The Jewish Floridian of South County

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00032

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
lewisli Meridian
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Defray Beach and Highland Beach
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, February 6,1981
' Change in Wind?
Reagan Aides Study
Middle East Policy
Kami Kaufman
\er, Kaufman (Jo-Chair
[eynoters Luncheon
l Chairp< i on ol t lit-
Ivision nt i 1M1
on campaign an-
topointmeni ol Tonl
[Karen Kaufman as
lefor (he Key rioters
on win In' held on
feb. 11 ai the home
binson in Kstancia
laton.
i contribution to the
^ision Campaign of
shed for this event.
per is the owner of
Arts (iallery. She
on of the 1980
iincheon, i~ a mem-
Beth El, the Na-
I of Jewish Women,
unty Jewish Feder-
Leaderstlhip Pro-
Children s Home
aim Heach County
Mrs. Kaufman is a past Board
Member <>f the National Council
ol Jewish Women, a member of
Temple Beth El, active in the
South County Jewish Com
munity Day School and is a
member of the South County
Jewish Federation Young Lead-
ership Program.
Both chairpeople indicate that
they expect a large turnout for
the lunceon based on advance
reports from the committee
members.
Members of the committee are
Eileen Berliner, Ruth Curl. Diane
Deckinger, Helene Eichler,
Sherry Endelson. Shirley Ensel-
berg. Lori-Fine. Gri Giaiwman.
Harriet Greenberg, Laurie
Greene, Lynn Persoff. Ellen
Pollock, Rose Rifkin, Joyce
Robinson. Francine Rogers,
Elaine Roth, Sylvia Samuels,
Jane Saull, and Lauren Sax.
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan Ad-
ministration said that it is
reviewing "the entire
policy" of the U.S. toward
the Arab-Israeli conflict,
including the issue of Jew-
ish settlements on the West
Bank and the attitude
toward the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization.
This disclosure was made at
the State Department in response
to questions as to whether the
Reagan Administration was con-
sidering the announcement by
the Israeli government in Jeru-
salem that it will build 10 more
settlements on the West Bank in
the next five months before
Israels parliamentary elections.
STATE DEPARTMENT
spokesman William Dyess
replied, without referring to the
legality of illegality of the set-
tlements, that 'While we were
aware of plans which were
previously announced, we do not
consider the carrying out of these
plans to be helpful."
He added that The new Ad-
ministration is reviewing the
entire policy to this vital region."
He said the State Department is
"taking the lead" in this review
but declined to say who is in-
volved in it. He insisted that the
review does not mean a change in
U.S. policy.
It is wrong to infer that there
will be or will not be changes."
Dyess said. "1 don't mean to
imply it either way. It is not an
agonizing reappraisal
something like that. That is not
what is intended. What we are
simply doing is to review the
policy as it now exists to see
whether or not we wish in all
reBpKta to continue the policy or
whether or not in some respects
we wish to change it." He ob-
served that "the study should be
expected as normal by any new
Administration."
DYESS SAID the Ad-
ministration will be undertaking
reviews of other issues in other
parts of the world and that the
Middle East review is "not one of
the more important decisions
facing the Administration." He
said that "in good time all major
issues and areas will be
reviewed."
The policy reviews will be
conducted "in the foreign policy
establishment and will not be
done in a hurried fashion, he
said. The foreign policy
establishment includes the State
Department. the National
Security Council at the Whit*
House, the Pentagon and the
CIA.
Asked if the review would
include the U.S. position toward
the PLO, Dyess referred to
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig's statement to the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee at
his confirmation hearing that the
PLO is "an umbrella or-
ganization." The State De-
partment spokesman reported
Haig as having said that the
PLO "includes many groups,
some of them are terrorist or-
ganizations and openly avow
terrorist acts."
Dyess was reminded that Pres-
ident Reagan, at his first press
conference after his election
November 4, had replied, "yes"
when asked if the PLO is a
terrorist organization.
Evidence
iUenberg Witnesses Say He's Alive
|E SAMUELSON
LM (JTAl -
is emerging here
of Raoul Wallen-
*h diplomat miss-
oviet Union after
*ve thousands of
'Hungary.
A hitherto unknown witness
claims he met Wallenberg in the
Lubyanka Prison months after
July 17, 1947, the date the
Russians say he died. Another
witness says that he heard about
Wallenberg in the early 1960s in
Vladimir Prison. Both appeared
here at an international hearinj
vw
Camp Maccabee
to> day camp in Boca Raton providing
xciting Summer experience within a
Jewish atmosphere.
ities include:
1lon __
Two
Preschool dMaton 3 and 4 year okta
School dMaton children entering K-4th grade
| Mini bua pick-up to and from camp
For information call
iuth County Jewish Federation
368-2737
Hooul Wallenberg
of the case organized by
Wallenberg's sister and brother
supported by sympathizers from
Israel. Britain, the United States.
France and Austria
THE FIB8T witness was
Andre Upchitz, stepson of the
late Jacques Lipchitz. the famous
Lithuanian-bom Jewish sculptor.
Lipchitz. a bachelor in his late
60s gave his evidence at the
hearing where he spoke under the
assumed name of Andre
Shimkevitch.
He said that he was Wal-
lenberg's cellmate for two days in
Moscow's Lubyanka Prison
shortly before Christmas. 1947. If
true his statement further
discredits Moscow's contention
Continued on Page 14


Page 2.
he Jewish Floridian
tk County
=:
Friday, February!
Organizations In The News
B'NAI B'RITH WOMEN
B'nai B'rith Women of Delray
Beach is sponsoring a Yucatan-
Maya Holiday. The trip will
include round-trip flight to
Mexico, bus connections to and
from airports, meals, guided
tours, and the cost is $530 per
person. The date is Feb. 17-22.
Call Ida Krane for further in-
formation.
B'NAI B-RITH
LODGE
The first Inaugural and
Installation of Officers and
Directors of the newly formed
Boca Teeca B'nai B'rith Lodge
No. 3119 will be held Saturday
evening, Feb. 7, 1981. Members
and wives will attend a dinner
dance following the installation
ceremonies at the Boca Raton
Country Club. 7601 Country Club
Blvd., Boca Katon.
B'NAI TOKAll
CONGREGATION
On Sunday. Feb. 15, B'nai
Torah Congregation will host a
Membership Open House at the
Synagogue. 1401 NW 4 Ave.,
Boca Raton, from 7:30 to 9:30
p.m. The evening will begin with
a formal presentation to acquaint
the Jewish community at large
with the programs and services
provided by the Conservative
Congregation of Boca Katon. All
are welcome to come and meet
Kabbi Nathan Zelizer, Terri
Swartz, Education and Program
Director, and the layleadership of
the congregation.
BRANDEIS WOMEN
Delray branch chapter of
Brandeis University Women's
Committee has an exciting day
planned for Feb. 19 a trip to
Vizcaya, the Museum of Science,
Temple Kmanuel and the New
Sephardic Temple. The bus will
meet at the tennis court in Kings
Point at 8:40 a.m. Call Mildred
Lasker for further information
and reservations.
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee, Boca
Katon Chapter, invites all to
attend and bid at "AUCTION
81" at Temple Beth El on
Wednesday, Feb. 25 at 7:30 p.m.
A vast amount of interesting
items including art, jewelry,
appliances, services, and en-
tertainment will be offered. For
information call Lorraine
Khoury, chairperson.
HADASSAH
Hadassah Ben Gurion chapter
of Delray Beach will be sponsor-
ing a picnic at Morikami Park on
Feb. 22 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
a cost of $4 per person. Fon
tickets and choice of food
(chicken or fish) call Yetta
Kosenthalor Belle Isakoff.
Boca Raton Aviva Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its next
regular monthly meeting on Feb
25. 12:30 p.m. at B'nai Torah
Congregation. Ms. Pearl Fried-
man will speak on. "Spotlight on
the Middle East." Drawing for'
a the ring raffle will be held.
I Friends and neighbors are invited
to attend. The first annual youth
aliyah luncheon will be held at
Bernards on March 2 at 11:30
a.m. An interesting speaker, out-
standing entertainment, plus
door prizes, will round out the
afternoon. For reservations, call
Mrs. Mae Kanners, Mrs. Arthur
Abramson, or Mrs. Robert
Gordon.
PIONEER WOMEN
, A regular meeting of the
Beereheba Club will be held
'Tuesday, Feb. 10, 12 noon at the
Pompey Park Community
Center, 1101 NW 2 St., Delray
Beach, Coffee hour will be at
noon. A meeting will follow.
There will be a book review by
Blanche Herzlich. A regular
.meeting will be held Tuesday.
March 10, I p.m. at the Pompey
.'Community Center, 1101 NW i
:St., Delray Beach. Coffee houi
will be at 12 noon. There will be i
44 th Anniversary celebration o>
For information on Area Organizations
Please call South County Jewish Federation
in Boca Raton 368-2737
Pioneer Women and a muscial
program.
The Palm Beach Council of
Pioneer Women will meet
Thursday. Feb. 12 at 10:30 a.m.
at the home of Kay Hornstein.
Representatives of the many
chapters in Delray Beach. West
Palm Beach and Lake Worth are
invited.
TEMPLE EMETH
Temple Emeth of Delray Beach
Ls holding its third annual bazaar
on Sunday. Feb. 15, 1981. The
bazaar will start at 10 a.m. and
will feature all saleable merchan-
dise, home baked goods, toys,
bric-a-brac and hand-made items.
Breakfast and lunch will be
served at a nominal cost. If you
have any new merchandise that
you would like to donate to the
bazaar, please call the Temple
office.
TEMPLE EMETH
SISTERHOOD
Sisterhood of Temple Emeth
will present a dinner and
showboat cruise at Hidden
llarlxir. I'ompano Beach, Fla.,
Sunday. March 15. 1981. Dinner
will beat 5:30 p.m. and the cruise
will last three hours. There will be
entertainment and dancing to a
Calypso Band. Donation is
$17.50 per person. Reservations
are limited. Please book early.
For further information or for
reservations, call the Temple
office or chairpeople, Dorothy Al-
bert or Anne Katz. Sisterhood
Annual Membership Luncheon
will be Tuesday, March 3.1981 at
11 a.m. Elsie Clemage, who is an
outstanding book reviewer, will
dramatize "Little Gloria. Happy
at Last."
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
All Points Chapter of Women's
American ORT will hold its
general meeting Tuesday, Feb.
17. 12:30 p.m.. at the Delray
Community Center. Blanche
Herzlick will hold our attention
with her excellent review of the
popular book, "Lest Innocent
Blood be Shed." Refreshments
will be served and all are
welcome. Reservations are being
taken for the Feb. 16 Miami
University and Viscaya Tours.
The Cost of $15 includes bus
transportation, concert and tour
of Miami University with lunch
at Faculty Dining Room, plus
tour of Viscaya. For further
information, contact Mona
Robinson.
Women's American Ort,
Delray Chapter will be sponsor-
ing the following events. Please
mark your calendar accordingly.
February 25 Reguar meeting
at Temple Emeth, West Atlantic
Ave. at 12:30. Refreshments will
be served. Guest speaker will be
Kabbi Bruce Warshal who will
speak on "The New Sexual
Morality": March 3 Jewish
Cultural Festival held at FAU-
Hillel Theater Moshe Shur
Trio. For further information, call
Gertrude Barnett.
Women's American Ort, Boca
East Chapter, will meet Monday,
Feb. 9, 1 p.m. at Temple B'nai
Torah. 1401 NW 4 Ave. By
popular request. Ruth Horowitz,
Marriage and Family Counselor
will again be guest speaker. Her
subject at this time will be,
"Marriage. During and After."
Ms. Horowitz is a graduate of
Cornell, with an MA from Drew
University and a post graduate
certificate in Advanced Marriage
Counseling from the University
of Penn. Guests are invited. All
are invited for an evening of fun
at the Palm Beach Jai Alai on
Feb. 11 at 6:30 p.m. A donation
of $15 entitles one to a delicious
full course dinner, a reserved seat
for the games, official program,
and self free parking. Call Selma
Shore for information and
reservations.
YIDDISH CULTURE
CLUB OF KINGS POINT
Yiddish Culture Club of Kings
Point will hold its second
February meeting on the 19th of
February at 8 p.m. in the Grand
Ballroom. The program will
feature the lives and works of two
Jewish composers: Abraham
Ellstein and George Gershwin. A
number of its members, old and
new, will participate in this
musical tribute to two outstand-
ing Jewish musicians. Meetings
are held on the first and third
Thursdays of each month at 8
p.m. in the Grand Ballroom. All
Kings Point residents who love
Yiddish are welcome to attend.
personalized
paper i
"shop at home service"
announcements
Business cards
Social stationary
Bar Mitzvah Bat Mitzvah Wedding
Special Occasions
Invitations and Accessories
We come to you!
Talaphona 439-2810
Attention
Israel Bond Holders
You do not help Israel by keeping your Israel
Bonds after maturity.
Israel must place the proceeds at the Chase
Manhattan Bank. Israel prefers you reinvest
your mature bonds into new bonds or file with
the Chase Manhattan Bank to collect your
principal plus interest.
For Information Call the
Israel Bonds Office
669-1445
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, M>niD'
6.1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 3
Glueckman to Chair
Boca Towers Division
W*SVttVMZM^^
loa
m a. Altman. Co-chair-
ITL198I Federation-UJA
. announces the ap-
ofSaulH. Glueckman
Towers Division
^ is a native of
."Mich., and was active in
i communal affairs in that
He is presently vice
U of Congregation B nai
^Boca Raton and will be
liLoiw at the Israel Bonds
held at B'nai Torah in the
months.
ansaid, "Having been
( our building cam-
jo past years, I am well
jithe needs ol Israel and
tfhcan Jewish ((immunity.
I honestly believe that
ds us more this year
ever before. We must
J is Jews and I sincerely
fihii the residents of Boca
Social Planning Committee Formed f
James Baer, President of the Cultural Series at Florida
Atlantic University and will pro-
ject center type needs for the
future.
South County Jewish Federatior
announces the formation of the
federation Social Planning
Committee and its Chairman.
Bety Stone.
Saul H. (Hueckman
Towers will rise to the occasion
and will respond with
generosity."
The Social Planning Commit-
tee has been formed to help plan
for the transition of the South
County Jewish community from
a small nuclear Jewish communi-
ty into a broad based populace
center of Judaism.
The committee will be func-
tioning through four sub-
committees. The Social Service
Subcommittee, chaired by Mike
Baker, will review the future of
the Jewish Family and Children's
Service, preparations of housing
for the aged and other social
service functions.
The Jewish community Center
Subcommittee, chaired by Eric
Detkinger. will review existing
programs including the Macca-
bee Day Camp, the Jewish
The Education Subcommittee,
chaired by Jim Nobil, will review
the educational needs of the
community including Day School
education and adult education as
well as services that the
Federation can render synagogue
education.
The Land Acquisition Sub-
committee, chaired by Don
Berger, will define the land needs
necessitated by the development
of other Jewish institutions.
The overall committee will
begin functioning in February. It
is anticipated that a final report
will be forthcoming within a six-
month period.
You are invited to participate in
a National UJA Mission to Israel.
March 1st- 10th
S950 per person all expenses included.
Deluxe accommodations meals included.
A family gift of $2,500 for a couple or $1,250 for a single person
will be received of all participants.
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION 368-2737
JUDAIC DESIGNS 6*
ft
Over
I ISO items
eP
Talhs Cases and Yarmulkes
Specialty items for children
Traditional and contemporary
Challah Cloths & Matzoh Covers
Tablecloths and Napkins
The tinest from Israel. France & U.S.
Write for your copy today!
33
STITCHERY BY HENYE
5710 W. Manposa St.. FLI
Phoenix. Arizona 85031
???#??#
Camp Maccabee
Camp Maccabee is looking for Junior and
Senior counselors interested in working with
children ages 3-9 years within a Jewish at-
mosphere in Boca Raton.
Counselors should bring with them
various talents in sports, swimming, arts and
crafts, dance, music and Judaica studies. Ex-
perience helpful.
South County Jewish Federation
368-2737
Hetty Stone

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Page 4
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Februc
Jewish Floridian
el South County
Fred Snochet
FRED SHOCHET SUZANNE SHOCMET MILTON KRETSKY
Editor and Publisher E>ecutlve Editor Newt Coordinator
PuMiehed Bi Weekly Second Claet Poetage Paid at Boca Raton. Fla USPS SS0-2S0
BOCA RATON OFFICE. 3200 N. Federal Hwy.. Boca Raton, Fla. 33431 Phone 366-2001
Main Ottice & Plant: 120 N.E. 6th St.. Miami. Fla 33101 Phone 1-373-4605
Poatmaater: Form M7 returns to Jewlah Floridian. P.O. Bo 01-2673, Miami, Fla. 13101
Combined Jewish Appeal South County Jewish Federation. Inc.. Otticers. President. Jamea B
Baer, Vice Presidents Norman I Stone. Milton KrettKy, Shirley Enselberg. Secretary. Phyllis
Cohen. Treasurer. Donald Berger; Executive Director. Rabbi Bruce S Warahal
Jewish Floridian does not guarantee Kashruth ol Merchandise Advertised.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES Local Area S3 SO Annual (2 Year Minimum ST), or by membership South
County Jewish Federation. 3200 N Federal Mwy Boca Raton. Fla 33431 Phone 368-2737 Out ol
Town Upon Request
Friday, February 6,1981
Volume 3
2-1 ADA R 5741
Number 3
Recalling Reagan's Vow
With the speculation growing daily about just
what President Reagan's new Administration will do
so far as Israel and the Middle East are concerned,
we hope that what is especially clear in Washington
is the wide disparity between Egypt's international
image as a peace-maker and the cold reality of
Egyptian politics on a day-to-day basis.
Last week, for instance, Egypt suddenly barred
Israel from the International Book Fair which
opened in Cairo. President Sadat has apparently
since lifted the ban when he "discovered" it.
Now comes the news that a recently-published,
official Egyptian map of the Middle East intended
for tourist use simply ignores the existence of Israel
altogether. What is shown of Israel is called
"Palestine."
Meanwhile, Israel continues to be charged with
"intransigence" and many other sins in the sanctus
sanctorum of the U.S. State Department and, of
course, in the sanctimonious parliaments of the
European Economic Community.
All of this is especially significant as Reagan
Administration officials this week made the surprise
announcement that they expect to open an exam-
ination into U.S. foreign policy toward Israel.
Let the record be clear. President Reagan
minced no words when he spoke during his election
campaign about any of these subjects: Israel and
Jerusalem, Israel and the settlements in Gaza and
the West Bank, Israel and the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
He must be made to stick to his words.
Pope's Metamorphosis
We observe with awe the metamorphosis in the
man. He is Pope John Paul II. What he said when he
was elevated to become the Prince of the Church is
not what he is saying today about Catholic-Jewish
relations.
In fact, some of the Pope's more recent pro-
nouncements on Jews and Judaism sound like the
venomous utterances of St. John of the Cross.
All of which is particularly significant in a world
which sees the sudden recrudescence of anti-
Semitism.
It is therefore hard enough for the best-intended
Christians to preach one thing about Jews and to
practice another. But when so distinguished a
Catholic leader as the Pope, himself, makes ques-
tionable statements about Jews, Judaism and Israel,
it does seem we are in for harder times.
French Anti-Semite's
Work Appears in Holland
AMSTERDAM (JTA) The first issue of the
Celine Journal, established by the Celine Society to
propagate the works of the late French author, Louis Fer-
dinand Celine, an anti-Semite and Nazi collaborator, was
published in Holland this week. The society was founded
last year with the stated purpose of making Celine's
writings available in the Dutch language. The journal will
appear twice a year.
i
Although the society acknowledges Celine's Nazi
sympathies, it regards him as a great writer whose books
ieserve to be read. Three of them have already been
ranslated into Dutch and more are expected to follow,
lis Voyage Au Bout de La Nuit has been adapted for the
tage by Belgian playright Guide- Lauwaert and will be
erformed in various Dutch cities in the next few weeks.
Only in America
Saga of Sen. Warren Rudma
By JOSEPH POLAKOFF
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
New Hampshire's newest Repub-
lican U.S. Senator. Warren Rud-
man, is a thrid generation Yankee
with Baltic and Russian fore-
bears who started life in America
a century ago. That first genera-
tion weathered the bitter hard-
ships of immigrant existence and
the new Senator one of six
Jewish Americans in the upper
chamber of the 97th Congress
has apparently inherited the
determination of his elders, al-
though in other ways, to win in
war, legal competition and na-
tional politics.
Rudman, now 50 years old, has
been a battler since his youth; as
a school boy at Valley Forge
Military Academy and, after
graduation from Syracuse, as an
infantry captain and company
commander in the Korean War
that brought him a bronze star
the U.S. Army's third highest
decoration for heroism under
Hre.
OUT OF the army, as a lawyer
in his hometown of Nashua, 40
miles north of Boston, he con-
tinued fighting for his ideas. Ten
years after being graduated from
Boston College Law School, he
was appointed New Hampshire's
Attorney General. Within five
years, he was elected president of
the National Association of
Attorneys General.
As New Hampshire's chief law
officer, he expanded the criminal
division in his office to deal with
the state's rapid population
growth and put into effect the
first organizations concerned
with consumer and environ-
mental protection. In 1977, as a
private citizen, he created and led
the citizens' organization that
fought the legalization of casino
gambling in New Hampshire.
With this background, he entered
the senatorial primary in a field
of 10 last year and then, as the
Republican candidate, unseated
the Democratic incumbent. John
Durkin.
What does Rudman stand for?
In the New Hampshire political
campaigns, he spoke out against
the 'over-influence of big labor
und its contributions" to politcal
favorites. He denounced his
Democratic opponent's views to-
wards the nation's economic
legislation and national defense.
In keeping with his speeches, he
wouldn't take a dime from any
out-of-state political action com-
mittees."
"I'M VERY strong on national
defense, he added in an inter-
view in his office. "I'm concerned
the US will be a second rate
power by the end of this decade if
something is not done and done
right away."
That brought up the question
of his vision of Israel in the U.S.
security program. "My position
on U.S. foreign policy is that it
must be in the interests of
America," he replied.
"Israel is a stalwart friend of
the U.S. It's the only real democ-
racy in the Middle East.
The U.S. must continue to give
strong support to Israel because
it is in our interest as well as hers.
We must support and strengthen
the Camp David accords and
continue working in that
direction. This has to be a bipar-
tisan effort that crosses party
lines. Some more moderate Arab
countries realized Israel is a force
of stability and can be a stronger
force for stability in the Middle
East."
APPOINTED to the Senate
Appropriations and Government
Affairs Committees, both of
which deal with overseas
relations, Rudman was asked
about U.S. aid to Israel and
support for Soviet Jewry. "I will
consider foreign aid point by
point," he said. "Certainly we
should give economic aid to
Sen. Warren Rudman
countries in the Middle East that
is in our own interest as well as
theirs. That also goes for military
equipment."
On the Jackson-Vanik amend-
ment that relates U.S. govern-
mental credits to the Soviet
Union to its emigration policy,
Rudman said he wants "to study
it more hilly." He noted he needs
"a lot of information" to make
that decision "information you
don't get until you're in the
Senate."
Rudman is not associated with
any organization "Jewish or
otherwise," saying I'm not a
joiner." He did not have much
Jewish education "my choice"
he said. "Religion is very
personal to me, and I don't talk
about it. I'm well informed about
Jewish religion, although I'm not
formally trained."
THE SENATOR and his wife,
the former Shirley Wahl, have a
son and two daughters, all in
their 20s. In many ways, the
Rudmans typify Jewish families
that came to America in the last
century. Grandfather Abraham
Kudman arrived in Bangor, Me.,
from Vilna about 1881 when he
was only 14 years old and placed
on a farm outside Bangor to
which he later went and
the soft drink bottling busui
Subsequently, he marriedl
Odessa emigrant and they
four sons and a daughtei
university graduates Har
Tufts and Wellesley.
Meanwhile, Abraham beca
representative of the
drink company, and he set u
agencies in Maine, New Ha
shire and Vermont. Di
World War I, all his four
served in the U.S. Army.
first Rudman brought
brothers to America from Lit]
ania and one of their sons
Rudman became a Maine i
preme Court justice. The
tor's maternal grandparents I
the Levinsons both came I
Riga, Latvia and settled in
York City.
THE YEAR Edward L_
the Senator's father was bornl
Bangor in 1897, 12 men
Nashua founded the Temple I
Abraham Congregation.
Edward came to Nashua
town had 35 Jewish families in
general population of 30,0
Since then, with the influx
electronics industries, the gene
population has grown to
families, many of whose bn
winners are engineers in the nej
industries.
Being a builder and furnitu
manufacturer, Edward Rudr
was named chairman of Ternd
Beth Abraham's buildi]
committee that constructed
new temple for the community.
As the interview was ending!
reporter remarked to tl
Senator's wife that the Kudml
saga was "unbelievable" fn
an immigrant who had no knoii
edge of English to a U.S. Senatj
in three generations. Hearii
this, the Senator called ou
"Only in America, as Han
Golden would say." There wa
general nodding of agreement.
Egyptians Do It Again
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
American journalist who works
lor the Jerusalem Post has been
ousted from Egypt. Joan Bors-
ten, who also writes for the Los
Angeist Times and holds Israeli
and American passports, was the
second staff member of Israel's
English-language daily so treated
in the past month.
She had visited Egypt 14 times
during the last 18 months. But
when she arrived at Cairo airport
at 4 a.m. local time Jan. 21 on a
flight from India, Borsten's pass-
port was confiscated, and she was
forced to remain in the transit
lounge for six hours under
surveillance by Egyptian
security agents. She was subse-
quently placed aboard an
Egyptian airliner and flown to
Tel Aviv.
LAST MONTH Kgypu
authorities deported Anna
Safadi, the Jerusalem Post)
Middle East affairs editor.
he wrote an article about allegi
differences between President
Anwar Sadat and Vice President
Hosni Mubarak. A ban against
the paper was announced
Cairo, although it was not i
mediately clear whether it f
plied to all Jerusalem I'ost
porters or Safadi alone.
Several days ago. an official
the Egyptian Embassy in 1
Aviv informed the Post tha
Borsten would be admitted
Egypt on a U.S. passport as
representative of the LA limes.
Israeli political circles we:
said to regard the Egyptian a
tude toward Post reporters
"serious." Efforts to have
ban lifted have failed so
tar.
Charles I. Cohen, Chairman of the Community J^M
Council, Consul General; JoelArnon, Israel Consul Genemi^
the Southeast, and Rabbi Bruce S. Warshal f#cu
Director of the South County Jewish Federation at "JV^g|
opening of a multi-media show at the Town Ccn*^/orfll
featuring the City of Jerusalem The presentation piay*i l
five-day period to over 1,500 viewers. It was officuW' r^
sored by the Israeli Consulate and by the South Countyv
Federation.


February
6.1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
Jewry Update
Brailovsky Seriously 111
Chosen Appointed Chairman
Of High Point Division
A\y Irina Hrailovsky
hat her husband's health
Emorated since his arrest
JT|3 Viktor, who is being
^Moscow's Butyrka Prison
his case is under investiga-
6SUlffring from a liver aU-
According to lrina. the in-
11 has been suspended
ilv because of Viktor's
/medical condition. This
jews is in sharp contrast
,1k information Irina had
v received from prison
In three letters, the
) Dec. 31, the officials
her that her husband had
, provided with appropriate
and was well.
I POC Iosif Mendele-
ibis been on a hunger strike
Ijhnost two months. He is de-
[that his religious books
jiiail articles, confiscated by
authorities, be restored and
ft allowed to observe the
nth. Moscow activists
that Mendelevich was
after fasting for two
; and that camp officials
| to repeat the action every
Miys Iosif is the only Jew
at the notorious First
ad Trial who still remains
(itonr camp
jiLA Aleksandr
i\ich. long-term refusenik,
fmlenced on .Ian. 10 to two-
|M years in a labor camp
Edtgtd charges ol circulating
llbnalKins known to l>e false
i defame Soviet state and
I system." The 10-year-old
I technician was arrested in
il9W. His place of detention
|M unknown.
10W Jewish religious
ktudy croup--, which have
ioned in the Soviet capital
us, have been compelled to
i their activities, following
appointment with the Deputy
Minister for Interior Affairs.
harassment and break-ins by
Soviet authorities these private
religious study groups have sus-
pended their informal classes.
However, some Ulpanim
(Hebrew language study groups)
continue to meet.
KLINTSY We have just
learned the location of the camp
to which Dmitri Shchiglik was
sent. It is in Bryanskaya oblast
in the Western part of the
Russian Republic. His address is:
l> Ya B-21 6A, Klintsy,
Bryanskaya obi.. RSFSR, USSR.
Dmitri is serving a one-year sen-
tence for alleged "parasitism"
and "evasion of payment for
support of child."
MOSCOW Refuseniks
. Naum and Marina Falkovich
were killed in an automobile acci-
dent on Jan. 14. They leave
behind an eight-year-old son,
Dmitri, who is staying with his
maternal grandparents in
Moscow. Thirty-five-year-old
Naum and his family had been
trying to emigrate from the
Soviet Union since 1976.
MOSCOW MakarLimanov,
one of the five Jewish activists
charged with alleged "hooligan-
ism." who spent ten days in a de-
tention center in December, was
again arrested last week. This
time he will lie incarcerated for
. filteen days for allegdly "dis-
obeying a police order." On Jan.
15 at ;> p.m. Limarov received an
order to report to the police
station that afternoon. At 4:30
p.m. he telephoned the police, ex-
plaining that his small son was ill
and he could not leave him un-
Bl tended. At 5 p.m. four police-
men invaded his apartment and
took him by force to the police
station.
Pavel Abramovich, who shared/
Limanov's ten clay detention in
December, contracted pneumonia
in his right lung while under
arrest. He is now at home,
recovering from this illness.
VINNITSA -- Without prior
warning or explanation, Soviet
authorities have ordered former
POC Isaak Shkolnik not to leave
his residence after 9 p.m. Jewish
activists are greatly disturbed by
this latest, unprecedented action,
as this type of violation of funda-
mental human rights has not
been perpetrated against Soviet
citizens since the Stalin era.
PERM January 20 marked
TOC Sharansky's 33rd birthday
- his fourth spent in prison. He
is serving a 13-year sentence,
effective until March 1990.
Falsely accused of working for
1 the CIA. Sharansky was con-
victed in July 1978 on trumped-
up charges of "treason" and
"anti-Soviet agitation and
propaganda." On the occasion of
Sharansky's birthday, NCSJ
Chairman Burton S.' Levinson
slated: "It is a tragedy that
Anatoly Sharansky, in the prime
of his life, is still denied his basic
human and Jewish rights to
live in the homeland he has
chosen. Israel, and to be with his
wife, Avital. and raise a Jewish
family. On this day especially we
say to Anatoly we have not for-
gotten you and the other Jewish
Prisoners of Conscience in the
USSR ."
ALKKSANDROV Former
POC Iosif Begun has finally suc-
ceeded in obtaining a document
ceil itving his father's death
during World War II. The ab-
sence ol such a certificate had
held up bis application for an exit
\ isa. The papers have now been
accepted by OVIR officials in
Vladimir, who informed Iosif that
be could expect a response in
about a month. His wife. Alia
Dnigova, was promised an
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Milton Kretsky, Co-chairman
of the 1981 UJA Federation
Campaign announces the ap-
pointment of Henry Chasen as
Chairman of the High Point
Division.
A division organizational
meeting will be heldonThursday.
Feb. 12 at 7:30 p.m. at Chasen's
home. Residents of High Point
who are interested in working on
the campaign are urged to at-
tend.
Chasen is from Boston,
Massachusetts where he spent 23
years on the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology faculty
as a technical advisor in the
chemical engineering depart-
ment. He is President of H. D.,
Chasen Co.. Inc. of Summerville
and Wilmington, Massachusetts.
He is a part-time resident of High
Point.
Chasen's commitment to
Judaism is reflected in the fact
that he is a member of four
synagogues in the greater Boston
area as well as Temple Emeth of
Delray Beach.
In accepting his position as
High Point chairman, he com-
mented, "I am aware that last
Henry Chasen
year's inaugural campaign in
High Point was a success, yet it :
was not a full-blown campaign
which calls on each and every
Jewish resident of High Point,
giving him the opportunity to
show his Jewish commitment. I
am confident this can be done.
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. ........



Pag* 6
The Jewish Floridian of South County
, Februarys]
Women's Division Advanced Gifts Party
pn
I
I
Charlotte Robinson, ZolaZinman, Gloria Rosenthal
Chairpeople of Advance Gifts (left to right): Rita Bogus, Women's Division Chairperson;
Gladys Weinshank, Advance Gifts Committee Co-chairperson; Colette Avital, speaker; Julia
B. Savin, Co-chairperson, Advance Gifts and hostess of Advance Gifts Luncheon; Margie Baer
Vice Chairperson, Women's Division Not photographed, Esther Blank, Co-chairperson,
Advance Gifts Luncheon. The Women's Division Advance Gifts Cocktail Party was held at the
home of Julia B. Savin with Colette Avital of the Israel Foreign Ministry speaking. Over
$132,000 was reached for the 1981 UJA / Federation campaign from those in attendance.
Present but not photographed was Elaine Kend.

.
Caroline Meier, Gert Seemd
Anne Brenner, Barbara Stein, Joan Judelson, Edna Baron,
Phyllis Wragge.

Eleanore Rukin, Lee Cravitz, Phyllis Cohen, Rose Viener,
Marian Altman, Shirley Marcus, Mae Volen, Mary Baskin.

I
U.
Gert Siegel, Frances Bornstein, Bethea Green, Rhea Labov,
Lilian Hildebrand, Marcia Moser, Sara Dana, Polly Kalten-
bacher, IrmaFier.
Fanne Pelavin, Sara Blum, Bernice Schankerman, Judith
Huston, Bernice Lebbin, Sylvia Zuckerman, Geraldine Rosen-
berg, Marilyn Sonabend
mm
Ruth Coleman, Ruth Alperin, Margaret Kottler, Lillian Kent,
Eleanor Wolff, Florence Melton, Libby Shipley, Betty Stone.
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The Jewish Floridian o( South County
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Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, February 6, J

News in Brief
Israel Disappears on Egypt's Latest Tourist Map
^^^__^_^^__ represented.
NEW VORK "Egypt wel
reported fp
comes the world." a map dis-
tributed by the Egyptian Tourist
Office in midtown Manhattan
proclaims. But Israel is not
recognized as part of that world,
at least not on that map.
An introductory note on the
ri \ em side of the map. which
lists tourism information in
Egypt, proudly declares: "You
have only to look at a map to
realize what an important part
Egypt plays in the travel world
for in order to reach most of th
Middle East. African and Asia'
countries it is necessary to pa;^
through this wonderful country.
But when you turn to theothi
side for a look at the map, th
southern part of Israel is showi
but the word "Israel" does noi
appear. The map lists Gaza Strip
towns and West Bank cities such
as Bethlehem and Ramallah.
They are labeled as being in
"Palestine." The only Israeli city
listed is Jerusalem which the
Egyptians obviously consider
part of'' Palestine.' *
JERUSALEM Israel would
like to see the United States par-
ticipate in a multinational force
to be set up in Sinai after the final
withdrawal to police sensitive
strategic spots. Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir said this week
that this issue would be high on
the agenda of priorities that
Israel seeks to raise with the new
Reagan Administration.
U> J>*

NEW YORK "Israel's chief
investigator of Nazi war crimes
has sharply criticized the Depart-
ment of .Justice for its decision
not to retry a Chicago res.
accused of committing acts]
persecution as a member of I
Gestapo in World War II
rVrw York Times
Washington.
The paper said it obtains
copy of a letter from Lt.
Menachem Russek of the Isr
National Police to Allan A. Ky
Jr., director of the Office
Special Investigations e \>,va
Fon/ign Minister Yitzhak Samir
The final withdrawal date
under Israel's peace accord with
Egypt is April, 1982. Under the
peace treaty package, a multi-
national force must be set up if
the United Nations is not pre-
pared to play the peacekeeping
role. This force would be present
at Sharm El Sheikh, guaran-
teeing free passage through the
Straits of Tiran and along the
northeastern coast of the
peninsula.
STRASBOURG The
Council of Europe has voted
down a Swedish Socialist reso-
lution asking for the dispatch to
Israel of a commission to investi-
gate the prison system and the
respect of human rights. The vote
was overwhelmingly against the
resolution submitted by Karl
Lindbom, a Swedish Socialist.
The two Israeli observers,
Likud Knesset Member Avidor
and Labor MK Shlomo Mil lei.
stressed before the various
parliamentary committees that
the Red Cross regularly visits
Israeli prisons, and two Euro-
pean parliamentary commissions
had visited Israel last week and
had had ample opportunity to
study these issues.
The council is an advisory
body on which practically all
West European parliaments are
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6,1981
. in his letter,
*% h" believed that
,, to retry Frank
MS mistaken and too
Russek added:
hiion has left me in a
eSS ".....' ;,,but
^md or accept it.
The State Attor-
roffKv m Krank.urt has
!. warri,m '"r ,ht
Vjosef Mengele. the chief
*_ Auschwitz who is
Irreported to he living: in
The warrant, which
[u,'evidence acainst the
Ins called the angel of
M,v Auschwitz inmates,
larranl issued in 1959.
-Ieh accused nl having
(concentration camp in-
Vthe gas chamber and of
brutal nn (heal ex-
jupon them \ttorney
I Hans-Kbcrhurd Klein
office (ell it necessary to
kthe charges. The number
'lind other prisoners sent
I chambers by Mengele
(even be approximated,"
5 to a recent report by
iTimerman in the Israeli
liaariv, Mengele is
nj! for the (iovemment
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
of Uruguay as an adviser on how
to torture inmates, especially
Jewish inmates, in the notorious
"Freedom Prions," the main de-
tention center for political
prisoners in Uruguay.
JKRUSALEM The likeliest
date for the election is thought to
be June 30, or alternatively June
23, according to well-placed
Knesset observers Monday. They
made the prediction following the
first session of the Knesset law
committee, considering the
government bill passed through
first readings last week to hold
the polls on July 7.
The observers said majority
opinion in the committee favored
an earlier date. The opposition
members were still talking of
May or even the end of April, but
eventually they would com-
promise, the observers predicted,
for a date towards the end of
June.
WASHINGTON The ITT
Grinnell Corp. of Providence,
R.I., has agreed to pay a civil
penalty of $50,500 for alleged
violations of the reporting
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requirements of the U.S. Anti-
Arab Boycott Law, the Depart-
ment of Commerce has disclosed.
The company "voluntarily
advised' the Commerce Depart-
ment of a total of 101 instances of
late filing of l>oycott requests at
three of its 1H5 facilities "after
the matter came to the attention
Of company officials." the De-
partment said in a press
statement.
NEW YORK The American
Jewish Congress has asked the
federal government to release all
its unclassified documents on the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion and its personnel and sup-
porters in this country.
In a sweeping Freedom of
Information Act request made to
more than 100 agencies of five
Cabinet departments and the
Central Intelligence Agency, the
A.ICongress stated that the
relent of the information was in
the public interest because the
interests and policies" of the
U.S., and that its "chief purpose
is to destroy the State of Israel."
PLO is an "avowed terrorist
organization, and the nature and
extent of its infiltration into
American institutions are
relevant to important issues 6f
domestic and foreign policy."
In legal papers filed in support
of the request, lawyers for
AJCongress point out that the
PLO engages in terrorist ac-
tivities which are contrary to the
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Winter schedules from West Palm Beach:
To Chicago Fly nonstop at 12:10pm or 5:00pm.
We also have one-stop thru-jets at 8:45am and
at 8:20pm la thrifty Night Coach).
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from 7:00am to low-fare N ight Coaches at
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To Indianapolis Fly straight thru any evening
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To Cleveland Seven flight-times daily, in-
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Delta is readv
VOUA


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
F"dy. February]
Rampal at Beth El
Wednesday Feb. 18
Jean-Pierre Rampal, the fabled
French flutist, will appear at
Temple Beth El on Wednesday,
Feb. 18, at 8:15 p.m., as the third
program in the Temple's Distin-
guished Artists Series. He will be
accompanied by Robert Veyron-
Lacroix at the keyboard. These
two musicians have played con-
certs together around the globe.
When they return to this country
in February, in addition to their
recital at Temple Beth El in
Boca, they will be appearing in
New York's Carnegie Hall, at the
Metropolitan Museum of Art,
and at the Academy of Music in
Philadelphia, among other
places.
The Washington Star has said
of Mr. Rampal. "There probably
isn't another flutist in the world
who could attract so large an
audience or whose golden instru-
ment is more magical." Jean-
Pierre Rampal is one of the most
recorded artists of all time
with orchestras, chamber groups,
and with Robert Veyron-Lacroix
at the keyboard.
The Distinguished Artists
Jean-Pierre Rampal
Series is fully subscribed. There
are, however, usually a few
tickets (-('donated to the Temple
for resale. If you are interested in
tickets, please call the concert
office at the Temple, 391-8600.
This will also put your name on
the mailing list for next year.
JCC Registration
Shirley Enselberg, president of
the South County Jewish Com-
munity Day School announces
that registration is now open for
the forthcoming school year for
grades 1 through 6.
The South County Jewish
Community Day School offers in-
tensive English, secular. Hebrew
and Judaica education. It is a
beneficiarv agency of the South
County Jewish Federation.
Mrs. Enselberg indicates that
the shcool provides specialty in-
struction in art, physical educa-
tion, and music. All teachers are
certified and experienced.
Further information concerning
the Day School can be obtained
by calling its director, Hadassa
Weiner at 395-3212 or by visiting
the school which is located at 414
NW 35 St., Boca Raton.
1 1 mm n W M
r&jkt recent Boca West cocktail party on behalf of the 1981
UJA Federation campaign are members of the committee:
Peter Smith, Norman I. Stone, Campaign General Chairman
Shirley Enselberg, guest speaker, Dr. Sam Rothfeld, Boca
West Chairman, Abner Levine and Nathan Rothstein, Boca
West Co-chairman.
K0*fi
Passover
tours
mo nM>)<
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Qiu"ir At the Rothenberg ramlly of hotels,
your Holiday will be brightened by the sociable
spirit of the congenial guests who have made the Rothenberg
Quality Vacation a yearly tradition.
And because It is a Rothenberg Hotel you are assured of
receiving the finest in service, deluxe accommodations and
strictly Kosher gourmet cuisine.
Full packages start at only $559 per person + airfare
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L1140 Broadway NYC 10001212-689-7600 / 800-
Interfaith Meeting
Thursday Feb. 12
!EYH0UND
RAClr.G
Temple Beth El of Boca Raton
Sisterhood will hold an Interfaith
Meeting Christian-Jewish
Dialogue as part of Brotherhood
Week and in conjunction with
Women Church Groups of Boca
Raton on Thursday, Feb. 12 at 7
p.m. Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum,
nationally known ecumenical
spokesman for the Jewish people
will lead the Dialogue.
He has been Jewish Spokes-
man and Representative at the
White House during dialogue be-
tween Christians and Jews. He
was the only Rabbi at Vatican
Council II and is widely con-
sulted by Catholic and Protes-
tant authorities; he is also a
founder and co-secretary of the
Joint Vatican-International
Jewish Consultative Committee.
The public is welcome.
Rabbi Tanenbaum will also be
Pulpit Guest at the Sabbath Eve
Services at Temple Beth El on
Friday, Feb. 13, at 8:15 p.m. His
topic will be, "The Decade of the
Eighties, The Jewish Per-
spective."
fflAS Notice
HI AS, the Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society, is trying to locate
Jews who lived in or around
Minsk, in Byelorussia (White
Russia), during the period of
1941-1944, about a matter of
utmost importance.
Please call or write Joseph
Edelman of HI AS about this
matter. The address is: 200 Park
Avenue South, New York City
10003. Telephone: (212) 674-6800.
? '' . 1980-81 SCHEDULE
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Mon Tueb & Thuf thru Sal
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For reservations 683 2222
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febra0'
6,1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
Community Calendar
Boca Teeca 6:30 p.m. installation of of-
\1
U,i.h Lodge
f t| grothe'hood 10 a.m. meeting Sooth County
Kratio" Kre.sky Cocktail Party.
J
.ngregot'on 7:30 p.m. board meet.ng ORT
I p m meeting Temple Emeth Singles noon
irlodossoh Ben Gurion theater party at Delray Movie.
(rent Even's Club 2 p.m. meeting Temple Emeth
u!2
. Women Boca 1 p.m. meeting Hadassoh Ben
10 am board meeting Temple Beth El Sisterhood -
I eennq Temple Emeth Sisterhood West Coast Trip -
'jBi'ihdoy Pioneer Women 10:30a.m. meeting Palm
LCouncil
!.13
Wo' Vetcui". 10 a.m. meeting Pioneer Women -
(to 12 30 p "i board meeting
.14
lleecoDmne' Djnce South County Jewish Federnimn
.15
jl Emeth Ba/oar (all day) B'nai Torah Congregation -
1p.m. membership open house.
IN
, B'nth Womc Boca 10:30 a.m. board meeting ORT -
.Miami and Vizcaya Tour
tw
|bI< Current Events Club 2:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah
iMonv 2pm meeting Yiddish Culture Club Boca 7:30
meeting* ORT Bodel 7:30 p.m. meeting ORT Delray -
10pm. meeting B'nai B'rith Delray Yucatan-Maya Trip
III
ft Regional 9 30 a.m. board meeting Temple Beth El 8
p concert series Hadassah Aviva p.m. night at the races at
ano
1.19
ah Ben Gunon 12 30 p.m. meeting Temple BethEl Sis-
meetmg Boca Hotel Lunch Pioneer Women Zip-
10 o.m. board meeting Yiddish Culture Club Delray -
. meeting Brandeis Women Boca 8:45 a.m. Miami
III
We Emeth Brotherhood Breakfast South County Jewish
(ration leadership Development night workshop
Hwh Ben Gunon Sunday Picnic
p-BocaEost- 12 30 p.m. board meeting Brandeis Women
^Century Village Museum Trip
4.24
IWi Current E-ents Club 2:30 p.m. meeting Yiddish
"e Club Boca 7:30 p.m. meeting Temple Beth El 8
I" American Fnends of Hebrew University. Dr. Bernard
lerel
1,25
W*s Women Boca 7:30 p.m. Auction, art trip, amateur
tote' ORT Delray- 12:30 p.m. meeting Hodossah Aviva -
F*Pm general meeting.
lu
WWar Veterans 7 p.m. meeting Jewish War Veterans
K* V 7 P '" mee,ln9 Temple Emeth Sisterhood 9:30
board meet.ng B'nai B'rith Women Boca 1 p.m.
1 Temple Emeth Brotherhood 7:30 p.m. board
King
iv
*hWarV
i.2|
eterans- 10 a.m. board meeting
* 0,ah Congregation 8:30 p. m. art auction.
2
.
'"h Women Naoifli 01537 12:30 p.m. board meeting
i ""Women Boca -9:30 a.m. board meeting Hadassah.
H- fouth Aliyah South County Jewish Federation Daf*>
T'-Bpm board meeting.
.3
"^m*,h 7 P m. board meeting B'nai B'rith Lodge- Boca
* JO a.m. meeting, Yiddish Culture Club Boca 7:30
meeting 0RT Bodel 7:30 p. m. board meeting.
|t 4
"9'onal. 9:30a I
h*cit, El Brotherhood 8 p.m. board meeting Temple
F^"'hood noon meeting
0men Zipporah noon meeting.
. m. meeting.
| Cherrick to Speak at Temple Beth El
Bernard Cherrick, Vice Presi-
dent of the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem will speak at a special
meeting Feb. 24 at 8 p.m. in
Temple Beth El at 333 SW 4 St.,
Boca Raton. The meeting is open
to the public and all are welcome.
Mr. Cherrick, a renowned
speaker of wide ranging intellect,
has lectured throughout the
world in behalf of the Hebrew
University and its unique role in
the growth and development of
Israeli society.
Urbane, witty, gracious and
eloquent. Mr. Cherrick s depth of
learning, passionate dedication to
Israeli and on-t he-scene exper-
ienct combine to make him a
foremost interpreter of the
current situation in Israel and the
Middle Hast.
Born in Dublin, Ireland and
educated in England, he studied
at the Universities of London and
Manchester. He took a Master of
Arts degree in Semitic languages
and philosophy at the University
of Manchester and held a
research fellowship there. After
his gradual ion. he conducted
research in sociology at the
London School of Economics.
Mr. Cherrick received his
Dm tor of Divinity degree from
the Liverpool Talmudic Institute
and served as Chief Rabbi at the
New Synagogue in London, one
of England s oldest and largest
congregations.
During World War II, he
served as chaplain with the
British Expeditionary Forces and
was cited for his extraordinary
achievements in working with
servicemen during the evacuation
of Dunkirk. After his discharge
from military service, he became
Director of the Jewish National
Fund and the United Palestine
several other senior positions at
the University and was elected
Vice President in 1968.
Israel's foremost institution of
higher education and research,
the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem held its first classes on
its Mount Scopus campus over-
looking the Holy City in 1925,
with Albert Einstein, Sigmund
Freud, and Martin Buber serving
on its first Board of Governors.
Today, some 14,000 students
attend classes on its four cam-
puses at Mt. Scopus, Ein Karem,
Givat Ram and Rehovoth. The
American Friends of the Hebrew
University fosters the Univer-
sity's growth and development,
conducts programs of infor-
mation and administers the
Office of Academic Affairs.
>ar ot Dai lvmzvans Weddings
and every other special event
ft /a.i/itif/ niftnf.it/
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(305) 832-4733
Open Monday to Saturday
5:30 to 11 p.m.
Appeal of Great Britain, and in this capacity he gained wide recognition as an administrator and orator. In 1947, Mr. Cherrick settled in Israel, becoming associated with the Hebrew University as its World Director of Organization and Information. He has held The law firm of Lesser, Lesser & Daniels, PA. is pleased to announce that The Honorable C. Michael Shalloway of the Palm Beach County Court will join the firm January 1,1981 The name of the firm will be Lesser, Daniels and Shalloway, P.A. Joe H. Lesser will continue of Counsel 909 North Dixie Highway West Palm Beach, Florida 655-2028
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Your savings insured up to $100,000 by an agency ot Ihe federal Government' Equal Opportunity Employer


Page 12
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Nay on Pleads for Big Birth Rate
F"day. February \
Points to High Risks of Jewish Assimilation
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
President Yitzhak
Navon has called on Jews
throughout the world have
more children. He spoke at
the seventh plenary as-
sembly of the World Jewish
Congress which elected
Edgar Bronfman, of New
York, as its president suc-
ceeding Philip Klutznick.
Navon, speaking at the open-
ing session", warned that world
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Jewry was endangered by a low
birth rate and assimilation. He
said that unless the birth rate
was increased there would be less
than 8 million Jews left in the
non-Communist world by the end
of the century.
THE BIRTH rate was de-
clining in Israel too. except
among the Orthodox, Navon
noted. But he said the situation is
better in Israel than in the dias-
pora. He noted that Israel has 23
percent of the world's Jewish
population but 40 percent of the
Jewish children in the world.
Navon also urged the WJC to
"establish a dialogue" with Islam
in order to foster better world un-
I del-standing between the two
religions.
The plenary assembly, the
WJC's first in six years, brought
together some 500 Jewish leaders
from 60 countries, including dele-
gates from Poland, Bulgaria,
Yugoslavia, and Rumania.
Cemetery Sales
Pre-need cemetery sales persons
wanted by Palm Beach County's
oldest traditional Jewish
cemetery. For information call
Howard Bernstein 9-5
684-2277
To include your personal or
business greeting in our special
Passover edition please call
Staci at 588-1652.
One issue emphasized was the
rising anti-Semitism in Europe,
South America and the Untied
States. Attention was also placed
on relatiohs with Islam and
Christianity, the situation of
Jews in the Soviet Union and the
Arab countries, and the threat to
Jewish survival of intermarriage
and assimilation.
IN A KEYNOTE address to
the assembly last night, Bronf-
man said the influence of Jews on
the policies of Western govern-
ments was becoming "less effec-
tive." In the United States,
Americans continue to admire
and respect Israel as the lone
democracy in hostile surround-
ings and the new Reagan Ad-
ministration "will no doubt strive
to maintain Israel's strength and
security," Bronfman said. "But
it will probably view Israel as
only one important factor in the
global East-West struggle."
In an obliquely critical com-
ment on Israel's troubled politi-
Ical situation, Bronfman noted
that Israel has "too much politics
and not enough leaders." But he
spoke warmly of Israel's "in-
genuity and valor," saying that
every Jew everywhere "takes
pride in Israel's accomplish-
ments."
Listing inflation, emigration
find ethnic problems, Bronfman
|said that Israel at 33 "already
has entered its "mid-life crisis"
even though it is still a young
state. "Even as we Americans,
i British and Eastern Europeans
are struggling with our systems,
so. too, is Israel," he said.
STILL, he added, he drew en-
couragement from a recent con-
versation with the Orthodox
scholar Rabbi Joseph Solo
veitchik of Boston who had urged
"We must relearn to- be Jews
whose strength and idealism can
be a leading force in societies
wherever Jews live."
Bronfman assumes the WJC
presidency after being acting
president since Klutznick became
Secretary of Commerce in former
President Carter's Cabinet last
year. Klutznick's long time
predecessor at the helm of th"
WJC, Dr. Nahum Goldmann
not attend the assembly.
Another speaker was former
U.S. Sen. Jacob Javits (R., N.Y.),
who urged the Reagan Adminis-
tration to "resist the blandish-
ments of Western Europe" and
"remain constant to the Camp
David peace process and the
Israel-Egypt peace treaty."

JAVITS declared We
European "efforts to bring,
a Mideast settlement that *
make Israel's security he
dependent on guarantees
other countries and that w
accept the ultimate estah
ment of a Palestinian stata
Israel's borders. Short term A
and fancied favors from AraH
exporters will turn into longt
disasters if Camp David!
derailed."
A highlight of the o
ceremony at the Binyi
Ha'ooma Convention Hall
the presentation of an av,
from the WJC to Zubin Mel
the long time musical direct
the Israel Philharmonic
chestra who is also director of I
New York Philharmonic. Mel
a non-Jew bom in India, sir
the orchestra's role as a a
emissary on behalf of the Je
State. Earlier, he led the on*
tra in a performance for the WJ

>
1
The Boca Logo 1981 Federation UJA Campaign Commit*
with Colette A vital, the featured speaker at the recent dinnt
dance held at the Boca Logo Country Club. From left to righ.
David Flagel, Arnold Rosenthal, Chairman, George Margo]
and Jerry Pankin.
.THE HIGHER BUYER.THE HIGHER BUYERTHE HIGHER BUYER-THE HIGHER BUYER. THE HIGHER BUYER
ID
>
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CO
u
CO
IO
ill
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WE ARE THIS AREAS
HIGHEST BUYERS OF
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. february'
6,1981
The Jewish Flpridian of South County
Page 13
^jtiand To Build Again
Sinai Kibbutz Members Prepare to Start Over
kUARTYGALLANTER
iB Sufa. Sinai Of
are going to go
. We're a kibbutz. Rafi
Obviously ag'.^J1- Af
Lv0( Kibbutz Sufa (storm)
^j of the Sinai desert, he
fw on his mind on a recent
1 ber afternoon when
mis in the UJA Young
up Cabinet 'Haahi-
, mission came to visit.
Aikktly less than a year, he
file sixty-eight other kibbutz
, would have to leave,
j the fields and orchards
I jpent nearly six years
-tag, and start an entirely
tgefriunity in the Negev. As
[of the Camp David accords,
[fed they had worked and
j would soon be returned to
, The site of their new
pat, (long what will become
itypuan border, was still
L Only a single lane asphalt
lading abruptly in the vast
j Negev indicates that here,
uy soon, there will be a new
community
I
kibbutzim, eleven
_l and the coastal com-
/ of Yamit in the Sinai all
Hotly come under Egyptian
njnty. The Israeli govern-
b negotiating with the
of Yamit, and those
I be in the surrounding
r most of whom own
lam homes and apartments,
lame at an equitable settle-
for the loss of their
Some will accept
lation and find new
Others may relocate to
pKtlements in the Negev.
ithe kibbutz members there
i option. Either they must
l to the new site or leave the
iky with not rung to show
iryears of effort.
W is a young kibbutz. The
nap age of the members is
I twenty-four. Most came to
^community directly from the
Pnmarily, they were city
young pmple who
t to experience t he pioneer
' that built Israel. A few
raistd on older, more
kibbutzim. They
|J> the Sinai because they
wto be involved in starting
'community, just as their
? had done. Together they
:* ork. They took a few
P and the beginnings of
'<* Six Day War. and
'hem into a growing
"settlement.
V.they have young strong
b, although the trees are
** years away from
sizeable fruit crop.
* harvesting tomatoes,
fern W11dt',variety of
They built a dining
budget projection called tor the
start of construction on the new
kibbutz in early 1980. However, a
serious short fall in expected
income and an uneven cash tlow
from the United Jewish Appeal
and Keren Hayesod campaigns
forced the Agency to abandon its
projections, and slash budgets
for 1980-82. One of the projects
delayed was the new Kibbutz
Sufa.
"If we had the brick and the
mortar and the machines, we
would start to build it ourselves,"
Rafi told the UJA Young Leader-
ship mission member. "But we
don't, so in the meantime all we
can do is wait."
dded
a community center
levnici 7.....""/ center
gj.awed construction on
^b"jJdmg liking toward
*ie Sin11*1* wouU l
iC.k n on the kib-
^* they will have to leave
lL''rLe2COncerned-"'"d
l *?***** to questions
. mssion members.
P>Kn 0n,the new kib-
BW yet he^n *"* the
r Agency says that there is
knumk^onevtoPutupthe
fcloJr",- Lven > they are
CSflhe kibbutz on
? hall *'1'move in without
Saw .Wlthout ">"-
eS If thev don't
'n time, our member.
1 Bity./" Wl" survive as a
,Pace
said
Vouni
treaty
Karen,
is un-
a dark-
foS* ^nan* to the
nP that it will last
Members of Kibbutx Sufa and participants in the UJA Young
Leadership "Hashiveynu" mission discuss the resettlement
issue at the soon-to-be abandoned kibbutz.
assistance it will be able to offer
the young settlers.
Despite uncertainty about
future Financial support and the
tremendous physical obstacles
they will have to overcome in the
new location, this group of young
people is more than ready to start
again. They are impatient.
"If we had our way," said
David, a founding member of the
kibbutz, '"we would leave
tomorrow. At first, we tried to
get the government to change,
not to give back this territory.
But that was not to be. We ac-
cept that we must move and we
would like to get on with it. It's
hard to find the motivation to
continue to work this land every
day. Yet, it's all we have until the
kibbutz is ready."
The 1979 Jewish Agency
Israel Bond Event
forever. But still, it is hard to
leave behind the tree I planted
four years ago, one I cared for
and nursed until it took root.
When we go, the water will be
turned off and the tree will die."
The Government of Israel and
the Jewish Agency have
promised the members of Kib-
butz Sufa that they will receive
new facilities, but there is no I
way to compensate them for the .
years of work that they have
invested. After many difficult
seasons of laboring to make
barren land produce, the kibbutz ;
has begun to generate income.
When relocated, it will, once
again, have to depend entirely on
Jewish Agency support until new
crops can be grown and har- |
vested- The Agency, forced to cut '
services and staff drastically, !
cannot even project how much
Temple Emeth is proud to an-
nounce that Lou Medwin, Editor
of Hakol. will be its honoree for
the 1980-81 Israel Bond Drive.
The Bond rally will be held Feb.
22. at 7:30 p.m. at the Temple.
He joins a list of former honorees
whose contribution to the Temple
and to the community have been
significant.
As a member of Temple
Emeth, Lou founded the bulletin,
Hukol. six years ago and has
been its only editor. He has been
Chairman of the House Com-
mittee from the very first day of
its conception. For over seven
years, he has served continuously
as a member of the Board
Directors. In addition, Medwin is
a vice president of B'nai B'rith's
King I-odge in Do I ray Beach and
serves as co-chairman of the
ADL. Lou and his wife, Rose,
who is equally involved, have
been residents of this area for
seven years.
Feature of the evening will be
Emil Cohen, one of the outstand-
ing performers on the entertain-
ment scene today. Since estab-
lishing himself as a top humorist,
raconteur and vocalist at Gros-
singer's Hotel and Country Club,
Cohen has appeared in major
night clubs, hotels and theatres
throughout the country. Seen on
numerous television programs,
and heard on many popular radio
shows, he has been acclaimed by
critics and audiences wherever he
appeared.
Please note that refreshments
will be served and there will be no
admission charge.
r
Will Vbur Lunch Today
Cause a Migraine Tomorrow?
You probably aren't
aware that what
you're eating today
could give you an
agonizing headache
tomorrow. Quite
frankly, certain foods
you eat could lead
to headaches.
Delicacies such as
ripe cheese, chocolate,
beansprouts, herring,
red wine, nuts and scotch are
known to cause headaches
in some people. In most cases,
once the food culprit is
removed from the diet, the
headache pain disappears.
Learning to understand
what causes headaches and
how to prevent them is one of
the many functions at the
Headache Treatment Center in
Ft. Lauderdale, a unit of the
Center for Neurological
Services
It is one of only a few such
Centers presently in the
United States and the only one
in Florida. Sophisticated
equipment, a highly qualified
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therapists plus expertise
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combine to provide
the finest in
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If you are suffering
from persistent or
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we suggest you consult
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NORTH WDGE MEDICAL PLAZA 5601 N. DIXIE HIGHWAY FORT LAUDERDALE 491-4296


Page 14
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Febru
ary(
Wallenberg Witnesses Say He's Alive
I Continued from Page 1
that Wallenberg had a fatal heart
attack at Lubyanka on July 17,
1947. It also boosts the
plausibility of witnesses who say
they saw Wallenberg long after
that date.
Another man, who says he
heard about Wallenberg in the
early 1960s, is Dr. Marvin
Makinen, a Finnish-American
who spent two years in Vladimir
Prison at the same time as Gary
Powers, the famous U-2 pilot.
Makinen had been accused of
espionage while on a visit to
Kiev. He is now a biophycisist in
the U S.
ANOTHER REPORT about
Wallenberg was given by Simon
VV iescnlhal. the Nazi-hunter who
helped trace Adolf Eichmann in
South America. He quoted an
unnamed witness as saying that
(Jen. (iennady Kuprianov had
encountered Wallenberg in 1953
and 1954. Some details of these
meetings were reported in the
\\tt two years ago. Kuprianov
was then said to have been inter-
rogated by the KOB in the course
ol winch he died.
The conference which heard all
this evidence, as well as a lot
more tenuous information, was
intended to break the worldwide
silence which has hung over the
U ailenberg case for the past 36
years. It was the culmination of
nearly two years of efforts by
concerned individuals in several
Western countries.
In addition to V\ iesenthal.
participants included Elizabeth
Moynihan; Ml' (Ircville .Janner.
president of the Hoard of
Deputies ol British Jews: Elie
\\ lesel. who heads President
Carter's Holocaust Memorial
Commission; Gideon Hausner.
prosecutor at the Eichmann trial;
and French Noliel Prize winner,
Pml. Andre Lwdff.
AFTER HEARING first hand
accounts of Wallenberg's war-
time work both from his Swedish
collaborators and Jewish pro-
teges, as well as copious evidence
about Wallenberg's detention in
the Soviet Union, the conference
unanimously resolved that it
believed the Swedish diplomat is
still alive.
It said it would ask the Soviet
Union to receive a delegation to
discuss the matter in Moscow
and that meanwhile the
Wallenberg Association would
seek the help ol Western Com-
munist parties and international
human rights agencies.
Hut 24 hours after the con-
ference ended the Soviet
Embassy here refused to accept
the resolution and would not let
ii s chairman, Supreme Court
Justice Ingrid (iaerde Wideman
ol Sweden past the Embassy
gates in her bid to see the Soviet
Ambassador.
THE SWEDISH government
on the other hand is making no
secret of its strong sympathy for
the conference. Ola Ulisten, the
foreign Minister, said Sweden
welcomed all efforts to clarify
Wallenberg's fate. Although the
Soviet government claims Wal-
lenberg died in 1947. he said, "the
Swedish government has never
accepted this as the final an-
swer."
One of the chief participants in
the conference was Annette
Lantos, wife of Kep. Thomas
Lantos (D., Calif.) who has said
that his first piece of legislative
business will be to propose that
honorary American citizenship be
conferred on Wallenberg. The
| Swedish diplomat's Budapest
mission was undertaken at the
liehest of the Roosevelt ad-
ministration during World War
It. Both Mrs. Lantos and her
hu- band come from Hungary and
were saved by the protection of
the Swedish and Portuguese
representatives there.
Latest Round of Autonomy
Talks End in Stalemate
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA| -
Israeli. Egyptian and U.S.
delegates wound up three days of
autonomy talks here with little
progress made other than a
decision to meet again in Egypt,
at a date still to be fixed.
The talks were held on the
technical level and the
delegations, headed by Wat
(luverius for the U.S., Chaim
Kuht-rsky for Israel and Ezzat
Abdul-l.atif for Egypt, sought to
draw up a list of points of agree-
ment reached during the past 18
months and those (joints on
which no common ground could
Ih- liillllcl
THE RESULTS will be
presented to President Reagan to
enable him to formulate his
policy. Conference sources said
tut lire meetings of the autonomy
committee would depend on
Reagan's decision on how to
proceed.
Although the talks were sup-
posed to have been technical, a
polilk'al note was introduced by
the Egyptians and promptly
protested by the Israelis. Latif
told reporters after the meeting.
"We have not been negotiating
matters of substance. We have
been consulting on ways and
means of removing the obstacles
which are facing these
negotiations."
Asked what these were, he said
"The main obstacles come ac-
tually from the political at-
mosphere that has lieen created
either by taking decisions like the
Knesset decision on Jerusalem or
the measures taken by the
military government in the occu-
pied territories and by the at-
titude taken towards the
Palestinians."
LATIF SAID the Egyptians
had naked the Israelis to take the
necessary measures to regain
mutual trust and hoped Israel
would help reduce tensions on the
West Bank, free political
prisoners and allow expelled
Arab leaders to return home.
Responding, an Israeli
delegation source said it was
strange that the Egyptians had
protested the law declaring
Jerusalem Israel's capital and
other actions, calling them ob-
stacles to negotiations, without
consideration of the fact that
Egypt itself had previously
suspended the talks to put pres-
sure on Israel, and the attitude
shown at times by Egypt in
international gatherings.
69 Senators Urge Turkey
To Maintain Israeli Ties
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
A bipartisan bloc of 69 Senators
has urged the Turkish govern-
ment to resist pressure from
other governments to sever nor-
mal diplomatic relations with
Israel.
In a letter delivered by Sen.
Howard Metzenbaum (D., Ohio)
to the Turkish Ambassador,
Sukru Elekdag, the Senators
expressed hope that the Turkish
government will reconsider its
"recent decision concerning
diplomatic relations with Israel"
and that the Ambassador convey
to his government "our strong
concerns."
Turkey recently reduced its
diplomatic representation in Tel
Aviv and asked Israel to cut
down its diplomatic personnel in
Ankara. The letter was signed by
38 Democrats and 31 Repub-
licans from 46 states, including
13 of the 17 members of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee.
IT STATED that the Senators
have been impressed with the re-
solve "your country has dis-
played in the past in maintaining
normal diplomatic relations with
both Egypt and Israel in the face
of pressure from other govern-
ments. We understand, however,
that recent pressure upon your
government has led it to down-
grade its diplomatic relationship
with Israel. This step could have
harmful consequences to both
Israel and Egypt, two countries
which are great friends (of
the U.S.).
"If your government persists
in this action, it will undermine
the Camp David accords, hurt
Israel and hamper efforts by
President (Anwar) Sadat to bring
moderation to the Middle East.
We believe that Israel and Egypt
present a strong hope for a just
peace in the Middle East. We
would be deeply disappointed if
Turkey would yield to the wishes
of extremist countries which seek
only to bring discord to the
Middle East."
TELEPHONE 684-3212
MEN'S CLUB
CONGREGATION ANSHEISHOLOM
5348 Grove St., Century Village
Weet Palm Beach
Cordially invites you to a
Concert by
PAUL ZIM
V*
World Renowned Concert Artist
Sunday, February 22,1961 at
8p.m. sharp
ALL SEATS RESERVED
Donation: Sanctuary 86
Social HaH $3
Israel's New Minister
Unfolds Economic Plai
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel's newly appointed
Finance Minister, Yoram
Aridor, is expected to in-
troduce an economic pro-
gram to slow the steady de-
valuation of the Shekel,
improve labor relations, en-
courage long-term invest-
ments and savings by the
public and, hopefully,
reduce the annual inflation
rate, now at a record 130
percent-plus to a more
manageable double digit
figure.
Much of Aridors program was
recommended to his predecessor.
Yigal Hurwitz. in an economic
plan paper submitted a month
ago, close associates of the new
Finance Minister told reporters.
He is expected to continue
Hurwitz's policy of slashing gov-
ernment spending which he con-
siders absolutely essential if in-
flation is to be contained. That
proved to be Hurwitz's most
formidable obstacle. He achieved
only limited success and resigned
over the issue Jan. 11.
ARIDOR INTENDS to prop
up the Shekel by offering the
public foreign currency saving
schemes. A stronger Shekel
would have adverse effect!
exports which rose substand
during Hurwitz's regime]
most notable achiever!
Aridor is said to be reach
recommend additional incenl
and compensation to expo
who find it hard to market i
goods abroad without a
Shekel.
Aridor will make wage
salary increases depend
entirely on increased prt
tivity. He believes this for
would lead to labor peao,
cushioning wage-earners agi1
inflation and offering then
tangible inducement to imp
productivity and at the
time, would peg costof-livin-
crements to 100 percent of]
price index and pay tl
monthly instead of quarterly]
present, the increments do !
cover the full rise of the
index.
ARIDOR IS said to favt
reduced tax on fuel and does]
lielieve the tax should go[
every time the price of fuel ri)
Thus, he believes, the econq
would be less subject to peril
jolts. He would offset thefudT
reduction by a one-time large!
crease in the value-added T
(VAT>. The new Finance Mb]
ter also wants to make gov
menl saving schemes more
tractive to investors as a met.
of absorbing the excess moq
supply.
Failure to Punish Iran
Sets 'Dangerous Precedent'
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV UTA) An
Israeli expert on international
terroism said that the deal en-
tered into to free the 52 American
hostages and the failure to
punish Iran for seizing them
more than a year ago may have
set "a dangerous precedent" Dr.
Ariel Merari. a researcher at Tel
Aviv University's Institute for
Strategic Studies, nevertheless
welcomed the release of the
Americans.
"I CAN FULLY understand
the rejoicing of the families of the
hostages,'' he said. "But from the
national and international po|
of view, it may serve as a dang
ous precedent for other would-]
kidnappers or hijackers, eitq
individuals, organizations
governments."
Merari said that there has I
a decline in hijacking
hostage-taking in the last five I
six years mainly becau|
countries have refused to
asylum to the hijackers for fearl
international sanctions. But t|
Iranian government was it
involved in the seizure and holj
ing of the Americans and
succeeded in its objectives.
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r February
6,1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
r'agelS
Saudis Must Keep Filling 'Er
LlYAHUKANOVSKY
tlLnUnivertity
dc Organization of Petro-
Ilxporting Countries
JL ji Indonesia, Saudi
fftoving announced in ad-
ft, increase in oil produc-
Ejexpansion of production
"S once again argued for
Vtion" in price. As in the
his stance was widely
Cj politically motivated,
PL is considerable evidence
ygwomic self-interest, more
(politics, underlies Saudi oil
eihtn Secretary of Energy.
s W Duncan. Jr.. earlier
dy asked Saudi Arabia's
sswn" to resume filling
jis strategic oil reserves.
^ with the Saudi oil
ff, Ahmed Zaki Yamani. to
America's oil-pur-
policies. Duncan and
^officials, assuming that
Sprites were kept moderate
Jjnly (or political reasons,
apparently afraid that if the
i were displeased because
reserves would increase
jin's energy independence,
finight retaliate with pro-
IB cuts, higher prices, or
(Yamani expressed dis-
with America's action
_ reserves, warning that
Bmight reach 950 a barrel by
1NG THE last 20 years.
declarations not with-
kng. the Saudis have fairly
Jitly based their oil
ns primarily on what they
perceived to be their
nm interest. They have
|production as close to sus-
; capacity as market con-
ns permitted and have set
i at levels best for them-
is History tells us that any
Mill's consistent pattern
i is a far more reliable key
i fundamental policies than
nblic statements.
W oil revenues quadrupled
"! 1960s, initially creating a
I surplus, but by the end
* decade, after heavy
"g on development and
needs, the country was
! deficits in lx>th fiscal
nts and the closely related
of payments. As oil
1 began to rise in 1971. the
increased production
W; again revenues soared.
ditures followed close
THIS analysis of Saudi
Arabia's oil policy was
written by Eliahu Kanov-
sky, professor of economics
at Bar-Ilan University in
Ramat Gan, Israel, and
originally published on the
Op-Ed page of The New
York Times.
In 1973, Saudi output rose
more than in any year before, or
since, despite the so-called em-
bargo in the last quarter. Indeed,
the embargo came at a most pro-
pitious time: Technical problems
in the oil fields required a tem-
porary slowdown. As soon as
these difficulties were resolved.
production was increased, even
though the official embargo
extended into the first quarter of
1974.
AFTER THE enormous hike
in oil prices in 1973 and 1974,
many experts predicted vast
OPEC financial surpluses, with
the Saudis capturing the major
share and they were right, but
only for a short time. In 1975,
Saudi Arabia embarked on an
ambitious five-year development
plan that, in the third and fourth
years, created an almost $9
billion cashflow deficit.
When 1974 prices reduced
world demand, total OPEC pro-
duction fell, but Saudi Arabia
and the United Arab Emirates
raised their output, lowering it in
1975 only when it became clear
that the market had remained de-
pressed, and raising it again as
soon as demand returned in 1976.
In the first half of 1977. there
was a split in OPEC, and Saudi
Arabia and the Emirates kept
their price increases below those
of other producing countries,
thereby boosting their own
exports. What's more, although
the Saudis agreed to a uniform
OPEC price in mid-1977, they
continued to produce more than
their so-called ceiling of 8.5
million barrels a day. When the
oil glut of 1978 compelled them to
cut back, they suffered a severe
cashflow shortage.
Religi
IOU8
Directory
H bclT" El- OF BOCA RATON,
'i nmw0r'Aviue. Boca Raton.
" "TO Reform Phone. 391 8900
. e.1!.E- s,ner. Cantor Martin
< Mboath Service*. Friday at
r2,s**ur1?v. : a.m. Torah
Jim Rabbi Merle E. Singer
am Sabbath Morning Services.
"E SINAI. At St. Paul's
Church, isi s. Swlnton
, o'X Retorm. Mailing
fi. -,?/ Box "0'' Oalray
"Hl Silver. President
"n*r. -07*7.
B** anshei emuna.
IVrlra" *nd Holidays 9 a.m.
""7 Temple No. 499-9M9.
*-T?AiH^GATION. 1401
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fats
I I*?"!***-; Otlrtir Bejch,
y^1.Phone 498 3536 Bernard
Predictably, all oil producers
increased both output and prices
after the Iranian revolution in the
autumn of 1978. In 1979, the
Saudis continued to ignore their
production ceiling and kept their
prices lower than those of other
producers. When an oil surplus
reappeared in 1980, they were in a
better export position than their
competitors.
NOW THE Saudis have again
taken advantage of the cutback
in Iranian and Iraqi oil exports to
raise output, and no doubt will
amass another cash surplus. But
given the huge 1980-85 Saudi de-
velopment plan, the earlier
pattern of high expenditures
overtaking high revenues is likely
to be repeated unless another
major exporter is unable to pro-
duce in the near future.
Despite Saudi Arabia's ambi-
fuels. and oil and gas exploration
outside the Middle East. OPEC
exports have declined. In the first
tious diversification plans, its
economy is. and for the foresee-
able future will remain, almost
solely dependent on oil. As high
oil prices have intensified world
efforts toward energy efficiency,
the development of alternate
half of 1980. they were signifi-
cantly lower than in 1973, and the
small increase in world demand
has been met by non-OPEC
sources. It is clearly in Saudi
Arabia's long-term interest to
keep prices relatively moderate
and to keep exporting oil.
This does not mean that the
Saudis and the other oil pro-
ducers will not raise prices when
short-term demand permits it;
nor does the primacy of economic
factors mean that political con
siderations are unimportant to
the oil producers. But why make
political concessions to persuade
the Saudis to do what their eco-
nomic interests dictate? Hasn t
Libya, no close friend of America,
bean selling one-third of its oil
here without a political quid pro
,,,.' It is strictly business, as it
should be.
For generations Jewish
families have turned to
ViwS*. h ^""t": Friday at 8
"M /< *v at m Dally Mln
'J5 m and 5 p.m. '_____
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Peres Pushes Jordan
Plan With Giscard
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Shimon Peres, chairman of
Israel's Labor Party, has
met here with President
Valery Giscard d'Estaing
for a detailed discussion of
Middle East issues on
which France and Israel
generally disagree. During
his one-day visit here,
Peres also conferred with
Giscard's two chief rivals in
the French presidential
elections scheduled for
April, Socialist Francois
Mitterand and Gaullist
Jacques Chirac.
Peres then went on to London
where he met with Prime Minis-
ter Margaret Thatcher and
Foreign Secretary Lord
Carrington.
In talks with Giscard. the
Israeli leader reportedly ex-
plained the "Jordanian option,"
to which the Labor Party is
pledged, and stressed that a
solution for the West Bank based
on an agreement with Jordan's
King Hussein could be the way to
a comprehensive peace.
LATER, when reporters re-
minded Peres that Hussein has
categorically refused to par-
ticipate in such talks with Israel,
the Labor Party leader said: "I
am less pessimistic than you are.
This is the Middle East, and
today's denials carry little worth
tomorrow. Remember that
President (Anwar) Sadat also
ruled out any Egyptian talks
with Israel only a few months
before he flew to Jerusalem."
The French government is
skeptical about both the long-
range application of the Camp
David agreements and imple-
mentation of a Jordanian option.
Peres told reporters on leaving
the Ely see Palace, "We disagreed
on many points."
The Socialists, whom the latest
public opinion polls give a 50-50
chance to beat Giscard, have
been pledged to the Jordanian
option since the Socialist Inter-
national conference in Madrid
last year.
J
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