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The Jewish Floridian of South County ( Janurary 23, 1981 )

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Organizations In The News
B'NAI B'RITH
Kings J^odge 2965~ B'nai B'ritr.
is planning a Brotherhood Pro-
gram to be held Tuesday evening
I'd) 17, at 8 p.m. at Tempi*
Krrieth, Atlantic Avenue, Delra>
Beach.
A plaque will be awarded by
the Lodge to an outstanding
citizen_ of Delray Beach. The
m'lection committee for this
award-will be chaired by the Hon.
I .eon Weakes, Mayor of Delray
Beach. He will have a committet
of ten to help select a candidate.
BRANDE1S
Brandeis University Nationa
Women's Committee of Boca
Raton "next regular meeting will
take place on Feb. 3, 10:30 a.m.
at the Town Center, Boca Raton.
Maurice M. Cohen will conduct a
seminar on "Money Sense for
Women: How to Protect Your
Savings by Investing Wisely." A
S3 fee will cover the cost of the
seminar and refreshments. The
publie is cordially invited. A
museum trip to Norton Gallery is
planned for Feb. 23, with a con-
ducted tour of Armand Hammer
Collection. There will be time for
lunch and shopping on Worth
Avenue. Cost of the trip is $8.
For further information, call
Helen Folkman.
Brandeis Chapter Requests
Books
The Boca Raton Chapter of the
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee is now
collecting used books in
preparation for its annual New
Books for Old sale which will be
held March ti and 7 at the Boca
llaton Mall.
"Funds raised from the sale will
nable the Brandeis University
iitiriirii's at Waltham, Mass., to
purchase needed books and
(search periodicals.
Tin Boca Raton Chapter would
itly appreciate the donation
01 books, both hard cover and
paperback, to its processing
center at Suite 202. 1300 N.
Federal Hwy., Boca Raton.
Donations are tax deductible and
can be made from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m., Monday to Friday. For
further information, call 368-
1836.
FREE SONS
OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel, Delray
Beach Lodge 224 will hold its
next meeting on Feb. 4, 7 p.m., at
Temple Emeth. Members must
be there to win the Ha-Ha Prize.
It's now $20. Planned for good
and welfare will be a discussion
on diverse topics. Our second
annual Deli-Dance has been set
for March 28. It is limited to 220
people at $8.50 per person.
Contact Izzy Siegel, Bernie
Fenster or Henry Chester, all of
Kings Point, for further in-
formation.
HADASSAH
ATTENTION LADIES: Ben
Gurion Chapter of Hadassah will
be sponsoring the following
events, stffee sure to mark them
on your calendar:
Feb. 9, theater party at Delray
Movie, 2 p.m., $1 admission. For
tickets call Belle Ysakoff or Yetta
For information on Area Organizations
Please call South County Jewish Federation
in Boca Raton 368-2737
Kosenthal; Feb. 19. meeting at
Temple Emeth at noon. Speaker
is Attorney Henry Scheier who
will speak on Wills and Bequests.
Men are invited and refreshments
will be served.
Boca Raton Aviva Chapter of
Hadassah will hqst its annual
education day at Florida Atlantic
University on Jan. 28. Tickets
must be obtained in advance as
admission is limited. There will
be a "paid-up" members brunch,
Jan. 29, at noon, at B'nai Torah
Congregation. A skit will be per-
formed entitled, "Women of the
Liberation." Reservations are
required and must be in by Jan.
26. On Sunday, Feb. 1, at noon,
there will be an "Unlimited
Champagne Brunch" at the Burt
Reynolds Dinner Theatre. The
cost is $24 per person, and the
show will be "The Odd Couple."
Car pools will be formed. For
reservations, call Mrs. Ed
Kanners, Mrs. Philip Israel or
Mrs. Louis Forman. Feb. 10, 6:30
p.m., "A Fun Evening at
Pompano Race Track." There
will be a full dinner and reserved
seating. For reservations and
information call Mrs. Ed Kan-
ners, Mrs. Arthur Abramson or
Mrs. Philip Israel.
SOUTH FLORIDA
JEWISH CIVIL
SERVICE EMPLOYEES
Sid Levine. president of the
South Florida Jewish Civil Ser-
vice Employees, a Chapter of the
National Jewish Civil Service
Employees, Inc.. invites all
government or public service em-
ployees of the Jewish Faith, who
are presentl> employed or retired
with any Federal, State, County,
City or Municipal Agency, to the
monthly meeting of the Chapter
on Sunday, Feb. 1. at 2 p.m. at
the Weight \\ ;it< hers
Auditorium in the Gun Club
Shopping Center on Military
Trail at Gun Club Road (between
Summit and Southern Blvd.),
W ast Palm Beach. The guest
speaker at this meeting will be
the renowned Professor Martin
Syden. a prominent world
traveler and lecturer, who will
show slides and speak on Jewish
Communities throughout the
world. It will be an informative
and enlightening meeting.
TEMPLE BETH EL
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
El of Boca Raton will hold their
Annual Gala Candlelight
Luncheon in the Boca Raton
Hotel and Club Cathedral Room
on Feb. 5 at noon. Preceding the
luncheon, a wine and hors
d'oeuvres reception will be held in
the Clister Loggia Room. Enter-
tainment will be provided by the
"Winged Victory" professional
musical group, widely known for
their variety of music and
comedy. For additional in-
formation, call Pearl Jaffe or
Bernice Schankerman, co-chair-
persons for the affair.
TEMPLE EMETH
Sisterhood of Temple Emeth,
Delray Beach, is holding its
February general meeting on
Thursday, Feb. 5, at noon. Kay
Moran will narrate a fabulous
fashion show, with clothes from
leading shops in Delray Beach,
Boca Raton and Boynton Beach.
Don't miss this function. Mem-
bers and guests are welcome.
Refreshments will be served. For
further information, call Rita
l^ewitas or the Temple office.
Sisterhood annual Winter
luncheon and card party will be
held Thursday. Jan. 29. at noon.
Members and guests are
welcome. A $4 donation is
requested. Join us for an enjoy-
able afternoon. Get your tickets
early. For further information
call Betty Binik. Adeline Kamen
or the Temple office.
TEMPLE SINAI
Many milestones will be
celebrated after prayers, Friday,
Jan. 30, 8:15 p.m. by congre-
gants of Temple Sinai who meet
each Sabbath evening at St.
Paul's Episcopal Church, 188 S.
Swinton Avenue. Sponsors of the
Oneg Shabbat will be Mr. and
Mrs. Krass Kestin. in honor of
their 38th wedding anniversary;
Mr. and Mrs. David Sherman, in
honor of their first wedding
anniversary; Mr. and Mrs.
Franklin Wise, in honor of their
27lh wedding anniversary, and
also in honor of the affiancements
of their son, Howard, and also
their daughter. Karen
At the service Rabbi Samuel
Silver will bless the celebrants.
Aiding the Rabbi in the conduct
dj the service will be Cantor
Betty Bobbins, the Temple choir,
led by Mrs. Silver. Philip Sobel
will bless the Torah and Bernard
Zeldin will lead in the chanting of
the Kiddush.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Women's American ORT. Del-
ia) Chapter, is sponsoring a
Sunday matinee. 2 p.m.. at
Palm Beach Junior College. The
show will be "Arsenic and Old
Lace." Cost is $4 a person. For
further information, call Ann
lx)w inger or Sylvia Schwartz.
Palm Beach County Region of
Women's American ORT is
sponsoring a handicrafts and
cake sale which will be held out-
side the Coral Gables Federal
Bank, Sandalfoot Cove, on Tues-
day. Feb. 3,10:30a.m.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
The Palm Beach Region of
Women's American ORT will
hold a Mid-Year Growth Con-
ference on Wednesday, Jan. 28,
at 9:30 a.m. at the Royal Palm
Beach Civic Center, Royal Palm
Beach. Representatives from
Boca Raton, Delray Beach and
Highland Beach chapters will be
present.
There will be a special premier
showing of the French film, "The
Link and the Chain." Members
will bring a Brown Bag lunch and
dessert and coffee will be served.
I
V
An Easy Way to Decorate Your Home and Office
Temple Beth David Sisterhood
invites you to an
ART AUCTION
Holiday Inn at PGA Blvd. in Palm Beach Gardens
* Saturday, Feb. 7
Preview and Refreshments 7:30p.m.
Auction 8:30 p.m.
Donation $2.50
PUBLIC INVITED
Appel
Dali
Calde'r
Miro
Simbary
and more
Hibel
Boulanger
Chagall
Vassarely
Agam
and more
Auctioneer: Gary Sher from Art Amenca/N Miami Beach
First time in our area
For informatio ncall 845-0841 or 626-3564
Riverside
Memorial Chapel Inc /Funeral Directors
For generations a symbol
of Jewish Tradition


I !
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach, Florida
683-8676
Now two chapels to serve you
West Palm BeachLantana.
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Keith P. Kronlsh, Manager
L
The only Jewish family owned
and operated funeral home
Palm Beach County.
in
EVITT
wE
EINSTEIN
memorial chapels
Complimentary Yahrzeit Candles
5411 Oleechobee Blvd.
W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33409
Telephone 689-8700
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
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TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TEl \ X
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Securities ?? 759 1310
Corporation t0h Free (800122^


JuMtfry
23,1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County
PagS
*


I
Pacesetters Luncheon
ICo-Chairpersons Named
l^Harpe"
Sidney Pearce
Morris W. Morris
\Morris, Pearce, Karpen Named
Campaign General Chairman
Milton Kretsky, C(vchainnan
b ih 1981 Federation-UJA
Ljjy and men's campaign
|-oiinces the appointment of
Iintu W. Morris as General
Ifturman (or the Palm Greens
iDnision and Sidney Pearce as
human of Palm Green Condo I
and Ben Karpen as
an of the Condo II sec-
Morris was active in the
|jnish community of Long
r._Bregation Beth Shalom and
Iij. j ir;i(li i in lioih (MA and
Pearce retired to Delray Beach
Ifan Washington. D.C. where he
Ik affiliated with the Bulova
liUiiiinin|iiiin lie id active in
|Tmple Sinai of Delray Beach
Ids a member of the Building
I Find Committee.
Karpen is a retired furniture
[auiufacturcr from Great Hills,
Met York. He was active in the
ISttion Place Synagogue in New
ITork Citv where he was Vice
President of the Men's Club. He
is presently active in Temple
Kmeth of Delray Beach.
The campaign officially began
at. the January 18 breakfast
where the committee formulated
plans for the drive.
Morris commented, "it is our
intention to have a UJA solicitor
contact each and every Jew in
Palm Greens so that we may all
have the opportunity to stand up
and be counted for Jewish
survival. The key to a successful
campaign is complete coverage."
Continued from Page 1
mysterious figure, known to his
co-workers as "John the Priest."
He served for seven months as a
leader of the ill-fated vessel and
his most celebrated exploit
remains his participation in the
Battle of the Exodus." The
Exodus affair and the evidence
preseted concerning it became a
focal point for the UN recom-
mending partition of Palestine
and the eventual establishment
of the State of Israel.
Rev. Grauel has been the recip-
ient of many awards. Fighter for
Israel Medal, with two combat
ribbons; Humanity Medal,
shared with Pope Paul; Victory
Medal and Medal of Jerusalem as
a founder of the State; B'nai
H'rith Humanitarian Award,
and many additional honors from
Hadassah, National Council of
Jewish Women, and many
others.
Members of the Pacesetters
Committee are : Arlette Baker,
Dorothy Brand, Mary Brumer,
Penny Byrnes, Lee Cogan, Phylis
Cohen, Sherry Endelson,
Dorothy Fleegler, Ruth Gold-
man, Jane Gortz, Emmy
Kalmanoff, Mary Jane Kaufman,
Dr. Goldie Kaback, Beverlee
Levie, J.P. Listick, Beatrice
Meltzer, Rhea Moss, Anne
Paskin, Marion Richman.
Florence Riesberg. Marcia Roff.
Betty Rothfeld, Ann Slossberg,
and Grace Taubman.
SKKKQQKKKQKQKQaKQQQKQKKKQKSK^^
The law firm of
Lesser, Lesser & Daniels, PA.
is pleased to announce that
The Honorable C. Michael Shalloway
of the Palm Beach County Court
will join the firm January 1,1981
The name of the firm will be
Lesser, Daniels and Shalloway, FA.
Joe H. Lesser will continue of Counsel
900 North Pixie Highway
West Palm Beach, Florida
665-2028
Mon., Jan. 28
Tues March 3
Mon, March 23
From shtetl to Stage Door
Featuring jack Gottlieb,
Leonard Bernstein's assistant at the
New York Philharmonic from 1958 to 1966
Moshe Shwr Trio
Moshe Stair is a singer of Hassidlc,
popular Hebrew. Yiddish and
American music
GloraFetdmanTrlo-
Jewlsh soul music
% when he plays music of Jewish foikiaristic
% background, i think that he stands without
Z peer today.'' Zubln Mehta. conductor of
Z the New York Philharmonic
^Tickets on a first come first serve basis
South county Jewish Federation
% 368-2737
"Wfe've discovered
THE MENORAH
FRENEED PLAN.
And all the satisfaction,
thoughtfulness
and financial value
of pie need planning.
"Pre-need arrangements have given us the peace of mind we want,
because now our family will not be burdened in a time of grief
and stress. Pre-need planning also offers us the right to make our
own choices about arrangements. Most of all, it sets the cost of
arrangements at today's prices, with up to five years to pay.
And with Menorah Chapels, we're certain that the traditions of
our faith will be upheld according to our wishes."
The Menorah Pre-Need Plan also offers several guarantees
*ch other programs don't provide:
ALL payments are held in trust and are 100* refundable
at any time
ALL contract forms are approved by the office of the
Florida Insurance Commissioner
interest-free payments for up to five years
Funds may be used toward funeral expenses both locally and
out of state
Only the purchaser can cancel the Menorah pre-need contract.
Menorah Chapels Cemetery CounselingSsrvk*
"''bkstnochvts.
-----------(------...:. ------------------------rix
JF1
jTo learn more about the Menorah Pre-Need Plan, just fill out this
coupon and return to Menorah Chapels, 6800 W. Oakland Park Boulevard,
| Fort Laudardale, Florida 33313. Attention: Pre-Need Plan Director.
| E2Send me your informational booklet on pre-need planning.
IO Call me to set up an appointment at my convenience to discuss the
___b___----------.aaf^Jj> a -. mhmW An. infnior
I
program with a pre-need counselor.
. I UNDERSTAND THE BOOKLET AND APPOINTMENT ARE AT
ABSOLUTELY NO COST OR OBLIGATION TO ME.
.NAME.
|ADDRESS_
ciTY______
I.
.STATE.
.ZIP.
I
TELEPHONE.
.AGE.
#1&
Serving chapelt throughout the US. end Canada
Kirtchenbeum Bros.. Inc. in New \brk.
Piter Memorial Chapels, in Chicago.
Stanettky-SchJostborg-Soiofnon, in Boston.
In Broward, 742-6000. In Dade, 861-7301. In Palm Beach, 833-0887.
------------------------.
.......
,. ,
_ '


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
Janurary 23, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00031

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla
Creation Date:
Janurary 23, 1981

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00031

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian

Full Text
Uemsti Floridian

'e
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
,3 Number 2
Boca Raton. Florida Friday, January 23,1981
iFndShochit
Price 35 Cento'
Federation Subsidized Teen Pilgrimage to Israel
t the second year, the South
Jewish federation an-
that it will subsidize
County Teenagers par-
in the forthcoming
. Teen Pilgrimage. Each
mil receive a $600 stipend
I the cost of $ 1.800 for the
,even week intensive
foprienw-
nty stipends will be
jd to students entering the
, through twelfth grades of
uehool. If there are more
120 applicants, the older
[ will be given preference.
Within grade levels, choice will
be made by drawing lots.
The group will leave on
Tuesday, July 7 and return 40
days later on Aug. 16.
The program is a 40-day ex-
cursion into the life of a nation. It
is a stimulating adventure that
includes three weeks of extensive
touring of Israel, 10 days in
Jerusalem, five days in a Nature
Study Center and five days
sharing the unique Gadna ex-
perience with Israeli youth. In
addition, an optional free week-
end is devoted to visiting family
and friends or home hospitality
with an Israeli family. To gain a
greater understanding of the
sites, the student will participate
in special seminars and lectures
which are planned throughout
the program.
The Nature Study Center is a
new concept which integrates a
study of nature, geography and
history in a unique project of the
Society for the Protection of
Nature in Israel. The Society
presently runs 12 centers all over
Israel which are under the super-
vision of the Israel Ministry of
locations of these Nature Study
Centers are chosen for their
scenic beauty, their historical
significance and their
geographical location.
Each Nature Study Center is
situated in the area and among
the scenery specific to the par-
ticular region on which its ac-
tivities concentrate. The aim is to
get thoroughly acquainted with
the area and most touring and
study is done on foot.
Because the itinerary is
crowded and demanding, par-
ticipants rise at dawn, or
sometimes even before dawn.
Each excursion includes on-the-
spot observation of charac-
teristics of the area wild life,
plant life, geomorphological
structures and digging into the
past in the form of visits to ar-
Continued on Page 7
U-Federation Campaign
Pacesetters Luncheon Co -chairpersons
Bagus, Chairman of the
is Division of the 1981
i-Federation campaign
the appointment of
iRifkin, Bernice Weiss and
ore Rukin as Co-chair
for the Pacesetters
i luncheon will be held on
ay, Jan 28 at the home
! Baker in the Oak brook
i of Boca West.
(minimum contribution to the
is Division campaign of
^established for this event.
. Rifkin is chair person for
South County Women's
of Israel Bonds, a
rof the Board of Trustees
American Friends of
i University, a member of
rd of the South County
i Federation and a member
speakers bureau. She is the
nt of the coveted Freedom
ilof Israel.
Mb- Rukin is a part-time
of South County reaid-
lerest of the year in Bergen
*}, New Jersey. There she
Wed the American Friends
tHebrew University chapter
Has being an active member
|| "raity Women. Hadassah,
Council of Jewish
and Ort. In South
ty she was the 1980 Co-
n for the Pacesetters
^ Weiss moved to South
iy from New York City
! e was active in Jewish
I nriuding United Jewish
!>ne was a board member
Women's Division for both
des Hospital and the
wnstein College of
She was on the Pace-
Ummittee in South
7 for the 1980 campaign
" member of New
?, an organization
nng community living for
l,ki?,n dama8 wd
l children.
speaker for the
' *ul be the Rev. John
'Urauel. Rev. Grauel is a
MS U,nlike mo8t k^n*18
1 *f alive. On Thursday
,fi 7-'947 Rev. Grauef.
&ha,r falling nearly to
^erstmygoldcroesona
(^ound his neck, stood in
mped room aboard
T9 fe-chnstened ship, the
iZrv. was ntrcepted
'English government.
Report Rothschild May
Opt for Israel Move If
Patriotism Questioned
Rose Rifkin. Bernice Weiss,
The first reports of Nazi
persecutions led him to resign
and join the American Christian
Palestine Committee, an organi-
zation dedicated to the establish-
ment of the State of Israel. He
became intimate with the Jewish
community and learned about the
Eleanore Rukin
Haganah. Fascinated, he joined
and volunteered to ride on the
President Warfield, soon to be
called the Exodus, as a galley
boy. He soon appeared in the
underground in Europe, a
Continued on Page &
PARIS (ZINS) In an
interview with the prestigious
daily, Le Monde. Baron Guy de
Rothschild said that he considers
himself to be a 100 percent
French citizen "in spirit as well
as in status." At the same time
he noted, that if his patriotic feel-
ings toward France will be
questioned on account of his
Jewishness, there is a possiblity
that we would leave and settle in
Israel.
Rothschild repudiated all
rumors that he is alleged to have
said at one time or another that
he feels himself a stranger in
Israel. The truth is, the Baron
said, that he feels very well in
Israel and is also close to the
Israelis. At the same time he
makes it clear that he is "a
French citizen and not an immi-
grant."
Plan Offered for Sinai Settlements
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Raanan Weitz, head of
the Jewish Agency's
Settlement Department,
has proposed that the
government transplant all
settlements in northern
Sinai across the border into
Israel as an alternative to
building new settlements
for the settlers who must
evacuate Sinai by the end
of next year in compliance
with the Israeli-Egyptian
peace treaty.
Weitz brought his plan to the
World Zionist Organization
Executive which authorized him
to present it to the Ministerial
Settlement Committee. He
argued that it was feasible to
physically transport houses,
yards, trees and green houses to
new locations in the Shalom
salient where the soil and climate
are the same as in the Yamit and
Raffiah regions of Sinai.
By so doing, he said the
government would avoid the
phenomenon of paying "ransom"
money to the settlers in compen-
sation for their property and
avoid the cost of building new
settlements from scratch.
SO FAR no official body had
endorsed Weitz's plan. It has en-
countered opposition from the
Sinai settlers who are negotiating
with the government for compen-
sation. Representatives of Sadot,
the oldest settlement, told Weitz
he came too late. They said many
settlers have already committed
themselves to other projects after
they evacuate the area.
Weitz drafted his proposal
about two months ago and asked
a team of experts, headed by
Prof. Haim Finkel, to study the
possibility of dismantling the
settlements and reassembling
them across the border. The
experts reported that it was not
only possible but could be done at
80 percent of the cost of building
new settlements.
Weitz estimated the cost of
moving Sadot at 20 million
Shekels. But even as he outlined
his plan to the WZO Executive,
the Likud Knesset faction was
discussing compensation for the
farmers of the Yamit region.
THE CABINET has already
approved guidelines for compen-
sation. Only Finance Minister
Yigal Hurwitz was opposed on
grounds that the sums were far
too generous and out of line with
what the government could
afford.
THE BARON also added that
anti-Semitism is rooted in
France, but that there is hostility
to other ethnic minorities in that
country as well. He cites a survey
which shows that one out of eight
Frenchmen believes there are too
many Jews in France.
The survey shows that 49
percent of the French public
believes there are too many
North Africans in the country; 28
percent said that that is true of
the blacks; 16 percent that it is
the case with the Spaniards; 12
percent with respect to Jews; 6
percent with respect to Corsi-
cans. and 4 percent with regard
to Protestants. "We are not at
the top of the list," de Rothschild
said, "but 12 percent is neverthe-
less a rather significant number."
DATE CHANGE
The Boca Teeca Dinner Dance
on behalf of the 1981 Federation-
UJ A campaign has been changed
toSaturdayiught^FebruajyM^


P*&2
I,,< JefnshFforidianofSoath County
Friday,
y. January 23.
Organizations In The News
BNAI B'RITH
Kings J>odge 129Q&' B nai B'ritr.
is planning a Brotherhood Pro-
gram to he held Tuesday evening
Feb, 1", at 8 0.m. at Tempi*
Emeth, Atlantic Avenue, Delray
Beach!
A plaque will be awarded by
the Lodge to an outstanding
citizen of Delray Beach. The
selection committee for this
award will be chaired by the Hon.
I.eon Weakes, Mayor of Defray
Beach. He will have a committet
of ten to help select a candidate.
BRANDEIS
Brandeis University Nationa
Women's Committee of Boca
HatolTnext regular meeting will
take place on Feb. 3, 10:30 a.m.
at the Town Center, Boca Raton.
Maurice M. Cohen will conduct a
seminar on "Money Sense for
Women: How to Protect Your
Savings by Investing Wisely." A
S3 fee will cover the cost of the
seminar and refreshments. The
public is cordially invited. A
museum trip to Norton Gallery is
planned for Feb. 23, with a con-
ducted tour of Armand Hammer
Collection. There will be time for
lunch and shopping on Worth
Avenue. Cost of the trip is $8.
For further information, call
Helen Folkman.
Brandeis Chapter Requests
Books
The Boca Raton Chapter of the
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee is now
collecting used books in
preparation for its annual New
Books for Old sale which will be
held March f> and 7 at the Boca
Raton Mall.
Funds raised from the sale will
nable the Brandeis University
libraries at Waltham. Mass.. to
purchase needed books and
research periodicals.
Th Boca Raton Chapter would
greatly appreciate the donation
of books, both hard cover and
paperback, to its proce
center at Suite 202. 1300 N.
Federal Hwy.. Boca Raton.
I >onations are tax deductible and
can be made from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m., Monday to Friday. For
further information, call 368-
1836.
FREE SONS
OF ISRAEL
Free Sons of Israel. Delray
Beach Lodge 224 will hold its
next meeting on Feb. 4, 7 p.m., at
Temple Emeth. Members must
be there to win the Ha-Ha Prize.
It's now $20. Planned for good
and welfare will be a discussion
on diverse topics. Our second
annual Deli-Dance has been set
for March 28. It is limited to 220
people at $8.50 per person.
Contact Izzy Siege). Bernie
Fenster or Henry Chester, all of
Kings Point, for further in-
formation.
HADASSAH
ATTENTION LADIES: Ben
(jurion Chapter of Hadassah will
be sponsoring the following
events, siffoe sure to mark them
on your calendar:
Feb. 9, theater party at Delray
Movie, 2 p.m., $1 admission. For
tickets call Belle Ysakoff or Yetta
For information on Area Organizations
Please call South County Jewish Federation
in Boca Raton 368-2737
Rosenthal; Feb. 19. meeting at
Temple Emeth at noon. Speaker
is Attorney Henry Scheier who
will speak on Wills and Bequests.
Men are invited and refreshments
will be served.
Boca Raton Aviva Chapter of
Hadassah will host its annual
education day at Florida Atlantic
University on Jan. 28. Tickets
must be obtained in advance as
admission is limited. There will
be a "paid-up" members brunch,
Jan. 29, at noon, at B'nai Torah
Congregation. A skit will be per-
formed entitled, "Women of the
Liberation." Reservations are
required and must be in by Jan.
26. On Sunday, Feb. 1, at noon,
there will be an "Unlimited
Champagne Brunch" at the Burt
Reynolds Dinner Theatre. The
cost is $24 per person, and the
show will be "The Odd Couple."
Car pools will be formed. For
reservations, call Mrs. Ed
Kanners, Mrs. Philip Israel or
Mrs. Louis Forman. Feb. 10, 6:30
p.m., "A Fun Evening at
Pompano Race Track." There
will be a full dinner and reserved
seating. For reservations and
information call Mrs. Ed Kan-
ners, Mrs. Arthur Abramson or
Mrs. Philip Israel.
SOUTH FLORIDA
JEWISH CIVIL
SERVICE EMPLOYEES
Sid Irvine, president of the
Scjuth Florida Jewish Civil Ser-
vice Employees, a Chapter of the
National Jewish Civil Service
Employees. Inc.. invites all
^>\ ernment or public service em-
ployees of the Jewish Faith, who
are presently employed or retired
with any Federal. State. County.
City or Municipal Agency, to the
monthly meeting of the Chapter
on Sunday. Feb. 1, at 2 p.m. at
(he Wright Watchers
Auditorium in the Gun Club
Shopping Center on Military
Trail at Gun Club Road (between
Summit and Southern Blvd.I,
West I'alm Beach. The guest
speaker at this meeting will be
the renowned Professor Martin
Syclen. a prominent world
traveler and lecturer, who will
show slides and speak on Jewish
Communities throughout the
world. It will be an informative
and enlightening meeting.
TEMPLE BETH EL
The Sisterhood of Temple Beth
El of Boca Raton will hold their
Annual Gala Candlelight
Luncheon in the Boca Raton
Hotel and Club Cathedral Room
on Feb. 5 at noon. Preceding the
luncheon, a wine and hors
d oeuvres reception will be held in
the Clister Loggia Room. Enter-
tainment will be provided by the
"Winged Victory" professional
musical group, widely known for
their variety of music and
comedy. For additional in-
formation, call Pearl Jaffe or
Her nice Schankerman, co-chair-
persons for the affair.
TEMPLE EMETH
Sisterhood of Temple Emeth,
Delray Beach, is holding its
February general meeting on
Thursday. Feb. 5, at noon. Kay
Moran will narrate a fabulous
fashion show, with clothes from
leading shops in Delray Beach.
Boca Raton and Boynton Beach.
Don't miss this function. Mem-
bers and guests are welcome.
Refreshments will be served. For
further information, call Rita
Lewitas or the Temple office.
Sisterhood annual Winter
luncheon and card party will be
held Thursday. Jan. 29. at noon.
Members and guests are
welcome. A $4 donation is
requested. Join us for an enjoy-
able afternoon. Get your tickets
early. For further information
call Betty Binik, Adeline Kamen
or the Temple office.
TEMPLE SINAI
Many milestones will be
celebrated after prayers, Friday,
Jan. 30, 8:15 p.m. by congre-
gants of Temple Sinai who meet
each Sabbath evening at St.
Pauls Episcopal Church, 188 S.
Swinton Avenue. Sponsors of the
Oneg Shabbat will be Mr. and
Mrs. Krass Kestin. in honor of
their 38th wedding anniversary;
Mr. and Mrs. David Sherman, in
honor of their first wedding
anniversary; Mr. and Mrs.
Franklin Wise, in honor of their
27th wedding anniversary, and
also in honor of the affiancements
of their son, Howard, and also
their daughter, Karen.
At the service Rabbi Samuel
Silver will bless the celebrants
Aiding the Rabbi in the conduct
dj the service will be Cantor
Hetty Robbins. the Temple choir,
led by Mrs. Silver. Philip Sobel
will bless the Torah and Bernard
Zeldin will lead in the chanting of
the Kiddush.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
Women's American ORT. Del-
ias Chapter, is sponsoring a
"Sunday matinee, 2 p.m., at
I'alm Beach Junior College. The
show will be "Arsenic and Old
Lace." Cost is S4 a person. For
further information, call Ann
Low inger or Sylvia Schwartz.
Palm Beach County Region of
Women's American ORT is
sponsoring a handicrafts and
cake sale which will be held out-
side the Coral Gables Federal
Bank, Sandalfoot Cove, on Tues-
day. Feb. 3,10:30 a.m.
WOMEN'S
AMERICAN ORT
The Palm Beach Region of
WOmen's American ORT will
hold a Mid-Year Growth Con-
ference on Wednesday. Jan. 28,
at 9:30 a.m. at the Royal Palm
Beach Civic Center. Royal Palm
Beach. Representatives from
Boca Raton. Delray Beach and
Highland Beach chapters will be
present.
There will be a special premier
showing of the French film, "The
Link and the Chain." Members
will bring a Brown Bag lunch and
dessert and coffee will be served.
7
An Easy Way to Decorate Your Home and Office
Temple Beth David Sisterhood
invites you to an
ART AUCTION
Holiday Inn at PGA Blvd. in Palm Beach Gardens
* Saturday, Feb. 7
Preview and Refreshments 7:30p.m.
Auction 8:30 p.m.
Donation $2.50
PUBLIC INVITED
Auctioneer: Gary Sher from Art America/N. Miami Beach
First time in our area
For informatio ncall 8454841 or 626.3564
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- January
23, 1961
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page)
Pacesetters Luncheon
iCo-Chairpersons Named
ItKarpen
Sidney Pearce
Morris W. Morris
Morris, Pearce, Karpen Named
Campaign General Chairman
Hilton Kretsky, Co-chairman
U the 1981 Federation-UJA
[ipilv and men's campaign
Lpounces the appointment of
fcrris W. Morris as General
(birman for the Palm Greena
Division and Sidney Pearce as
Clurman of Palm Green Condo I
I action and Ben Karpen as
Qairman of the Condo II sec-
I OB
Morris was active in the
I Jewish community of Long
(hand. He was Vice President of
I Congregation Beth Shalom and
|ij.,i Ii'.kIii hi Ixith I'.IA and
[krllliinililino "
Pearce retired to Delray Beach
I (ran Washington, DC. where he
w affiliated with the Bulova
I UjuIi (tMiipiiMv He ix active in
Temple Sinai of Delray Beach
d is a member of the Building
: FndCommittee.
Karpen is a retired furniture
I manufacturer from Great Hills,
* York. Be was active in the
Sutton Place Synagogue in New
York Citv where he was Vice
President of the Men's Club. He
is presently active in Temple
Emeth of Delray Beach.
The campaign officially began
at. the January 18 breakfast
where the committee formulated
plans for the drive.
Morris commented, "it is our
intention to have a UJA solicitor
contact each and every Jew in
Palm Greens so that we may all
have the opportunity to stand up
and be counted for Jewish
survival. The key to a successful
campaign is complete coverage."
Continued from Page 1
mysterious figure, known to his
co-workers as "John the Priest."
He served for seven months as a
leader of the ill-fated vessel and
his most celebrated exploit
remains his participation in the
"Battle of the Exodus." The
Exodus affair and the evidence
preseted concerning it became a
focal point for the UN recom-
mending partition of Palestine
and the eventual establishment
of the State of Israel.
Rev. Grauel has been the recip-
ient of many awards. Fighter for
Israel Medal, with two combat
ribbons; Humanity Medal,
shared with Pope Paul; Victory
Medal and Medal of Jerusalem as
a founder of the State; B'nai
H'nth Humanitarian Award,
and many additional honors from
Hadassah, National Council of
Jewish Women, and many
others.
Members of the Pacesetters
Committee are : Arlette Baker,
Dorothy Brand, Mary Brumer,
Penny Byrnes, Lee Cogan. Phylis
Cohen, Sherry Endelson,
Dorothy Fleegler. Ruth Gold-
man, Jane Gortz, Emmy
Kalmanoff, Mary Jane Kaufman,
Dr. Goldie Kaback, Beverlee
Levie, J.P. Listick, Beatrice
Meltzer. Rhea Moss, Anne
Paskin, Marion Richman,
Florence Riesberg, Marcia Roff,
Betty Rothfeld, Ann Stossberg,
and Grace Taubman.
The law firm of
Lesser, Lesser & Daniels, PA.
is pleased to announce that
The Honorable C. Michael Shalloway
of the Palm Beach County Court
will join the firm January 1,1981
The name of the firm will be
Lesser, Daniels and Shalloway, PA.
Joe H. Lesser will continue of Counsel
MM North Dixie Highway
Wast Palm Beach, Florida
665-2028
Mon., Jan. 26
Tues., March S
1
;Mon., March 23
"From sriteti to Stag* Door
Featuring jack Gottlieb.
Leonard Bernstein's assistant at the
New York Philharmonic from 1958 to 1966
Moshe Shwr Trio
Moshe Shu r is a singer of Hassidlc.
popular Hebrew, Yiddish and
American music
GloraPeldmanTrto-
Jewlsh soul music
when ha plays music of Jewish foikiaristic
background, I think that he stands without
peer today." zubln Mehta, conductor of
g
% the New York Philharmonic
^Tickets on a first come first serve basis
south county Jewish Federation
g 368-2737
"Wfe've discovered
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'


Psge4
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, January
23,!
FREOSHOCHET
Edi(o and PuMttftar
JewishFloridian
:;>WTO;::::m::;::^W:::Wx*KW^%38BW8Wl
s#m
SUZANNE SHOCHET
MILTON KRETSKY
Eiacutiva Edno> News Coordinator
- Saooftd Ctaaa oataga PaM at Boca Raton. Ra. USFS SUMS)
BOCA RATON OFFICE. 3200 N Fadaral Mwy Boca Ralon. Fla. 3*431 Kona SBt-2001
Mam Offtca a nant: 120 N.E *Ml ft. Miami. Fla. 33101 Phona 1-373-4B05
nlauilir Fata ant nfraa m> Jawajk WiUBJm. .0. Baa Slam, mu. Fla. ai1
Combinod Jaaaah Appaai Sooin County Jaman Fadaratton, Inc.. Otttcara: PraaMam. Jamaa B
Baar. Vica PraalOanla Norman I Slona. Milton Krotaky. Shinay Enaafearg. Sacratary. Phyiin
Cohan, Traaaurar. Donald Baron Eiacutiva Olraclor, flaobl Bruca S Warahal.
Jawialt Floridian doas no! guarantaa Kaahruth ol MarcnanOiaa Advaniaad
SUBSCRIPTION RATES. Local Araa W SO Annual (2 Yaar Minimum S7fc or by mambarantp Soutn
County Jaw'an FaOaration. 3200 N. Fadaral Mwy., Boca Raton. Fla. 33431 Pnona 392737 Out of
Town Upon Request
Friday, January 23, 1981
Volume 3
18SHEVAT5741
Number 2
Surprises in Store
The decision to advance the elections in Israel
from November to an earlier date has had surprising
effect in the general press. It does seem as if Prime
Minister Begin is a bone in everybody's throat and
that no one can wait for his descent from power.
This suggests that what is expected is a
radically different approach to Begins conducting of
the currently stalled peace negotiations with Egypt,
which everybody and his brother blames on the be-
leaguered Prime Minister.
We would like to remind those who can't wait for
Mr. Begin to leave that the Labor Party was from the
beginning unalterably opposed to the unconditional
ceding of the Sinai to Egypt which Mr. Begin was
responsible for doing.
Neither Prime Minister Begin nor Israel ever
receives even an iota of congratulation for this
gesture. What, in effect, is anticipated are more con-
cessions from Jerusalem once Mr. Begin goes. More
and more and more. There may well be surprises in
store for those with such expectations so that, by
contrast, in the end Mr. Begin may not seem that
"intransigent" at all.
Let there be no mistake. A change in power, let
us say the assumption to the premiership by the
Labor Party's Shimon Peres, will not mean a
radically different view toward the negotiations.
Clerics Sign on Line
For Reduced Israel Aid
WASHINGTON (JTA,_ A
Massachusetts-based group
called "Search for Justice and
Equality in Palestine" has urged
the United States to reduce its
aid to Israel until Israel
"recognizes the human rights of
the Palestinian people."
A petition supporting that de-
mand, signed by 400 clergymen
and other religious figures, also
called on the U.S. to negotiate
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization. "U.S.-PLO talks
will allow Washington to better
understand Palestinian aspira-
tions and will enable the U.S. to
act as a genuine mediator" in the
Arab-Israel dispute, the petition
stated. It also accused Israel of
violating Mima-p rights.
THE PETITION was con
demned by the Synagogue Coun-
cil ol America (SCA), the co-
ordinating agency for the
Conservative, Orthodox and
Reform rabbinic and'
congregational organizations, for
"hypocrisy and blatant lies." Thai
SCA statement, issued by Rabbi
Bernard Mandelbaum, SCA
executive vice president, noted
that among the signners of the
petition were Rev. Daniel
Berrigan and Rev. Jesse Jackson.
"These ministers-have often
made biased and unfounded
statements against Israel," the
SCA statement said. "Now,
however, they are joined by
others in accusing Israel of
violating human rights. In 'doing
this, they ignore a recent UN
eport which distinctly cites
Israel's observance of human.
rights, in marked contrast to the
autocracies of its surrounding
neighbors, Syria, Iran, Iraq and
Saudi Arabia."
In commenting on the peti-
tion's call for the U.S. to meet
with the PLO, the SCA said the
PLO "is a terrorist organization
whose leadership has embraced
and fought alongside with the
Ayatollan Khomeini in his anti-
American policies which defy
international law."
THE "Search for Justice"
petition, which was delivered to
President Carter, President-Elect
Reagan and the Israel Embassy
here, also condemned Israeli
settlements on the West Bank as
a "major violation" of interna-
tional law and urged the Israeli
and American governments "to
recognize the right to self-
determination, including an
independent state in the West
Bank and Gaza if they so
decide."
IN ADDITION to Berrigan.
who was a prominent Catholic
anti-Vietnam war activist, and
Jackson, founder of Operation
PUSH, others who signed the
petition included: William
Wipfler. director of the office of
human rights for the National
Council of Churches; Philip
Saliba, Metropolitan of the
Antiochian Orthodox Church;
Philip Berrigan, a prominent
Catholic anti-Vietnam war ac-
tivist; Bishop James Mathews of
Washington, of the United
Methodist Church; and five other
United Methodist Church
bishops.
Six Illusions About
The Middle East
By JEROME H. BAKST
In the United States and other
Free World countries today
crucial foreign policy decisions
are all too often made on the
basis of illusions about the
Middle East. In Washington, for
example, such illusions are
passed along, through
statements and briefings by the
White House and State
Department, to correspondents
and commentators as well as to
influential members of the
American foreign policy
"establishment" and other
opinion-molders. As a result,
many glib and superficial cliches
divorced from realities in the
Middle East have reached the
public and have been repeated so
often that they ahve become the
"conventional wisdom" about
the area.
Since the Carter Ad-
ministration took office in 1977,
six principal illusions have come
to the fore and enjoy widespread
acceptance in Western Europe
and Japan as well as in the
United States.
ILLUSION NO.l
That the issue of the Arab Pal-
estinians is the core of the Arab-
Israeli conflict and the whole
Middle East problem.
The heart of the problem is the
refusal of every Arab state except
Egypt to recognize Israel as a
legitimate sovereign Jewish
state, to accept its presence in the
Middle East, and to end three
decades of warfare aimed at its
destruction. None of the so-called
"moderate" Arab regimes, such
as Jordan, Kuwait or Saudi
Arabia, let alone radical Moscow-
oriented regimes such as Syria,
Iraq or Libya, will even sit with
the Israelis to talk peace
Indeed, moderate and radical
Arab states alike have united
with the Palestine Liberation
Organization to sabotage Camp
David and to undermine the
Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty
that followed. The Arab states,
moreover, support the PLO
terrorists politically,
diplomatically and financially,
and continually press the UN to
adopt resolutions and take ac-
tions aimed at delegitima tiring
Israel, itself a member of the
world organization. Arab in-
transigence is, in short, the curx
of the conflict.
ILLUSION NO. 2
That the PLO has changed or
is changing toward "moderation"
by abandoning its commitment
to the elimination of Israel
through "armed struggle" and
terrorism.
The PLO has not changed. To
the PLO the "liberation" of
"Palestine" continues to mean
the elimination of israel as an in-
dependent Jewish state. This
strategic goal ia written into the
Palestinian National Covenant,
the PLO's basic charter, and has
repeatedly bean reaffirmed in its
official resolutions.
Al Fatah, the dominant wing
within the PLO. headed by
Yasir Arafat, who also serves as
PLO chairman, has often been
erroneously described aa
moderate." Last May, at
Patah's Congress in Damascus,
500 delegates adopted a political
program that reaffirmed its own
commitment and that of the PLO
to the destruction of Israel,
declaring:
Fatah is an independent
national revolutionary movement
(whose aim is to liberate Palestine
completely and to liquidate the
Zionist entity, politically,
economically, militarily,
culturally and ideologically. It
also aims at establishing a Pal-
estinian democratic state on all
the Palestinian soil, where all
citizens wul have equal rights
without discrimination on the
basis of race or creed, and whose
capital will be Jerusalem ...
The only way to achieve our
aim is through the armed popular
revolution. The armed revolution
of the Palestinian Arab people is
a decisive factor in the battle of
liberation and the liquidation of
the Zionist presence. This
struggle will not stop until the
Zionist entity is liquidated and
Palestine is liberated. (Emphasis
added.)
The declaration from
Damascus also called for
"strengthening the strategic
alliance with the socialist
countries, led by the USSR" and
asserted that "this alliance is
necessary in order to effectively
block American-Zionist plots
against Palestine and world
liberation." While reaffirming its
alliance with the Kremlin, Fatah
also made clear its hostility to the
United States. It declared that
"the USA is the leader of the
enemies of our people and
nation" and that America
"makes military alliances
designed to subjugate the region
militarily" and "to despoil our
national treasures."
CHANGING PLO
TACTICS
In the pursuit of its goal the
liquidation of Israel the PLO
has changed tactics from time to
time. Its proclaimed readiness in
recent years to accept a state in
the West Bank and in Gaza, set
forth in the PLO'S "Ten Point
Transitional Program of 1974,
was one such tactical shift. It
provoked disagreement inside the
organization itself. But the
argument was over tactics
whether to seek the goal of
eliminating Israel all at once, or
by stages, with a West Bank-
Gaza state one such stage.
The illusions prevalent in
Western Europe with respect to
the PLO and the Middle East
were underscored a month later.
On June 13, in Venice, member
nations of the European
Economic Community issued a
so-called Middle East
"initiative" that called for a
"comprehensive" peace solution
to the Arab-Israeli conflict
code language for a repudiation
of the Camp David accords and
the peace treaty.
Despite Patah's reaffirmation,
10 days earlier, of its com-
mitment to "armed struggle" to
wipe Israel off the map and its
rejection of "all forms of set-
tlement," the EEC declared that
the PLO would have to be
"associated with" the
negotiations for Arab-Israeli
peace. Although asserting the
principle of "the right to
existence and security of all the
states in the region, itwhafiiyig
Israel," the nine Western Eu-
ropean nations did not demand
that the PLO end its terrorism
against Israel or abandon its
resolve to liquidate the Jewish
state. Instead, their declaration
echoed Arab demands for an end
to Israel's "territorial oc-
cupation" of the West Bank and
the Gaza Strip and went out of it*
way to raise the issue of the
future status of Jerusalem.
Earlier, the Europeans had
seriously considered an effort to
appease the Arabs and the PLO
by revising UN Security Council
Resolution 242 the foundation
for all peacemaking efforts in the
Arab-Israeli conflict. Spear-
heading the European plan to
revise Resolution 242 was Lord
Carrington, the British Foreign
Secretary, who, as late aa April.
1980, stated publicly that he was
"not aware" of any PLO plan to
destroy Israel. Ultimately, the
Europeans abandoned their
scheme in the face of a threatened
U.S. veto in the UN, continued
opposition by President
and the PLO's renewed
mutation to rely on violence"
"armed struggle" to eradi.
Israel
The air of unreality and
iciam that suffused Euro,
<^beratins prior to Venicei
the EEC statement uself wa
further dramatized by the fa
that the European declarati
had been rejected by Arafat eve
before it was issued. Arafat
said publicly that the Arab 1
estinians needed no sucj
"initiative" from the Europea
and that their destiny would
determined by "the gun of
Palestinian revolutionary
ILLUSION NO. 3
That an Arab Palestii
state, "homeland," or "entity"!
comprising the West Bank and
Gaza, presumably controlled by
the PLO, will bring about peacA
between the Arabs and Israel.
As a declared ally of the Sovie
Union, and heavily armed with!
Soviet weaponry, the PL0|
coordinates its political posturel
with the Kremlin, serving as a j
key cutting edge for Russina
penetration of the Middle East. I
It is worth noting that PLOI
chairman Arafat has made 14
publicly-reported trips to
Moscow 11 of them since the
1973 Yom Kippur War. He has
also journeyed to other capitals
of the Soviet bloc's Warsaw Pact
nations as well as to Middle
Eastern cities to confer with
Soviet representatives. By 1977,
a full-fledged alliance had |
emerged.
A PLO state alongside Israel i
and Jordan, both of which the
PLO is sworn to destroy, would
be an anti-American puppet in
the heart of the region,
aggravating the Arab-Israeli
conflict, increasing Soviet in-
fluence in the Middle East, and
threatening the security of Israel.
Yet Israel is a major strategic
asset of the U.S. in the crucial
Middle East and. with Egypt,
provides America with two
reliable friends and a solid
foundation for countering the
Soviet danger there
The Arab-Israeli conflict and
the Arab Palestinians, moreover,
nrv only two of many facUirs.
causing instability in the Middle
East. Other destabilizing forces,
aside from increasing Soviet
pentration, include the upsurge
of Moslem fundamentalism in
Iran and elsewhere; power
struggles inside Syria, Iraq and
Iran; feuds between various
Islamic states, such as Iraq
versus Iran, or Syria versus Iraq;
the shaky internal stability of oil-
rich Saudi Arabia; snd the ac-
tivities of unpredictable leaden
such as Libyan dictator
Muammar Qaddafi.
ILLUSION NO. 4
That am Arab Palestinian
state, "entity or "homeland
the West Bank and Gaza,
presumably controlled by tkt
PLO, will assure a steady flow of
Arab oil to the US and to the
West, perhaps even at lower
price*.
The o* production polkaej
the Arab states are a*"*"3
OTinw>*r and technologies'
factors and nre baaed on ArsD
self-interest. The Organization ol
Arab Petroleum Exporting
Countries (OAPEC). carW
within the larger OPEC. J-J
tions to keep prices up by holding
production down. This enaDW
these states to increase revenue"
substantially while keeping
vital resource in the groona
where it increases in worth *
time passes.
ARAB SELF-INTEREST
Despite repeated Arab threat*
and Western fears, the economic
Continued on Page9_


-January-^
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 5
il K-.V .'>., U<\. ;
HtW/?/ies / Defray North
Capucci Behind EEC 'Peace' Plan UJA-Federation Campaign
Urion (apucx. the
"' r Patriarch of the
Jen, Orthodox (Greek
Jtholid Church in East
tSm ami the West
Kwho served a term in
|t Israeli jail for smuggling
^Lponsto Palestinian ter-
[Js.was the main archi-
fof'the European Eco-
Dic Community's (EEC)
fpeace formula for Jeru-
L according to the
jianweekly. Panorama.
ICipucci. a member of the
jfcjtino Liberation Organiza-
,'s National Council, was re-
ted for the task by Msgr.
_rftmo Casaroli. the Vatican
[foreign Minister.'" who headed
^uamthat drafted the EEC's
jgiBslem proposals. Panorama
U Thev comprise one of the
chapters in the 30-page
tplan for the Middle East
grated in the EEC Heads
(State Venice Declaration of
lldJune.
J THE CONTENTS of the docu-
Bmts are still secret Panorama
|iimed that the Jerusalem
iiptfr contain- three suggested
Lhtions for Jerusalem. They
He. according to the magazine.
h return to the pre-1967
nation."' "a new plan for
liwlini! '-he en v under a ioint
Hilarion Capucci
Arab-Israeli administration,"
"extraterritoriality for the Holy
Places,"' similar to that of certain
Vatican basilicas outside the
Vatican walls in Rome.
Panorama said of the latter
that "in this manner, Jerusalem
would have a religious adminis-
tration and this, for the Vatican,
would be the best choice."
Israeli security forces arrested
Capucci on Aug. 18. 1974. on sus-
picion of aiding members of El
Fatah. He was accused of acting
as a liaison for the Fatah com
mand in Lebanon and of bringing
weapons and sabotage materials
from Lebanon to terrorists on the
West Bank.
CAPUCCI was sentenced on
Dec. 9, 1974, by a Jerusalem Dis-
.rict Court to a total of 59 years'
imprisonment on six counts of
smuggling arms to terrorists in
Israel-occupied territory, having
contacts with terrorist agents,
and serving illegal organizations.
He was to have served a maxi-
mum of 12 years as the six sen-
tences, pronounced by Judge
Miriam Hen Porat. were con-
current.
Capucci riid not honor that
promitt. In January, 1979.
\pptand at the PLO's
National Council Confirmee
in Dednatcus, to the acute
emba i ,,t tht Vati-
can The Holy .SV.
statement ut the inn. ,
plaining that Capucci, u Ac
had been aiaignad to pa*
toral duties in Latin Amer-
ica, 'mud, the inp toDamam-
i us mi his own initiatU .
without the authorization of
the Holy See and without
g prei iously informing
the Hiil\- See.'
The Pines of Delray North,
1981 UJA-Federation campaign
was inaugurated recently at a
gala cocktail party hosted by the
committee at the horde of Emma"
Hittman.
Habbi Bruce Warshal. South
County Jewish Federation
Executive Director spoke to a
standing room crowd who
responded generously and comit-
ted themselves to an extensive
door-to-door campaign.
The day was chaired by Esther
> r-j
Omansky and Sid Gerbefy Co-
chairpeople. for the- Pihee- Narth
jrive. Both indicated great satis-
action at what they termed an .
luspicious beginning.
Members of the committee are
mma Bittman, Harold and
\rlene Kantor, Sidney and Joan-
na Gerber. Percy and Pauline '
Greenberg, Abraham and Betty
Levy, Albert and Esther
Omansky, Charles and Lillian
Ostrow, Walter.ajid.Trudj .Rpths; .
* child and Beeno and Lillian Wez- <"
stein.
Capucci did not honor that
promise. In January, 1979. he
appeared at the PLO's National
Council Conference in Damascus,
to the acute embarrassment of
the Vatican. The Holy See issued
a statement at the time ex-
plaining that Capucci, who had
been assigned to pastoral duties
in Latin America, "made the trip
to Damascus on his own initi-
ative, without the authorization
of the Holy See and without
having previously informed the
Holy See."
Kings Lodge 2965 of BB
1981 Operation Book
Kings Ix>dge 2965 B'nai B'rith
of Delray Beach announces the
beginning of its 1981 Operation
Book Distribution. Operation
Book Distribution was started in
1979 under the then Community
Affairs Chairman Lewis Peck.
The Lodge collected over 1.000
books which were distributed to"
the various hospitals and nursing
homes in Delray Beach, Boynton
i and Boca Raton. The Ixxige was
cited with an award by the State *
Council for this project.
I
j
The 1980-81 chairman for this
project is Sam Appel, and in 1980
over 900 books were collected and
distributed, and he hopes we may
go over the top in 1981.
Anyone wishing to give books,
please contact Sam Appel or
Lewis Peck.
Committee members of the Aberdeen Arms, Dalton Place, 1981 Federation- UJA campaign at a
recent cocktail party at which Mrs. Andre Lefkovitz spoke. From, right to left: Dr Harry H.
Weiss, Leon Allen, Bill Riesberg, Dan Kadan, Elizabeth Kefkovitz, Mel Garber, Harry Potash.
II
V,v
v-- V , * V V
,/ovVV
> .o .yv v A V
V\v-
IfNMTUM ;#)JWm
^J
However, Capucci served only
.16 months of his sentence.. He
iviis released in 1977 through the
personal intervention of Pope
Jaul VI. The Vatican agreed at
the time to Israel's request that
I the cleric stay out of politics and
j never return to the Middle Fast.
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Pagefi J,
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday, Jmuary 23,
Federation'
Subsidized
Pilgrimage
To Israel
Continued from Page II
chaeological sites. The program
includes a great deal of hiking
and climbing under the super-
vision of expert guides.
Participants in the Israel Teen
Pilgrimage will have the op-
portunity to experience Gadna,
which is perhaps the most
unusual program of its kind for
high school students. The
program combines physical
activity' with lectures and
discussion groups that provide
an accurate understanding as to
the contribution made by Israeli
youth to their homeland. Every
attempt is made to give
American teen-agers insight into
the lives of their Israeli peers who
are learning the importance of
shouldering their responsibility
as citizens to the national
defense.
Five day8 are spent at a Gadna
encampment. Qualified Gadna
instructors will guide par-
ticipants through a rigorous
program of obstacle courses,
practical sports, fieldcraft, camp-
craft, and other skills that will
foster physical fitness and self-
reliance.
In short, Gadna is a school of
Israeli reality a school for the
pioneer spirit and for under-
standing Israel's special
problems.
The students will also visit
kibbutzim and moshavim in an
attempt to give them a greater
understanding of these agri-
cultural settlements, their
communal way of life and the
people who live and work there.
All students on the Israeli
Teen Pilgrimage will be required
to participate in an eight week
study program meeting once a
week in preparation for the trip.
Students will study Israeli
history and current events under
the direction of Rabbi Bruce
Warshal and guest lecturers and
rabbis.
Application forms for the
Israel Teen Pilgrimage can be
obtained at the South County
Jewish Federation offices, Suite
124 3200 N. Federal Highway,
Boca Raton. FL 33431.
Community Calendar
Jon. 23
Bnoi Torah Congregation 6:30 p.m. Congregation Shabbat
dinner "Jewish War Veteran*- 10 a.m. board meeting.
Jon. 24
South County Jewish Federation Annual dinner-dance p.m.
Jan. 25
Brandeis Women Boca 4 p.m. card party, art trip, amateur
theater Temple Emelh Brotherhood breakfast.
Jan. 26
ORT Boca East 12:30 p.m. board meeting South County
Jewish Federation Community Relations Council Play FAU
theater.
Jan. 27
Yiddish Culture Club Boca 7:30 p.m. meeting.
Jan.28
ORT Boca East p.m. Jai-Alai ORT Delray 12:30 p.m.
meeting Hadassah Aviva Education Day at FAU South
County Jewish Federation, Pacesetters Luncheon.
Jan. 29
Temple Emelh Sisterhood 9:30 a.m. board meeting Temple
Emeth Sisterhood 9:30 a.m. board meeting Temple Emeth
Sisterhood noon lunch and card party Hadassah Aviva -
paid-up membership luncheon
Feb. 1
South County Jewish Federation Boca Teeca $100 minimum
dmner-dance Temple Emeth Brotherhood concert 8 p.m. -
liana Vered.
Feb. 2
South County Jewish Community Day School 8 p.m. board
meeting B'nai B'rith Women Naomi 12:30 p.m. board
meeting Brandeis Women Boco -9:30 a.m. board meeting.
Feb. 3
Temple Emeth 7 p.m. board meeting B'nai B'rith Lodge Boca
Teeca 9:30 a.m. meeting Brandeis Women Boca 10:30
a.m. meeting Yiddish Culture Club Boca 7:30 p.m. meeting
ORT Bodel 7:30 p.m. board meeting.
Feb. 4
ORT Regional 9:30 a.m. meeting South County Jewish
Federation Pioneer Lunch invitations Hadassah Aviva 10
a.m. board meeting.
Feb. 5
Temple Beth El Brotherhood 8 p.m. board meeting Temple
Emelh Sisterhood noon meeting Pioneer Women Zipporah -
noon meeting.
Feb. 7
B'nai B'rith Lodge Boca Teeca 6:30 p.m. installation of of-
ficers.
Feb. 8
Temple Beth El Brotherhood 10 a.m. meeting South County
Jewish Federation Kretsky Cocktail Party.
Feb. 9
B'nai Torah Congregation 7:30 p.m. board meeting ORT -
Boca East 1 p.m. meeting Temple Emeth Singles noon
meeting Hadassah Ben Gurion theater party at Delray Movie.
Feb. 10
Jewish Current Events Club 2 p.m. meeting Temple Emeth
Brotherhood 7:30 p.m. meeting Yiddish Culture Club Boco
7:30 p.m. meeting Pioneer Women Beersheba 12:30 d m
meeting Temple Emeth Sisterhood West Coast Trip.
Feb. 11
Keynoters luncheon South County Jewish Federation Temple
Emeth Sisterhood West Coast Trip ORT Boca East Joi Lai.
p.m.
Feb.12
Brandeis Women Boca 1
Gurion 10 a.m. board meeting temple Beth El Sisterhood
board meeting Temple Emeth Sisterhood West Coast Tri
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1 p.m. meeting Hadassah Ben
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Jewish War Veterans 10 a.m. meeting Pioneer Wome
Beersheba 1 2:30 p. m. board meeting
Feb. 14
Boca Teeca Dinner Dance South County Jewish Federation
Feb.15
Temple Emeth Bazaar (all day)
Feb. 16
B'nai B'rith Women Naomi 12:30 meeting B'nai B'rith Women
Boca 10:30 a.m. board meeting
Feb.17
Jewish Current Events Club 2:30 p.m. meeting Hadassah
Boca AAariv 2 p.m. meeting Yiddish Culture Club Boca 7:30
p. m. meeting ORT Bodel 7:30 p.m. meeting
Feb.II
ORT Regional 9:30 a.m. board meeting Temple Beth El -8
p.m. concert series Hadassah Aviva p.m. night at the races at
Pompano
Feb.19
Hadassah Ben Gurion 12:30 p.m. meeting Temple Beth El Sis-
lerhood meeting Boca Hotel Lunch Pioneer Women Zip-
porah 10 a.m. board meeting
Feb. 22
Temple Emelh Brotherhood Breakfast South County Jewish
Federation Leadership Development night workshop
Hadassah Ben Gurion Sunday Picnic
Feb. 23
ORT Boca East 12:30 board meeting Brandeis Women Boco
Museum Trip
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tt*rt
23,1981
The Jewish Floridian of South County

?
Page7
General Assembly Ends Session As It Began: Unnoticed

fyfl2HAKRABl
nNATIONS-
P*33y ended here
Ifloost the way it
oticed, if nl 'Knored
Lrest of the world was
Intention on the grow-
pluals within and ex-
Ejlirts between Mideast
"Especially the continu-
Ltween Iran and Iraq,
\jng tension between
d Syria and the holding
pnan hostages by
[lb UN was conducting
is usual: condemning
Raising it and reviling
iState.
I longtime contention,
[Arab-Israeli conflict is
[reason for instability
jst, was dramatically
Jby the Persian Gulf
Jtfe massing ol Syrian
|e Jordan's border. The
1 that a solution to
_ problem would
tee the Western world
of Arab oil.
j GENERAL Assembly,
tils oblivious in the real
in the Mideast and
Twith its yearly ritual of
}tali-Israeli resolutions,
id concentrating on how
|Uk Soviet occupation of
jn or how to end the
d bet ween Iran and Iraq.
Maembly which officially
pSept. 21. seemed at the
; to liode ill for Israel.
encouraged by the
Council resolution on
n. which resulted in the
lof all 13 foreign em-
|io Tel Aviv, and the
laergency session of the
kmbership
M House
Assembly earlier, which called for
total Israeli withdrawal from the
"occupied teritories," were
planning to force the suspension
of Israel from the 35th session of
the Assembly.
The Arabs were also de-
termined to do all in their power
to have the UN impose sanctions
on the Jewish State, instead of
merely passing vicious anti-
Israeli resolutions. But the tum
of events in the Mideast proved
that the Arabs and their allies,
despite their overwhelming
majority, do not operate in a
vacuum and cannot, therefore,
manipulate the international
community at all times.
ACCORDING TO diplomats
here, the Arab offensive against
Israel did not succeed during the
last Assembly, due mainly to
three factors: The Persian Gulf
war between two Moslem
countries, both outspoken
: ft*. 15
y.Feb. 15. H'nai Torah
Ption will host
kip Open House at the
5 1401 N\V 4th Ave.,
I* to 9:30 p.m. The
Twl begin with a formal
ion to acquaint the
community at-large with
l.Ppams and services
J>y the Conservative
'n of Boca Raton. All
m to come and meet
Whan Zelizer, Terri
^Wucation and Program
"* the lay leadership of
Ration.
it 197. B'nai Torah
lCrmlha?dfult0Ver
pCrim'l,eS- Rabbi
fc 1977 ^"Kregation in
Lm hey dedicated
Library. ln ,9?9 ^
B5t^aged the
f^tor
ser-
T?wKia
supporters of the Palestine
Liberation Organization: the
armed stand-off between Syria
and Jordan: and the Presidential
election in the United States.
"This General Assembly was a
very bad time to promote the
Palestinian cause," one diplomat
' here observed. "For one thing,
the prestige of the PLO has
reached a new nadir as a result of
the war between two Moslem
countries that have adopted the
Palestinian cause. For another,
the Arab world was divided then,
and still is, as it has not been for
a long time." In addition, the
diplomat said, the Arab states
were in a state of confusion
during the American election un-
certain as to who was going to be
America's next President and
what approach the new
Administration would pursue in
dealing with the Arab-Israeli
conflict.
YEHUDA BLUM, Israel's
Ambassador to the UN, pointed
to the decline of the PLO after
the Assembly voted 98-16 with 32
abstentions to establish a
Palestinian state in the West-
Bank. A similar resolution the
previous year had received
broader support with a vote of
11714 and 19 abstentions. Blum
recalled. He contented that this
showed an erosion in support for
the PLO even at the UN.
While anti-Israeli debates and
resolutions have been routine at
the UN so routine that very
few delegates bothered attending
the debates a new ugly
element surfaced during the
deliberations of the last
assembly: vitriolic, undisguised
anti-Semitic statements.
A case in point was the state-
ment by Jordan's Ambassador
Hazen Nuseibeh who in line
with the most notorious anti-
Semitic slurs charged that the
Jews control the wealth of the
world and from that position
manipulates the rest of
humanity. Blum, charging that
delegates to the UN "enjoy an
immunity to spread anti-Semitic
invectives with an openness and
in a way which will not be toler-
[ated in any decent society,"
accused the Jordanian diplomat
of uttering "nothing but out-and-
out anti-Semitism of the worst
and most virulent kind."
ALTHOUGH THE PLO and
its supporters did not succeed in
isolating Israel this time, or bring
about international pressure on
Israel to yield to their demands,
they added, however, to their
king-term goal of delegitimizing
the Jewish state, a new series of
anti-Israeli and anti-Zionist
resolutions contributing to their
goal of legitimizing Palestinian
nationalism.
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all Entenmann's



Page 8
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Fr>dy.JaauaiJ
Behold: he Shadchan
It's Easy to Meet Tour Natch
By JAMES LEWIN
Lonely? Bored with the usual
round of inhibited parties where
strangers sit in a circle mumbling
inoonsequentratty while drinking
soda ant)- munching pretzels?
Disguested with seedy cafes and
dubious discos where lecherous
louts wait to fall upon love-
hungry losers? Broken-hearted?
Desperate? Thinking. Heaven
forbid1, of the lonely years
stretching ahead?
Wait. There's still hope. Even
if you're a woman over 2b an
old maid by Israeli standards.
Bran if you're so bashful
aroand the opposite sex, you
male Woody Allen look like
Casynova. Even if you're so in-
experienced or have been out of
circulation so long that you can't
distinguish btween Elvis Presley
and Austin Healy.
Yes, you too can find romance.
Confused as you may be, there's
probably someone out there just
as mixed up as you. And,
together, you could be a happily
married couple!
WITH A little help from the
horoscope, handwriting analysis
and intuition, finding the most
suitable mate is largely a matter
of technique, according to David
Gal, director of the Re'im
matrimonial service.
One of the oldest and most
well-established of the
professional matchmaking
services in Israel, He'im (com-
panions) has been serving the
public in this way for 18 years,
with an average of about seven
couples marrying out of their
offices every month.
"People are limited in whom
they can meet at work, at school,
or on the street," observed Gal.
I'hey can't find whatever they
may lie seeking. When they come
here, they can tell me whatever
requirements they may have in
terms of age. education, back-
ground, special interests,
physical beauty and financial
circumstances. Basically. in
terms of meeting someone for the
purpose of marriage, we can find
whatever people wish."
DOES THIS mean he can tin,
a partm r for anybody? No! quite,
conceded the handsome, athletic
looking Gal. He told the storj o
a widower with lour children whl
sought a woman without children
who would agree l o help raise his
offspring and not have an) more
children ol her own I tried lor ,i
intl or two lo help him." -aid
Gal \fterwards. 1 returned hib
monej becau i there was nothing
1 COUlfl do in a case like that
H .nits pav tie equivalent
to iatsol
[jotential husbands and wives in
If oarrj under the
luspic the young
oupltj litional
20i) the initia ens'.; ol
married life, to be paid to the
matchmaker for services ren-
dered.
Bachelors or bachelorettes who
apply to Re'im must be physic-
ally healthy, with a good army
record, no problems with the
police and available for marriage
If he or she qualifies, a snap
shot is taken on the spot and the
individual in question is added to
the list of names of potential
mates.
IN A NUTSHELL, that is the
story behind the long list of
advertisements in the matrimon-
ial columns of the daily
newspapers Teacher-training
student (f) beautiful and gentle;
student (ml attractive sports
enthusiast: engineer, handsome,
broad horizons; divorcee,
beautiful, very wealthy; rich,
attractive widow; educated
bachelor, high quality, witty and
serious. They're all there, on file
waiting for their appropriate
counterparts to make a life to-
gether.
Yet. the question remains, how
can something so spontaneous
and unpredictable as romantic
love be "arranged" in the frame-
work of a modern office or
through advertisements in the
daily paper?
"That's our job." said Gal.
Recently, he recalled, a very tall,
handsome young man came to his
office. Gal introduced the pros-
pective groom to 15 of the most
l>eautiful possible brides in his
reservoir, and none of them
interested the applicant.
Finally. Gal showed him bb\
eral photographs Ol a \ante> 0
girls, and the young man picket
out the shortest and scemingh
homeliest girl with glasses, anc
iiad, "This is the type I'm look
ing for." and eventually, the tali
hoy married the short girl with
glasses and presumably lived
happily ever after-
ONLY ABOUT 20 percent of
the applicants to He'im do find
their mates through thematch-
making services, although many-
get married by other means,
noted Gal, Whether marriages work out in the long
run is not part of their statistics
All they do is make the marriage
possible.
The tradition of shad-
chanim, ( ul noted, was brought
by Jews from F.urope where the
matchmaker went from family to
family with a little notebook,
matching sons of one family with
daughters of another. While
modern professionals have taken
over this tradition in modern
offices furnished with leather up-
holstery and shag rugs, the older
style still endures in the religious
neighborhoods of Jerusalem
where Madame A. lives, through
narrow winding streets of decrept
but quaint stone buildings with
clinging vines and little balconies
and a synagogue or yeshiva or
both on every block.
Up two flights of a scrubbed
but indelibly scarred staircase in
a hallway which hasn't seen a
coat of paint for many years.
woman with a strictly tied
kerchief on her head, dress tight
at the neck and sleeves down to
the wrists, with a pale moon-face
and shrewd twinkling eyes in-
vites the guest to enter.
MADAME A. works only for
orthodox religious clients seeking
to fulfill the holy commandment
of marriage and family. It isn't
her sole means of support, but
she has been actively involved for
many years and has considerable
resources and contacts at her
fingertips. She charges much less
for her services than the offices in
Tel Aviv $10 for the "down
payment" until one finds a
suitable match and, after the
marriage, a price to be arranged
by agreement, somewhere in the
vicinity of $255.
MADAME A. works obviously
on a much more modest scale
than the large offices in the
center of Tel Aviv. However, she
and others like her probably do
account for a large percentage of
religious marriages, especially
helping people who can't find a
partner in any relaxed social
gatherings where the sexes may
meet, since such events are pre-
cluded by a strictly religious life-
style.
The marriage business seems
to be booming because new of-
fices are appearing and old ones
expanding (even if one well-
known matchmaker was accused
of cheating her clients and
another had been linked to a
brothel). One agent advertises.
"We have been at it for two
years, marrying lots of people."
Another boasts enticingly of
students, graduates, secre-
taries, pretty, beautiful and
shapely. A third claims virtu-
ally telepathic powers for their
leading lady of situations
ALL KINDS of lonely people,
to judge from the weekly matri-
monial advertisements in the
newspaper, teek salvation from
their solitude through match
La C ha made Restaurant Frances
3700 South Dixie Highway Cocktails
Wejt Palm Beach. Florida 33405
Owner Host
JACQUES GARRIGUE
(305)8324733
Open Monday lOSaturday
w5.:3C to 11 p.m. '
makers and private post office the Jews left F.gypi"
According to the Talmut. it is
as hard for the Creator to bring
couples together' as it was for
Him to part the Red Sea when
helps u> explain
many people who uei
waiting for a miracle -
matchmaker to get fixpH"
a match.
Palestine Terrorist Fingered]
For Hotel Bombing in Nairobi
LONDON (JTA) The terrorist respond
the fatal bombing of the Jewish-owned Norfolk HJ
Nairobi, Kenya, Dec. 31 was identified by Kenyanal
ities as 34-year-old Qaddura Mohammed Abe a I Ha]
Moroccan member of the Popular Front for the l.il)e
of Palestine.
A TIME BOMB exploded in the hotel durins
Year's Eve celebrations, killing 15 persons andinju
others, most of them foreign tourists. The gover.
news agency in Nairobi said in a statement that all
arrived there Dec. 23 using a Maltese passport and!
name and left Kenya for Saudi Arabia seven hours I
the bomb blast. According to the statement, he is a {1
member of El Fatah, the terrorist branch of the Paid
Liberation Organization.
You are invited to participate in
a National UJA Mission to Israel.
March 1st 10th
$950 per person all expenses included.
Deluxe accommodations meals included.
A family gift of $2,500 for a couple or $1,250 for a single pa
will be received of all participants.
SOUTH COUNTY JEWISH FEDERATION 368-273
% Advertising
% Information
| Call 588-1652
The Paf. to
share tne arm
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gfOUP At y^ Rothcnberfl Family of Motels,
your Holiday will be brightened by the sociable
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And because it is a Kothenberq Notel you arc assured
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Full packages start at only $559 per person < airfare
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__________


,23,1961
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 9
Six Illusions About The Middle East
dfromPg*
nd political
of key Arab oil-
;> I especially
7_ impose limits on
Jen go in reducing
" in withholding oil
flUer the Saudis
. "conservative ou
f^u Kuwait and the
jSEmirates, can risk
tam the economies of
Western Europe or
^m [hey care to invite a
Comic and financial
iidangemK bl,,l f
IL hive invested in the
Ihv ould "I80 let loose
world radical and
forces posing
* to these Arab
Blves than to the
J Saudi decision to in-
| production from 8.5 to
a barrels a day was
In a 'Fourth of July
t American people but
ected Saudi economic
self-interest: an
j brunt a mounting anti-
flKklaih in the U.S.
[from long lines at U.S.
ilions, a need to sell
t new and higher prices
[temporary Saudi cash
I,and the Saudi stake in
of the American
The decision also
the plain fact that,
the Saudis publicly
lor not, the U.S. remains
ratrong nation to which
turn for help and
against external
' from the Soviet Union
nist-controlied South
i the southern border of

! of Saudi oil fields
pother petroleum reserves
lian Gulf remains a
n of the United States
I Western allies; these
armot be allowed to fall
dly hands. A PLO
rab Palestinian state
it Bank and Gaza
t bring more oil to the
" i West but instead,
J the Soviet threat
i Gulf oil fields and
Middle East, would be
I to the interests of the
' States, the European
"Community and Japan
> the Saudis and the
Gulf states them-
IN0.5
Soviet Union must
Koshe
Tburs
[years]
CAPULCO
rERTO RICO
PRACAO
R^SPAIN
[JAMAICA
P> BEACH
^ASTEP;^
'. *
600
somehow be brought into the
Middle East peace process to
assure its success and to
"guarantee" an overall set-
tlement of the Arab-Israeli
conflict and continuing
"stability" in the area.
Underlying this illusion is the
assumption that the Soviet
Union shares the U.S. goal of
peace and stability in the Middle
East. Recent history shows,
however, that the Kremlin seeks
to foment turmoil and instability
in the area in order to increase its
own influence and maintain its
leverage with the radical states in
the Arab world and the PLO.
The Soviet takeover in Af-
ghanistan marked one step not
necessarily the last in a steady
Russian penetration of the
Middle East that began shortly
after the end of World War 11 and
that has been carried forward
relentlessly for the last 35 years.
Clearly, the Kremlin's target is
control of the Persian Gulf not
only to choke off U.S. and
Western access to the oil supplies
there, but quite probably to gain
them for itself and at the same
time to give the Soviets access to
more warm water ports on the
Arabian Sea and the Indian
Ocean, across sea lanes vital to
the West that are already
threatened.
To achieve these goals, the
Soviets have been clamping giant
pincers around the target Gulf
area through penetrations in
Africa Libya, Ethiopia,
Angola and Mozambique and
through influence in Iraq, Syria
and South Yemen. In Iran, where
Khomeini'a government is beset
by unrest, the Soviets have
troops poised on its northern and
eastern borders, and support an
active Communist (Tudeh)
Party.
The Soviet Union is part of the
Middle East problem not part
of the solution.
ILLUSION NO. 6
That an overall or "com-
prehensive" settlement of the
Arab-Israeli conflict is achievable
now or in the immediate future,
and that such a settlement must
be sought now.
A "comprehensive" settlement
of the conflict between Israel and
the Arab states is not achievable
now because, with the exception
of Egypt, there is not evidence
whatsoever that any other Arab
stale, let alone the PLO, is
prepured to end the 30-year Arab
war to destroy the Jewish state
anil negotiate peace with Israel.
The contention that a
"comprehensive" agreement is
possible now distorts reality. As
the New York Times pointed out
(September 9, 1979), the illusion
regarding the possibility of an
overall settlement rests on the
pursuit by the Carter Ad-
ministration of a "fantasy: a
magic moment when all the
issues can be herded into one
corral and 'settled' in an orgy of
compromise."
As the Times pointed out, the
Carter Administration's "dream
of a comprehensive settlement"
in 1977 "was upset by President
Sadat's journey to
Jerusalem...The brilliance of that
gesture...lay in Mr. Sadat's
rejection of the Grand Design, in
his recognition that the most
militant Arabs, backed by
Moscow, would always block a
package deal; settlement had to
be sliced into manageable
hunks.
SUMMARY AND
CONCLUSION
In the 1980'., the United
States, Japan and Western
Europe confront a growing threat
to their security and vital in-
terests posed by the massive
Soviet military and naval buildup
of the last decade and by the
deepening Soviet penetration of
the Middle East. It is certainly
no time for any illusions, let alone
the six listed above.
Camp Maccabee
Camp Maccabee is looking for Junior and
Senior counselors interested in working with
children ages 3-9 years within a Jewish at-
mosphere in Boca Raton.
Counselors should bring with them
various talents in sports, swimming, arts and
crafts, dance, music and Judaica studies. Ex-
perience helpful.
South County Jewish Federation
368-2737
HS9B
&m
YOUR
PARADISE?
COME
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On Mcnoo Island a short lOO miles from B the pressure of the Bast Coast Is getting
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Marco Island Fla 33937
TELEPHONE Bus..
Jtss


Page 10
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Friday. Jaouar
U.S. Turns Right-Will Israel Turn Left? Bori8 Bloch to A 1
HAIFA Rnnnlri RHl?lin's __a___a___aBaa___aBaaaBaBaHaaHmw rlihl hua fnr the Amorimn T*'II
On 'Sunday at Thred
At Temple Beth El
HAIFA Ronald Reagan's
broad foreign relations policy
won't be spelled out until after he
has taken over as President, and
the details of that policy will not
become clear until many months
thereafter. In the meantime, the
commentators and observers are
having a field day seeking to
anticipate the decisions which
will inevitably affect the destiny
of much of the world.
Israel had not been prepared
for a Reagan victory, and the
November election was followed
by much scurrying around
seeking to ascertain new channels
that might best lead to the White
House. Local brain trusts have
been busy analyzing how the
changes in Washington are going
to affect us here.
Theoretically, the conserva-
tive, nationalistic, right-wing
Republican administration in'
Washington should have much in
common with the conservative,
nationalistic, right-wing Likud
Government in Jerusalem. Every
indication, however, is that when
the next election takes place in
Israel some time in 1981, it will
bring back into power a Socialist
Labor government, the very anti-
thesis of the new Washington
administration.
OBVIOUSLY, attempts will
be made in both capitals to give
the appearance of harmony and ,
friendship, but the conflicts in
principles will be too deep to
plaster over easily. Indeed, this
aspect of U.S.-Israel relations
may even have an influence on
how some Israelis vote no less
than the degree to which the
votes of some Americans were in-
fluenced by the bi-national rela-
tions.
Reagan's expected new posture
of strength uis-a-vi.s the Soviet
Union should lead him to
strengthen American military
and naval bases overseas, and to
seek new bases wherever possible
in strategic corners of the world.
The Carter administration has
on its own initiative already
made a move in this direction,
without official proclamation, by
basing units of the American Air
Force in Egypt, andd providing
for joint exercises by the
Egyptian and American Air
Forces. Though Israel had
several times made clear its will-
ingness to entertain any proposal
for the establishment of a
military base here, there had been
no affirmative response. The
decision in favor of Egypt was
therefore especially disappoint-
ing to Jerusalem.
VISITS TO Haifa by units of
the Mediterranean Sixth Fleet
had given rise to hopes that
Israel's leading port could prove
a reliable base for the American
ships. In 1978, the aircraft carrier
Nimitz. and in 1980 the aircraft
carrier J. F. Kennedy visited
here, and a number of smaller
naval vessels in between. While
the sailors were enjoying shore
leaves, it is presumed that the
senior officers were appraising
with expert and professional eyes
all the logistic and military at-
tractions of the place.
The loss of Iran and the uncer-
tain political situation in Turkey
which calls into question the
reliability of existing American
bases there, make it all the more
important, therefore, that the
U.S. extend its pieds-a-terre in
the Eastern Mediterranean.
Israel Governments have on
more than one occasion made it
clear that they do not seek the
support or intervention of a
single foreign soldier in the
defense of Israel; that is the
function of the Israelis. But a
mutual understanding, if not an
actual spelled nut agreement for
joint defense of joint interests,
should be acceptable to both
sides.
In the shifting constellations of
Middle East politics, and the
strengthening of the Russian
position in Afghanistan and
Syria, Reagan and his advisers
might well have serious inten-
tions with respect to the role of
Haifa in the complex of Mediter-
ranean defenses. Coming months
may reveal the answer.
Arab MK Murdered In Jerusalem
JERUSALEM Sheikh
Hamad Abu Kubivu. a member of
Propose Means to Force
Soviet Compliance With
Human Rights Accords
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
OTTAWA (JTA) Mark
MacGuignan, Canada's Secre-
tary of State for External Affairs,
recommended to the government
several measures to pursue
Soviet compliance with human
rights accords in the aftermath of
the Helsinki review conference in
Madrid. MacGuignan also heard
a report from Irwin Cotler, presi-
dent of the Canadian Jewish
Congress, on the rapidly deteri-
orating situation of Jews in the
USSR.
Cotler, a professor of law at
McGill University, briefed the
minister on the Madrid con-
ference which he attended. He
noted that one-third of all Jewish
Prisoners of Conscience in the
Soviet Union have been con-
victed in the last six months
alone.
HE SAID that the arrest of
Soviet Jewish scientist and
activist Viktor Brailovsky, seen
in the context of the dramatic
drop in Jewish emigration from
the USSR and the intensification
of anti-Semitism, was profoundly .
disturbing. Cotler observed that
Brailovsky s arrest in particular
was "an ominous note, Brail-
ovsky being for the Soviet Jewry
movement what (Andrei)
Sakharov is to the dissident
movement."
Cotler expressed appreciation
for Canada's strong stand in
Madrid by Ambassador Louis
Rogers, particularly his out-
spoken condemnation of anti-
Semitism. MacGuignan replied
that "Canada regards Soviet
anti-Semitism as unacceptable
and has told the Soviets in
Madrid that all persecutions,
harassments and violations of
human rights must stop at once."
The Canadian minister has
recommended a post-Madrid con-
tinuing review of human rights
violations by an internationally
established committee of experts
to monitor compliance with the
Helsinki human rights agree-
ments. He also proposed to the
Soviets the establishment of a bi-
lateral round-table conference on
the implementation of human
rights.
Israel's Knesset and representing
the country's 42,000 Bedouin
eili/ens, wus gunned down
Monday night us he sat in his car
outside a Jerusalem hotel.
Abu Rubiya was known
throughout Israel as the man in
the traditional white flowing
Arab headdress, which made his
api>earunce on the floor of the
Knesset so unique.
ABU RABIYA's murder was
the first of a Knesset member in
Israel's history. He was a mem-
ber of the Opposition Labor
I'arty led by Shimon Peres, who
is currently challenging Prime
Minister Menachem Begin for his
job. He was one of six Arab
MK's.
I'olite have already^ ruled out
lhat the murder was "a terrorist
attack. Speculation is rife that he
hail liecn killed by Bedouins who,
according to Israel Radio, "were
displeased by u real estate deal
that he helped to bring about."
Abu Rabiyu gained renown for
organizing protests against land
acquisition policies in the desert
by the Israel government.
BUT ISRAEL Radio also
reputed that Abu Rabiya had
liecn engaged in a feud with
Sheikh Jabr Moadi, of the Druze
minority, over the seat that Abu
Kubiyu held.
Israel Radio said that Moadi
wus "deeply sorrowful" after a
court ruled against his claim on
the seat, but Moadi insists that
subsequently he and Abu Rabiya
hud made peace.
TELEPHONE SS4-M12
MEN'S CLUB
CONGREGATION ANSHEISHOLOM
SS4I Drove St, Century Village
Weet Palm Beech
Cordially invites you to a
Concert by
PAUL ZIM
World Renowned Concert Artist
Sunday, February 22,1961 at
8 p.m. sharp
ALL SEATS RESERVED
Donation: Sanctuary
SodelH.il S3

Boris Bloch, the young and
exciting Russian emigre pianist,
will appear at Temple Beth El on
Sunday at Three, February 8. He
is an established young pianist,
both in this country and in
Europe, as well aa in his native
USSR. Since winning the Young
Concert Artists Series at the
92nd Street "Y." he has per-
formed throughout the United
States. Mr. Bloch has appeared
as soloist with orchestras includ-
ing the Cleveland Orchestra
under Lorin Maazel and the New
Jersey, Indianapolis, Seattle, St.
Louis and Syracuse Symphonies,
and at the Spoleto-USA Festival.
Mr. Bloch's many honors
include First Prize in the 1978
Busoni International Piano
Competition in Italy, the Silver
Medal of the 1977 Arthur Rubin-
stein Piano Master Competition
in Israel, and top prizes in the
Piccola Scala Competition in
Italy, the Jaen Competition in
Spain and the All-Soviet Union
Competition in Moscow.
All Young Artists Subscribers
will have the opportunity to meet
and to talk with Mr. Bloch at the

Boris Bloch
reception in his honor]
diately following the
Everyone enjoyed the
ments and meeting the i
the first Young Artists |
in December.
Some subscriptions
available at the pro rata i
$15. Individual seats will I
for 18 at the door. For]
mation, call the Concert!
the Temple. 391-8600.
Sidney C. Cole, M.D., PA
Melvin D. Young, M.D.
Diplomat**. American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
announce the relocation of their office for
Orthopaedic and Hand Surgery
to
392-3670
Belle Terrs Professional Building
825 Meadows Road
Boca Raton, Fla. 33432
Dr. I. Goodman
Chiropractor
Boynton Plaza
t*3 N. Cony*** Avo. IN. W. 2nd Awe.)
Pmchsd Nrves Disc Problems
ArthrtoSc4atk-re*ur*gia
Phone 737-5591
Offlc# Mrs. Mon., Tum. Wssd., rrt.
SI? ?.
Thurs-a**
>12
MEDICARE, WORKMEN'S COMP.
AND MOST INSURANCES INCLUDE CHIROPRACTIC
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,jmuaf>
23. 1W1
/ tie Jewish Floridian of South County
Page 11
BE
*
Vtt,
^
/
*
_., famed stage and soreen star, gives a present to a sick child in the Children's
mint of the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem. The actress
guest of honor of the Hadassah Leadership Mission, 'In the Footsteps of Hen-
kSzold.' _____________
eadlines
[azi Victims Can File for Indemnity
(.uiiU'runn on Jewish Material Claims
Germany is announcing that Jewish
ol Na/.i persecution who were in no
lb lilc claims under German indemnifi-
ib- mi) apply for a j;rant from a Hard-
Fund established with German Federal
cm approprial inn-.
tunlinn in lln' Guideline! issued by the
nmenl. grants will he made to such
ftetsecutees who suffered damage to their
land are in straightened financial circum-
I Tin Guideline!) limit individual pay-
DM5.000pei person
DlanJship Kund i-- intended primarily to
mh Jewish victims of
hi inn wlid left Eastern Kurope after
| loi tiling claims under the
nuidiiiiniiu.ition laws expired.
Mijiiun maj !n made by writing to Con-
mi Jewish Material Claim \gainst
. Gruneburgwet? 119. 6()(K) Frankfurt.
W. ii" later than December .11. 1981,
ti"' It Rnthstein, a housing and urban
luuullanl, has Ixn-n appointed director of
Ntiuna housing for H'nai B'rith Intirna
. Dr. Daniel Thursz, executive vice presi-
"I the Jewish service organization an-
1 The appointmeat is effective this
inrithhas been s|M>nsoring non-sectarian
tilor thr elderly for 15 years and has 17
mt projects in operation or in various
p construction in the United States, plus
PCinadaand abroad. In November. B'nai
pie ground for projects in Boston and
ft* will serve .is the liaison between
'nil ami t!. i s Department of Housing
FM Development and other relevant
F one will also provide technical assist-
1 sponsors and managers of existing
rejects as well as to local B'nai B'rith
tag sponsorship.
L ,l,a ( "nference on Soviet Jewry is
** death, in Moscow, of 17-year-old
gfeksandr |Sasha) Landsman.
N "' the NCSJ Chairman Burton S.
ftol nwn fami'y applied for per-
lT*T l l8rael in 1977 ""* were
K "Lf "sta* security." In fact.
J*l. neit her Mr. nor Mrs. Landsman.
lrfcCrt'Tn,wr and computer pro
Iftt n& had acce8s to 9tate **.
faauiV SSH a" matters be'ong to the
Jjjy hing can be a secret'." The couple
eirn. im lhe,r Jbs- however, at the
pPPhcation.
,& WaS PWI in earlv 1980, and his parents
otto, I aulhorilies tp allow them to
It iVai| \7'r *>"> might receive advanced
*1! '" ,srael and the United
man> appeals were ignored.
Jj-andsman died on Dec 28
nukugy lias risen in recent years from 5 percent to
close- to 25 percent. This increase is a result of a
spi-iial compensatory education program estab-
lished at the Institute in 1964 for army veterans
[rum disadv antaged families who might otherwise
not meet the Techniona tough requirements.
The program is part of a nationwide project
under the .luspues ol the Ministry ol Education,
Israel's universities and the Israel Defense
Innes All coats are covered, and lied, board and
academic tuluning are provided as part ol the
program. Students take part in intensive classes
in mathematics, physics, chemistry, Fnglishand
Hebrew \i the completion of this preparatory
work, the> compete in the Technion's entrance
cxuins with all other candidates 80 percent of
them succeed in passing the admittance test, as
compared to 30to in percent ol other candidates.
The national United Jewish Appeal, in co-
operation with tin Morris J. Kaplun Foundation,
is sponsoring an essay contest for American uni-
versity students on the theme: "Toward Jewish
Survival in the 21s1 Century: New Visions and
Strategies.
The nationwide competition, open to any
undergraduate or graduate student in an ac-
credited institution 'of higher learning, is an-
nounced by Dr. Henry Feingold of the College of
(lie Cit) ol New York, chairman of the UJA Uni-
versity K.isay Contest Committee.
An all-expense paid trip to Israel will be
awarded to the authors of the eight winning
essavs The ten day trip in August will include
visits with Israeli leaders and tours of border
set i lenieiits. archaeological excavtl ions and other
event sol historical, social, and educational value.
Candidates may not Ih- older than 26 years of
age by August. 1961. Entries must be between
1 .MX) and 2.:M) words in length and must be post
marked no later than March 28. 1981. Contest
winners will be announced June 15. Address is:
UJA University Fssay Contest Committee, Crea-
tive and Educational Programs, United Jewish
Appeal. 1290 Avenue of the Americas, New York
10104.
"*nij

oTTtti!
Thomas S. Hurwitz has been named national
executive director of the American Associates of
Ik-n-Uurion University of the Negev. Announce-
ment of his appointment was made by president,
Aron Chilewich. of New York City.
Making his headquarters at the organization's
national offices in New York, Hurwitz has
assumed responsibility for administering fund-
raising and developmental activities for the uni-
versity throughout the United States.
Since its establishment in 1969. Ben-Gurion
University of the Negev has been the spearhead
of Israel's hopes for the development and settle-
ment of its desert, an area that encompasses 60
percent of all Israel's land, but is presently home
to only 10 percent of its people. BGU has spurred
the industrial, agricultural and social develop
wfcile bringing the epportunity
' its youth-, rnany of them
'It trrruirvia.._______A.__
Painted in Swastikas
Wiesenthal Center Given
Nazi Treatment
By RONALD SOLOMON
LOS ANGELES -
(JTA) The Simon
Wiesenthal Center for
Holocaust Studies here has
been defaced with spray-
painted swastikas and anti-
Semitic slogans some of
them written in German.
Officials at the Center,
which is located at the
Yeshiva University of Los
Angeles (YULA),
estimated that the van-
dalism took place between
midnight and 5 a.m. on the
morning of Jan. 7.
The outside walls of the
Center s Holocaust Museum were
daubed with slogans which read.
Death to the Jews." "Simon isa
Murderer." "National Socialist
White People's Party, Awake,"
Jews Beware. the SS is
Coming." a^id"Kill Jews."
PRESIDENT ELECT Reagan
sent a message to the Center
saying; "I am shocked at the
vandalism and the defacement.
The actions are an outrage to
Americans."
Mayor Tom Bradley reacted
w ith anger when he learned about
the vandalism, he delared that
"the city ol Los Angeles is proud
ol its multi-racial, multicultural
population, and we do not accept
the ugly and shameful attempts
ol the few sick vandals to fright
en. threaten or goad us into the
pit wibb them "
Gov. Edmund Brown Jr.
leaded similarly to the incident.
At the same time there was a
flood ol telephone calls to the
Center from Christian clerics
throughout Los Angeles offering
t heir help in cleaning the walls.
TWO CANS of spray paint
were found outside the building
by students as they prepared to
attend classes Police art seeking
the whereabout of two young
men who participated in a bizarre
incident at the Center the
previous Sunday, and may be
conn Tied with the vandalism.
Religious
Directory
TEMPLE BETH EL OF BOCA RATON.
333 SW Four! Avenue. Boca Raton,
Fla. 33432. Reform Phone: 391-900.
Rabbi Merle E. Singer. Cantor Martin
Rosen Sabbath Services, Friday at
8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9:15 am Torah
Study with Rabbi Merle E. Singer
10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Services
TEMPLE SINAI. At St. Pauls
Episcopal Church, 188 S. Swinton
Ave., Delray. Reform. Mailing
Address: P.O. Box 1901, Delray
Beach. Fla. 30444 Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Samuel Silver. President
Lawrence Sommers. 498-0797.
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA.
551 Brittany L. Kings Point,.Delray
Beach 33446 Orthodox Harry Silver
president Services daily 8 am and I
p.m. Saturdays and Holidays 9 am
Phone: 499 7407. Temple No 499 9229.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION 1401
NW 4th Ave Boca Raton, Fla. 33432
Phone 392 8564 Rabbi Nathan
Zehzer. Sabbath Services: Friday at
8 15p m.. Saturday at 9:30a.m.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY
HEBREW CONGREGATION 5780
West Atlantic Ave., Dtlray Beach,
53 33446 Phone 498 3536 Bernard
A Silver. Rabbi Benjamin B Adler.
Cantor. Sabbath Services. Friday at 8
p.rn Saturday at 9 a.m". Daily Mm
vans at 8:45 a m and 5 p.m. _____
ItMPLE BETH SHOLOM Mailing
Address P.O. Box 134. Boca Raton
33432. Located in Century Village.
Boca Services Fridays 5:30 p.m.,
Saturday 9 a.m. Nathan Weiner,
president 482 7207
SIS
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The Jewish Fhridian of South Cemnty
Philosopher-Priest

Brings
By J. A. LEWIN
1 ii 4 ellecttial Ferment to Job
" ^Ui?^ ***** *"* .._ of l8r8el and the Holy Bible
tne the status of Jerusalem.
Marcel Jacques Dubois,
the newly-appointed chair-
man of the Department of
Philosophy at the Hebrew
University, brings Chris-
tian Intellectual support to
Israel's struggle for under-
standing in the non-Jewish
world. With warm, genial
enthusiasm, the French
philosopher-priest and
PhD, emphasizes the
special relationship be-
tween the Jewish people
and the Land of Israel,
based on the eternal coven-
ant with the first Jew,
Abraham, giving this land
forever to the children of
Israel.
Perhaps only a serious student
of Scriptures can appreciate the
depth of this connection to the
Holy Land and its meaning for
Jews seeking their place in the
Divine plan, as recognized by
Christian theologians.
ALTHOUGH his first al
legiance is clearly to the Catholic
tradition into which he was born,
Father Dubois exemplifies the
readiness of many individual
Christians to reconsider the his-
torical relationship, so often
bitter and cruelly oppressive, be-
tween Christians and Jews, to
realize that both religions come
from one living source, and to
recognize that the modern State
of Israel, in fact, fulfills Biblical
prophecies of the return of the ine rus, v -.- h However, he emphasized, this
Exiles to their own land. status of Jerusalem Nearly m Howev j ^
rea and symbolic terms, the key doesn i g.' whatever
> ~. m* nasxtsesar SSJjSSB
Prof. Dubois was born in u-tween tne people and the
France in 1920. He received his
Christians to look at Judaism
from the perspective of Jewish
history and aspirations that Prof.
Dubois finds most hopeful in the
future of the Catholic Church"s
relationship with the State of
Israel. It is "singularly difficult
to appraise because of the
constant interplay of politics and
religion," he writes in a recent
issue of Christian News From
Israel.
He points with hope to the
creation in recent years of a
Vatican committee to meet with
Jewish leaders on an annual
basis. He also supports the report
of a committee of French bishops
which calls on Catholics to
"understand that the origin of
the conflict in the Middle East
lies in a conflict between two
justices. It hopes for peace in
Jerusalem as the augury of peace
for all men."
DUBOIS OFFERS diplomatic
explanations for why the Vatican
has not yet recognized the State
of Israel, but emhasizes that the
basic problem is theologically
accepting the "significance of the
covenantal bond between the
Jewish people and the Land as a
factor of Jewish identity one
which goes much deeper than
purely political Zionism."
Since 1974, Prof. Dubois points
out, the Vatican has altered its
earlier support for the "inter-
nationalization" of Jerusalem, to
making known its desire for
"international guarantees" for
_ in
Doctorate of Philosophy in 1961
from the Rome Angelicum. He
came to the Hebrew University
as a teaching Fellow in 1968 and
has been a lecturer in philosophy
there since 1971. Before agreeing
to an interview, he expressed his
reluctance to talk with journal-
ists because of the delicacy and
depth of the questions involved.
"It will take a great deal of time,
and we need to be very patient in
order to find the answers," he
said.
IN TERMS of the relationship
between Christians and Jews,
Prof. Dubois stated that it is
necessary "on the Christian side
to repair some mistakes of the
past, and for both sides to re-
discover the history of Salvation.
There has been too much em-
phasis in the past on dualistic
categories," he said, which do not
give enough weight to the
common origins and ultimate
goal of both religions.
Regarding the Vatican's policy
on Jerusalem, Father Dubois
stated that the current agree-
ment has been to keep the
situation open by remaining
silent on certain issues. "Many
people think only in terms of eco-
nomic considerations and don't
pay enough attention to the
philosophical issues" involved in
Middle East politics. It is neces-
sary for Christians, said Father
Dubois, to recognize the link con-
necting Jewish people, the Land
land in the past, they would now
be better able to give helpful
advice concerning the issue of the
rights of the Palestinian Arabs."
"ISRAEL IS a paradoxical
state," said the Dominical
scholar, "and although we are
forbidden by religion to speculate
on the future, for we have no
prophecy, we may need to be
purified and united by a common
trial, and obliged to return to the
meaning of history. Ultimately."
he contends, "it is the identity of
Jesus that
divides us.
"The key," I
link the Land
the People to|
this process
demption,
meaning of
not be clear I
hensible to anj
Dubois, and
upon to sust
called the i
While the
ments repre*
Nations seem]
struggle for
seemingly j
around the
support the ii
Jews to live aT
in their own
who hold up
the encroachij
be included tl
chairman of
partment
University.
???#??#
T
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A new day camp in Boca Raton]
an exciting Summer experience
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Varied activities include:
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Music
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Two four-week sessions
Preschool division 3 and i
School division children i
Mini bus pick-up to and fro
For information call
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368-2737
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