and then opt
for a new life in the West, predominantly with a
covetous eye on the United States.
There is something, we suppose, deceitful in
someone's declaring that his or her one desire is to go
to Israel and then to flee to the United States as fast
as possible once the iron gates of the Kremlin open
up and present a free choice as to destination.
But we object to the way in which Mr. Dulzin
expresses his anger. The other week, for example, he
said of "drop-outs" that they are traitors.
Our major concern must be to save the lives of
Jews under any circumstances, and we should be
grateful that these days we have alternative means of
doing just that. It is irresponsible to accuse Jews so
harshly who are looking for a way out of the Soviet
Union. It only complicates the present means avail-
able to us to help these Jews when, as Mr. Dulzin has
been doing, he shows the rest of the world a break in
the ranks of the world Jewish community with
respect to what should be our primary objective: not
to impose a destination on where Jewish refugees go.
but to celebrate the fact that they are going at all
Nor can we in American afford to join Mr.
Dulzin in the broad expression of his frustration and
even anguish at those Soviets who say "no" to a new
life in Israel. If we are so upset with these Soviets.
then why don't we demonstrate our belief in the
prospect of a new life in Israel by going there our-
selves?
Unlike the Soviets, we don't have to beg for exit
papers as a matter of life and death; they are ours for
the asking, no hard feelings either for friends and
family left behind.
Storm Warning Posted
President Reagan has rejected the Saudi Arab-
ian "peace plan" for the Middle East. For now, any-
way.
The President's rejection was based on the con-
: tinuing U.S. policy not to do business with the Pal-
; estine Liberation Organization until the PLO first
; recognizes Israel's right to exist within safe borders.
: That's as fine as it goes. We don't think it will go
I very far for very long.
There can be little doubt that President Anwar
j Sadat's recommendation to Mr. Reagan that the
: U.S. start talking to the PLO and the announcement
I of the Saudi "peace plan" were orchestrated
: beforehand as a simultaneous experience to occur
: during Sadat's visit the other week in the United
: States. Even if that effort has thus far failed, what is
: in the works is making the Administration ac-
: customed to demanding more and more Israeli con-
cessions until the Saudi objective and yes, even
: Egypt's, is achieved: Israel returned to its pre-1967
i borders.
Until now. the President has been remarkably
consistent in his stout defense of Israel even against
his own State Department. But Mr. Reagan, for all
of his well -propagandized leadership abilities in the
face of unpopular causes, has also been remarkably
consistent in withdrawing from many of these
strategically advanced causes once withdrawal
seemed the better part of discretion.
His brave words about Soviet world domination
in January gave way to his lifting of the wheat
embargo in April-May. His firing of 12.000 profes-
sional air transport personnel in early August is by
now a burial ground upon which his Administration
wfll likely be conceding to PATCO in September.
Friends of Israel, while they may be happy
about Mr. Reagan's Israel policy, would be well-
advised to exercise caution. In the winds of Wash-
ington change, storm damage is often unalterably
widespread and lethal.
I
fJevvish^Floridian
MLTOW kmetsky
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MmiOaaHM 1J0N Si Ma* aw xmm 1 -iTymm
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I RATES -oc* Aam tSSC Annual O imw Mnaaaai n o t>r
Amnon Golan (left), director general of Tel Aviv University, and John Bndemas fright),
president of New York University, meet at NYU. With 20,000 students, Tel Aviv University
is the largest in Israel and the world's largest Jewish institution of higher education. NYU,
the largest private university in the U.S., will celebrate its 150th anniversary this year,
beginning with the official inauguration of Dr. Brademas as president on Oct 14.
Headlines
Voting Rights Act Extension Urged
The Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith
has urged early action" by Congress in ex-
tending provisions of the Voting Rights Act for
ten years beyond its expiration next August.
The call for passage was contained in written
ADL testimony submitted this week to Rep. Don
Edwards (D Call, whose Subcommittee on Civil
and Constitutional Rights has held hearings on
the voting rights extension bill.
The statement, signed by David A. Brody.
ADL s Washington representative, noted that
the human relations agency is already on record
in fsvor of the extension as part of the Leadership
Conference on Civil Rights, an umbrella group
which testified during the public hearings-
Jerusalem's Shaare Zedek Medical Center has
inaugurated its new Hall of Remembrance.
One wall of the Hall displays the plaques, some
dating back to 1873. removed from the hospital
building on Jaffa Road and reset into a prominent
passageway in the new location. One visitor. Mrs.
Els Bendbeim of New York, found the plaque
honoring the memory of her parents from the
Netherlands who sent the generator and all of the
equipment needed to make the old Shaare Zedek
the first building in Jerusalem powered by
electricity
On the opposite wall is s tablet mmmiMjiBdj
and brought from New York by Mrs. Erica
Jesselson. chairman of the National Women's
Division in the U.S.. and herself a second gen-
eration "survivor."
antr Z20C fc
Outo>Tovn upo Hio.m
Friday. September 4. 1961
Volume 3
5 ELUL 5741
Number 16
Edwm Shapiro, president of Hias, the world
wide Jewish refugee and migration agency, has
been named to the Citixen's Comma tee for Im-
migration Reform, a non-partisan, broadly based
group in the field of migration affairs The Com-
mittee is dedicated to the promotion of a humane
and coherent immigration policy for the United
States.
The Citizen's Committee, which also includes
such prominent citizens as wj~ Civiletu
Cyrus Vance. George Rotnney. Philip Klutxnick,
and Rabbi Marc Taneabam. was founded
through the efforts of Fr Theodore Heaburgh.
president of Notre Dame University, and chair-
man of the government appointed Select Com-
mission on Immigration and Refugee Policy.
The Cnmnaaaion has conducted an exhaustive
review of US immigration poliriw asj0 pro-
cedures, and isasislsJ its J nwaaasaaa^awMaaal
to President Reagan earlier this year. Nine K
Solars, who served on the staff of the Select Com-
naseion. serves as executive director of the Ck
sten s Committee.
. Ben-Gurion Univ..
of the Negev. will hold their nation*] darner dance
rt.8^. ,6 ," t*9m **'' Pim Hot* *
Daha (Mra Lawrence) Leeds of M^k^m m
chairman and Irene (Mrs Lane) Kirkland of
Washington. D.C.. co-chairman of the black-tie
Secretary of State Henry
will receive the degree of Honorary Fellow "for
his distinguished service to peace in the Middle
East". University President Maj Gen. (Res.)
Shlomo Gaza, Israel's former director of military
Intelligence, will also participate in the program.
Arnold Forster. general counsel of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. will receive
the Ben-Gurion Negev Award The League's chief
attorney for over 40 years, Forster is a nationally-
known authority on human and constitution!!
rights.
Calling on the White House to fill the vacant
post of Assistant Secretary of State for Hunan
Rights and Humanitarian Affairs. B'nai B'rith
International has urged President Reagan "and
all U.S. policymakers" to maintain human right*
as a "significant factor" in making foreign policy
decisions.
In a resolution approved by the organization'!
Board of Governors at its annual summer meet-
ing in Grossinger. N.Y., B'nai B nth stated that
leadership by the United States can assist the
effort to contain worldwide violations of human
righte."
Failure to fill the vacant State Depirtment
post. B'nai B'rith said, could be interpreted as "i
waened U.S. commitment" to human rights
This, in turn, could lead to an open season'on
domestic political enemies in many countries-
Groups of I si line and students from many
parts of the world are taking pert in summer
seminars specially arranged for them at Bar-IUn
University. Accordin- to Avraham Pomennu.
academic secretary in charge of the program*
there has been s considerable increase mp
txapation this year. PomeranU is being "*"
by Micha Landau, of the Rabbi Joseph H L*
stein Center for Jewish Education in the Dn
pora.
The first of the groups were ISO teachers fron
Judea and Sumaria who sttended a tour-Ay
seminar organised for them by the In***?
In-Service Stodaw of the Israel Minastry d]&
cation. They ware followed by college satfaw
from throughout the United States whoM
come for a summer mator of intensive *w
A major admaustrative restructuring
National ConJsrence of Synagogue Youth- the
youth nwemant of the Orthodox UakaJMJ
nounced this wash by Harvey Bbu. chut"?
the Union's Youth Commission, and W""
Greanwald. chairman of NCSY
Rabbi Yttxchok Rosenberg, who served _NCS*
as director of national projects for the V**
years, and Rabbi Raphael B. Butler "JJJJ
and administrator with an extei^I^rSn*
in community work, have been named "j^^
tors of the organuat ion. which annually re*"-
out to over 10.000 young people searching
their Jewish heritage


September 4, 1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 6
ie Maccabiah in Israel as Seen Through
ie Eyes of Irving and Rose Rifkin
Lrfthe mort thrilling-
'^ of our livea was attending
^Lning ceremonies of the
jjjah games in Israel in
Held in the stadium in
at Gan, just outside of Tel
i- University, the stadium
-filled with 60,000 enthusias-
?<& tumultuously welcoming
.Jewih athletes from 37 coun-
I After the arrival of President
E5k Navon and Prime Min-
Menachem Begin the pro-
of athletes by country
ded onto the stadium
accompanied by the
of the Israeli Defense
(band.
plying in the balmy breezes
(the Maccabiah flag and the
j of the various nations which
.erepresenUd. Who can forget
[thrill of hearing 50,000 voices
Hatikvah! How can one
i the sorrow of the Yiskor
in memory of the 11
i slain in Munich and the
vices for Pierre Gildesgame,
President of the Maccabiah
but one week before the
i was tragically killed in an
btomobile accident.
I After the opening parade, the
hbearer, running around the
I stadium mounted the sum-
mit and kindled the flame for the
Maccabiah games.
With only the torch burning,
the stadium went dark and the
guests were asked to light a
match from the book of matches
each one was given upon entering
the stadium. What an unforget-
table sight 60,000 sparks of
light in the darkness, glowing as
though to spark with hope the
heart of each one of us.
The athletes then marched off
to the rows of seats held for them
throughout the stadium.
Now 2,500 young people from
Kibbutzim and Moshavim
throughout Israel came into the
arena and performed gymnastics,
a display of technique and preci-
sion that sent the multitude into
gasps of admiration. This was
followed by 2,500 more young
people in gay and colorful
costumes dancing Israeli dances
barefoot to the music of "Am
Yi8roel Chai." Such choreo-
graphy, such lithsome beauty of
Israeli's youth could well have
done the most prestigious
choreographer proud. As we
looked about us among our peo-
ple from so many countries, with
so many accents and dialects, one
could feel the oneness of spirit
and appreciation for these
displays of beauty and perfec-
"emple Sinai Admitted to
National Reform Movement
| Temple Sinai of Delray Beach
formally admitted into the
nily of Reform Judaism during
Irecent Sabbath eve service held
1 the group's meeting place, St.
|mi1's Episcopal Church, 188 S.
irinton Avenue, Delray Beach.
IA charter of membership in the
|nion of American Hebrew Con-
*gation. the mother institution
I over 700 liberal Jewish syna-
bgues in the Western Hemi-
bhere, was presented to Bernard
(tish, Sinai's president, by Mor-
Robinson, of Boca Raton, a
ember of the national executive
ardoftheUAHC.
|The service, which marked the
emonial installation of the
nple's officers and trustees,
marked by greetings to the
Uuctees by a galaxy of
nitaries.
[Among those who spoke were
mes Baer, president of the
rish Federation; Rabbi Bruce
Letter to
The Editor
fDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I read with interest Rabbi
ranhal's column relating to the
Dm, collation. As a New Eng-
nder for over 65 years, I don't
per recall hearing the word used
P to a snack, meal or otherwise. I
m however, say that I have
Prd it used a number of times
pre in South Florida. The of-
ers of both Beth Shalom Con-
egation (Boynton Beach) and
"o the officers of the Lake
forth Lodge Knights of
"^thias frequently use the word
en they serve coffee and after a
ting.
|I was always under the impres-
i?uat to co,,ate was to staple
fold pages together and was a
used in the printing busi-
P hope I have possibly taken
** England off the hook.
Very truly yours,
JACK KAPLAN
Delray Beach, Florida
K-S. I hope the people using
F word come from the metro-
|litan area of New York City
Jd wonder if they have an
Mwer.
Warshal, its executive director;
Irving Rifkin, executive vice-
president of Temple Beth El;
Stanford Hermann and Harry
Boreth, representing the
National Federation of Temple
Brotherhoods; Edward Law-
rence, president of the Brother-
hood of Temple Emeth; and
County Commissioners Frank
Foster, Norman Gregory, and
Mrs. Peggy Evatt. Rep. Dan
Micah, Mayor Leon Weekss of
Delray Beach; and Commissioner
Dennis Koehler, sent greetings.
In his response Bernard Etish,
Sinai's president, expressed
confidence that the young Re-
form congregation will ultimately
have its own house of worship.
The officers were installed by
Rabbi Samuel Silver.
Reborn
Capucci
Leading PLO
Advocate
Continued from Page 1
quarters in Rome. While in
Europe, Archbishop Capucci ap-
peared with PLO leader Yasu
Arafat when the latter visited
Spain in September, 1979.
Abbot Rudloff said that up to
the summer of 1980 Capucci
could be said to have acted
"without the authorization of the
Vatican which appeared em-
barrassed by his activities and
criticized him for visiting Iran. In
July, 1980, Israel's Foreign Mm-
ister Yitzhak Shamir said the
Vatican had informed Israel that
it was taking steps to honor the
agreement under which Arch
bishop Capucci was released,
Abbot Rudloff said
BUT IN August. 1980 Abbot
Rudloff went on, Pope John Paul
II "entrusted Capucci with a
delicate job in Irani to in-
tercede for the beleaguered
Catholic community there.
Archbishop Capucci, an Arab
who was spiritual leader of 4,500
Melchite Catholics who live in the
Jerusalem area, "repeatedly
smuggled arms into Israel, some
of which were used to kill inno-
cent civilians." Abbot Rudloff
said.
tion.
As though we were not already
keyed to a pitch of exhilaration,
the stadium once again went dark
and two red carpets were laid
crosswise in the center of the
arena, and our attention was
directed by the floodlights turned
to the sky, on three airplanes
flying overhead. To our utter
amazement and delight, dropping
one at a time from the planes
came 50 army parachutists, each
one guiding his parachute and
landing on his feet, smack in the
center of the square made by the
criss-crossed carpets. As each one
descended, the cheers from the
onlookers was only a bit louder
than the thumping of our hearts
and the flowing of our adrenalin.
What a sight what a thrill. The
last three parachutists came
down with flares attached to their
heels and the last two of these
descended with the Maccabiah
flag and the flag of Israel. The 15
lined up, saluted General Raphael
Eitan, Chief of Staff, who was
handed the flag which had been
placed atop the Western Wall
after the six-day war.
After the magnificent fire-
works display, rivaling the most
elaborate of any July 4th, a huge
blue balloon filled with helium
was let into the air unfurling the
Star of David aa it soared up-
ward, and this was accompanied
by thousands of silver balloons
that were released simultaneous-
ly. This is just the briefest outline
of some of the activities that took
place. There were many more
that kept up a pace of exuberance
and excitement.
To the tune of happy music,
50,000 emotionally spent and ex-
hilarated people left the stadium
and filed into the hundreds of
buses that had brought them. It
was interesting to note that on
the trip back, in our bus, there
was hardly a word exchanged and
a song sung. Each one was ab-
sorbed in his or her own thoughts
and emotions, too spent and
awed by all that had taken place.
Of course the entire evening's
events were televised for Israel,
and what a pity that the United
States television stations did not
do so as it was beamed to be
shown across the seas.
One ha s to ponder the thought
that if the Israelis can put to-
gether such a moving evening of
such magnitude and beauty while
they have to be alert for mur-
derous PLO activity, can we but
imagine what they could do if
they would be free from terrorist
attacks. Israel at peace with her
neighbors could surely be a boon
to the nations and a light unto
the world.
We have been privileged, in our
lifetime to witness many thrilling
events, but nothing we have ever
been a part of so stirred us with
emotion, pride and hope as these
opening ceremonies of the Mac-
cabiah. The tears frankly flowing
from so many eyes, the glow
lighting so many faces, were
living testimony to the resource-
fulness, the talents and the
courage of the Israelis. They cele-
brate life and its fulness in the
creation of great moments that
we, the Diaspora Jews can share.

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Vi cup chopped or whole small
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Vi cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
Vi package (lOoz.) frozen whole
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Pages
The Jewish Floridian of Sgutk-Couuty
W^S***^
/Mews in Brief
Hussein Meets With Mitterrand
)
PARIS King Hussein of
Jordan met French President
Francois Mitterrand Wednesday
for what French officials say was
a wide-ranging discussion of the
Middle East situation. Mitter-
rand is due to leave next month
for his first official visit to the
area, to Saudi Arabia, and For-
eign Minister Claude Cheysson is
starting this week a trip to
several Arab capitals, including
Damascus and Beirut, where he
is due to meet Palestine
Liberation Organization chief
Yasir Arafat.
The recent Arab slant within
the French administration is
provoking a definite uneasiness
among many French Jews. The
usually pro-Socialist weekly,
Tribune Juive, in an editorial due
to appear this week, says "the
time has come to judge the new
(French) administration on its
acts and not on its sentiments of
professed sympathies."
WASHINGTON The State
Department says that it has "no
evidence" to support a report
that Israel secretly sold Iran
spare parts and tires for
American-built F-4 fighter
bombers last October to help Iran
in its war against Iraq and at a
time when American hostages
were being held by Iran.
According to a report last
Thursday night on ABC News,
former Iranian President Abol-
hassan Bani-Sadr said in an in-
terview in Paris with ABC that
he had been opposed to any deal
with Israel but had been over-
ruled by religious leaders close to
Ayatollah Ruhollah.Khomeini. "I
was opposed. I said: If we have
to buy arms from the Israelis,
why not make peace with the
Iraqis? It would be much better,"
Bani-Sadr said.
Former Carter Administration
officials and diplomatic sources
said over the weekend that the
Israelis yielded to American
pressure not to continue their
military relationship with Iran
until the hostages were freed.
Responding to questions from
reporters, State Department
Dean Fischer stated last Friday,
"We have no evidence that any
U.S.-origin equipment or spare
parts subject to our control, has
been supplied to Iran by the gov-
ernment of Israel."
NEW YORK The National
Conference on Soviet Jewry has
learned that Viktor Brailovsky
has started his journey by pris-
oner train into internal exile, the
place of his banishment as yet
unknown. On Aug. 14, Brail-
ovsky's appeal was heard by the
Supreme Court of the RSFSR,
which upheld the conviction and
sentence of five years' internal
exile imposed by a lower court on
June 18. The prominent refusenik
scientist was convicted on alleged
charges of "fabrications which
defame the Soviet state and
social system."
JERUSALEM The two
Chief Rabbis ruled that the entire
City of David archaeological site
is a cemetery, and no excavations
are to take place. Nevertheless,
the archaeological team led by
Prof. Yigal Shilo continued its
work under heavy police pro-
tection. The scientists argued
that the rabbinical ban is not
binding and that the permit
allowing them to dig, which was
issued by the Ministry of Edu-
cation and Culture, is still in
effect.
The question now is whether
the government will abide by the
permit and consider it valid or
capitulate to religious pressure.
One indication that the issue will
become more intense were state-
ments by Religious Affairs Min-
ister Yosef Burg and the National
Religious Party's Knesset Whip
Dr. Yehuda Ben Meir, Both said
that the ruling of Ashkenazic
Chief Rabbi Shlomo Goran and
Sephardk Chief Rabbi Ovadia
Yosef was binding.
TEL AVIV A private home
in Ganei Tikva near Tel Aviv was
badly damaged Thursday when
part of the refuelling mechanism
of an Air Force plane broke off in
mid-air and fell into the living
room. The family was outside the
house at the time and was un-
harmed.
BONN Former SS official,
Heinz-Guenther Wisner, 64, goes
on trial Sept. 17 in Duesseldorf.
He is charged with the murder of
31 Jewish inmates of the Riga-
Kaiserwald concentration camp.
For the last year Wisner has been
in custody. According to a
spokesman for the Duesseldorf
Prosecutor's Office, the Nazi offi-
cial was the right hand of the
doctor stationed in the con-
centration camp. His trial is like-
ly to take six months.
PARIS President Francois
Mitterrand told Iraq that France
was willing to replace the nuclear
reactor destroyed by Israel in an
air attack last June.
Officials indicated that Mit-
terrand told Iraqi special envoy
Tareq Aziz that if replaced,
France would impose tighter re-
strictions to prevent the use of
the resctor for military purposes.
Mitterrand believes that Iraq
should not be denied materials
and technology which are pro-
vided to other countries, one
official said.
"But we want to make sure
that under no circumstance
would such supplies lead to a
proliferation of nuclear weap-
ons," the official said. "France is
opposed to nuclear proliferation."
GENEVA Israel's Ambassador to the
United Nations here, Yoel Bar Romi, will return to Jeru
salem at the end of September where he will head the
Latin American Department in the Foreign Ministry
Ambassador Ovadio Softer will replace Bar Romi here.
k 25 avkiv s& **> *-*
age has been held up by a seamen s strike. Work on un
loading 62,000 tons of coal from Australia was due to hav
begun Monday to start coal stockpiling for a new power
generating plant at Hadera Israel's first to be fired bv
coal instead of more expensive oil. y
* Reports by JTA
m
Investment Equity
Real Estate
Don Vogel
MS
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Residential-Condominium-Investment
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You can save
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That's how Master Blend can save
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Page8
77m? Jtwiah Floridian of South County
Wfcy.SepUttb.4
Normalization at Issue
Israel Critical of Egypt's Slow Pace
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Menachem Be-
gin headed the large dele-
gation in Alexandria for the
first Egyptian-Israeli sum-
mit meeting since Begin s
reelection for a discussion
of a variety of topics, in-
cluding one which is sore
point for the Israelis
what they consider the slow
pace of normalization of re-
lations between Egypt and
Israel for which they hold
Egypt responsible.
Another key topic was the
completion of Israel's withdrawal
from the Sinai peninsula,
scheduled for next April under
the Egyptian-Israeli peace
treaty. Observers said the Israeli
delegation will seek to create a
linkage between the way Israel
will evacuate the Sinai and the
nature of relations between the
two countries.
OBSERVERS said that nor-
malization of relations and Sinai
evacuation arrangements have
been given precedence, as far as
the Israelis are concerned, over
resumption of the talks on
autonomy for the Arabs of the
West Bank and the Gaza Strip,
also required by the Egyptian-
Israeli treaty, which have been in
a state of supension for the past
14 months.

i

J&s?
Bl
Iff **"*'
Israeli officials reportedly feel
that they will have more leverage
to expand normalization before
completion of the Sinai with-
drawal than after.
As the Israelis see it, an evacu-
ated Sinai peninsula will serve as
a bridge between Israel and
Egypt, and the peninsula will be
open to a free flow of tourist
traffic, both by auto and train.
Airfields in the Sinai will be used
for civilian purposes, and postal
services will operate on the
ground as well as by air.
Israel also wants a step-up of
the normalization process in such
areas as larger operations of
Israeli corporations in Egypt,
youth delegations exchanges and
more cultural ties.
UNDER THE peace pact, Is-
rael must turn over to the Egyp-
tians the civilian and military in-
frastructures they created during
their occupation of Sinai, but at a
regular Sunday Cabinet meeting
there were expressions of differ-
ing views as to just what parts of
those infrastructures should be
handed over to Egypt.
Moat Cabinet Ministers urged
that everything movable should
be dismantled and brought back
to Israel, with only the immov-
able components left behind. But
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon, a
member of the delegation going
to Alexandria, and three Liberal
Minister suggested that Israel
leave behind a considerable
quantity of buildings and equip-
ment, but on a purchase-by -
Egypt basis.
Begin was expected to raise in
Alexandria the resumption of the
autonomy talks, but he was not
expected to try for a formal un-
derstanding on which talks could
be resumed, primarily because
the two countries are so diamet-
rically opposed on many prin-
ciples affecting the autonomy
goals. Egypt's Foreign Minister
Kamal Hassan AH, said over the
weekend that the autonomy talks
are not likely to resume until
after the completion of President
Reagan's meetings with Mideast
leaders at the end of the year. Be-
gin determined that Israel had
no more to offer than it had al-
ready offered, was seen likely to
agree with this approach.
THE SADAT-Begin summit
lasted two days. It included three
work sessions between the two
leaden, with parallel talks be-
tween ministers of both coun-
tries. Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon stayed in Egypt until the
end of the week.
According to reports from
Cairo, the Egyptians showed
special interest in Sharon's recent
intensive contacts with leaders of
the West Bank. Egyptians have
expressed their hope that this ac-
tivity would pave the
resumption of the
tflks and the establish*..
P^^ttofen trust in theasuS
Sharon met last weekut
the artt,among that?
Bank leaders. Elias FreTi,
of Bethlehem, and Ai
Hat*, former Coven*^
salem. Both are consider
Jordanian moderates He
also reportedly meet with M*
BasswnShakaofNablus.r
referred to by Israeli mihu
government officials as "
commander in the territories
It t our concession to to* ntl-wtillng lobby.
P'elonaN
11 M
WITH A
n\\:<\
TZ IN HAIFA
DIAL DIRECT
Does your area hove Inrernorionol Dialing? Then you con coll around rhe world
in almost no rime. How? Dy dialing yourself. Wirhour Operator assisrance. And
wirhour waiting. Here's how ro dial Haifa:
Ml INAnONAl ACCIM CCX*
COUNTRY CCOC
cirrcooe
011 + 972 + 4 + LOCAL NUMDER
Dialing direct saves more than time it saves you o lot of money $4.50, more
than 47% on a 3-minute call to Haifa placed any day during the week
ALMOST DIRECT
This is rhe next best way to save time if your area doesn't hove International
Dialing yet. Dial 0, and be ready ro give the Operator rhe country city and local
telephone number you wont. Specify Station or Person. The fewer questions rhe
Operator musr ask, rhe fasrer you'll connecr. On Srorion colls not requiring special
operator assisrance, you con get the same low rores as Inrernorionol Dialing.
PS Everyone can dial direcr ro Canada, rhe Caribbean, Alaska, Hawaii,
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Ordering oranges or finding a friend, keep a record of rhe counrry and
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Ik---"'
giptanber 4,1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County

Page 9
Cini I MviMlM lOt-MCO CO
e pleasures
I
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>*1q,9
mg


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Septnbr 4]

Community Calendar
Soft.7
Brandeis Women-Boca, board meeting; LABOR DAY Diamond
Club, 9:30 a.m. meeting.
Soft.
ORT-Delray, board meeting South County Jewish Community
Day School, 8 p.m. board meeting Pioneer Women-
Beersheba, 12 noon meeting ORT-Sandlefoot, 1 p.m. board
meeting.
Seft.f
Hodassah-Boca Mooriv, 10 a.m. meeting B'nai Torch
Congregation-Sisterhood, 7:30 board meeting Hadassah
Aviva, 10 am board meeting South County Jewish
Federation, 9:30 a.m. Women's Division Cabinet meeting
South County Jewish Federation-Delroy chairmen meeting, 7:30
p.m.
hpt.1l
B'noi B'rith Delroy Lodge, 10 a.m. board meeting Pioneer
Women-Zipporah, 5 p.m. Bingo.
kpl.ll
Delray Beach Council of Histodrut, 1 p.m. meeting Jewish War
Veterans Snyder Tokson, 10 am dedication of flag pole.
Ijfl.fl
B'nai B'rith Women of Boca. 6:15pm Marco Polo Theater.
Sept. 14
Hadassoh Aviva-New membership tea Temple Emeth Singles,
12 noon meeting Diamond Club, 9:30 o. m. meeting.
Sept. 15
B'nai B'rith Boca Teeco Lodge, 9:30 a.m. board meeting B'nai
B'rith Women Genesis, 10 a.m. board meeting B'noi B'rith
Delray Lodge. 7:30 p.m. meeting ORT-AII Points, 12:30 p.m.
meeting.
Sept.lt
B'nai Torah Congregation-Sisterhood, 7:30 p.m. board meeting.
Sept. 17
Temple Beth El Sisterhood, meeting Temple Beth El
Brotherhood, Executive board meeting, 8 p.m. South County
Jewish Federation-CJF Conference. New York Temple Sinoi
Sisterhood, 12 noon all day excursion Hodossah Ben Gurion,
12:30 p.m. meeting.
Sept. It
South County Jewish Federation-CJF Conference. New York
Delroy Beach Council of Histodrut, convention.
Sept. 19
South County Jewish Federotion-CJF Conference, New York
Delroy Beach Council of Histodrut. convention.
Sept. 20
Temple Beth El Brotherhood, 8:30 o m. meeting South County
Jewish Federation-CJF Conference, New York B'nai B'rith
Nooh Lodge, 9am breakfast meeting Delroy Beach Council
of Histodrut, convention B'nai B'rith Olympix XI, 930a m
meeting.
Sept. 21
B'nai B'rith Women-Boca, 10 a.m. board meeting Diamond
Club, 9:30 a.m. meeting Temple Sinai Sisterhood, 12 noon
meeting Delray Beach Council of Histodrut, convention.
Sept. 22
B'nai B'rith Women-Genesis, 10:30a.m. meeting.
Sept. 23
ORT-Delray, 12:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah Aviva, 12:30 p.m.
meeting Pioneer Women-Boco, 10a.m. meeting Jewish War
Veterans Auxiliary, card party and luncheon National Council
of Jewish Women, 8 p.m. meeting ORT-Sandlefoot. meeting
South County Jewish Federation, 8 p.m. board meeting.
Sept. 24
Temple Beth El Brotherhood, 8 p.m. board meeting.
Sept.Jt
ROSH HASHANNAH EVE
Sept. If
ROSH HASHANNAH 1st day
Sept. 30
ROSH HASHANNAH 2nd day
OCT. 1
Jewish War Veterans, Snyder-Tokson, 10a.m. meeting.
Oct. 4
Temple Beth El, 10:30 a.m. cemetery pilgrimage Temple Sinai
Sisterhood, Bowling Party.
Oct. 5
Brondeis Women-Boca, boord meeting Hodassah Boca Mariv,
1 p.m. board meeting South County Jewish Federation, 9 o.m.
presidents meeting-update '82 Diamond Club, 9:30 a.m.
meeting.
Oct. 4
B'nai B'rith-Boca Teeco lodge, 9:30 a.m. meeting South
County Jewish Community Day School, p.m. board meeting
Temple Emeth, 7 p.m. board meeting Hadassah Menochem
Begin, 9:15 a.m. board meeting Pioneer Womon-Beersheeba,
12 noon meeting convention reports ORT-Sandlefoot, 1 p.m.
board meeting.
Oct. 7
YOM KIPPUR EVE
Oct. t
YOM KIPPUR (DAY OF ATONEMENT)
BatMtz\
At Tempk\
Beth El
Canadian Civil Rights Bill
Expected to Outlaw Ku Klux Klan
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA> A
landmark civil rights bill which
could effectively outlaw the Ku
Klux Klan has been introduced
by British Columbia's Attorney
General Allan Williams. The
Civil Rights Protection Act, the
first provincial law of its kind in
Canada, prohibits the promotion
of hate propaganda or doctrines
of superiority based on race, reli-
gion or ethnic origin, Williams
explained. The opposition New
Democratic Party hailed the
measure and promised to push
for swift passage in the legis-
lature.
Williams has been under pres-
sure from opposition members to
take action against the KKK in
British Columbia. The racist out-
fit recently conducted crossbum-
ings and has spread hate
propaganda against East Indians
in the province.
THE NEW ACT will permit
civil action in the provincial Su-
preme Court against any person
or group that interferes with an
individual's civil rights by pro-
moting racial hatred. The court
could issue an injunction to pro-
hibit racist activities.
The act would also allow pro-
secution under summary con-
viction and provide for maximum
fines of 82,000 or six months in
prison for individuals, or $10,000
for a corporration or a society.
There are already anti-racist pro-
visions in the Canadian criminal
code
Tod Marcus
TOD ANDREW MARCUS
On Saturday morning, Sept. 5,1
Tod Andrew Marcus, son of Iri.1
and Joel Marcus, will be caUedtol
the Torah of Temple Beth El of I
Boca Raton as a Bar Mitzvth.
Tod is a student at Boa
Academy and attends the Temp*
Beth El religious school. Family
members snaring in the sunda
include Tod's brother, Lawrence
grandparents, Mrs. Doris Marea
of North Miami Beach and Mrs.
Gertrude Dubroff of Sunrise. Our
of town guests are Tod's suat
and uncle, Mr. and Mrs Pal
Marcus of Lyndhurat, Ohio. Tod
is an avid sports enthusiast and
has received trophies in both
baseball and bowling. Following
services, Mr. and Mrs. Mtrau
will host a luncheon at the Boa
Raton Hotel and Club.
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
'53 V, N. Conor*** A v. IN W 2nd Ae.l
Boyfiaon Baacri
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
Turn., Wed., Fn
Thun.bSat
9-12
Otfk. Mr. Mon
MEDICARE. WORKMEN'S COMP..
AND MOST INSURANCES INCLUDE CHIROPRACTIC
RICHARD E. KOWALSKY,
NORMAN S. COHEN,
M.D., P.A.
M.D.
Stephen S. Scher, M.D.
Announces TIM Opening Of His ONica
For The Practice 01
GYNECOLOGY
AND
INFERTILITY
DELRAY MEDICAL COMPLEX
Sutte.Q
3434 Lake Ids Road
Delray Beach
OFFICE HOURS: TELEPHONE:
BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2724W
SyWne.
Announce the opening of an office in Delray Beach
for the practice of
OBSTETRICS-QYNECOLOQY and INFERTILITY
909 Palm Trail
Suite 202
Delray Beach, Fla. 33444
(305) 278-4442/278-4448
By Appointment Only
Genz Plaza I
299 W. Camino Gardens Boulevard
Boca Raton, Fla. 33432
(305) 392-4477
By Appointment Only
LAWRENCE I. MARCUS, M.D.
Diplomat; American Boardol
Psychiatry and Neurology
ANNOUNCES THE RELOCATION
OF HIS OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF PSYCHIATRY
TO
951 N.W. 13th Street-Suite 1-A
BOCA RATON, FLORIDA 33432
TELEPHONE 368-9933


. September 4,1961
The Jewish Fbridian of South County
*"
Page 11
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The Jewish Fbridimm of South County
rrt*T.8eptabfc.
We think it's
high time to end
the confusion over
who's the lowest.
\ JTe make Now cigarettes.
WW And we say that they're
the lowest tar brand available.
We're aware, however, that
we're not alone.
There are, Injact, quite a
Jew cigarettes claiming to be
the lowest. We can Imagine
how confusing and annoying
this must be for the tar con-
scious smoker.
So we've done something
to clear up the confusion. We've
put all the tar numbers of all
brands claiming to be lowest
together In the chart below.
And the chart makes plain
several Interesting/acts.
For Instance, Now Soft
Pack 100s contain less than
Box
half as much tarasCarlton
Soft Pack 100s.
Now Box 100s Is by Jar the
lowest In tar of all 100mm
cigarettes.
And no cigarette Is lower in
tar than Now.
So tf you want the Ultra
Lowest Taf brand, there's no
confusion.
It's here. And It's Now.
NUMBERS DOJVT LIE.
NO CIGARETTE, IN ANY SIZE,
IS LOWER IN TAR THAN NOW.
NOW
CARLTON
CAMBRIDGE
BARCLAY
80s t^
La* than
O.Olmg
0.01 mg
O.lmg
lmg
"5 Spack
lmg
lmg*
lmg
lmg
lOO'Sba. 100s&\
Less than
O.Olmg 2mg
lmg
5mg
4mg
3mg
All tar numbers are av per cigarette by FTC method, except the one asterisked f!
which is av. per cigarette by FTC Report May '81.
Box 100s -------------------------
NOW
The lowest in tar of all brands.
Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health
BOX. BOX 100'S: Less than 0.01 mg. "tar". 0.001 mg. nicotine. SOFT PACK 85s FILTER MENTHOL 1 mg. V. 0.1 *'
SOFT PACK 100s FILTER. MENTHOL 2 mg. "tar". 0.2 mg. nicotine, av. per cigarette by FTC method.