The Jewish Floridian of South County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00033

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Defray Beach and Highland Beach
rjiumber4
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, February 20,1981
FndShochtt
Price 35 Cents
irter Aide's Secret Mission
[flow Kreisky Pressed U.S. to Use PLO in Hostage Negotiations
L WILLIAM SAPHIRE
L york (JTA) Shortly after
.militants seized the U.S. Embassy in
,on Nov. 4, 1979 and took 60 Ameri-
age, Chancellor Bruno Kreisky of
-made strenuous efforts to induce the
[states to utilize the Palestine Libera-
Lnization as the instrument for their
\uA thereby extend at least de facto
-r\
%
I
recognition to the terrorist organization.
The revelation of Kreisky's machina-
tions, the U.S. consultations with Israel that
immediately followed and the Carter
Administration's ultimate rejection of the
PLO channel, are detailed in an article by
former White House Counsel Robert Lip-
shutz whom President Carter dispatched on a
top secret mission to Vienna on Nov. 10, 1979
to speak with Kreisky.
The article, just released, also discloses
that Israel was consulted in the early days of
the hostage crisis as to whether a rescue
attempt was feasible and concluded that it
was not and that the U.S. had a "private
channel of communication with the PLO"
established sometime previously "with
Israeli concurrence."
-:-;.
According to Lipshutz's ac-
count, three days after the
Embassy seizure he was con-
tacted by a New York attorney
and friend, Leon Chamey, who
also knew Kreisky and was told
that the Austrian Chancellor had
invited him (Chamey) "and
someone else who could speak for
the American Government" to
come to Vienna to discuss the
hostage situation "and that such
a trip might be productive
toward releasing the hostages."
Chamey was also the "personal
attorney and confidant" of the
then Israeli Defense Minister,
Kzer Weisman.
PRESIDENT CARTER
authorized Lipshutz to make the
trip. Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance instructed him to report
through Assistant Secretary of
State Harold Saunders who
headed the American Iran Task
Force.
Lipshutz had his first private
meeting with Kreisky at the lat-
ter's home on Nov. 11, ac-
companied by Charney and the
U.S. Ambassador to Austria.
Milton Wolf. Subsequent meet-
ings were attended by Austria's
Ambassador to Iebanon. Dr.
Herbert Amry. whom Kreisky
described to Lipshutz "as a man
with the most knowledge about
and best relationship with the
FLO" who "would serve as a
Continued on Page 11
tWhiteHouse Counsel Robert Lipshutz (left) shown with former President Carter (right)
mlore Lipshutz undertook a secret mission to Vienna to deal with Austria Chancellor
Uniskys efforts to induce the U.S. to use the Palestine Liberation Organization as ago-
in effort- to release the 60 American hostages taken by Iranian student radicals in
kber. 1979. Looking on are Leon Charney, (second from left). New York attorney, ana
thraelDefence MinisterEzer Weizman.
Applications Being Processed For 1
\2nd Year Israel Teen Pilgrimage i
South County Jewish
Non announces that
ns are being processed
1 second year program of
* Teen Pilgrimage. Each
1 Wl receive a $600 stipend
f the cost of $1,800 for the
'*wk intensive Israel
experience. The Federation office
urges interested teenagers to
apply.
Twenty stipends will be
awarded to students entering the
10th through 12th grades of high
school.
The group will leave on
vw
,
Camp Maccabee
A new day camp in Boca Raton providing
on exciting Summer experience within a
Jewish atmosphere.
^activities include:
Blwtructlon _
Swim Daily T*o four-weefc nasloni
nd Crafts Preschool dMaton and 4 year oMa
School division chHdren entering K 4th grade
rtpt | Mini but pick-up to and from camp
For information call
South County Jewish Federation
368-2737
Tuesday. July / and return 40
days later on August 16.
The program is. a 40-day ex-
cursion into the life of a nation. It
is a stimulating adventure that
includes three weeks of extensive
louring ol Israel. 10 days in
Jerusalem, five days in a Nature
Study Center and five days
sharing the unique Gadna ex-
perience with Israeli youth. In
addition. an optional free
weekend is devoted to visiting
family and friends or home
hospitality with an Israeli family.
To gain a greater understanding
of the sites, the student will
participate in special seminars
and lectures which are planned
throughout the program.
The program may be beat
summarized from the reactiona of
the 10 local teenagers who
participated in last year's
pilgrimage.
Lisa Jurist wrote, "One of the
most rewarding things on the
tour was the hiking down and
through the montains and
canyons. You would never think
you could reach the bottom
(without collapsing first) and
when you did, you would get such
a feeling of accomplishment."
Linda Frank commented.
"Hiking down the beautiful
Curmel mountain was not only an
experience, the scenery was
Continued on Page
Anti-Nazi Protestants Rap
Rise of West German Extremism
BONN (JTA) Three members of an anti-Nazi
Protestant group that opposed the Hitler regime have
published an open letter in Mainz warning of the
resurgence of neo-Nazism in West Germany and abroad.
The letter noted that during 1980 a wave of neo-Nazi
activity in several European countries, including Ger-
many, resulted in the deaths of more than 100 persons.
They urged the religious community to take immediate
action to alert the populace to the "creeping danger' of
Nazism.
Reagan and 'Days of Remembrance'
WASHINGTON (JTA) Four Senators and
five members of the House, all members of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council, have asked President
Reagan to conduct this year's observance of the
"Days of Remembrance" of the Holocaust in the
White House and that he personally address the
gathering.
The co-signer of a letter to the President making
the request. VOID
The co-signers of a letter to the President making
the request are co-sponsors of the legislation, passed
last year by both houses of Congress, which
established the Holocaust Memorial Council as a
permanent part of the federal government.
THIS YEAR'S "Days of Remembrance" will be
held from April 26 to May 2. The signers of the letter
are Sens. John Danforth (R., Mo); Henry Jackson
(D., Wash); Claiborne Pell (D., RI); and Rudy
Boschwitz (R., Minn.)
The others are Reps. William Lehman ID.. Fla.);
James Blanchard (D., Mich.); William Green (R.,
N.Y.); Stephen Solarz (D., N.Y.); and Sidney Yatea
(D.. 111.).
The letter stated: "For millions of Americans of
all faiths, the Holocaust is an event of deep
emotional significance and the effort to com-
memorate it is a deeply spiritual one. It would be
uniquely appropriate, for you, as our President, to
lead the nation in expressing remembrance of the
victims of tyranny.


pys,
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Fe
Organizations In The News'
AMERICAN
MIZRACHI WOMEN [
American Mizrachi Women,
Beersheba Chapter, Delray
Beach, will hold its regular
meeting on March 4, 1981 at
Temple Emeth, Atlantic Ave., |
Delray Beach at 12 noon at which
time nomination of officers for
1981 will take place. All are
welcome to attned and become
members. Coffee and cake will be
served.
American Mizrachi Women of
Boca Raton will meet for an
enlightening and interesting
morning, Tuesday, March 10 in
the Town Center Meeting Room
at 10:30 a.m. A movie,
presenting the many facets of the I
work of American Mizrachi
Women in Israel, will be one of
the highlights. Another feature
will be the signing of the charter.
And, what is Purim without
hamantoshin? So, do come! For
further information contact
Teddy Blendes of Hattie Thum.
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
A "Get Acquainted" orien-
tation session will be available to
members of B'nai B'rith Women,
Boca Raton Chapter, at Town
Center Community Room on
Wednesday, March 4, 1981 at 2
p.m. For further information call
Lil Seligson. The Board of B'nai
B'rith Women, Boca Ratorn
Chapter, will honor Mrs. Louise
Cohen of Boca Raton at a lun-
cheon to be held at L'Hexagone,
1600 North Federal Highway,
Boca Raton, on Thursday, March
12 at 1 p.m.
B'nai B'rith Women of Delray
Beach, Naomi Chapter 1537, is
pleased to announce that on
February 25, 1981. Rose Rosen,
Chairman of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. Naomi Chapter, will
present the Essay Awards on
Brotherhood to the three winners
of the contest at the Carver
Middle School.
FREE SONS OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel, Delray
Beach Lodge 224, will hold its
next meeting on March 4 at 7
p.m. at Temple Emeth. The
program for that evening calls for
the raising of such controversial
questions, that any of the an-
swers which are given will induce
spontaneous laughter. Everyone
is assured, from past experience,
of having an hilarious time. The
For information on Area Organizations
Please call South County Jewish Federation
in Boca Raton 368-2737
sale of tickets to our 2nd annual
Deli-Dance, March 28th is going
well. Members have another week
to get their tickets before opening
it to quests. Tickets are $8.50 per
person. Contact Izzy Siegel of
Kings Point for further in-
formation.
HADASSAH
Hadassah Ben Gurion Chapter
is sponsoring a cruise to Nassau,
March 6 through 9. Cruise to
Nassau starts from Kings Point,
at a cost of !249, all
included. For reservations
information, call Yetta Rosen thai
or Claire Wechsler. On April 5,
for an enjoyable afternoon, come
and see the hilarious "Bubbe's
Yerusheh" presented by the
famous Delta Players at Deer-
field High School, 2:30 p.m. Get
your tickets now because the
Delta Players sell out fast. Call
Edith Hornstone or Belle Isakoff
for further information.
SOUTH FLORIDA
JEWISH CIVIL
SERVICE EMPLOYEES
Honorable Judge Abraham M.
Roth, former New York State
Criminal Court Judge will be the
installing officer at the South
Florida Jewish Civil Service
Employees charter and in-
stallation meeting. Judge Roth
has been active in many civic,
welfare and charitable
organizations in New York and is
active in the Mid-County Medical
Center, Democratic Party, as well
as many other civic, welfare and
charitable organizations in West
Palm Beach, where he now
resides. Nat Taksier. National
Regional Vice President (South
East and Puerto Rico) will
present the National Charter to
the Chapter. This meeting will
lake place on March 1, 1981 at 2
p.m. at the Weight Watchers
Auditorium in the Gun Club
Shopping Center. Military Trail
and Gun Club Road, West Palm
Beach. Collation to follow.
Guests are welcome. For further
information, call Henry Brill,
Kings Point. Delray Beach.
TEMPLE BETH EL
Beth El Solos On February
22. Sunday, 12 noon, Beth El
personalized
papen
"shop at home service"
announcements
Business cards
Social stationary
Bar Mitzvah Bat Mitzvah Wedding
Special Occasions
Invitations and Accessories
We come to you!
v

Camp
.
Maccabee
Camp Maccabee is looking for Junior and
Senior counselors interested in working with
children ages 3-9 years within a Jewish at-
mosphere in Boca Raton.
Counselors should bring with them
various talents in sports, swimming, arts and
crafts, dance, music and Judaica studies. Ex
perience helpful.
South County Jewish Federation
368-2737
Solos will be sponsoring a brunch
which will be held at Temple Beth
El Social Hall. AH members are
urged to attend. An interesting
program will follow.
Beth El Singles Today -
Calendar of Events Saturday,
March 7, House Party; Monday,
March 9, General meeting at
Temple Beth El; Saturday.
March 14. Movie Night; Sunday,
March 15, Brunch at
Bonaventure Restaurant;
. Saturday. March 21, P.J.-
expenses I Slumber Party; Monday, March
ions and I 23, Board Meeting; Friday,
March 27, Singles Service;
Saturday. March 28, Impromptu
Night. For further information,
please call the temple office.
TEMPLE EMETH
Sisterhood of Temple Emeth.
Delray Beach is holding its
monthly meeting on Thursday,
March 5, 12 noon. Robert K.
Aslofrom, Ph. D., P. A. will be the
guest speaker. Dr. Also from, is a
practicing psychologist, listed in
"Who's Who in America, and
hosts a daily television program
on WPEC, Channel 12, called
"What's on your MindT"
Members and guests are en-
couraged to come and experience
this most interesting and in-
formative program. Refresh-
ments will be served. For further
information call the Temple office
or Rita Lewitas.
TEMPLE SINAI
Sisterhood of Temple Sinai will
have its next meeting on
Monday, February 23 at Pompey
Park, 11th Avenue and 2nd
Street, Delray Beach, at 12:30
p.m. The program will consist of
"An afternoon with Sholom
Aleichem." All are welcome.
An opportunity for those of the
Christian faith to witness a
Jewish sabbath eve service is
being provided to residents of
Delray Beach and environs when
Temple Sinai will conduct a
worship service at the First
Baptist Church, 400 S. Swinton
Ave., Delray Beach, Friday, Feb.
27, 8:15 p.m. At that time, the
Temple and the Delray Beach
Clergy Association will sponsor
the event in celebration of
brotherhood month. At the
service, Dr. Andrew Hall, Pator
of the church and Rabbi Samuel
ilvcr of Temple Sinai will
ngage in a pulpit colloquy on the
heme, "How Fares the Inter-
'faith Movement?" Music at the
service will be provided by the
Sinai choir plus the musical
ensembles of churches of the
area. Already scheduled for
participation is the choir of the
Mt. Olive Baptist Church. A
collation will follow the service. It
is being prepared by the ladies of
the church and the Temple.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
The Palm Beach Region of!
Women's American Ort will hold
the Annual Donor Luncheon on
Wednesday. February 25.1981 at
the Poinciana Club, 70 Royal
Poinciana Place, Palm Beach.
Women's American Ort will be
celebrating its 10th birthday in
Palm Beach County. Over 20
chapters will be represented,
including Boca Raton, Boynton
Beach and Delray Beach. Please
contact your donor chapter
chairperson for reservations.
Women's American Ort,
Delray Beach Chapter schedule
of events. March 16 Purim
Dance and Chinese Auction at
Temple Emeth. Cost $4 Time.
7:30 p.m. Refreshments will be
served. Mimi and Ray will en-
tertain; March 18 Large
membership tea at Adult
Recreation Center, 802 N.E. 1
St., Delray. Refreshments and
movies will be shown.
Prospective members, hold the
date.
f
fc
439-2810
-------
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2b! I*1
The Jewish Fhridian of South County
portnoy to Speak
Thursday Feb. 26
New Building On Mt. Scopus Campus
ipltT.
H'rih Women. Boca
1 K are presenting a
fiecturer in their
Ration of Nat.onal
^Week.
^1 portnoy. specialist
Tol Modern European
A of Soviet and
..Communism will be
Speaker at the
I Week Program at
j. El 333 Fourth
Raton. Thursday.
ll meeting is open to
Community of Boca
is held during the
Celebration of
jWeek.
ffctnoy is ,;'urren
iof History and was the
nan of the Dept. of
Dr. Samuel Portnoy
History of Florida Atlantic
University.
femple Emeth Concert
ISeriesPart Two
|bale of the Temple
Frst Concert Series will
liaSunday. March 29 at 8
h the appearance of the
i Family Players. This
I six fine musicians is
based on personal
i at the best known
p in this country and
&kis musical evening
j First Concert Series
i Emcth bringing the
htConcert music to this
I reserved seats are still
liat subscription prices of
- and $5. You may
come l the Temple or call Box
Office 198-7422 to make your
arrangements for this March 29
gala Concert presentation.
Special discounts to
organizations.
The First Concert evening on
Pub. 1. which featured Miss liana
Vered was a musical success.
Cuesls from various newspapers
greeted and toasted Miss Vered.
who is internationally applauded.
The Hoffman Family Players,
composed of prestigious
musicians. each of high
professional talent, will surely
excite patron Concert tastes as
well.
The Florida Friends of the
Hebrew University are erecting a
major new structure on the
University "s Mount Scopus
campus. The building will be
called Florida House and will
house part of the Faculty of
Humanities announced Merwin
K. Grosberg. President of the
ftoca Raton-Delray Beach
Chapter of the American Friends
of the Hebrew University.
The project, according to
Irving N. Rifkin, Chairman of the
Hoard of Trustees, for the Boca
Raton-Delray Beach Friends,
meets a growing and serious need
for teaching and research space
for the Faculty of Humanities.
Members of the Friends chapters
throughout Florida have already
donated more than $1 million to
this effort. Mr. Rifkin said. The
building will be dedicated during
an international conference of
Used Book Sale
March 6
The Boca Raton Chapter of the
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee will hold its
annual Used Book Sale on Friday
and Saturday, March 6 and 7,
from It) a.m. to 9 p.m. at the Boca
Rlon Mall, located on Federal
llwy.. between N.E. 2nd and 6th
Sts.
Several thousand books of all
descriptions will be available at
low prices. Paperbacks, hard-
covers, fiction and non-fiction,
cook books, art books, and
selected periodicals will be in-
cluded in the sale.
All funds raised are donated to
buy books for the libraries at
Brandeis University.
The chapter is still accepting
donations of used books for the
sale.
Friends groups from around the
world in Jerusalem this summer.
The University found its
original home on Mount Scopus
in 1918. according to Mr.
Grosberg, but was prevented
from using the campus for 19
years, from 1948 until 1967. by
Jordanian authorities.
After Israel reunited
Jerusalem during the Six Day
War. the University undertook a
massive rebuilding campaign on
Mount Scopus culminating this
year with the dedication of
several new buildings, including
Florida House.
The four-story building is a key
structure in the new Humanities
complex on Mount Scopus, af-
fording the members of the
faculty much needed space for
research, tutorials and research.
"With this project." Mr.
(irosberg said, "the Florida
Friends are playing an exciting
role in creating a living symbol of
Meruin K. Grosberg
the Hebrew University's
determination to guarantee the
preservation of the life of the
spirit that has os distinguished
the University through the
years."
, South County
Jewish Community Day School
1981-82 Registration
Now Open
Classes 1 6
Small classes
Personal instruction
Secular and Judaica curriculum
Quality education within a
Modern Jewish setting
For Further Information
Call 395-3212
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Page 4
, > i
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Prida
y. Febr
What Makes Kreisky Run?
It is hard at this point to appraise the story
about Robert Lipshutz, former President Carter's
special assistant when Carter was in the White
House.
The report on our front page this week by
newsman William Saphire is based on a story that
Lipshutz himself circulated last week. We have noj
reason to question its accuracy and are running it
based on our investigation into its facticity.
On the other hand, no less a distinguished
journalist than Victor M. Bienstock, whose
thoughtful articles appear on this page from time to
time and elsewhere in The Jewish Floridian, firmly!
believes that Lipschutz was taken in by a trick when I
he undertook a secret mission for President Carter to
Vienna to speak to Austria's Chancellor Bruno'
Kreisky about using the "good offices" of the,
Palestine Liberation Organization to bargain for the
lives of the American hostages in Terehan right after1
their incarceration.
Bienstock is a former vice president and top
editor of the Jewish Telegraphic Agency in New York
for some 25-oddjyears,and his sensitive nose for these
things can not be ignored.
The essential problem, as we see it, is not'
President Carter or his Jewish aide, Bob Lipshutz,.
now returned to the private practice of law in
Atlanta. The problem is what motivates Chancellor
Kreisky of Austria a Jew who has forgotten his
Jewishness.
A Craven Bunch I
An El Paso, Tex. law firm has placed an ad in
the Texas Bar Journal looking for a "Christian at-
torney."
Shades of the past.
It is interesting that a law firm should use a Bar
journal in which to advertise its bigotry its desire
to violate the laws of this nation on equal access -
equal opportunity.
What is even more interesting is that the name |
of the law firm in question is Craven & Craven. The 1
Britannica World Language Dictionary defines I
craven as "lacking in courage; cowardly; a base 1
coward."
We could not have characterized the law firm
more aptly. It deserves the public criticism to which
it will surely be subjected.
Untapped Expertise
The Reagan Administration, which is con-
centrating on domestic issues, should not overlook
the expertise that is available in the organized
Jewish community. This is especially true of the
many American Jewish organizations which deal
with issues that concern not only Jews alone but all
Americans.
Organizations like the American Jewish
Committee, the American Jewish Congress, the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith and the National
Jewish Community Relations Advisory Council, as
well as others too numerous to name, all deal with the
entire gamut of problems this country faces.
Whether it is the economy, the major concern now of
the Administration; social problems, energy, urban
at lairs, the separate concerns of the aged and the
young, crime, what have you, the Jewish community
can offer up some of the most sage advice to be found
in the United States.
Nor should the Jewish community be tapped for
advice alone. There are men and women who can
make important contributions to the new govern-
ment. Here, especially, women should be mentioned.
The Regan Administration appears to be having
trouble finding women to name to office.
Jewish Floridian
ol South Count, ,. FfedShoch*
FRED SMOCHET SUZANNE SMOCMET MILTON KRETSKY
Editor and Pubiiahef Executive Editor Newt Coordinator
Puoliahed Bi-WMfciy Second Claea Poetaoe PaJ at Boca Raton, Fla USPS MO-290
BOCA RATON OFFICE. 3200 N Federal Hwy.. Boca Raton. Fla 33431 Phona 38*2001
Main Office t Plant 120 N.E 6th St. Miami. Fla 33101 Phona 1-373-4805
PoetmaeMr: Form 3878 return, le JailaH Ftartolan, P.O. Bo. 01-2873. Miami. Fla. 11101
Combined Jewieh Appeal South County Jewish Federation. Inc Oltlcera President James B
Baer. Vice Presidents Norman I Stone. Milton Kreteky. Shirley EnseiOero Secretary Phylliai
Cohen. Treasurer. Donald Berger. Executive Director. Rabbi Bruce S Warehal
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashrulh ol Merchandise Advertised
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area (3 SO Annual (2 Year Minimum (7). or by membership South
County Jewish Federation. 3200 N Federal Hwy Boca Raton, Fla 33431 Phone 388-2737 Out ol
Town Upon Request
Labor Manifesto
Party to Okay All Religious Brand
BY DAVID LANDAU
f JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Labor Party has
pledged to "ensure recogni-
tion of all the (religious)
streams in Judaism, by
means of legislation if need
be," should it win the elec-
tions this spring. That
formulation, worked out in
the 11th hour behind-the-
scenes consultations, was
the central plank in a State-
and-Religion platform
adopted by the party's na-
tional convention.
It represented a compromise
between the "Young Guard" and
other liberal elements in the
party who sought a firmer com-
mitment to religious pluralism
and more conservative trends led
by Moshe Baram, a Cabinet
minister in the former Labor
government, and MK Rabbi
Menachem Hacohen
THE CONVENTION was due
to wind up with the ratification of
a new Central Committee com-
prising over 1,000 members.
Originally, Labor intended a
smaller Central Committee the
senior policy making forum be-
tween conventions. But pressures
from various sectors and interest
groups within the party resulted
in its enlargement.
Former Prime Minister Yitz-
hak Rabin kept a low profile
during the convention. The
"Rabin Camp" was said to have
some 26 percent of the new
Central Committee and to be
satisfied with that represen-
tation. Rabin won almost 30
percent of the votes in the leader-
ship contest with Shimon Peres
at the convention's plenary
sessions in December.
The party appeared deter-
mined to present an image of
unity and business-like prepar-
ation to take over the reins of
government later this year.
A poll published by Israel's
leading pollster, Mina Zemach,
showed Labor's solid majority
holding steady, though there
would be some erosion if former
Foreign Minister Moshe Dayan
and former Defense Minister
Ezer Weizman decided to form a
new centrist party.
FORMER BANK Hapoalim
chairman Yaacov Levinson was
the "star" of the first day's
deliberations, presenting a sober
and impressive economi -
program and in this way asserted
himself as the leading candidate
for finance minister. The "State-
and-Religion" issue was the focus
of debate during the second day.
. A committee headed by former
Foreign Minister Abba Eban
drafted the original proposals
calling for "equality" between
the various "streams" (Ortho-
dox. Conservative and Reform)
and pledging legislation to enable
non-orthodox rabbis to officiate
at weddings. But a last-minute
protest move led by Baram,
former UN Ambassador Chaim
Herzcg and Hacohen produced a
reconsideration that continued
throughout the night.
The reference to officiating at
marriages was omitted from the
convention resolution. It was
decided that this would be taken
up by the new Central Com-
mittee. The Convention pledged
itself to "ensure recognition" of
all the streams, a vaB
that all sections of
could live with.
IN ADDITION, tbi
tion passed resolutions!
the party, when in f
ensure religious facil
state budgets for the i
dox "streams" and call
party to ensure as
representatives of the i
dox streams are electl
regional religious counc
the country.
These bodies,
alongside municipalii
regional councils, disb
budgets for religious se
have traditionally b
larged dominated by I
Religious Party a
Israel, although thee
are also represented.
Similarly the converj
on Labor Party repp
in the municipalities ai
councils to "relate witl
partiality to all ihi
streams" and to en
public services, public
buildings be made "av
all the streams to enabl
carry out their va
styles."
OTHER resolutions
and-religion declared ti
will revoke recent
barring abortions
reasons and limiting
Labor will act. by fe;
necessary, to ease the
those individuals and
affected by special
restrictions (bastar
would-be immigrants
affected: and Labor w
restrictive "Who is a J
lation as proposed by
dox parties and su
Herat.
for
i _.
wore
,,/i w
ii
^8.w
/_ -1 ,

' #
' f.
J^FT^
>'/..

_______
Although Jews have a tradition of maintaining their cultural heritage,
they also have the reputation of becoming an integral part of the community t
live in. And Scotland is no exception.
Glasgow prides itself on having the only Jewish pipe-band in
the world. And one of the city's largest kilt-makers is Jewish.
Scotland's most famous product is fine Scotch whisky. And
America's favorite scotch is J&.B. We carefully select the finest scotches ]
and blend them for smoothness and subtlety. The result is why we say
that J&.B whispers.
No matter where your friends or guests come from, serve them
J&JB to make them feel at home.
Friday, February 20,1981
Volume 3
16-1 ADAR R741
Nu it 4
86 Prod Blended Scotch What* C1881 The PedOnoJon Corp. NY
/Hispers.


-20.1961
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
ilty Not Mandated by Amendment
>|ENGALLOB
pgK.JTAI- Anew
Z appellate court has
Kon believed to be
3 that the First
.joes not mandate
,' toward religious
L reversing a lower
,that the Teaneck
J had violated federal
B constitutions by
atra-curricular ac-
t Jewish and Christian
gjZuckerman. president
ijnional Jewish Com-
! Law and Public
KlPAI. which helped
Irtooi board attorneys
Bailegal test of the ban.
Inptllate court decision
|L widespread im-
\ He said that COLPA
Adafriendoflhecourt
Uehalf of the school
) the Teaneck Board
i approved the ban
[\i" in a bid to end
practices in
jblic schools, including
J equal opportunity to
Jbased on religion. The
Improved a resolution
|fjwided that "to the
feasible extent,"
ivities and programs
|Vacheduled on a Friday
iday day. or Sunday
was challenged in
1978 by the Teaneck
ol drama class. "The
%" when its members
their play. "Don't
[Water.' could not be
Koshe
rer
|lburs__-
From $539.
BJROC HOTEL
Mam, Beach
I^LAW HOTEL
Acapulc,
"CESS ISLE
turacao
FER1CANA
L Hawaii
&SANJUAN
K CENTER
.^toRico
^AWAYBAY
Jamaica
'ANDALUS
Spain
SJP"" I'oturt
l **:cf.omrnodatior
"W1*! Seders
ftlfalht,
^Jiimeni
meals daily
"neni ry7
Masters
.^"'aowray N y
'^ 9 7600
""800-223-7676
performed, as originally
scheduled, on Thursday, Friday
and Saturday evenings during
the fall semester of the 1978-79
school year.
The drama class, represented
by the New Jersey Civil Liberties
Union, filed a suit in the chancery
division of New Jersey Superior
Court, the lowest state court,
charging that the school board,
having acted on the basis of the
religious practices of some local
public school students, had im-
permissibly entangled the school
hoard with religion. The chancery
division upheld the complaint of
the Playcrafters and a three-man
appellate division panel reversed
that opinion in a ruling handed
down in Trenton last Jan. 19
PRESIDING JUDGE John
Michels. writing for himself and
the other two judges on the
panel, held that "the First
Amendment does not mandate
hostility or callous indifference
to religious practices. To do so
would be to prefer those who do
not believe in religion over those
who do."
The appellate division also
ruled that the ban was "an effort
by the Board to enable its
students to participate as fully as
possible in extra-curricular ac-
tivities without infringing on the
religious liberties of those
students."
The ruling also declared that
permissible accommodations to
religion can take the form of
avoiding conflicts between
secular and religious activities."
Zuckerman, commenting that
he did not know of a similar
ruling in any American court,
declared that the school board
policy does not conflict with
constitutional bans on establish-
ment of religions but, rather, that
it represented action "in keeping
with the finest traditions of this
nation, since essentially it
guarantees all students an equal
opportunity to participate in
school-related activities regar-
dless of their religious beliefs and
practices."
HE ASSERTED that if the
First Amendment is held to
prohibit the school board's
policy, this would amount to an
implication that the church-state
separation doctrine requires
hostility to religion.
Zuckerman said it was im-
portant to note that the issue in
the Teaneck school board policy
is not whether a school was
required to re-schedule school
activities to avoid conflicts with
religious practices of some
students, but, rather, whether
such re-scheduling was constitu-
tionally permissible so as to
afford equal opportunity for
participation by all students.
Women's Divison Pacesetters Luncheon held at the home of Arlette Baker raised over $45,000
for the 1981 UJA-Federation campaign. Pictured left to right, Rita Bogus, Women's Division
Campaign Chairperson, Eleanore Rukin, Pacesetters Co-chairperson, Arlette Baker, hostess;
Rev. John S. Grauel, speaker; Rose Rifkin, Bernice Weiss, Pacesetters Co-chairpersons and
Margie Boer, Women's Division Vice-Chairperson.


Page 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
F"day, Febr
'Liberation Threats'
Ex-Hostages, Refusi
Jerusalem Mayor Not Worried Seen As 'Chips' to Bar*
NOTRE DAME, Ind. "
(JTA) Mayor Teddy
Kollek of Jerusalem
declared here that recent
threats by Arab leaders to
"liberate" Jerusalem do not
disturb him. "It's not the
first time," he said. "But
Arabs in Jerusalem are the
most civilized, best edu-
cated of any in the world,
and they don't want to see
their city divided any more
than the Jews."
Kollek s remarks were made to
the 23 North American members
of the Jerusalem Committee who
held a two-day meeting at the
University of Notre Dame where
they endoresed Israel's adminis-
tration of Jerusalem. The meet-
ing was the first held by the
committee outside Jerusalem and
the first where North American
members met separately.
The participants expressed the
hope that similar regional meet-
ings will be held in other areas of
the world and recommeded the
full 130-member committee met
in Jerusalem this year.
THE JERUSALEM mayor
emphasized the success he has
had in uniting the city's religious
entities during the Jordanian
occupation 13 years ago. 'There
is more tolerance in Jerusalem
now than there has ever been," he
said. "Under the 19 vears of
Jordanian rule, Christians and
Jews weren't allowed to visit
their holy places; there was no
free Christian education; 58
synagogues were destroyed.
"Now the holy places are meti-
culously taken care of; Arabs are
allowed the citizenship they
desire and the education system
they want. Each religion ad-
ministers its own holy places;
there is free access to the Arab
countries, and everyone can
participate in the local demo-
cratic elections."
The committee's report en-
doresed Kollek s efforts toward
unity and universal access to the
city, as well as his plans for au-
tonomous governing units within
the multitude of cultural and
religious communities. Coming in
the wake of criticism of last
summer's Knesset reaffirmation
of a united Jerusalem as Israel's
capital, the resolutions stressed
the need for harmonious relations
and unity within the city.
FATHER Theodore Heaburgh,
president of Notre Dame and a
member of the Jeursalem com-
mittee, who hosted the event,
contrasted the tranquility of
Jerusalem with the tension and
armed conflicts elsewhere in the
Middle East. Stating the consen-
sus of the committee, he
declared:
"I believe that any person of
good-will fully acquainted with
the facts of the situation and with
the ways in which Jerusalem now
lives, thrives, and is adminis-
tered, will join me in recognizing
that the promise of enabling
Jerusalem to fulfill its historic
role as the 'City of Peace." '
The special advisor to the
mayor, Zvi Brosh, stated, "There
is an alriost total consensus
among Israelis on the state of
Jerusalem: that it must remain a
unified city and that it retain its
status as the capital of the State
of Israel."
SPEAKING TO various
proposals for the future of Jeru-
salem, including partition, in-
ternationalization and sovereign-
ty by one nation, J. Kenneth
Blackwell, former mayor of Cin-
cinnati and a committee member,
noted "Access to Jerusalem may
belong to the world, but the care
of Jerusalem belongs to Israel."
Brosh stressed not only unity,
but autonomy as well: "We see
that Jerusalem is a pattern that
proves that coexistence between
Arabs and Jews can work; the
city can remain united, simul-
taneously giving the Arabs every
possible advantage of freedom
and control over their own lives."
Kollek also emphasized that
"We're not looking for a melting
pot."
The committee resolution sup-
GOOD
READING
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You'll receive an overview of the
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money market data
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receiving our newsletter
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ported these views, recom-
mending that the local religious'
communities within the city be
given extended responsibilities of
self-government and that his
should be legalized. Kollek has
pressed for the status of
boroughs on the model of
London's self-governing cities, as
a means of offering each distinct
section as much autonomy as
possible, thereby preserving the
unique nature of the diverse
cultures and traditions that have
existed in the city for centuries.
KOLLEK ALSO wants to
create areas where the homo-
geneous entities can meet, and he
is trying to bridge the physical
divisions architecturally, through
city planning strategies. The
committee, which includes such
renowned architects as Buck-
minster Fuller, Harry Mayero-
vitch, Samuel Mozes and Moshe
Safdie, recommended that such
interaction be encouraged when-
ever possible in the commercial,
business and recreation centers of
the city.
The, group also recommended
the continued independence of
the holy places, the vesting of
administrative authority over
them in the religious bodies
responsible for them, and en-
hanced universal access for all
faiths. The committee indicated
its satisfaction with these
measures instituted by Kollek.
With over a million Christian,
Jewish, and Moslem pilgrims
each year to the 4,000 year
city, with more than 150,000
Arabs from countries not recog-
nizing Israel, this is undoubtedly
a key concern.
Charles Haar of Harvard Law
School recommended that a
thorough documentation of the
degree of autonomy be made
within each living area, and this
should be confirmed by law, "so
that there is no feeling that it
could be suddenly swept away.'"
Private
Showing of Art
Boca East Chapter of Women's
American Ort on Saturday,
March 14 from 5 to 7 p.m. will
host a private showing of art at
the beautiful Patricia Judith
Gallery, 720 E. Palmetto Park
Road in Boca Raton.
The lovely soprano voice of
Terry Rabinor will entertain in
the pretty mediterranean style
gardens. Wine and Cheese will be
served.
A contribution of $9 per person
is set for a most delightful early
evening with a european flavor.
BY JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Harvard law Prof.
Alan Dershowitz, who de-
fended Anatoly Sharansky
at his trial as a Soviet Pris-
oner of Conscience, sees
Soviet Jews and the Ameri-
cans who had been held
hostage in Iran as "chips in
the international bargain-
ing game."
Like the now freed Americans,
the Soviet Jews are "anxious to
breathe the air of freedom," Der-
showitz told about 170 members
of the House of Representatives
and the Senate and their aides at
a meeting on Soviet Jewry a,t the
Capitol last week.
THE MEETING, a biennial
gathering conducted by the
Union of Councils for Soviet
Jews, was sponsored by Sens.
Carl Levin (D., Mich.) and Pete
Domenici (R., N.M.), and
Representatives Michael Barnes
(I).. Md.) and Jack Kemp (R.,
N.Y.|. Its purpose was to
familiarize new members of Con-
gress with the plight of Soviet
Jewry.
MM ..n(.. touW.Kl
IKK "m HIM
Q PHm %* fvi brochurt on t.t MHMllcipM bond!
D Pim pimem mm on your monthly n*wsiii* mailing litt
Nam*___
Address.
Slat*___
cJbH
iMMDMyK 10 ISA wiCKwiW SI
J.B. HANAUER & COMFttNY
MUNICIPAL BONO SPECIALISTS SINCE 1M1
aw*"#f ra^a**/ 'e#c aasw""Ww* f^^\#
MIAMI IMS) t]2-M* PALM MACM |MS| (it (M0
|HOi.LrWOOOfJOt|071 M0 POMPANO MACH(MS) rS MM
L OrMf RCITIf SIN fLA TOLL WU (M Iti-ttt*
OUTSJOC Of FLA CALL TOLL FMCf torn }1J i'ti
Dmitri Simes, a prJ
Johns Hopkins Unive
himself a Soviet Jt
migrant, said that the!
help Soviet Jews must!
istic and persistent!
Richard Pipes of Ha7
adviser to President I
Soviet affairs, had to
appearance when he wai
the White House.
During the session,
call was placed to Dr.
Lerner in Moscow, but!
nection could not be n
Moscow operator said _
no answer from Lernerl
Manon, the Councils
director, discount}
operator's statement, sal
the call had been arnl
advance and in pers
traveler to Moscow.
DERSHOWITZ
gotiating with the Sov
much like using a
machine. He said one
coin, and if no candy
one can put in another}
kick the machine, but "j
talk to it."
The Council, whit
founded in 1970 with sii
and now has organizatio
cities, is headed by Rob
don, a Boston businessmi
You are invited to participate in
a National UJA Mission to Israel.
March lat 10th
S950 per person all expenses included.
Deluxe accommodations meals included.
A family gift of $2,500 for a couple or S1.250 for a single ,
will be received of all participants.
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION 368-2

Summer Teenage Tra\
EXCITING TENNIS & G0LFT0UR:
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,20,1961
The Jewish Fbridian of South County
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Febr
Budget Cuts Make Moshav Eidan
A Settlement Without Settlers'
Moshav Eidan, Israel From
the hills surrounding Jericho, the
topography drops sharply to the
Arava, Israel's southern plains.
The rutted, one-lane road that
winds past the Dead Sea Works
makes an abrupt left turn into a
landscape of rock and sand and
silence. A few kilometers ahead a
crudely painted white arrow
points the way to Moshav Eidan.
The scene is ghostly. A chain-
link fence topped with barbed
wire surrounds squat houses
clearly a triumph of function over
esthetics each with a living
room, kitchen, and twobedrooms
compressed into 72 square
meters. A kindergarten, social
hall, and store stand next to a
planned medical and dental
clinic. Nearby is the site for a
swimming pool.
There are no people. Only the
wind and footsteps disturb the
silence. Moshav Eidan is a
settlement without settlers.
Thirty young families from the
United States and Canada were
scheduled to establish a com-
munity here in June of 1979. But
deep cuts in the Jewish Agency's
rural settlement program
funded by Keren Hayeaod
campaigns the world over, and by
United Jewish Appeal-
Federation campaigns in the
United States have delayed
occupancy.
In addition, the prolonged wait
in temporary housing caused a
crisis in commitment among
members of the group. Only half
of the families originally
recruited for Moshav Eidan ,
remain in the Arava. The others '
have moved into Israel's cities or
left the country.
The settlers of Moshav Eidan
are not idle while they wait to es-
tablish themselves in their new
home. While living at Mercaz
Sapir, the regional center for the
Arava, the families receive in-
tensive agricultural training from
government experts and veterans
of the moshav experience, and
study Hebrew in an Ulpan.
At the same time, an ab-
sorption committee is actively
seeking new families and

Members of the Moshav Eidan garin (settlement group) tend
young watermelon plants sprouting in the desert of the Arava.
Budget cuts have delayed permanent occupancy of Moshav
Eidan for almost a year. (Photo by David Illions)
would have helped us through the
long summer of waiting and
working. And most of us had no
earthly idea of the physical
reality of farming."
Her husband Bruce adds:
"There has been a process of self-
selection, which is probably
inevitable in a project like this.
The families who have stayed
really want to be here."
Thirty adults and their 15
children who remain have been
toughened by their experience,
but remain optimistic and en-
thusiastic. Driving to the fields in
the gray dawn, Bev looks out
over the desolate landscape and
says:
"Look at thisall this sand.
It's hard to believe that anything
is growing here at all. I can't help
it. Whenever I look at this and
think about what we are ac-
complishing, well, it's pretty
inspiring."
Bruce joins a group kneeling in
the damp sand to cut small
windows in the plastic "mini-
greenhouses" which protect the
spring crop of watermelon plants
from the cold nights.
"We may not be in our per-
manent homes yet," he savs.
screening applicants to replace
the "drop-outs" from Moshav
Eidan, and a planning committee
struggles over priorities and the
details of implementing future
goals. An agricultural study
group is translating technical
materials from Hebrew to
English and hold* weekly
sessions on the practical leaaons
learned in the fields.
The long journey of the garin
(settlement group> began in
Toronto in the Spring of 1978.
With the help of shlichim (aliyah
emissaries in American and
Canadian cities) and under the
guidance of a representative of
the Moshav Movement, the
families gathered to form a new
agricultural settlement.
Only married, Jewish im-
migrants from an English-
speaking country were con-
sidered and "mixed couples"
Israelis married to Americans or
Canadians were encouraged to
participate. Meetings and
workshops were held to introduce
the settlers to one another and to .
moshav life.
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The families made the arduous
trip to Israel only to run head-
long into a first of many financial
setbacks caused by a runaway
national economy and reductions
in funds available for the
program from the Jewish Agency
budget.
The settlement's economic
difficulties were further
aggravated by whet has proved
tone the high price of peace with ,
Egypt. Massive dislocations in
the defense and civilian sectors
mandated by the Israel-Egypt
peace treaty squeezed spending
for settlements such as Moshav
Eidan even tighter as funds were
diverted to dismantling set-
tlements in the Sinai,
establishing new settlements in
the Negev and Galilee, and
meeting other government and
private sector expenses
necessitated by peace.
As weeks of delay lengthened
into months, one half of the garin
abandoned the project. As Mimi,
one of the founders of the group
in Toronto, puts it:
"There was a lack of common
ideology and purpose which
touching the green sprout
gnn, But the land is
"I came here to buildl
thing out of nothing "f
Bonnie, another Moshav
settler. "I can't do
Winnipeg or Tel Av
Jerusalem. I can only
here." *
At 8 a.m. a group of,
arrives to begin harvests
rows or rich purple egg
Ama, a former Broold
pauses to doff her sweats!
the sun breaks through i
clouds. She rubs persp
from her forehead, leav,
streak of sandy soil behind
is easy to believe she giv*J
to the dreams of all of her)
moshav pioneers when she/
"This is the most fulfill
and craziest thing I'v
done. You've got to be
crazy to come here, with tk
the isolation, the 14-hour
the fields. But in 10 or 15
111 point to the grass, tl
our fields and say to our a
"None of this was here wh
were born!"
"Like the song says.i
adds, "We came to Irael tol
and be built."
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""1
Laky, February 20,1W1
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
Jewish Opinion Alienated from UN;
Waldheim Denies He's Arab Sympathizer
Scandal Rocks Kosher Meat
Marketing Practices in Israel
mjiTED NATIONS -
mi In a two-hour meeting
General ruir
IAI
|jj Secretary
- \merican Je
delegation 1
s^-^ffiSr-.*
0f Presidents
Wfcre?ce_j:n Jewish Organi
1 5" growing disenchantment
'^ United Nations could
k in a major change in
Jjnr between the United
gates and the UN.
Howard Squadron, chairman
J the Presidents Conference,
f .id one strong possibility was a
I ^ cut in U.S. funding of the
l^mational body. Currently,
Wishington provides about one-
fcarth of the UN's budget.
Squadron described the meet-
[ i*is "cordial but quite candid,"
lidding: "Secretary-General
Wildheim conceded that the
I poeral perception of the UN was
mt w his liking but .rejected the
dHTR that he was personally
uUlsrael.
INDEED, Dr. WaJdheim
ousted with some passion that
k was deeply committed to the
Btagrity of Israel with secure
ad recognized borders; to the
mm of Arab-Israel MM and to
uc application of UN Security
Ceoncil Resolution 242 as the
appropriate method of achieving
tsst peace."
Duriag the meeting with
Wtldnam, which lasted about
twice as long as originally
Kheduled, the Presidents
"Conference delegation enu-
nmted some of the reasons far
that they considered the "rapid-
ly declining reputation of the UN
si force for peace."
Among the reasons are: the
infamous Zionism equals racism
resolution, which has been
consistently reiterated in UN
resolutions on the Mideast and
n other issues, such as women's
rights; the "overblown" treat-
ment of the Palestine Liberation
Organization as a member-state
father than a mere observer; the
permission granted to two ousted
West Bank mayors to conduct a
vigil on UN premises; the later-
disproved charge that Israeli
soldiers had mutilated the bodies
of FLO terrorists killed in
Lebanon; and Waldheim's
Personal participation in the re-
cent Islamic summit conference
in- Taif, Saudi Arabia, which
ended with a call for jihad (holy
war) against Israel.
SQUADRON reminded Wald
heim that the Jewish community
had helped lead U.S. public
opinion in support of the prin-
ciples of the UN but that in view
of the widespread disapproval of
these and other actions by the
UN and the office of the
Secretary General, "the very
future of American support for
the UN process is now being
widely questioned.
"We told Dr. Waldheim," he
continued, "that the Office of the
Secretary General had a
responsibility to bring this fact to
the attention of all of the UN's
member states. Certain kinds of
conduct create certain kinds of
perceptions. If the UN wants to
change the perceptions, it must
change its conduct including
the unremitting series of anti-
Israel actions."
According to Squadron, Wald-
heim said he was obliged to carry
out the mandate of the UN
member states and that he did
not control the UN's agenda.
HE ALSO said that his
presence in Taif was "routine,"
thai it was limited to the first day
of the meeting, that his predeces-
sors had established the practice
of attending meetings of various
heads of states and that in his
remarks at Taif he had spoken of
the integrity of all member states
of the UN.
Asked about the "peace
medal" which Waldheim report-
edly gave King Khaled of Saudi
Arabia in Taif, he replied that he
had purchased the medallion in
the UN gift shop and that anyone
could buy one for himself.
BY HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Medical files related to cases of
food poisoning during the past
decade are under reexamination
as a result of an emerging scandal
over the marketing of tainted
meat from carrion in the guise of
freshly slaughtered meat. The
criminal practice, with apparent
underworld connections, is
believed confined to the Haifa
area. The secretary of the Israel
Poultry Raisers Union has been
arrested on charges of selling
diseased turkeys for human con-
sumption.
Similarly, one of the largest
meat wholesalers in Haifa is
under detention for allegedly
supplying carrion to kosher
butchers, sausage manufac-
turers, restaurants and catering
establishments.
ALTHOUGH Jerusalem and
central and southern regions of
the country are believed to be free
of tainted meat, there has been a
dramatic drop in meat consump-
tion among all Israelis while book
dealers report an upsurge in
demand for vegetarian and dairy
cookbooks.
The scandal broke as a result of
a parliamentary question asked
three months ago by MK
Shulamit Aloni of the Civil
Rights Movement. A police in-
vestigation that followed led to
the arrests of Arab villagers,
Jewish butchers and indications
of lax kashrut supervision
1 Two weeks ago, police dis-
covered that an Arab family
named Shalhabi from Sulam
village in the Jezreel Valley, has
been profiting for the past 12
years from the sale of the car-
casses of diseased cattle and
I poultry to meat wholesalers and
processors.
THE SHALHABIS gathered
the carrion from scores of kib-
butzim in northern Israel, osten-
sibly for sale as dog food. Kib-
butz spokesmen said they had no
idea it was being marketed to
butchers and thought the Arab
clan was doing them a favor by
clearing the land of the carcasses.
Rabbinical authorities seized
on the scandal to exhort Jews to
eat only kosher meat.
Applecation Being Processed For
2nd Year Israel Teen Pilgrimage
Continued from Page 1
incredible. Nowhere in my life
had I seen something so beautiful
as the sights I saw that day."
The group was very conscious
of the effect of the Teen Mission
to Israel on its Jewish identity.
Jordan Handler wrote, "To feel
part of a majority and having a
common bond with those around
is an extraordinary sensation."
Jeff Grubtnan said, "For the first
lime in my life, by being Jewish I
was part of a majority instead of
a minority."
Aynn Granet summarized the
trip for the whole group, "Israel
on the whole was one of the best
experiences I have ever had. The
people, the land, the Army,
everthing was different from
what I would have guessed. I
never could have imagined such a
small country with such beautiful
diving and water on one coast
and high statuesque mountains
on the other. The people on the
outside were tough and arrogant,
but on the inside, they were
totally lovable. The oddest
fueling I experienced during my
trip was boarding the plan, it was
like I had to leave home to get
home."
Teenagers and parents who
may be interested in this
program are urged to contact
Rabbi Bruce Warshal, Executive
Director of the South County
Jewish Federation at 368-2737.
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f
Page 10
The Jewish Ftoridian of South County
Friday. February
Reagan Say Settlements Not Really Illegal
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan said that
America's "number one. .moral!
commitment" in the Middle East
is "to see that the State of Israel
has a right to continue living as a
nation" and that he also feels
"that morally, the United States
should do everything it can in an
even-handed manner, to bring
peace to the Middle East." But
he emphasized that the process
"starts with the accptance of
Israel as a nation" by those
countries which refuse to
recognize it.
Reagan, in the first of a series
of informal news conferences with
selected reporters in the Oval
Office, also reiterated his belief
that Israel's military capabilities
are "of benefit" to the U.S. in the
region and his disagreement with
the Carter Administration's
contention that Israeli settle-
ments on the West Bank are
"illegal." However, he criticized
Israel's current settlement moves
as "ill advised" and "un-
necessarily provocative." |
REAGAN, responding to
questions by reporters from The
New York Times, the Wall Street
Journal, Christian Science
Monitor, Chicago Tribune and i
Time magazine, made his most
comprehensive comments on the
Middle East since his election
last November.
With respect to the strategic
security of the region, he
maintained that the U.S. should
establish a "ground presence"1
there "for the the Soviets who
know that if they made a reckless
move, they would be risking a
confrontation with the Untied.
States."
Asked if his was an "even
handed policy in the Mideast,"
the President replied, "I believe
that we have. No. 1, a moral
commitment for the present to
see that the State of Israel has a
right to continue living as a
nation. I believe that, and think
that we're moraly bound to do
that. But beyond that, I think
it's also a two-way street."
He added. "I think Israel,
being a country sharing our same
Rudolf Hess XJommittee' Members
Demand $7JOfan Ramom
BONN (JTA) A group of
neo-Nazis calling themselves the
Rudolf Hess Restitution Com-
mando, have set a Feb. 14 dead-
line to kill two Jews at random
unless they receive $7 million for
a fund to free Rudolf Hess from
the Spandau Prison in West
Berlin. Hess, 86, who was
Hitler's right-hand man as the
Deputy Fuehrer, is now the only
prisoner in Spandau.
The neo-Nazi group made its
demand in letters dated Jan. 30
and mailed in Salzburg, Austria
to the governments of the four
Allied powers which administer
the prison the United States,
Britain, France and the Soviet
Union a West German govern-
ment spokesman said.
The neo-Nazi organization said
the $7 million it is demanding
would be "a gesture of good will"
and should be paid to the
"Freedom for Rudolf Commit-
tee," an organization formed by
Hess' son, Wolf-Ruediger Het.^,
43, a Munich architect. No
comments were available from
the younger Hess and there is no
indication that he is involved
with the Restitution Commando
group.
COME TO
JERUSALEM AND
CELEBRATE THE
HEBREW UNIVERSITY'S
HISTORIC RETURN
TO MOUNT SCOPUS.
THE RRST INTERNATIONAL
CONFERENCE OF THE FRIENDS
OF THE HEBREW UNIVERSITY
JUNE 28-JULY 4,1981
This conference will bring together hundreds of Friends for
an in-depth look at the role the University plays in the life of
the State of Israel, as well as its profound ties with Jewish
communities everywhere.
Meat distinguished scholars and scientists In their class-
rooms, attend gala events, including a concert and July
Fourth Ball, a recaption with Yitzhak Navon, the President
of Israel, tours and many other special events.
Join groups from Miami, Hollywood/Hallandale, Boca
Raton, and Palm Beach for special Florida Friends activi-
ties, including dedication of Florida House, a key link in the
University's historic rebuilding of Mount Scopus.
I am Interested In attending the First International Confer
i sand further Information.
cmr.
SUB. PHONE
Send to:
Vr
.STATE.
.-
HOME PHONE.
Frier km of Oie Heor ew University
30071sl8treet
Fl. 33141 006) M
ideals, I think democratic ap-
proach to things, with a combat-
ready and even a combat-
experienced military, is a force in
the Middle East that actually is
of benefit to us
"BUT Ialso feel that morally the
united States should do every-
thing it can in an even-handed
manner to bring peace to the
Middle East. Now this, based on
our first commitment, means
that we have to get over the
hurdle of those nations in the
Middle East that refuse to recog-
nize the right of Israel to exist.
"Peace will come when that
first step is taken. Now a few of
them have as Egypt did; and
(President Anwar) Sadat who I
think is one of the great states-
men for doing that."
Asked if he approved of the
"accelerated settling of the West
Bank" by Israel, Reagan said,
"As to the West Bank, 1 believe
the settlements there I dis-
agreed when the previous
Administration referred to them
as illegal, they're not illegal. Not
under the UN resolution that
leaves the West Bank open to all
people Arab and Israel alike,
Christian alike.
"I DO THINK, perhaps now
with this rush to do it and this
moving in there the way they are
is ill-advised because if we're
going to continue with the spirit
of Camp David to try and arrive
at a peace, maybe this, at this
time, is unneccessarily
provocative."
The President questioned the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion's claim to legitimacy as
representing the Palestinian
people. Asked if he had "any
sympathy toward the Palestin-
ians or any moral feelings toward
them and their aspirations.
"I know that that's got to be a
part of any settlement. I think in
part of any settlment. I think in
arriving at that, here again, there
is the outspoken utterance that
Israel doesn't have a riht J
exist; there is the tWmL
practice by the P^oTS
been dected by the Palestinian*
VL il f! "^Puzed by them
as their leadership, but I've never
SJiSL^fiL' been ^finitely
gaB*"* But- it starts
with the acceptance of Israel as a
nation.
Merkava Decision
Laid At Britain's Fee\
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's decision to design andl
produce its Merkava battle tank was the result of
Britain's withdrawal of an agreement to supply Israel
with modern Chieftain tanks, according to Maj. Gen
(Res.) Israel Tal, initiator of the Israeli tank, described by
military experts as a first-rate weapon which pays more!
than usual attention to the comfort and safety of its
crews.
TAL TOLD a Tel Aviv University forum that the British had
agreed in 1966 to supply Israel with a number of Chieftain tanks, then
still in the development state, as well as a number of older Centurians.
Two Chieftains were sent to Israel secretly for extensive testing under
Middle East terrain conditions.
Agreement was reached on the establishment in Israel of a special
factory to produce the new model with locally-suggested im-
provements. But under Arab pressure and terrorist threats to attack
British embassies abroad, the British in December 1969 suddenly
withdrew their agreement.
UNDER TAL'S INSISTENCE, Israel therefore undertook in-
tensive research on its own to produce an entirely new tank, using
local battle experience. Tal said the nine years this research took was
a record for such a project, which cost some $65 million also a rela
lively small sum. Tal said that if a war were to break out in the Middle
East now, some 13,000 tanks would probably be deployed in the arena.
f eui*
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HIGH IN THE BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAINS -
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For Israel Cordially Invites You to the Annual 3
ARMDI-Samuel Reinhard *
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Award Dinner *
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Honoring
Mayor Murray Meyerson
Of Miami Beach
1981 Recipient
Cocktail. 7.00 p.m.
Couvert. $100 i
Tlbor Hollo
Dinner Chairman
Sunday, April 12
Konover Hotel Konover Ballroom
Dinner 8KKJp.ro-j
For Reservation Call 947-3263
Dietary Laws St net lay Observed ^^ ^^.roj
Southeast ARMDI District Dir.^j
David Cotemsn
Southeast District ARMDI Chslrmsn


February 20,11
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
Kreisky Wanted PLO to Mediate
Continued from Page 1
^nt to us and as liaiaon
the initial meeting, accord-
* Lipshutz, Kreisky insisted
?k.t if anyone in the world could
2.1 lAyatollah Ruhollah)
gomeini to release the
Lean hostages, that person
iYisir Arafat, leader of the
S). and that the United States
^iddo business with Arafat.
w THAT connection, Kreisky
jiBiwd out that the PLO had
Ea the lead in training
Booeini s "guerrillas" and
ggiry personnel "and that the
pLOand the miliUnts who seized
At Embassy virtually were
jterchangeable. Further, he
Hninded us that Arafat and the
PLO were practially the only
an who openly befriended
ftomeini and his people while
tfcv were in exile from Iran,"
Lipshutz wrote.
What Kreisky did not remind
u of were these facts (although I
as quite aware of them) that
[ Kreisky himself was the leading
Ldvoca'te among European lead-
in for recognition of the PLO;
that the PLO obtains practically
all of its arms from the Soviet
Union; that Arafat at that very
moment was conferring with
Russian leaders in Moscow. .
ud that the Soviets stood to pro-
It greatly from friction between
Iranand the United States. ."
Bruno (Kreisky) then, with all
ike persuasiveness he could
muter, urged me to meet and
tali with the PLO leader Issam
Sartawi. who was in Vienna" and
who Kreisky described as a man
whose life "is in constant danger
from radical Palestinians"
because he is "dedicated to the
cause of bringing peace between
Israel and the Palestinians."
Lipshutz said Kreisky insisted he
should meet Sartawi "regardless
of the fact that the U.S. had a
commitment to Israel not to do
so..."
FURTHERMORE, according
jo Lipshutz. "Kreisky stated that
he wanted our government to
le demonstrable action'
f*nly and directly with the PLO
which would be de facto recog-
Wion of the PLO. ..even though
tned to assure us that this was
* quid pro quo to get Arafat's
intervention with Khomeini in
hostage situation." Lipshutz
rote that he remained non-
MBRUttal.
Meanwhile, Kreisky made
"TOgements for Chamey to fly to
'srael to meet with Weizman.
weizman called together a
""sting of his top military and
intelligence advisers to discuss
Possible plans by which the
American hostages might be
"*ued. and actually allowed
though Israel fully recognized
that 60 American lives were at
stake in the Iranian situation."
Lipshutz continued:
"Charney believed that the
situation in Israel, both with
reference to its economic
problems and its political in-
stability, was so bad that any
miscalculation on our part
relative to contacts with the
PLO, could precipitate an Israeli
reaction which, although perhaps
emotional, might be the pretext
for drastic action taken for the
purpose of unifying the Israeli
people."
On Nov. 14, Lipshutz spoke
with Saunders by telephone from
Vienna and was told "that about
an hour earlier the decision had
been reached and 'the project had
been wrapped up.' Saunders
advised me as follows:
1) that the decision had been
made to pursue only the private
channel of communication with
the PLO which had been
established months earlier with
Israeli concurrence, and not the
Cham
ofth
y to sit in on at least part
e meeting."
With
respect to the phase of
he consultations, Lipshutz wrote
"at 'Even though the Israelis
gwably know as much about
"eran and Iran and the Iranian
P^'Ple as anyone in the world,
"eianan and his advisors
included that they would see
"y to conduct a successful
military mission to rescue our
"stages."
AS FOR the Austrian-PLO
Proposition, Lipshutz wrote that
"eizman told Charney that any
\""i pro
I
' pro quo approach by U.o
J-S. U> the PLO, even relating to
J* Iranian hostage matter,
ou d be a serous indication to
"* "raelis that the U.S. govern-
"** did not have sufficient
["o've to fulfill its commitments
f?? the U.S. capitulation" in
" regard well might have a
minal effect on the peace
r*31) proceedings because the
"n'ted States' commitments in
T_ KKyptianIsraeli peace
"<* are so vital ,r .evan.
public channel urged by
Kreisky." (The author does not
elaboarate on the nature of the
"private channel" or "Israeli
concurrence.)"
2) that there would be no
public recognition of or quid pro
quo with, the PLO;
3) that I should explain this
decision to Kreisky, express our
appreciation for his assistance
and advice, and try to keep the
Kreisky connection war but not
hot. ."
SUMMARIZING the episode,
Lipshutz noted that throughout
the hostage crisis President
Carter's guiding objectives were
"to protect the safety and obtain
the release of the American
hostages and to protect the
integrity and national interests of
the United States------The Pre-
sident refused to deal with the
FLO (other than through non-
public channels of com-
munication previously agreed to
by our government and by
No TRouBcE IN Dooce
MiiiTER...Y'CoT .
IO f*lMUTE4 TG'T/
>"**
***
Israel), despite the possible
assistance Arafat might have
given to obtain the release of the
hostages. Such action would have
violated our nation's agreement
with its friend, the State of
Israel, an agreement which was
made by Secretary of State Kis-
singer at the conclusion of the
1973 Arab-Israeli war.
"Further, he never publicly
revealed the close ties of the
Iranian government and
militants with the PLO, and
possibly the Soviet Union, which
revelation might have en-
dangered even more the lives of
the hostages. Further, despite
the tremendous political advan-
tage which would have been his
in the Presidential campaign,
Jimmy Carter never revealed this-
'Austrian connection' and his
refusal to legitimize the PLO and
reward their terrorist actions,
even under these most tempting
of circumstances.
Community Calendar
Fab. it
Hodassah Ban Gurion 12:30 p.m. meeting Temple Beth El
Sisterhood meeting Boca Hotel Lunch Pioneer Women -
Ziporah 10 a.m. board meeting Yiddish Culture Club Delray
-8 p.m. meeting Brandeis Women Boca 8:45 a.m. Miami
Trip
fob. 21
SCJF leadership today p.m.
Fab. 22
Temple Emeth Brotherhood Breakfast Hodassah Ben Gurion -
Sunday Picnic, Temple Emeth bond rally 7:30 p. m.
fob. 23
ORT Boca East 12:30 p.m. board meeting Brandeis Women -
Boca Century Village Museum Trip Temple Sinai Sisterhood -
12:30p.m. meeting.
Fab. 24
Jewish Current Events Club 2:30 p.m. meeting Yiddish
Culture Club Boca 7:30 p.m. meeting Temple Beth El 8
p.m. American Friends of Hebrew University. Dr. Bernard
Cherek.
Fab. 25
Brandeis Women Boca 7:30 p.m. Auction, art trip, amateur
theater ORT Delray 12:30 p.m. meeting Hadassoh Aviva -
12:30 p.m. general meeting ORT Regional Dohar Luncheon
B'nai B'rith Women Delray Essay Award.
Ft*. 25
Brandeis Women Boca 7:30 p.m. Auction, art trip, amateur
theater ORT Delray 12: 30 p.m. meeting Hodassah Aviva -
12:30 p.m. general meeting. B'nai B'rith Women Delray -
Essay Awards, ORT Regional Dohar luncheon.
Fab. 26
Jewish War Veterans 7 p.m. meeting Jewish War Veterans
Auxiliary 7 p.m. meeting ? Temple Emeth S.sterhood 9:30
a.m. board meeting B'nai B'rith Women Boca 1 p.m
meeting Temple Emeth Brotherhood 7:30 p.m. board
meeting.
Fa.. 27
Jewish War Veterans 10 a. m. board meeting.
Fab. 28
B'nai Torah Congregation 8:30 p.m. art auction.
March 1
South County Jewish Federation Cocoa Woods Breakfast.
March 2
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi 12:30 board meeting Brandeis
Women Boca 9:30 a.m. board meeting Hadattah Aviva-
Youth Alijah Luncheon South County Jewish Community Day
School 8 p.m. board meeting National Council of Jewish
Women 8 p.m. general meeting.
March 3
Women's American Ort Delray theater p.m. -Temple Emeth 7
a m board meeting B'nai B'rith Lodge Boca Teeca 9:30 a.m.
meeting Yiddish Culture Club Boca 7:30 p.m. meeting Ort-
Bodel-7:30 p.m.
March 4
Women's American Ort Regional 9:30 a.m. meeting Free
Sons of Israel 7 p.m. meeting American Mizrachi Women -
Beersheba Chapter meeting B'nai B'rith Women Boca 2
p.m. meeting.
March 5
Temple Beth El-Brotherhood 8 p.m. board meeting Temple
Emeth Sisterhood noon meeting.
March 6
Pioneer Women Zipporah 12 noon meeting Hodassah Ben
Gurion-Nassau Cruise.
March 7
Notional Council of Jewish Women -8 p.m. Boca Teeca Country
Club dinner auction Beth El Singles housa party.
March I
Temple Beth El Brotherhood 10 a.m. meeting.
March*
B'nai Torah Congregation 7:30 p.m. board meeting Woman's
American Ort-Boca East 1 p.m. meeting Temple Emeth
Singles 12 noon meeting Beth El Singles meeting.
March 10
American Mizrachi Women-Beershebo 10:30 meeting
Temple Emeth Brotherhood 7:30 p.m. meeting Yiddish
Culture Club Boca 7:30 p.m. meeting Pioneer Womtn-
Beersheba 12nnon musical program, 1 p.m. meeting.
March 11
South County Jewish Federation Women's Division Pioneers
Lunch- 10:30 a.m. Hodassah Aviva 10a.m. board meeting.
March 12
Hodassah Ben Gurion 10 a.m. board meeting Temple Beth El
Sisterhood board meeting Brandeis Women-Boca 11:30
a.m. luncheon Boca Teeca Israel Bond dinner 8 p.m. B'nai
B'rith Women-Boca 1 p.m. luncheon.
March 13
Jewish War Veterans- 10 a.m. meeting.
March 14
Beth El Singles movie night Women's American Ort music
and art show 5 to 7 p.m. B'nai Torah p.m. Israeli bond
evening cocktail party.
March 15
Beth El Singles Brunch Women's American Ort-Delray p.m.
dance Temple Emeth Sisterhood Dinner show Temple Beth
El 3 p.m. young artist series Temple Beth El Lecture Dr. Ruth
Gruber.
March 16
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi 12:30 meeting B'nai B'rith Women
Boca 10:30 a.m. board meeting Pioneer Women-Beersheba -
12:30 p.m. board meeting.
March 17
American Mizrachi Women-Beersheba Cake Sale Jewish
Current Events Club 2:30 p.m. meeting Hodassah Boca
Maariv 2 p.m. meeting Yiddish Culture Club-Boca 7:30 p.m.
meeting Ort Bodel 7:30 p.m. meeting South County Jewish
Federation-Boca Barwood Organizing Meeting 7:30 p.m.
March II
Women's American Ort Regional 9:30 a.m. board meeting
National Council of Jewish Women-Seminar on Family 9:30
a.m.-2:30 p.m. Hodassah Aviva-Pompano Day at the Races*
Ort-Delray Membership Tea.
March 19
I Hodassah Ben Gurion 12:30 meeting Temple Beth I
Sisterhood meeting coffee with the church ladies.
March 19
FEAST OF ESTHER
EREV PURIM,


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, February 20,1981

Tired?...Bored?...
Spend Weekend in Nazi Concentration Camp (British-Style)
NEW YORK (JTA) -
According to a newspaper report
out of England, a new found'
vacation spot for tired and bored
executives resembles something
one could only envision as part of
the television show "Fantasy
Island." British businessmen are
spending $75 for a three-day
excursion to a "vacation" camp
which is modeled after Colditz,
the infamous German POW
camp.
The report, which was con-
firmed by an official at the
British agency, Spectrum, which
distributed the story, described
in detail what this "vacation"
camp is like. Ivocated in southern
England, the camp is guarded by
50 armed "Nazi" soldiers, a team
of trained attached dogs and is
surrounded by 14-foot high
UitrbtHi wire fences as well as
searchlight-equipped watch-
towers.
"PRISONERS" are trans-
!>orted to the camp by truck, and
are medically examined to
determine if they can handle life
in the camp. The vacationers who
pass the exam are given prison
tatigues or Allied military garb to
wear. Housing consists of hut-
like barracks with rags for
mattresses and blankets. Meals
consist of stale bread and rancid
tjruel.
The pleasure concept that the
camp provides is that upon
arrival to the camp, the
prisoners" are issued maps
vhich list four possible escape
routes, of which only one is
asible. "Prisoners" can try to
scape and those who succeed in
getting four miles out of the
region of the camp, are con-
sidered to have made it to safety.
The task is made much more
difficult since a helicopter is
utilized to hunt down any
"escapees" and catch them
before they reach the four mile
freedom mark. Those who make
it are able to return to their
homes. Those who are recap-
tured, however, are returned to
the camp to face harsh interro-
gation and solitary confinement.
THE "commandant" of the
camp is quoted in the story as
saying that those "vacationers"
who are successful in their escape
from this life-like POW camp,
would most likely have been able
to do the same if they were in-
:arcerated there during World
War II. This three-day vacation
has proven so popular that
organizers are considering im-
plementing a three-month
version.
A variety of observers, when
asked to comment on this
vacation spot, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that while
the situation is shocking it is
hardly surprising. Famed author
and Auschwitz survivor Elie
Wiesel called the vacation spot
"sick and morbid." Wiesel. who
serves as chairman of the U.S.
Memorial Council on the Holo-
caust, pointed to this as another
episode to cheapen the
Holocaust.
"It is now touching every area
and has even invaded the
recreational area. Everything
becomes 'fun.' he said. Wiesel
also commented on the irony of
the situation in that the
"vacationers" are "trying to
vicariously experience things
they can't understand or live."
A PROMINENT American
psychiatrist and analyst of social
behavior commented that this
could be an attempt on the part
of the British vacationers to try
to recapture what he called their
"lost glory." Since times for the
British are quite difficult today in
light of their economic situation.
this psychiatrist, who barring a
personal examination, preferred
to remain anonymous, felt that
this could be their way of looking
for an "escape" by reliving
glorious moments of the past.
Other survivors and social
commentators echoed these
views. The response to this latest
vacation resort was best summed
up by one middle-age woman,
herself a survivor of Dachau, who
said: "If back then anyone had
known of anything like this camp
in England, no one could believe
it. So how can I believe it?"
Up
Weinberger Approves Beefing
Saudi Arabia's Armed Forces
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Defense Secretary
Casper Weinberger in-
dicated here that he favored
improving Saudi Arabia's
armed forces by agreeing to
the Saudis* request to en-
hance the combat capa-
bilities of the 60 F-15 war-
planes they have bought
from the U.S.
as
'We want to make them
effective as we can for
their purposes," Wein-
berger said in response to
questions at a press con-
ference.
"They (the Saudis) have a
>asically difficult defense
>roblem with a long coastline and
a small number of forces and
immensely valuable resources for
the free world." he said. He add-
3d, "We want to do everything
ve can to assist them in
>roviding the additional secur-
ity they need."
THE SAUDIS have asked for
additional fuel tanks and bomb
racks for their F-15s. The Carter
Administration did not send the
request to Congress before it left
office. Weinberger and the State
Department indicated that the
Keagan Administration would
make its decision soon.
Israel and its supporters in the
U.S. have vehemently opposed
the supply of equipment that
would increase the range of the
Saudi jet fighters. Congressional
souces had informed the Carter
Administration that enhancing
Saudi aircraft would distrub the
military balance of power in the
Middle East and would pose a
threat to Israel.
In another matter related to
the Middle East, Weinberger said
that he could not conceive of "a
serious request" from Israel to
station American troops on its
soil, but "We will certainly ex-
amine that kind of question if it is
ever raised in a sympathetic
viewpoint." The question was
put to the Defense Secretary in
light of discussions in the Reagan
Administration of an American
presence in the Middle East to
deter Soviet aggression there.
WEINBERGER referred to
Israel as "a good and strong and
important ally," but he did not
know if it wanted U.S. troops. "I
would be very surprised if it did,"
he said. He said the question was
"hypothetical" and observed
that the response to such a
request would depend on "what
the host country wants."
He said if it ever arose it would
be considered "just as we did
with Saudi Arabia when the
request was made of the A WACS
planes." The U.S. sent four of the
giant communications aircraft to
Saudi Arabia, piloted by
Americans.
President Installed
Curtis CJ. Levine will be in-
stalled President of Boca Raton's
Noah Lodge of B'nai B'rith,
Sunday. Feb. 22. Installation
ceremonies will be conducted by
former Lodge President. H.
Philip Cohn, at the Holiday Inn
Lakeside. Glades Road in Boca
Raton, beginning at 10 a.m.
Breakfast will be served.
U.S. Rep. Dan Mica ID Fla).
who is slated to return to the
House Foreign Affairs Com-
inillee, will speak to Lodge
members and guests.
Mr. Levine practices law with
the firm of Baskin & Sears in
Boca Baton. He la also Chairman
of the Boca Raton Environmental
Ailivsory Board.
THE HIGHER BUYER.THE HIGHER BUYER'THE HIGHER BUYER'THE HIGHER BUYER-THE HIGHER BUYER
UJ
15
. CO
UJ
X
C3
UJ

NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS, INC.
't% NORTH AMERICAN
.>*> RARE COINS, INC.
WE ARE THIS AREAS
HIGHEST BUYERS OF
GOLD SILVER DIAMONDS
CLASS RINGS-COINS'BROKEN JEWELRY-WEDDING BANDS-CHARMS-TEA SERVICES
CHAINS-FLATWAREEARRINGS*POCKET & WRIST WATCHES' U.S. & FOREIGN GOLD COINS
THREE COflVEnienT LOCHTIOnS
LAKE PARK
905 FEDERAL HWYj
(U.S. 1)
GREENBRIAR
SHOPPING CENTER
OPEN
MON SAT 10 A.M. 5:30 P.M.
842-0827
WEST PALM BEACH
1897PALMBEACHLAKESBIVD.
( CROSS ROADS BLDG. 114)
JUST WEST OF I-95
OPEN
MON. SAT. 9 A.M. 6 P.M.
684-1771
LAKE WORTH
L.W0RTHSH0PPIN6
PLAZA WEST
(LAKE WORTH & JOG RD.)
CENTER OF MALL AREA
OPEN
MON. -SAT. 10 A.M. 5:30 P.M.
965-9389
oOd
NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS, INC.
NORTH AMERICAN
RARE COINS, INC.
3H1 M3Afl9 H3HDIH 3H1 H3AD9 d3HDIH 3H1 U3AD9 fcJ3HDlH 3H1 a3Afl9 U3HOIH 3H1 a3Afl9




^.February 20,1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 13
Rocky Would Give Human Rights
The Cold Shoulder Treatment
On the occasion of their retirement, the two top executives ofHIAS are shown being honored
at a reception and dinner at the Harmonie Club in New York City. Left to right are Harry
Friedman, retiring vice president, administration and finance; Edwin Shapiro, HIAS presi-
dent; Bobbie Abrams, vice president ofHIAS and co-chairman of the event; and Gaynor I.
Jacobson, retiring executive vice president. Succeeding Jacobson is Leonard Seidenman,
until now director ofHIAS European and North African operations. Friedman's successor is
Irving Haber, who was HIAS comptroller.
Headlines
Report Traces Rise in German Extremism
In recent years, there have been two major
developments within the right-wing extremist
movement in the Federal Republic of Germany,
according to the Minister of the Interior's Report
on Right-Wing Extremism: a decline in mem-
bership of large, organized right-wing groups
{since 1969) and an increase (since 1974) in the
number and membership of small, usually neo-
Nazi groups without strict organizational
structure.
Though the largest rightist organization, the
National Democratic Party, lost almost half its
1976 vote in the 1980 elections, the number of
right-wing groups in the country increased from
69 in 1979 to 75 in 1980, with a total membership
of around 19.000 (1979: 17,3001.
Since 1977. according to the report, the number
of disturbances and acts of violence instigated by
extremists has more than doubled. In 1980,
rightist violence resulted in 17 deaths, including
13 in the Oktoberfest bombing in Munich.
New York Chief Judge Lawrence H. Cooke said
that his recent order banning official court
business in discriminatory social clubs will not
only combat bias but enhance the judicial system.
The chief judge made his remarks at a meeting
of the National Committee on Discrimination of
the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith held
at the League's New York headquarters.
Also appearing at the meeting was Joan
Specter, a member of the Philadelphia City
Council and author of that city's newly-enacted
ordinance against discriminatory social clubs.
Mrs. Specter described her efforts in
spearheading passage of the legislation which
prohibits Philadelphia from paying emplyees'
business expenses at discriminatory clubs and
lns city contracts with firms that pay their
employees' dues at such clubs.
Greatly disparate metals, as well as some
metals and ceramics, can now be bonded firmly
and permanently, using a novel process developed
y Drs. Lev Levin and Moshe Wein, of the
department of Materials Engineering at the
echnion Israel Institute of Technology.
The most common methods of bonding metals
- welding, brazing and soldering are often
"applicable, especially where two materials of
greatly differing characteristics are to be joined.
Accepted diffusional bonding techniques and the
process of explosive cladding also have their
^advantages for some applications.
The technique utilizes the accelerated diffusion
rkl accmpanie8 a recrystallization process at
* cntact site of the matched pair. By this
"^ans, high-strength bonds are obtained within
minutes or even seconds.
Bonds so far produced include aluminum to
9U*l. duraluminum to steel, and any of these
"jetals to ceramics. Multi-layer "sandwiches," of
aluminum, steel and ceramics, have also been
produced.
Over loo genetic disorders are known to afflict
^Jewish people, according to a new book en-
titled "Genetic Disorders among the Jewish
People," by Dr. Richard M. Goodman, professor
of human genetics at Tel Aviv University's
Sackler School of Medicine and the Chaim Sheba
Medical Center, published by the Johns Hopkins
University Press. Most of these diseases are
severe and affect the longevity of those afflicted,
says Prof. Goodman.
The book, the first authoritative reference work
on the clinical genetics of the Jewish people,
offers a broad overview of the historical
development and consequent heterogeneity of the
Jewish people: of the genetic diseases known to
afflict various Jewish ethnic groups (Ashkenazi,
Sepharadi, and Oriental); and of diagnosis,
prevention and therapeutic approaches to the
disorders.
Genetic diseases have existed for as long as
man has existed, says Prof. Goodman. His book
lists over 30 genetic disorders mentioned in the
Bible and the Talmud (not the same disorders
known to be common among Jews today), some of
which the sources clearly recognized as family
afflictions which could be transmitted by the
mother and or the father.
HIAS the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society
is now accepting applications for the fifth
annual Ann. S. Petluck Memorial Awards, which
will be presented at the agency's 101st annual
meeting in New York March 23.
Awards of $400 each will be given to three
refugees "who have made exceptional progress or
shown outstanding promise in resettling in the
United States." There are no restrictions on age
or sex.
Individuals or organizations representing them
may obtain applications for the awards by writing
to HIAS. 200 Park Avenue South, New York,
NY. 10003. Filing deadline is March 2. Winners
will be notified on or before March 9, and need not
be present at the HIAS annual meeting to receive
their awards and stipends.
The awards are named for Ann. S. Petluck, a
social work administrator who specialized in
immigration and refugee work, and who in-
fluenced the practice of migration casework and
helped reshape United States immigration law.
The number of Germans touring Israel reached
180,000 last year, according to Gideon Pat,
Israel's Minister of Economics and Tourism, at a
press conference in Frankfurt. Most of the
tourists, said Pat, stay one or two weeks and
some have been there before.
Pat also drew attention to the closer and more
evenly-balanced trade ties between the two
countries. German-bound Israeli exports in the
year's first nine months increased from $400
million in 1979 to 479 million last year. For 1980
as a whole, Israel exports may have reached
about $600 million worth of goods. Agricultural
products and flowers account for nearly one-
third; textiles, clothing, fashion for 23 percent;
and diamonds chiefly industrial for 22
percent.
It all began with a press
conference that Chase
Manhattan Bank President
David Rockefeller conducted in
Buenos Aires in November. With
regard to concern over violations
of human rights in Argentina,
Rockefeller said, in effect, that of
course America should help
"uphold human rights in all parts
of the world." Then he went on to
say that if we keep lecturing and
publicly condemning regimes
with which we disagree, we
probably won't get the results we
desire.
Rockefeller seemed especially
worried that our repeated lec-
turing about human rights
"our attempt to impose our own
standards by threatening to
curtail foreign aid and trade"
is ill-advised. Let's stop being
self-righteous and offensive, he
went on.
THEN TURNING to develop
ments in Argentina, he noted
that until 1976, when the military
took over, Argentinian society
came near to crumbling, with
"terrorists carrying out political
assassinations and kidnappings
on a scale that traumatized the
country."
So we are to understand that
now that Gen. Jorge Videla heads
the government, everybody can
breathe easier. The rate of in-
flation is down, foreign exchange
reserves are near $10 billion, the
economy is rapidly improving.
And the Videla regime "seems to
be trying to rectify the injustice
that occurred."
Let us turn now to the 1979
report on Human Rights
Practices for 1979 by the U.S.
Department of State. There have
been six military and six civilian
presidents in Argentina since
1955, that comprehensive and
authoritative review notes. Was
there a change then in 1976 and
after, as Rockefeller believes?
Again let's look at the U.S.
report: "At this point, the Armed
Forces again took control of the
state, with the avowed goals of
promoting economic recovery
and ending terrorism and
corruption The Armed Forces
maintained the state of siege
imposed in 1974, closed
Congress, deposed the President,
and replaced all members of the
Supreme Court. Elected state
and local governmental officials
were replaced by military of-
ficers, and political party ac-
tivities, including the right of
assembly, were prohibited .
The security forces embarked on
a widespread "counter-campaign
of vilence aimded at terrorists;
(and) many known or suspected
terrorists, as u>ell as many
persons with no subversive
record, disappeared'' (Italics
added.)
AMERICAN congressmen
who probed and reported on the
stale of human rights around the
world know that Adolfo Perez
Esquivel, the Argentinian leader
of an organization promoting
human rights in Latin America
and latest winner of the Nobel
Peace Prize, knows it; Jacob
Timmerman, the Jewish editor
long held under house arrest by
tRe government of Argentina,
knows it. And the 71 outstanding
American religious leaders,
including 12 bishops, who have
urged Ronald Reagan to
denounce infractions of human
rights throughout the world,
know it.
But Rockefeller insists he has
been unduly criticized for a part
of what he said at his press
conference.
When Americans praised
Mussolini for making the Italian
trains run on time early in the
century, they, too, isisted they
were being unduly criticized.
They were to learn later what an
extremist regime can do by way
of oppression, torture, denial of
Robert
Segal
basic rights, and eventual
murder.
If Jimmy Carter or Ronald
Reagan or any other President of
the United States, aware of the
bitter lessons taught the world
by extremist regimes, right and
left, cry out against oppression
wherever it breeds, why try to
curb such protests?
HAD FORMER State
Secretary Cordell Hull not in-
sisted on refusing to condemn
Adolf Hitler in the 1930s as he
should have been denounced by
' the American government, how
many lives might have been
spared?
Rockefeller might want to
reevaluate some of his
judgements on the relationship of
human rights to a nation's
economy. And surely, Ronald
Reagan will want to do con-
siderable soul searching before he
gives the generals and colonels in
certain Latin American countries
any reason to believe this nation,
conceived in liberty, will condone
destruction of individual freedom
anywhere.


Page 14
v*iK"; 'f\iu2.\o KtAsWoW 'v.i
The Jewish Flortdlan of South County
Friday, February 20, ]
Waldheim Defends Stamp Honoring Palestinian People
By YITZHAK RAM
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Secretary General
Kurt Waldheim has de-
fended the issuance by the
United Nations Postal Ad-
ministration of three
stamps bearing the inscrip-
tion, "Inalienable Rights of
the Palestinian People," in
English, French and Ger-
man. The stamps, author-
ized by a General Assembly
resolution in 1979, drew
sharp protests from various
groups and individuals.
Waldheim, in a statement read
by a UN spokesman, responded
to charges that the stamps may
legitimize terrorism. "There was
no intention, by implication or
otherwise, to legitimate terrorism
to which the UN remains
'.strongly opposed, nor to jeopar-
dize the legitimate rights of any
of its member states," the state-
ment said. The spokesman noted
that the stamps were being
issued with the objective "of
publicizing the inalienable rights
of the Palestinian people."
He added, "The importance of the world community, including
assuring the rights of the Pales- all the parties directly concerned
tinian people in the process of with the Question of Palestme.
establishing a permanent peace | The spokesman noted that
in the Middle East has been profits from the sale of the
accepted by the vast majority of
Israel Stays Cool As
U.S. Reviews Mideast
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Israel offered a mild official
reaction to the Reagan
Administration's announcement
that it is reviewing U.S. policy in
the Middle East, its character-
ization of new Israeli Settlements
on the West Bank as "unhelpful"
and the hint of ambiguity in its
appraisal of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
A Foreign Ministry spokesman
said that it was only natural that
the new Administration would
take stock of its commitments
around the world. He said the
remarks by State Department
spokesman William Dyess on the
settlements, the PLO and other
matters seemed to be a con-
Police Accused of
Threatening Suspects
JERUSALEM (JTA) The lawyer for the three
sons of Druze Knesset member Jaber Muadi accused the
police of using threats and intimidation to extract ad-
missions of guilt from his clients in the Jan. 12 murder of
Bedouin Sheikh Hamad Abu Rabia. The Muadi brothers,
said by police to be the prime suspects, were arrested
shortly after the killing which paved the way for their
father to assume the Knesset seat held by Abu Rabia.
IN A LETTER to Police Inspector General Arye
Ivtzan, defense attorney Shlomo Tussia-Cohen said the
"unacceptable methods" employed by police inter-
rogators included denying the accused access to a lawyer
for more than a week after their arrest.
He said the confession by Seif Muadi claiming full
responsibility for the crime was obtained under duress,
pressure and insults. Muadi was accused by his ques-
* tioners of assiting terrorists and Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization chief Yasir Arafat, Tussia-Cohen said.
Chiles Warns Aging Not
To Quit Social Security
WASHINGTON Outgoing
chairman of the Senate Special
Committee on Aging, Sen.
Law ton Chiles (D.Kla.l, has
announced the release of a new
Information Paper entitled,
"State and Local Government
Terminations of Social Security
Coverage."
The trend for some groups to
drop out of the Social Security
program is of serious concern to
me," stated Chiles. "While loss of
Social Security coverage is not
detrimental to every person in
every circumstance, it is clear
that some workers have been dis-
advantaged without clearly
knowing what they were getting '
into."
Chiles added, "Perhaps the
single most valuable asset of
'coverage under Social Security is
the annual, guaranteed cost-of
living adjustment. Our research
did not find any system sub-
stituted by a state or local
goverment that could come close
_ to matching this very real i
benefit."'
Chiles said that "Anyone '
considering the option of term-
inating Social Security coverage
should weigh the pros and cons
very carefully. We have tried to
provide an objective analysis of
the arguments for and against
Social Security. It is my hope
that this paper will prove
valueable to all those who are
faced with this important
decision.
tinuation of U.S. Mideast policy.
But the spokesman differed with
the view of the PLO as an
"umbrella organization" which
implies it contains "moderate
and terrorist elements. 1
THAT characterization was |
attributed by Dyess to Secretary
of State Alexander Haig during
his confirmation hearings by the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee. The Foreign Ministry
spokesman stressed that in
Israel's view, the PLO is an
extremist terrorist organization
and the existence of any
moderate elements within it,
remains to be proven. Even if
such elements exist, the question
is to what extent do they in-
fluence PLO policy. the
spokesman said.
He pointed out that the PLO is
committed by its Covenant and
its very nature to the annihilation
of Israel, by any method in-
cluding terrorism. Israel believes
that the U.S. stands by President
Heagan's description of the PLO
as a terrorist organization, the
spokesman said.
Noting the State Department's
references to the Islamic summit
meeting in Saudi Arabia, the
spokesman said that conference
was committed to war against
Israel, and Saudi Arabia called
lor iihuil (holy war) to recover
.h-rusak-m. The spokesman said
Israel was deeply disappointed
by the presence and participation
of UN Secretary General Kurt
Waldheim at the Islamic summit.
stamps "as in the case of all UN
stamps, will be placed in the UN
General Fund which is redis-
tributed to its members."
The stamps are valid only
when posted from UN premises.
The 15-cent denomination stamp,
which bears its inscription in
English, is for mailing from UN
headquarters here. The UN has
two post offices, one in the public
area open to visitors and oper-
ated by the UN Postal Adminis-
tration and the other in the Sec-
retariat building which is
managed by the U.S. Postal
Service.
The two other stamps are for
use at UN headquarters J
Geneva. The one inscribed in
French has a denomination off
F.s. 0,80 and the one with the
German inscription a denom
ination of S4. The English and
French-inscribed stamps wen-
printed in quantities of 19
million each and the German in-
scribed stamp 2.1 million. All are
printed in four colors and were
designed by an American, David
Dewhuret. Many stamp dealers
said they would not distribute
the stamps.
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
153'/, N. Congress Avt. (N.W. ted Av.)
Boynton Bwch
Backaches Headaches
Pinched Nerves Disc Problems
Arthritis Sciatica Neuralgia
Phone 737-5591
Office Hr.. Mon.. Timm.. Wd F Thur*. t &
MEDICARE, WORKMEN'S COMP.,
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DENTURES
Our individual custom constructed dentures are GUARANTEED
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nnoio 7 ft 1 3
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(305)652-5712
Minimum f>ei applied m all to.f. barring complication*
By Florida Licensed Dentists
DR. HORNADAY, D D.S.
689-0593
Some Location for Over 5 Years
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m
Prepared with the assistance of
the Social Security Administra
tion, the Paper updates and
earlier report released by the
Committee in September, 1976
entitled "Social Security
Coverage: The Impact on State
and Local Governmen.
Employees." It includes an
analysis of the withdrawal of the
State of Alaska from coverage, as
well as a dollar and cents look at
the value of Social Security.
Single copies may be obtained
free of charge from the Com-
mittee: Room G-233, Dirksen
Building, Washington, D.C.,
20510
Myron Mayer Persoff, M.D., P.A.
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1961
ine Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 15
News
in Brief
Ben-Elissar to Quit Post as Envoy
ill
to
incumbent
gfo Ben-Elissar resigns to ran
JERUSALEM -Jan**<
shortly when
k*
Knesset
seat. The new
expected to be
-voy w Cair0 1S
H, Sasson, a veteran
JLmat who has served
Zious Labor governments as
Q as the present Likud regime.
Foreign Ministry spokesman
Niftalie Lavie told reporters that
jje no official decision has been
Lje Sasson was considered
rthin the Ministry to be
-tody qualified to serve as
Ambassador to Egypt. Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir is
^ported to have decided unof-
ficially to appoint him.
Sasson, 55, currently holds the
unk of Special Ambassador with
wponsMity for the Foreign
Ministry's two European Affairs
jvisions. He served earlier as
Israels Ambassador to Turkey
E to Italy and is one of Israel's
leading experts on Arab affairs.
MEXICO CITY Mexico's
Defense Minister, Gen. Felix
Lopez, announced here that his
country wul not buy the Israel-
made Kfir jet fighters for its air
force, but he praised the Israeli
army.
Lopez arrived in Israel Jan. 11
it the head of a 16-man military
delegation to inspect military
installations and, specifically the
Kfir, the first combat aircraft
designed and built in Israel.
Donng his six-day visit, he in-
spected the Kfir production line
Eliahu Ben-Elissar
at Israel Aircraft Industries.
Mexico reportedly had been
Alexander Haig in Washington
later this month. News of the
meeting was released in
Washington by the Israeli
interested in the Kfir for some
time as part of a program to
reequip its air force. It was ex-
pected to order 24 of the aircraft.
But the Kfir had to compete
against the American-made F-
15E, and apparently the order
will not materialize. Lopez told a
press conference here, however,
that he "saw the Israeli army,
and it is one of the best in the
world."
JERUSALEM Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir will
meet with Secretary of State
Israelis Pessimistic About
Possibility of Peace
TEL AVIV (ZINS) Most Israelis are not too optimistic
about the chances for permanent peace with Egypt as a result
of the Camp David accords, according to a survey by the PORI
Institute. 43.8 percent of the public does not believe that the
Camp David agreement will result in a permanent peace,
compared with 30 percent of those questioned who do believe
that it will happen. 8.3 percent said that it depended on the
resolution of the energy crisis and also on the results of the
election in the U.S.A., as well as the status of the problem of
Jerusalem. 17.9 percent expressed no opinion either way.
THE SURVEY further finds that the ranks of the pessimists
include young and native-born Sabraa, academicians, and those
hose countries of origin were Europe or America. The op-
timistic camp includes mostly those whose countries of origin
ere Asia or Africa. A second survey by the same Institute
dealing with the popularity of former Minister Yigal Hurvitz
fcund that 28.4 percent of the public was pleased with his
performance while 44.8 percent were not. He has since resigned.
Ambassador, Ephraim Evron,
following his 45-minute talk with
Haig. Shamir is understood to
have asked for the meeting to
establish contact with the new
American Administration and to
discuss matters of immediate
concern to Israel.
Two subjects likely to be taken
up are the U.S. arms sales to
Saudi Arabia which Israel views
with alarm, and the creation of a
multi-national peacekeeping
force to patrol Sinai after Israel
completes its evacuation of the
peninsula in April, 1982.
NEW YORK Viktor
Brailovsky, who was arrested
last November on charges of
"defaming the Soviet state and
public order," has been trans-
ferred from Moscow's Butyrka
Prison where Anatoly Sharansky
was held incommunicado for 14
months,.it was reported here by
Burton Levinson, chairman of
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry.
Brailovsky, a leading activist
of the Jewish emigration
movement and editor of the
journal, "Jews in the USSR,"
was reported last month to be
seriously ill by his wife, Irina.
She said then that the in-
terrogation of Brailovsky had
been temporarily suspended
because of his medical condition.
Efforts to ascertain the nature of
his illness have been un-
successful.
Brailovsky has not been seen
by his wife, nor have formal
charges been leveled against him,
Levinson said. He noted that the
transfer may mean that Soviet
authorities intend to continue
their investigation of the case.
LONDON The British
government will begin an im-
mediate study of racist
organizations and is considering
setting up special police units to
investigate racist attacks.
William Whitelaw, Home
Secretary, made this pledge after
talks with the Joint Committee
Against Racialism, a broad-based
body which includes represen-
tatives of the churches, colored
minorities and the Jewish
community. The committee,
formed four years ago to combat
the rightwing National Front,
says it knows of at least 1,000
attacks on colored minorities in
the last 18 months and believes
Religious"
Directory
"llftf tETH ELOF Boi:A RATON,
ff 5W,,' Avenue, Boca Raton,
iLPf "elwm Phona: Wl two
MM Merle E. Singer. Cantor Martin
Mi. Sabbath Sarvicas. Friday at
i,ifm, Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah
W with Rabbi Mont E. Slno*r
":a.m. Sabbath Morning Sarvlce*.
TEMPLE SINAI. At St.
MttNj Church, 1M S.
tdS. Delral **orm.
**: P.6. Box 1901,
Paul's
Swlnton
Mailing
Delray
Hft F' 33444. Friday at 1:15 p.m.
wm Samutl Sllvar. President
*"" Sornmar*. m-077
CS51GRrEAT,0N ANSHEI EMUNA.
SiSiXS.v Jc K,n* Point,.CWray
pVwli^ rhodox. Harry Sllvar.
pm^r.r ^""c" dally I a.m. and 5
KL^Mff Holidays 9 a.m.
""" 'nw4,??AH CONGHEflJATlON. 1401
L*hAve, Boca Raton, Fla. U432.
Ption:
."? UM. Rabbi Nathan
Saturday at 9:30 a.m.
^eSrI^^H OF THE OELRAY
*> A,!L,f10REGATIOH. 57B0
A Siil oPh0n,: **3534. Barnard
Canto c ?*' niamln B. Adlar,
m <[ bb,m ^vlcav Friday at
^^ a.m. and 5 p.m.
a" Locata-^J34' B0C- R,,0
&<* w ln Cvry Vlllaea,
? 'I a.m. Matton W
?aidant ij'JV.
i
II
... ik%J9o&to
GRATCH MANDEL
HARTMAN-MH.LER
Our new insignia symbolically expresses
the kinship between PISER of Chicago and
MENORAH CHAPELS in Florida. You will
find the same trustworthy service and
respect for Jewish traditions here that
generations of Chicagoans have come to
rely upon. In Chicago or Florida, you can
call on us at any time with complete
confidence.
Executive Office*:
6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd.
Fort Lauderdate
(Sunrtaa), Fla. 33313
305/742-6000
5915 Park Drive at U.S. 441
Marsala, Fla. 33063
305/417-4700
2305 W. HilKboto Blvd.
Deerfidd Beach, Fla. 33441
30S/427-47OO
Oade County.
305/861-7301
Palm Beach County
305/833-0887
the total
thousand.
may be several
WASHINGTON Human
rights will continue to be a prime
issue to the Reagan
Administration, Rep. Jack Kemp
(R.. N.Y.I told a meeting here of
the International Council of B'nai
B'rith. WhUe praising President
Reagan and Secretary of State
Alexander Haig for their
statements of foreign policy,
Kemp noted that Haig has placed
greater emphasis on combatting
world terrorism.
"The struggle for human
-ights must go on," the
Congressman declared. "I don't
think the United States can
afford to signal the world that it
is relaxing its fight for human
rights."
Texas Law Firm's
Vhristian' Only As
Spurs Inquiry Call
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Congress has called for a
Federal investigation of an El
Paso, Tex., law firm that placed a
help wanted ad in the Texas Bar
Journal seeking a "Christian
attorney."
In a letter to Eleanor Holmes
Norton, chairman of the Federal
Equal Opportunity Commission,
Stephen Gutow, chairman of the
AJCongress Dallas Chapter's
Commission on Law and Social
Action, said, "We find it par-
ticularly troubling that lawyers
are willing to openly flaunt their
disobedience of the law in a
journal dedicated to the ad-
vancement of the legal
profession."
THE LAW FIRM, Craven &
Craven, of 2244 Trawood, El
Paso, placed a five-line classified
ad in the January issue of the Bar
Journal with the headline,
"Christian attorney wanted," in
capital letters.
The rest of the ad requested a
resume and a "statement setting
forth your interests and the area
of law in which you wish to
practice." Persons admitted to
the Bar last fall are preferred, it
stated.
The advertisement carries a
"special meaning" for Jewish
lawyers, Gutow pointed out,
because it was "not that long ago
that many of the nation's most
prominent law firms excluded
Jews from employment or
partnership.
"Prompt action by the
Commission in this case will
reaffirm that equal employment
opportunity applies to the legal
profession as well as every'
other," Gutow told Mrs. Norton.

Announcing
PHILIP WEINSTEIN
Jewish Funeral Director
FORMER VICE PRESIDENT OF
LEVITT WEINSTEIN MEMORIAL CHAPELS
Providing the Finest in Jewish Funeral Service with
7 Conveniently Located Chapels
aoca baton
II
73-7140
41-4111
5*5-5591
427-5544
IN COOPERATION WITH KRAEER FUWERAl HOMES
For generations Jewish
families have turned to

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MEMORIAL CHAPELS .
Serving the greater Florida area >
in the finest of Jewish tradition.
WEST RMJV\ BEACH 689-8700
1DELRAY BEACH 278-7600
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SonnyLevttt Jod Wm. Weanstdn Norftbn Cutler
Jade Sanders Henry Khan Juftan tjfewsda
BaGruahow
AONraSTRATOR
Cantor Manny Mahdd
RELIGIOUS ADVISOR
HOULYWOOD 921-:
1921 Pwnbrokc Road
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
. 13385 W. Dixie Hwy.
,315
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IN CHICAGO
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Ted Weanstdn
W*LMETTE 312/256-5700
Myron Wdnstesn
CHICAGO 312/761-2400


**>
Page 16
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday,]
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UM
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