The Jewish Floridian of South County

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Portion of title:
Jewish Floridian
Uncontrolled:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
F.K. Shochet.
Place of Publication:
Boca Raton, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Boca Raton (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Palm Beach County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Palm Beach -- Boca Raton

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Dec. 14, 1979)-
General Note:
The Apr. 20, 1990 issue of The Jewish Floridian of South County is bound in and filmed with v. 20 of The Jewish Floridian of South Broward.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 44560186
lccn - sn 00229543
ocm44560186
System ID:
AA00014304:00005

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian


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Full Text
Ulewislti Florid fan
>e
Of South County
Serving Boca Raton, Delray Beach and Highland Beach
i2 Number 2
Boca Raton, Florida Friday, January 25,1960
CfndShochti
Price 35 Cents
romen 's Division Lunch Set
iHagus, Margaret Kottler
Jr'.leanor Rukin, co-
lons, announce that the
ers Luncheon of the
pounty Jewish Federation
Is Campaign will be held
Lday, Feb. 6, at the home
her Cohane. A minimum
J's Division gift of $500 is
feed.
_ Weissman Klein will be
lured speaker. Mrs. Klein
brn in Bielitz (Bielsko),
, where she lived with her
and brother at the time
lerman armies occupied
in 1939. She and her
were all sent to con-
lion camps.
(ierda's father told her
|r her ski boots to work
11 June, he would hardly
tat they would help in her
^te fight for survival.
I1DWINTER of 1945, as
ti empire began to crumble
the advancing Allied
the 4,000 women inmates
Gerda Klein
of her camp in Silesia were forced
to walk 1,000 miles eastward
toward Czechoslovakia by the
Gestapo.
When the march came to a halt
in a small village in that country,
there were fewer than 200 sur-
vivors. Gerda took the boots off
her frozen feet and extracted the
family photographs which she
had hidden in the soles. Every
member of her family, every
friend died in the concentration
camps.
Her first book, All But My
Life, has been hailed by critics in
the United States, England and
Holland as "one of the most
moving and beautifully written
books of Jewish suffering and
survival."
In its 18th printing, it is in the
British War Museum as a
reference work on European
history. Excerpts from her book
are now being used as part of
"Perspectives in Literature" in
the secondary schools
throughout the United States.
Members of the committee
working on the luncheon are:
Marian Altman, Marjorie Baer,
Mary Baskin, Pat Brown, Mary
Brumer, Penny Byrnes, Esther
Cohane, Ruth Goldman, Jane
Gortz, Jewel Paley, Barbara
Ratner, Florence Reisberg, Anne
Slossberg and Bernice Weiss.
os Angeles Study
STot All Jews are Rich;
[leligiotis Ties Weakening
By TOM TUGEND
kion Chronicle Syndicate
i ANGELES More than
lit of ten Ixjs Angeles Jews
irv glad that they were
|Jews, but few consider
i as the foundation of their
identification.
Contrary to stereotypes, most
Jews are not wealthy, are not
merchants but professionals, are
not politically radical and are not
clannish.
These conclusions are among
the initial findings of a two-year
study profiling the identities,
attitudes and behavior of Los
rench Helped Achieve
Nazi 'Final Solution9
By DAVID KANTOR
JONN (JTA) An expert on Nazi death
tinery told a Cologne court that no "final solution"
rrench Jewry would have been possible without the
boration of French institutions and public
aizations.
.PROP. WOLFGANG SCHEFFLER of the Free
Jersity of West Berlin, was testifying at the trial of
accused Nazi war criminals, Kurt Lischka, who was
of the Gestapo in Paris during World War II;
Bit Martin Hagen and Ernest Einrichsohn.
rcheffler stressed that his statement was meant
fer to clear nor to incriminate the defendants, but was
d on his research. He said the help given by French
tutions was indispensable to the Germans in their
ts to liquidate Jews. As an example, he noted that in
vave of arrests 2,500 French policemen took part.
[SCHEFFLER, who also testified for five hours, has
Ket said if he has information on whether the defen-
s knew what would be the final fate of the Jews they
to concentration camps. This may be the decisive
tion in the trial, which started last Oct. 23.
*ut Scheffler did testify that Lischka rejected a
estion by the German army in 1942 that the Jewish
[tes be released and that the Red Cross be given infor-
jon about their arrests.
THE AUDIENCE throughout the trial has been
Je up mainly of French Jews, some of them carrying
j>w placards reading Juif de France. Demonstrators
|ide the courtroom waved two Israeli flags.
Middle East
Dangerous
new-Dayan
Angeles Jewry, believed to be the
first of its kind in the United
States. With 472,000 members,
the Jewish community in the Los
Angeles metropolitan area is the
second largest in the world,
'ollowing New York City.
ON THE long-range future of
the Jewish community, the news
is both good and bad. On the
negative side, the birthrate is
going down, although the decline
has been offset by large-scale
immigration from Israel, Iran
and Russia; intermarriage is
rising steeply; and only one out
of three Jews is affiliated with a
synagogue or Jewish
organization.
More positively, there is a
strong and growing Jewish
awareness among young
educated people, an over-
whelming and even militant
commitment to Israel, and
widespread support for an in-
creasing role by women in Jewish
religious and communal life.
The study, spanning four
generations, was commissioned
by the University of Judaism and
led by Dr. Neil C. Sand berg, an
urban sociologist and western
regional director of the American
Jewish Committee, and Dr. Gene
N. Levine, professor of sociology
at the University of California,
Los Angeles (UCLA). After a
canvass of 5,000 households in
five sections of Los Angeles, they
selected 413 families for in-depth
question-and-answer sessions,
each lasting one to two hours.
IN AN interview, Dr. Sanberg
cited the passing of the old
tightly-knit neighborhood and
the growing estrangement from
traditional institutions as
threatening steps on the road to
assimilation.
"Unless our present in-
Continued on Page 13
By BARBIE ZELIZER
JERUSALEM -(JTA) -
Former Foreign Minister
Moshe Dayan said that the
Mideast situation is more
serious and potentially
dangerous than that de-
picted in the press. Dayan
spoke on the Israel
television program, Moked.
Citing the Soviet in-
vasion of iAfgharristan and
the turbulence in Iran as
examples of the volatile
Moslem world, Dayan
noted that the situation is
much more serious than one
thinks. But, he added, he
does not believe it will
bring about a clash between
the superpowers.
IN THAT light, Dayan said,
"It is very, very important for
Israel to defuse its conflict with
the Moslem world and making
progress on the autonomy
question would be one way of
doing that." There "are a number
of local problems," including
autonomy, "whose quick solution
would remove us from the circle
of those in conflict with the Mos-
lem world," he said.
The former Foreign Minister
dismissed the view that the U.S.
snubbed Israel by not informing
Jerusalem of the decision to use
air bases in Egypt "The
Americans can still be our friends
without telling us they have an
Moshe Dayan
air base at Kina," he observed.
In Dayan's view, the U.S.
prefers to use bases in Egypt
rather than Israel because they
are thinking in terms of actions in
the Moslem world. By using
bases in Israel in order to realize
such an aim, the U.S. would
alienate Saudi Arabia. Further-
more, bases in Egypt are more
centrally located than those in
Israel.
ALONG with these obser-
vations, however, Dayan em-
phasized that if the U.S. were to
need Israeli bases, Israel must
answer such a request in the
affirmative. If Israel were to
refuse this request, we could no
longer expect to receive
American aid.
Marjorie Baer
James B. Baer
Israel Bonds Dinner Set
Marjorie and James Baer will be honored by Temple Beth El in
Boca Raton at a dinner to be held on Sunday night, Feb. 24, it was
announced by Irving Rifkin, Palm Beach South County chairman for
Israel Bonds. A full committee is being organized.
Julie Styne, Broadway composer, will be the featured entertainer.
Jim Baer is a vice president of Temple Beth El, president of the
South County Jewish Federation and active in the Israel Bonds
campaign.
Marjorie Baer was one of the founders of the Federation and is on
its board. She is vice president of the Temple Beth El Sisterhood.


Page:
With the
Organizations
BNAI B'RITH
B'nai B'rith Olympic XI Lodge
is sponsoring an Old Time
Vaudeville Amateur Show on
Wednesday. Feb. 13. at Temple
Beth El in Boca Raton. Everyone
is welcome to try for a spot in the
show. Cash prizes will be
awarded to top three winners in
accordance with audience
response. Information is
available by calling.
B'nai B'rith Women. Boca, will
install its officers and induct its
charter members at Temple Beth
El in Boca Raton on Thursday.
Jan. 24. at 12:30 p.m. Ruth
Wallace and Ruth Goldberg of
South Coastal Region will be
installation and induction of-
ficers, respectively.
BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
WOMEN
Boca Raton Chapter invites all
to attend and bid at "Auction
80" at Temple Beth El in Boca
Raton on Tuesday. Feb. 12. at
7:30 p.m. Art. jewelry, ap-
pliances, etc. will be displayed at
7 p.m. before the auctioneer calls
for bids. Information is available
from Dorothy Segal.
FREE SONS
OF ISRAEL
Delray Beach Lodge No. 224
meets the first Monday of each
month at Pompey Park Com-
munity Center. President Henry
Chester invites all Free Sons past
or present and all interested
parties to attend the next
meeting. The next function is a
dinner-dance to be held March 29
at the Knights of Columbus Hall
in Boynton. Information is
available from Izzy Siegel.
HADASSAH
Ben-Gurion Chapter of Delray
Beach will hold Regional
Education Day Jan. 28 at FAU.
Topic is "Myths and Facts."
The monthly meeting of Ben-
Gurion Chapter will be Feb. 21 at
12:30 p.m. at Temple Emeth and
will highlight Jewish National
Fund. Guest speaker will be
Dorothy Spector from national
headquarters. Refreshments will
be served.
REFORM HEBREW
CONGREGATION OF
DELRAf
Sisterhood will meet Jan. 28 at
12:30 p.m. at Pompey Park
Community Center. A talk will be
given on the "3 R's of Living in
Florida.'" Open membership.
Information is available from
Ruth Wallace.
TEMPLE EMETH
The temple is holding its
second annual bazaar on Sunday.
Feb. 3. at 10 a.m. The bazaar will
feature all salable merchandise,
homebaked goods, toys, bric-a-
brac, hand made items, etc.
Breakfast and lunch will be
served. There will also be auc-
tions at various times of the day.
The third annual concert at
Temple Emeth will be presented
Saturday. Jan. 26, at 8 p.m. This
cultural event will be performed
by the Miami Opera Company
and will feature selections from
operas and the concert stage.
Reserved seats are available.
Information is available through
the temple office.
WOMEN'S AMERICAN ORT
The Sandalfool Boca Chapter
will hold a cake sale on Feb. 4 on
the sidewalk outside the Coral
Gables Federal Savings & Loan
Bank in the Sandalfoot Cove
Plaza. Boca Raton at 10 a.m.
Proceeds go to the ORT school in
New York City, the Bramson
Technical Institute, where
students learn about computer
The Jewish FhridianofSouthCounty
technology. optics. data
processing and business ad-
ministration.
Palm Beach Region announces
that this year the annual donor
luncheon will be held a the
Poinciana Club in Palm Beach.
This luncheon will be presented
on Tuesday. Feb. 12: at DOOn.
Information is available from
Mrs. Sugerman.
WORKMEN'S CIRCLE
Workmen's Circle Branch 1051
meets the second Wednesday of
each month at Temple Emeth in
Delrav Beach. The next meeting
will be at 1 pm. on Wednesday.
Feb. 13.
Send articles to: South County
Jewish Federation. Alt: Milt
Kretsky, 3200 N. Federal Hwy-.
Suite 124. Boca Raton FL 33431.
K"dey.JB,
Large Attendance Expe<
At Men's Division Diniu
Costa
Passover
Cruise
On March 31. the first day of
Passover. Costa Cruises is of-
fering the first strictly Kosher for
Passover cruise ever offered from
Miami aboard the World Renais-
sance.
The ship will convert all
operations to meet kosher and
religious standards. Costa has
secured the rabbinical super-
vision of O.K.. the Organized
Kashruth of America, headed by
Rabbi Bernard Levi.
A shipboard synagogue will
offer daily services, a cantor will
assist the rabbi in conducting the
Seders, and special entertain
ment will feature Jewish and
Israeli artists.
Ports include San Juan. St.
Croix, Curacao. Aruba, Port
Antonio and Miami.
Fly cruise packages
available from 106 U.S.
Canadian cities.
Based on advance reser-
vations, the South County
Jewish Federation announces
that it expects that attendance at
the Men's Division Formal
Dinner, to be held Saturday
evening. Jan. 26 at the Boca
Raton Hotel, will be twice as
large as last year's.
Sam Revits, dinner chairman.
indicates that the entire 1980
Campaign to date is approaching
the final figure for the 1979
Campaign. Revits hopes to see
the 1980 Campaign overtake last
year's final figures at the Men's
Division dinner.
Zvi Brosh. minister of in-
formation for the Embassy of
Israel in Washington, will be the
featured speaker. Brosh has been
in Israel's Foreign Service since
I960. He was previously Israel's
consul general in Ix>s Angeles,
ambassador to Burma and
counselor for information in
Bonn. West Germany.
During World War II. Brosh
served with the British Navy,
and in 1948 he was an officer on
the staff of Col. Moshe Dayan,
ha
Zri Broth
then commanding the defg
Jerusalem.
are
and
Investment Equity
Real Estate
DON VOGEL
Registered Real Estate Broker Salesman
Residential-Condominium-lnvestment
2352 PGA Boulevard Business 626-5100 a
Palm Beach Garden*, Fla. 33410 Residence 622-40001
*1_
The only Jewish family owned
and operated funeral home
m in Palm Beach County.
Levitt^Feinstein > d
memorial chapels
Formerly Levitt Memorial Chapelt
5411 Okeechobee Blvd. Telephone 689-8700
W. Palm Beach, Fla. 33409 philip weinstein, v.p.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities
WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES.
*
TRANSACTIONS DAILY VIA TELEX
TO ISRAEL STOCK EXCHANGE.
,
NASD
A Subsidiary o'H Bank Laumi tclttaai B M
18 East 48th Street
New York N Y 10017
(212)759-1310
Toll Free (800) 221-4838
Securities
Corporation
Technion
Pan American
Conference
Members of the Southern
Region of the American Technion
Society-Israel Institute of
Technology- will join with other
Technion supporters throughout
the United States. Canada and
Mexico in attending the first
annual Technion Pan American
Conference.
The conference is slated for
Feb. 15 18 at the Maria Isabel
Hotel in Mexico City
(iuest of honor at the Technion
Conference will be Dr. Henry
Kissinger, former U.S. Secretaq
of State and diplomat. Kissinger
will speak to the group at the
Tribute Dinner on Sunday
evening, Feb. 17.
Religious
Directory
TEMPLE bETH EL OF BOCA RATON.
333 SW Fourt Avenue, Boca Raton.
Fla 33432. Reform. Phone 391 8900
Rabbi Merle E. Singer. Cantor Martin
Rosen Sabbath Services, Friday at
8:15 p.m. Saturday, 9:15 a.m. Torah
Study with Rabbi Merle E. Singer
10:30 a.m. Sabbath Morning Services.
TREES OF LI
For Dignified Fund-raisin
Over 52 years experience in lurnu
kinds of Bronze and Aluminum Ti
Memorials. Donor Plates. Trees of Lite
Portrait Tablets, Letters. Testir
Dedicatory Tablets. Original Scul|
Send for free calalog or call
UNITED STATES BR0N2
& ALUMINUM CORP.
1065 E. 28th St. Hialeah, Fla.33
836-2880 or 836-2908
$
Riverside
MwiKKial Cmpei in, Funeiai P tecloii
THE REFORM HEBREW CONGRE
GATION OF DELRAY. At St. Pauls
Episcopal Church. 188 S. Swinlon
Ave., Delray. Reform. Mailing
Address. P.O. Box 1901. Delray
Beach, Fla. 33444. Friday at 8:15 p.m.
Rabbi Samuel Silver. President
Lawrence Sommers. 272 2908
CONGREGATION ANSHEI EMUNA
551 Brittany L, Kings Point, Delray
Beach 33446. Orthodox Harry Silver,
president. Services daily 8 a.m. and 5
p.m. Saturdays and Holidays 9am
Phone: 499 7407 Temple No 499 9229
BNAI TORAH CONGREGATION 1401
Nw 4th Ave Boca Raton, Fla 33432
Phone: 392 8566 Rabbi Nathan
Zeluer Sabbath Services Friday at
8:15 p m, Saturday at 9 30a.m.
For generations a symbol
of Jewish tradition.
TEMPLE EMETH OF THE DELRAY
HEBREW CONGREGATION 5780
West Atlant.c Ave., Delray Beach
tiL-i444- oTe: 27*3536 Morris
Silberman, Rabbi. Leonard Price
Cantor Sabbath services Friday at 8
5m.'J5 1dav a" a m Dai|V Win
yans at 8 45 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Now two Chapels to serve you .
West Palm Beach Lantana
4714 Okeechobee Boulevard
West Palm Beach. Florida
683-8676
VP,Jmi,M^l


bary25, 1980
Th
e Jewish Floridian of South County
*wo Federations Join
Endowments Effort
i B. BAER
Page 3
Kretsky Named Head
Of Delray Campaign
LMES B. BAER
|th County Jewish
[has embarked on a
raise endowment
it is following the
kf progressive Fed-
(the United States and
which have raised
of endowments in
HION and its agen-
unds to meet emer-
|d contingencies, to
reserve against bad
Up meet future capital
to undertake con-
structive projects which cannot
be financed through the annual
campaign.
The Federation and its
agencies are dedicated to the con-
tinuity and enrichment of Jewish
life. They look to the endowment
E?R! & finance Programs
with this objective.
Federation asks endowments
commitments from Jews who
understand the need and who are
in a position to participate. It
regards this as an opportunity to
provide for the next generation
immunity Calendar
(Beth El BOFTY Convention Temple Beth El Sisterhood
light Luncheon -12:30 p.m. at the Boca Hotel
bounty Jewish Federation $1,000 minimum Kick-off
lot the Boca Raton Hotel Temple Beth El BOFTY Con-
] Temple Emeth Opera Concert 8 p.m. B'nai B'rith
I's Naomi of Oelray Night at Pompano Raceway
IBeth El BOFTY Convention Temple Emeth Brotherhood
lost 9:30 a.m. 'Temple Emeth Art Show 7 p.m.
\'% American ORT, Boca East 12:30 p.m. Board Meeting
Hospital 12:30 p.m. Board Meeting Reform Hebrew
jation of Delray Sisterhood Pompey Park Hadassah,
Education Day at FAU Hadassah, Ben-Gurion -
jnDay at FAU
Hospital 12:30 p.m. Meeting South County Jewish
lion Boca Logo Dinner/Dance 7:30 p.m. at the Boca
puntry Club
k's American ORT, Delray 10 a.m. Meeting Temple
Sisterhood Luncheon/Card Party noon
(Emeth Sisterhood Board Meeting -9:30 a.m.
Emeth Sisterhood Bazaar 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Jewish
hool Play at the "Y" 1 p.m.
3h Menachem Begin Board Meeting B'nai B'rith
Naomi, Delray 1 p.m. Board Meeting Free Sons of
Keeling
ah Aviva Races Temple Emeth Board Meeting 7:30
Women's American ORT, Sandalfoot Cake Sale 10
|County Jewish Federation Women's Division "Pace-
Luncheon 10:30 a.m. at the home of Esther Cohane of
|olm ($500 min.) National Council of Jewish Women -8
oard Meeting Women's American ORT, Region 9:30
lee Meeting
Beth El Sisterhood 10 a.m. Board Meeting Temple
Brotherhood 8 p.m. Board Meeting Hadassah Sabra
r 8 p.m. Board Meeting Brandeis University Women,
lecture-7:30 p.m.
bran Congregation Las Vegas Nile -8:30 p.m.
| Beth El Brotherhood Breakfast 10a.m.* Temple Beth El
Adult Education Temple Emeth Choraleers Concert 8
I's American ORT, Boca East I p.m. Meeting B'nai
Tongregation Board Meeting 7:30 p.m. B'nai B'rith
| of Boca 1:30 p.m. Meeting South County Jewish Fed-
Cofee at the "Hamlet" 8 p.m.
Emeth Brotherhood 7:30 p.m. meeting Brandeis
Ji'y Women, Boca 7 p.m. Auction Women's American
Igion noon Luncheon at the Poinciana Club
>h. Aviva 10 a.m. Board Meeting B'nai B'rith Olympic
Vaudeville Amateur Show Workmen's Circle 1
Temple Emeth.
T...our cnildren and grand-
children.
IT WILL offer community
leaders a variety of methods
through which they can par-
ticipate in the program during
their lifetime or through a testa-
mentary bequest.
The South County Jewish
J-ederation has cooperated with
the Jewish Federation of Palm
Beach County in forming a joint
endowment committee.
This allows both Federations
to share the expertise of pro-
fessional staff and lay leadership
while still maintaining separate
endowment funds for the two
Federations.
Alan Shulman, president of the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, has indicated that initial
results are encouraging. Endow-
ment fund gifts totalling ap-
proximately half a million dollars
have been received to date.
In future editions of The
Floridian, a new column will offer
information about money
management and estate planning
and will describe ways in which
people may participate in the
program.
DETAILS regarding the
program are available by calling
Henry L. Zucker, endowment
consultant, at the Jewish Fed-
eration of Palm Beach County
office, 832-2120, or Rabbi Bruce
Warshal, executive director of
the South County Jewish Fed-
eration office, 368-2737. Rabbi
Warshal is also an attorney and
is conversant concerning endow-
ment funds.
James B. Baer, president of the
South County Jewish Federation,
has announced the appointment
of Milton Kretsky as Delray City
chairman of the 1980 Jewish
Federation-United Jewish Ap-
peal campaign.
Kretsky's responsibility will be
to coordinate existing campaigns
in five condominiums and to
expand the campaign into newly
developed areas.
In making the appointment,
Baer said, "I know of nobody
more capable or more know-
ledgeable in this field than Milt
Kretsky, who spent a lifetime as
a professional on the staff of the
Anti-Defamation League. Under
his leadership I am sure that we
will see at least a doubling of the
Delray Beach campaign."
Kretsky is also a vice president
of the South County Jewish Fed-
eration and vice president of
B'nai B'rith Kings Lodge. He
resides in the Pines of Delray.
Milton Krttsky
Rabbinical Confidential
screened introductions 5th year
Meet your mate
"Through //> Rabbi"
Write of your desires to
Rabbi Yehuda Lelb, 98 Stone
hurat Blvd. Freehold, NJ 07728
(201)780-9338
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Light tt\e candle
and remember?
As our fathers before us, light the
candle and remember those who
have left us. Hold this day for
reflection and thoughtfulness; in
solemnity, strength of purpose
and hope.
Menorah Chapels, to preserve the
traditions of our faith, wishes to
offer a gift of remembrance. A
Yahrzeit Calendar in the name of
the departed. A part of our
religious life, now and through
the ages.
eei
CtjapekS
THE OLDEST JEWISH-OWNED CHAPELS
IN BROWARD COUNTY
Rf PRESENTING
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PISER MEMORIAL CHAPELS
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Call or write for your Yahrzeit Calendar at:
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In Dade, call 861-7301
In Palm Beach, call 833-0887
BE SURE TO INCLUDE THE NAME DATE
AND TIME OF DEATH OF THE DEPARTED.
Chapels also in Deerfield Beach and Margate


Page -4
The Jeuisk Fbn*anSuthC*^
Prida
>>\.
Jewish Floridian
OF SOUTH COUNTY
Srvm Krfon, Dtlry <* Highland tMCK
InTiTIncUon wi" Sou"1 ""S>-^hFederation. lac.
^ Combined Jewlih APPffJ^^
PA1JI BEACH BOCA RATON OFFICE
3300 North Federal Highway Boc. fUton. FU JMS1 ,ggg
Prlnttnj Office l N.E. th SL HlimL FU. 1S2 Phone J7S-4WO
MILTON KRETSKY
FRE D K SHOCHET .. Coordinator
EditorandPublUher 8UZANNE 8HOCHET
Executive Editor
The Jewish Ficrldian Doe* Not Guarantee TMKMknM
Of The Merchandise Advertised In Its Colunn*
FORM 3579 return* to The Jewuh Florldian
p n Rnx0iJ87S Miami. Fl*. J3101 _
PubHahedBl-W-ealy P-'Bo>l0UW' SecondClaM PoeU,. Pendu^
, Latest Firing and Black Dissq
Norman I Stone.
Milton Kretaky. Shirley Enselberg Secretary
Berger. Executive Director Rabbi Bruce S Waraha. ___
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7SMtVAT5740
Number 2
Federation Officer. Prag.Oht. ^^;gtfSgfciail Dona.d
Friday. January- 25. 1980
Volume 2
Don't Pass the Buck
At the trial in Cologne. West Germany, for Kurt
Lischka, who was the Gestapo head in Paris during
World War II and two other accused Nazi war
criminals, a West Berlin professor said that his
research has shown that the Nazis could not have
carried out the 'final solution" of French Jewry
without the complicity of a large number of French
officials. The professor. Wolfgang Scheffler of the
Free University of West Berlin, noted that in one
wave of arrests of Jews 2,500 French policemen took
part.
The complicity of many French officials is well
known. It has recently been depicted in several fine
films made in France itself. The French, and other
Western Europeans under occupation, may not have
joined in the actual murders as did many from the
Baltics who became war criminals, but they certainly
helped in finding and rounding up Jews to be
deported to the death camps.
There is plenty of guilt to be shared for the
Holocaust from that of commission to that of
omission by many world leaders of that era.
But the complicity of others cannot be used by
war criminals as a defense of their own crimes. They
committed these crimes against humanity, and they
must pay for them. They cannot now say they should
be freed because others helped them.
Normalization is Attitude
There has been some concern expressed in Israel
over Egypt's alleged coolness toward normalization
of relations with Israel. One reason is that Egypt
reportedly wants to staff its embassy in Tel Aviv
with only five diplomats, much less than Israel would
like to send to Cairo when diplomatic relations of-
ficially begin in February.
But normalization is more than just diplomatic
representation. It is attitude. Take Prime Minister
Menachem Begins visit to Aswan Jan. 7 where he
met with Egyptian President Sadat. Remember the
hullabaloo over Begin's previous visits to Egypt, as
well as Sadat's trips to Israel?
There is little of that now. The visits are
becoming routine.'
Sure, there will still be plentyiof hard negotiations
and some tough talk over trie question of estab-
lishing autonomy for the Palestinian Arabs on the
West Bank and Gaza Strip. But while this will be
going on, Israelis and Egyptians, officials and non-
officials, will be going back and forth between the
two countries.
Khomeini Stealing Wealth
Of Many Iranian Jews
By YITZHAK SHARGIL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Kol Israel Radio said that
the regime of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini is con-
fiscating the property of wealthy Iranian Jews worth
many millions of dollars. According to the report, the
property of 54 Jewish families was expropriated after they
were charged with collaborating with the regime of the
deposed Shah.
AMONG THOSE to lose their property is a well-
known Jewish industrialist who was formerly a member of
the Iranian parliament, and the late Habib Elkanian, a
Jewish leader executed by the Islamic regime shortly after
Khomeini came to power for alleged collaboration with the
Shah and for maintaining contacts with Israel.
The property of Elkanian's sister was also con-
fiscated, Kol Israel said. The radio reporter did not dis-
close the source of his information but said it was reliable.
A Bradenton. Fla.. outfit
specializing in coin investment
advertised in the newspapers the
other dav that it was giving im-
mediate cash for silver, gold and
old coins. In a special highest
prices paid" category, it listed
Nazi items as first among the
most desirable and valuable
products for instant purchase
and monetary return to
customers
Also listed in the "highest
prices paid" category was an
expressly-stated demand for
what the advertisement called
German war medals." It is
intriguing that this category-
listed the war decorations of no
other countrv. especially not the
United States. What the ad
shows in general is a sentimental
yearning for memorabilia of the
absolutist National Socialist
period.
THE implications are
frightening. Still, we must
examine them soberly. It is more
than the mementos for which
people show a sentimental
yearning. It is the political and
military quick-fix characteristic
of the Hitler era that so many of
us seem to want these days to
solve our own problems without
an awareness of the cost in in-
dividual freedoms we would be
called upon to pay for such a
capability.
If Nazi items and German war
medals are at a premium, can the
"rejuvescence" of the Nazi jack-
boot be far behind? That is a
question with which the Im-
migration and Naturalization
Service, with varying degrees of
steadfastness, has been wrestling
for some time now under the
prodding of Rep. Elizabeth
HoltzmanlD. N.Y.I.
The crude fact is that there are
still living in our midst tens of
thousands of former German
refugees. American citizens who
were once the victims of the
quick-fix Nazis and their anti-
Semitic madness.
BUT THERE are also living in
our midst hundreds upon hun-
dreds of those "heroic" tor-
mentors of their Jewish and other
victims for whose war medals and
other Nazi memorabilia the
Bradenton. Fla.. coin investment
firm will be happy to pay a
premium price. It is not that
these beasts sneaked into the
country after World War II to
hide from the forces of retribution
let loose at Nuremberg.
It is that the hush-hush "Oper-
ation Paperclip." secretly
organized by some American
officials after the war, instructed
the INS to look the other way as
these beasts were permit led to
enter our shores. We, the con-
querors of National Socialist
ideologies and their leaders,
became their principal defenders,
their architects of sanctuary.
It is this schizoprenic real-
politik that the INS began to
pursue under Holtzman's
prodding which encouraged and
led to the strengthening of the
work of Martin Mendelsohn,
deputy director of the Justice
Department's Criminal Division.
MENDELSOHN began to
have some positive results in his
pursuit of former Nazis hiding in
the U.S. And that was enough for
the old "Paperclip" boys to let
out a contract on him. In what
must be counted as one of the
shabbiest power plays on Capitol
Hill in a long time, Mendelsohn
has just been fired by Philip
Heymann, his superior in the
Criminal Division, on the basis
that Mendelsohn was having a
personal feud with Walter
Rockier, a former prosecutor at
Nuremberg.
There is little doubt that
Mendelsohn, in his two years
with the Special Investigations
Unit, had become a super-hitman
of ex-Nazis living in the U.S.
How could he have offended
Rockier, the special units
director?
By being successful, of course,
far more than Rockier, himself,
whose record as director has been
less than sterling and whose
commitment to the program, for
all of his Nuremberg credentials.
is subject to profound question.
But the internal politics of this
struggle are less significant than
the end result. Once again, the
"Paperclip" boys have won.
WHAT I find so obnoxious in
all of this is that I have yet to
hear a peep out of the press or the
general community deploring the
firing of Mendelsohn. In a world
placing such high value on Nazi
items and German war medals,
this should come as no surprise.
But what if this were a
question involving Castro-type
criminals secretly in our midst
who offended the sensibilities of a
powerful Latin community here?
The slavish press obsequiousness
to Latin power would devise a
flood of lurid headlines decrying
the injustice of it all. and the
Latins themselves might be
throwing bombs.
And what about the Black
community? Especially, I have in
mind the firing last year of
Andrew Young, which promptly
became a cause celebrt ranging
from a chilling outburst of frank
Black anti-Semitism to the
practice of amateurish inter-
national diplomacy by the likes of
Jesse Jackson and the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference.
I see no such equivalent furor
in the Black community at the
firing of Mendelsohn. Or in any
other community in the nation
which joined in the attack on the
Young firing as an attack on civil
liberties.
ISN'T THE Mendelsohn firing
at the hands of encrusted Nazi
prototypes on Capitol Hill (and I
don't mean Philip Heymann him-
self he merely did the dirty
work I at least as much an attack
on civil liberties?
It is in fact more so. But the
case of Martin Mendelsohn has to
do with a Jew. or so it super-
ficially seems, and therefore who
cares? It has to do with Nazis,
and they never really did much
harm to anybody except to Jews
who probably deserved it. Isn't
that so?
In the end, the sad I
the firing of Mendelsok,
the Nixon-enginaeZj
Abe Forta, frkfcQLl
States Supreme CouftT1
placed the nation i
jeopardy by force,
majority misreads *
only of the Jewish i
the forces arrayed
egalitarianism and
not the enemies of J*
and those who would I.
exemplify the shortsk.
interest that the Youngf
since encouraged to i
the shadows 0f (
American anti-Semit
dangerous delusion.
THE SILENT
should hang its head in]
and especially the
community which, for,
preachers and preach
fails to understand the i,
of civil rights and. what i
the responsibilities
libertarianism must bear.
There are people on |
Hill who love Nazis
don't have to buy or
items and German
from coin investment
prove it. Theirs is a
dangerous amour.
This bodes ill for oil <
just Jews. The Bit
munity's failure to <
Mendelsohn firing it
the larger national indirS
single it out merely
community's militant i
the Young firing sh
selective, parochial i
wrong we have
determining just I
being gored.
KGB Haiti]
Leningrad
Memorial
NEW YORK IJfl
Soviet KGB agents brol
attempt several days
Moscow Jewish activisui
the ninth anniversary oft
Leningrad Trial, it was i
here by the Student
Soviet Jewry and the
Councils for Soviet Jews.
The two groups said I
of the Jews who sou
demonstrate at the Lenin 1
near the Kremlin were deti
their homes. The
managed to reach thepr
- Vladimir Prestin.
Abramovitch and Elena I
skaya were put in i
and driven around for twoj
before being released in'
suburb of Moscow.
K*A SHORTCUT
i mjtr.
*"'.

'<*;' :*fc


January 25, 1980
kwlrirkr****

Page 5
aq Stocking Up
phisticated French Weapons Include Jet-Fighters
EDWIN EYTAN
llS (JTA) Iraq
dered 24 additional
i F-l fighter-bombers
^ taken an option on
Fs new combat plane,
Vage-2000. According
fial available figures,}
i has sold 64 F-ls to
aver the last two
F-l is the French
at to America's F-16.
lies sold to Iraq will be
.. with the new Matra
80 air-to-air missile used
ersonic dogfights. The
: can hit a supersonic
|t a distance of 18 miles.
version can also carry a
jmb load. The Iraqi Air
llso flies an unspecified
of MIG-23s equipped
Joviet-made air-to-air
ECENT years. Iraq has
diversify its arms sup-
nd has bought large
\es of military equipment
ace, including AMX-30
[ Panhard armored cars,
missiles and a variety
bat helicopters, including
pily armed Super-Frelon.
reports say Iraq is also
^ing for the purchase of
veapons systems, as well
are defense missiles.
e number of Iraqi of-
studying at French
chools or undergoing
at French air and naval
088-
experts believe the Iraq
to have more than
since the Yom Kippur
nd that Iraq now has a
bredible strike force. These
I also believe that air crews
well trained and highly
>nal according to Western
ds.
LELI MILITARY circles,
jg Chief of Staff Gen.
Eitan, warned last week
the danger of Arab
trations of modern forces
kraal's eastern front.
ling to Western sources,
id Iraq now have a larger
modern air force than
I Arab countries, including
had on the eve of the Yom
War.
France continues to sell
including modern
bnic planes, to a variety of
k. including practically all
pb states, France officially
last Friday the sale of
or other radioactive
Js to Libya or Pakistan.
[ president of the French
Energy Commission,
Pecqueur. said Friday
th France and Niger, the
i state where the uranium
SOVERI
nGclman and Unhwraal
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acted in accordance with the non-
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regulations of the (Vienna-based)
International Atomic Energy
Agency."
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large quantities of Niger-
produced uranium have been
sold, hijacked or misappropriated
and have ended up in the con-
struction of the "Islamic bomb"
now manufactured in Pakistan
with the help of Libyan money.
The head of the French Atomic
Energy Commission said "Not a
single nugget of uranium yellow
cake has found its way to
Pakistan or Libya. There has
been no theft nor any misappro-
priation of uranium."
French sources recall that
France last year cancelled its
contract to supply Pakistan with
a nuclear fuel processing plant
after it became known that a
nuclear device was being built
near Islamabad. The French
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Page 6
TheJewishFlondianofSouthCo^_
Friday, j.
i,l n
PLO Goals Firm
,
Even for Arab Intellectuals
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Eleven prominent
Palestinian political and
intellectual leaders have
unanimously rejected
making changes in the
Palestine National Charter,
so that is no longer calls for
the extinction of Israel.
The proposal was put to
them by the Arab-owned
Middle East monthly
because of claims that the
Palestine Liberation
Organization could not
become a partner in Middle
East peace talks until it
dropped the extreme
passages in its basic
document.
THE PALESTINIANS, all of
whom have been described as
moderates, declared that the
Charter should not be changed
and that this was not necessary
for a continuation of the PLO's
pursuit of international
recognition.
They include Prof. Edward
Said. Columbia University; Dr.
Payez Sayigh. consultant to the
Kuwaiti delegation at the United
Nations; Prof. Hisham Sharabi,
Georgetown University; Sidky
Dajani, PLO executive com-
mittee member; Mahmous
Labadi. PLO spokesman; Zehdi
Labib Terzi. PLO representative
at the UN; Sabri Jiryis, director
of the PLO research center; and
K haled Fahoum, chairman of the
Palestine National Council.
Th'.^y gave a unanimous "no"
to the following questions:
Should the Palestine National
Charter be changed? Should the
Palestinians set up a govern-
ment-in-exile with a new
provisional constitution for
Palestine? Would changing the
Charter lead to a U.S.-PLO
dialogue or force Israel to
recognize the PLO?
PROF. SAID, once thought of
as a possible Palestinian par-
ticipant in the Middle East talks
stated: "In the P"*n* "J*^
pressure to change the Charter M
K assault upon Palestinian
rights." Sayigh also opposed
changing the Charter but added
that should circumstances
warrant it. "consideration might
be given to the adoption of a new
political program.
The Palestine National Charter
was adopted by the Palestine
National Council in !*/"r
years after the creation of he
PLO. of which the Council is the
Plenary' Assembly.
Among its provision- La that
armed struggle is the only way
l,. liberate Palestine" (AltK
and "the Arab Palestinian
people, expressing themselves by
the armed Palestinian revolution,
reject all solutions which are
substitutes for the total
liberation of Palestine" (Article
21
However, most of the PLO
leaders questioned also claimed
that these provisions did not
nullify the PLO's right to pursue
a political solution.
President Carter looks on as U.S. Circuit Court of
Judge Abner Mikva administers the oath of office to A
Klutznick as Secretary of Commerce J an. 9 in theEastl
The White House. The President praised Klutn
" distinguished and experienced public servant."
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January 25, 1980
The Jewish Fhridian of South County
Page 7
larter Aide Praises Israel's Return of Oil Fields
ILADELPHIA A top
President Carter praised
Jfor returning the Sinai oil-
|i.i Egypt, calling it "an act
jtesmanship that has been
too little recognition in an
ved world."
|id Aaron, deputy assistant
President for national
y affairs, told the annual
bly of the National Jewish
tinity Relations Advisory
fjl (NJCRAC) here that as a
of the revolution in Iran
the Soviet invasion of
listan, Israel and Egypt
become "important new
Irs to America's efforts to
be the Middle East."
White House official, who
l\ aide to National Security
pr Zbigniew Brzezinski,
|ned. however, that Israel
"especially difficult"
in the West Rank-Gaza
alions with Egypt.
tUSALEM Prime
\er Menachem Begin and
ent Anwar Sadat reached
dent at their Aswan
It meeting on the details of
|li/ation between Israel and
which takes effect of-
later this month. Begin
need, at a joint press con-
with Sadat before he left
that regular civilian
between Tel Aviv and
i ill begin on Jan. 26.
king to reporters on the
home, Begin said the
n agreement was a notable
t since it is not strictly
ed under the terms of the
annex to the Israeli-Egyp-
eace treaty, the protocol
; with normalization.
tUSALEM Eliahu Ben-
r. a 48-year-old scholar who
ki Herut Party politics and
ae one of Prime Minister
phem Begin's top aides, was
ned by the Cabinet Sunday
tael's first Ambassador to
I. He will assume his post in
|on Feb. 26 when Israel and
L exchange ambassadors.
en the Likud government
bffice in 1977, Begin named
tlissar director general of
[rime Minister's Office. In
bapacity, he became closely
yed in the peace nego-
ns with Egypt. He headed
I first Israeli diplomatic
ktion to Cairo for peace
at the Mena House in
fiber, 1977, one month after
ent Anwar Sadat's historic
]o Jerusalem.
continued to be closely
Fed in the peace process,
hpanying Begin to Camp
in September, 1978, and
I out various missions for
rime Minister in connection
Ihe peace negotiations.
|W ifORK The Palestine
ation Organization is pre-
to move into a townhouse
anhattan's posh Upper East
which it bought for a
ted $1 million in cash.
fdi Labib Terzi, the PLO's
va at the United Nations,
he plans to hold an open
and make other overtures
lm the fears of neighbors of
|w headquarters at 115 East
ptreet. Some neighbors have
N the recent bomb attack
' Soviet Mission to the
Nations which is only a
[locks away. The new PLO
quarters is on the same
where former President
has bought a townhouse
i scheduled to move in soon.
Mt and the United Arab
Ites.
[RUSALEM Moshe
In suffered Monday his first
tmentary defeat since his
nation from the Foreign
- but gave the
coalition little reason to rejoice.
The Knesset struck off the
agenda by a narrow margin of 42
to 40 an urgent motion raised by
Dayan to discuss the transfer of
the Eilon Moreh settlers to the
new site of Jabel Kabir near
Nablus. It was Dayan's first
parliamentary initiative since his
resignation, and it was suf-
ficiently provocative to stir up
the house.
Dayan said he had nothing in
principle against a Jewish settle-
ment near Nablus. However, he
opposed a settlement which at
best would not contribute to the
relations with the Arab neigh-
bors, but may even be geared at
inheriting their land.
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Page8
The Jewish FloridianofSouthCounty_
Friday, Janus.
T 251
Israeli Officials Lament Small U.S. Aid
By GIL SEDAN
And YITZHAK SHARGIL
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Israeli officials have expressed
disappointment with the $200
million in military sales credits
that President Carter has agreed
to add to the $3 billion aid
package for Israel over the next
three years.
The White House announced
that the President will seek
congressional approval of that
Israel had requested a total of
$3.4 billion in military and
economic assistance for the fiscal
year 1981 which begins next Oct.
1.
According to Israeli officials,
the short-fall means that military
expenditures will have to be
reduced substantially and the
government will be forced to
implement even tougher
economic austerity measures
than those already announced.
Defense Minister Ezer
Weizman returned from
Washington where he had spent a
week conferring with President
Carter, Secretary of State Cyrus
Vance, Defense Secretary Harold
Brown and other top officials on
the new aid package.
According to reports, top U.S.
officials complained to Weizman
about Israel's West Bank set-
tlement policy and about the lack
of progress in the autonomy
talks.
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The $3.4 billion Israel sought,
double its present allocation, was
expected to cover the loss of
purchasing power of the U.S.
dollar owing to inflation.
Congress has already approved
$2.2 billion in military aid credits
over the next three years to help
Israel carry out the terms of its
peace treaty with Egypt, in-
cluding the redeployment of its
forces from Sinai to the Negev.
Congress also approved $800
million in economic aid.
Basis For Decision
The amount Israel will receive
for fiscal 1981 will not be known
until the administration an-
nounces its budget later this
month. In announcing the ad-
ditional $200 million for military
purposes, the White House said
the increase "reflects our
sympathy and concern for
Israel's security and well-being."
The White House statement
said, "The decision was based on
consideration of such factors as
inflation and Israel's balance of
payments deficit and takes into
account the fact that the Israeli
government has instituted since
last November extremely tough
austerity measures designed to
overcome those economic
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The statement also stressed
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Weizman came in for sharp
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larger aid package.
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3 Gourmet Kosher Mean Defy
**f* Enteruwiment I Many Msj
CAMMEAN CMM
AMERICANA
Bal Harbour, Florida
PLAZA DOMINICANA
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lonfy 40 mewta rom Manhattan)
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ow Paaaovor Vacaoom
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Out Of N.Y. State Call Tol Prw
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$18'
INCLUDING KOSHEI MEALS DAILT,
1 ON SAHATH > Nightly Tel loom
,>aiu>pn prison dt*r JO d l0 t mi NOT INCLUDING PASSOVEl
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" ioDiT.toNithu$3251Sr~
2 ft 4 wk Packages IncI Passover Avail
services Cond by s Renowned Cantor
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ACUITIES INCLUDE H Ho., Phor,e srrke
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or 1-672-0333
rated by the BEKKOWIT2 Fimil
The Defense Minister, who
reported on his mission to Prime
Minister Menachem Begin,
rejected the criticism. He
maintained that Israel would
have received even less were it
not for his efforts and challenged
anybody to do better. Weizman
said he was not surprised by the
White House announcement,
considering the inflationary
pressures in the U.S.
Disappointment On Two Levels
Israeli officials were disap-
pointed on two levels. According
to some sources, the relatively
small addition to the aid package,
spread over three years, meant
that Washington did not see
"Israel as an asset."
As for the immediate impact, it
was generally agreed that Israel
will have to take stringent
measures to cope with the "new
economic reality."
Fear was expressed that Israel
would have to draw on its foreign
currency reserves to finance
urgent defense needs.
Dr. Eliezer Sheffer, deputy
governor of the Bank of Israel,
warned that the country's
balance of payments deficit
would reach $5 billion this year if
the government failed to im-
plement austerity measures.
These include manpower cuts in
public service, a freeze on salaries
and a 4-6 percent cut in the
budget.
Even if those measures are
adopted, the deficit would be $4
billion, he said.
Other measures that may have
to be considered are a more rapid
devaluation of the Pound to make
exports more profitable and a
reduction of imports.
Some experts said the
government would have to
reconsider its liberal policy
regarding foreign currency
holdings. While Bank of Israel
governor Amon Gafni has ruled
that out on grounds that the
national deficit stemmed from
excessive imports rather than
excessive purchase of foreign
currency by individuals, another
expert remarked, "It is hard to
accept that Israel has such a
tough time getting dollars
whereas its citizens can buy as
KOSHER FOR PASSOVER
CRUISE FROM MIAMI
1173
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Why is this cruise different from all other
cruises? It's Passover at seathe first cruise of
its kind to depart from Miami The entire ship
will operate under the strict rabbinical super-
vision of (R) including the presence of a Kosher
chef to plan menus and meal service Traditional
Seder services will be conducted by a rabbi and
a well-known cantor A synagogue setting will
accommodate daily prayers And entertainment
will feature Jewish and Israeli artists Visit
San Juan. St Croix. Curacao. Aruba. Nassau and
Freeport Rates from $995-$ 1580 per person,
double occupancy, plus $195 Kosher for
Passover supplement per person Money saving
air/sea packages available from your city
See your travel agent World Renaissance of
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COSTA CRUISES
One BiscayneTower. Miami. Fla 33131 (305) 358-7330
many dollars as they wish."
Practical Implication*
Of Aid Package
The immediate practical
implications of the limited aid
package include reduced
production of warplanes, missiles
and ammunition.
Army exercises will be leas
extensive and soldiers will use
less live ammunition. Some 4,000
employees will face dismissal
from defense industries and
civilian industries that supply
the army. The government will
have to hike the price of imports
and spur exports by every
possible means.
Finance Minister Yigal
Hurwitz said he was grateful to
the U.S. for its aid to Israel, but
that aid will not satisfy
needs in either the mil^l
civilian sectors. *l
Weizman noted that J
administration has decide
to increase its aid to a nuT'
countries and, in sorne(
reduce it.
He said the Israel Embai
Washington spared no effort,
increase Israel's share but it,
his visit last week that bore I
in the form of an additional I
million.
"This is something, thowj
so much, Weizman said, ad2
"One has to remember that]
President is making an effort]
check inflation and it j,!
election year and this is all
could get."
Savings Stoi
with Unbeatable Rates!
WEEKLY SPECIAL
182 Day Money Market Certificate
Minimum Deposit $10,000. Simple Interest
ASK FOR THIS WEEK'S RATE
MONTHLY SPECIAL
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Minimum Deposit $100. Compound Interest.
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rDAILY SPECIALS -i
6 Sa vinqs Certificates
with $100 Minimum Deposit
Interest Compounded Dally
ANNUAL RA'F. TERM ANNUAL YKID
8.00% YEARS 8.33%
7.75% 6 YEARS 8.06%
7.50% 4 YEARS 7.73%
6.75% 30 MONTHS 6.98%
6.50% 12 MONTHS 6.72%
5.75% 3 MONTHS 5.92%
The Handy-Dandy-ln-and-Out
PASSBOOK ACCOUNT
5.50% per year yields 5.65%
Earns interest from day of deposit to day of withdrawal
A GREAT GIFT IDEA!
Savings Certificates sublet to substantial interest penalty lor ear*
withdrawal Renewals sublet to change in annual rate and effective y*k
ISO minimum balance to earn interest on Savings Accounts
Washington Savings
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CONVINItNT OFFICES SERVING VOU IN FICMHOA
MIAMI BEACH
1701 Meridian Avenue/674-6612
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CORAL GABLES
520 Biltmore Way/445-7905
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JACKD GORDON Preuctent. ARTHUR H OOUftSMON, ChaWIMW "* 8^'d


Ijanuary 25,1980
TheJewinh Floridian of South County
Page 9
raeVs Runaway Inflation: The Human Impact
From the
nitt'd Jewish Appeal
Israel's new Minister of
easury, Yigal Hurwitz,
ced his new measures for
inflation, he warned the
I.! Israel that the unavoid-
i steps would hurt.
economy measures in-
abolishing subsidies for
products such as milk,
End oil and raising prices
suit of it. Israel's people
these steps with mixed
ybody understood the
curb inflation, but the
prices did hurt, most of all
Bidents of the distressed
arhoods: large families
nly one breadwinner, and
erly and the sick, who live
nail pensions or social
or welfare.
^PORTER from Maariv
veral large families in
ected neighborhoods and
p a I'd parents and children
the way they are coping
li new situation.
|d and Gabi Mamo live in a
uarter in Safed. David, 39,
)i, 38, come from Tunisia.
Gabi have ten children,
to 18. They have a small
ent of three rooms rented
Imidar.
l<; works as a maintenance
buildings housing a
rs seminary and an ex-
of Bar-Han University,
irorks three hours a day in
al supermarket.
in David Mamo adds his
[wages and the children's
[Security allocation to his
ck now, with the new
in effect, his income
permit him to spend
for anything outside of
[id clothing for the family.
FOR EXAMPLE: Since the
lood subsidies were abolished,
the Mamo family has cut the use
of milk and milk products by 50
percent in comparison with
previous months.
treats for the children: peanuts,
chocolate, halva.
To save on electricity and gas,
the Mamos use an old-fashioned
oil-lamp for cooking, a slow and
Qahlui "t___* l j laborious process. This year they
fourSSL nf SS A b% da* ft COU,dnt afford *nd their ^O
packages of powdered milk year-old daughter to the
but today this would cost me
about 65 lirot (pounds), so we
purchase only two packages
daily. Instead of two packages of
white cheese I buy only one, and
instead of four cups of yogurt I
buy only two. We also had to cut
down on oil, which I use a lot for
making pancakes, falafel and
other fried foods.
"At the supermarket, I get a
15 percent discount, and I don't
have to pay cash because m\
purchases are deducted from my
paycheck at the end of each
month. But the paycheck never
catches up not with all the
food a family of 13 needs. Before
the new policy, my food bill just
exactly used up all my salary.
Now, by the end of the month,
I'm going to owe the super-
market money between 2,000
lirot and 4,000 lirot ($60- $120)."
BECAUSE OF the rise in the
price of bread, the Mamo family
cut its daily consumption of
bread from four to three loaves.
"Why waste food when it's so
expensive?" says Gabi.
They used to give each child
one egg daily. Now, they have
made a new arrangement: each
child, in turn, gets either milk or
an egg per day.
The rising prices have also
caused the Mamo family to
consume less meat. Instead of
three chickens, they now buy
two; instead of one and a half
kilograms of beef per week, they
buy only one. They also consume
fewer fruits and vegetables.
There are no longer any sweets or
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DOUBLE OCCUP.
FROM
pre-
kindergarten school, where
tuition went up to 2,000 lirot
($60) per month. They are going
to wait for the very coldest
weather before using any fuel to
heat their apartment.
THE FAMILY is worried by
economic conditions, but have
kept their morale.
All of the children are properly
dressed, though their parents
have had to resort to installment
plan buying and heavy use of
hand-me-downs. The children do
not complain. They are clean and
well-kept and are making good
progress in school.
The oldest daughter, Kochava,
graduated from high school last
year and is now preparing for
office work. For this purpose the
parents paid 3,000 lirot ($90) for
several months to a special in-
structor. Their son, Saul, 17, will
finish high school this year and
wants to become an airplane pilot
or naval commando, preparing
for this within the framework of
his military service.
Another Maariv reporter
visited the small apartment of a
low-salaried Kupat Cholim office-
worker in Petach Tikva.
THE SOVA family has four
children, a 12-year-old daughter,
a 10-year-old son and thre year-
old twins. They are constantly
trying to "tighten the belt."
The father, Yossi Sova, brings
home monthly wages of 10,000
lirot ($300). They try their best to
avoid wasteful spending, and to
hold out on this amount till the
end of the month. The twins stay
home because they can't afford to
pay 3,000 lirot to a pre-kinder-
garten for them.
The Sovas' tiny living room
has been turned into a playroom
for the twins. The two older
children come home for lunch,
and their mother, Amalia. insists
on giving them a warm lunch.
"No matter what happens,"
she says, "my children will not
get up hungry from the table. I
buy half a kilogram of meat and
make it go twice as far. The twins
love yogurt and the older ones
like sweets, but I feel apples are
more important than sweets. I
have ajso cut out Saturday cake.
The older children understand
that chocolate is out, and they
learn to give up.
"MY DAUGHTER Michal
was especial 1 lucky this month: a
neighbor came back from abroad
and brought her a pair of Adidas
shoes. She would never have
gotten them otherwise; to
Michal, it's like a miracle."
The Sovas are careful about
every expens.
"We never call a reapir man,"
says Yossi, "and repair every-
thing ourselves. The cheapest
repair would cost us the price of a
whole week's supply of bread."
The Minister of the Treasury is
talking about transferring people
from the services to industrial
production, and Yossi, who has
worked in the services of Kupat
Cholim for the past ten years, is
worried. Some of the ptaients
who come to the clinic are already
working only part-time, and
Yossi wonders what is in store for
him.
AMALIA WOULD like to
work part-time in order to help
Yossi, but paying a day care
center for the twins would totally
consume her wages, and there
would be no one to clean the
house or care for the children.
A third Maariv reporter writes
about a visit to the home of a
worker in one of the biggest food
processing factories in the
country.
His name is Reuven Yechezkel,
and he arrived in Israel in 1951
from Iraq. He married a year
leater and found a modest apart-
ment in a poor neighborhood in
south Tel Aviv. He is now 50
years old and three of his five
children are already independent.
At home there are only the
youngest daughter who is now
serving in the Army and the
youngest son, 11, who is a pupil
in sixth grade. His wife's parents
helped him to acquire a three-
room apartment in Ramat Gan.
REUVERN'S NET monthly
wages are 8,000 lirot ($240). Just
one week after the rise in prices of
food and other necessities, he was
already feeling th epinch.
He says: "We were living
modestly before, and we will have
to live even more modestly in the
future. We spend most of our
budget on our youngest child,
and we save most on ourselves. I
walk to the factory and back on
foot, three kilometers in each
direction, to save on bus tickets.
The factory is reimbursing us for
the trips and this is another way
to save and to get more exercise
at the same time.
How do they get along on 8,000
lirot? "Very simple. We buy less
cheese and beef and eggs, and we
use no butter. We do not buy any
big appliances, and we pay the
food store every day in cash. If
we have the time for it, we go to
the vegetable market, and we do
not pick the biggest and most
beautiful apples or vegetables.
"WE DO NOT visit the family
too often because the trips have
become too expensive, and my
wife has stopped baking any
cakes only cookies twice a
month, because they cost less.
"The last time she bought a
new dress was more than a year
ago, and we haven't been to the
movies for two years."
RARE JEWISH FACTS
from
J&B RARE SCOTCH
Q: Why should the Zeppelin
really be called a "Schwartz?
A: Because "The Zeppelin" was
invented by David Schwartz.
David Schwartz was an Austrian-born
engineer who, in 1890, came up with the
idea of an airship with a gas-filled metal
container to make it rise. Because of finan-
cial reasons, the Austrian minister of war
turned down the idea. However, in 1892,
after Schwartz built a prototype in Russia,
the German government urged him to
go ahead with production for them.
Unfortunately, Schwartz died before the
project could get off the ground. Shortly
thereafter, Count von Zeppelin bought the
patents from Schwartz's widow.
ANOTHER RARE FACT...
A big part of Jewish warmth and affec-
tion is to quickly become completely
open and informal with people and
things they particularly like. Samuel is
called "Sammy!' a snack is a "nosh"
and the famed Chicken Soup has
become known as "Jewish Penicillin'.'
And right in keeping with this inherent
warmth, J&B Rare Scotch has come to
be regarded as a favorite part of the
'mishpocha'. Because along with its
elegance at formal affairsJ&B is
also the kind of Relative' one can
take his shoes off with, loosen the tie
and relax with friends at home.
J'B
RARE
SCOTCH
RARE
*0WCT O* KO'lAM*


Page 10
The Jewish n, i.T'g'*"",wtv
Friday, Janur
en's
Division Advance Gifts Cocktail Party
Seventeen couples recently attended the Federation Men's
WvSXSKs cocktail party. Over 8260,000 m pledges
announced by those present. Ambassador Dov Sinai was the
was
featured speaker.
Abner Levine, Mildred Levine, Philip Zinman, Ambassador
Dov Sinai, Lynne Warshal and Rabbi Bruce Warshal


m
\\k
James B. Baer, Marjorie Baer, Ambassador Dov Sinai, Shirley
Cohen andAlvin Cohen.

Samuel Revits and Verna Revit
s.
Myron Cohen, Louise Cohen, Sam Revits, Irma Fier and Sol
Fier.
n

Dr. Karl Enselberg, Shirley Enselberg, Norman I. Stone, Mae
Enselberg, Robert Byrnes, Betty Stone.

Betty Stone, Norman I. Stone, Rita Bagus, Al Bogus, Anne
Brenner and Henry Brenner.
David Kend, Florence Meltzerand Sam Meltzer.
%'JlSlTbe^-L,Saul Sl"^erg, Richard Siemens, Carol
Siemens, Jay Eichlerand Helene Eichler.


v, January 25,1960
Bonn's Last Hurrah?
The JewishjFbridiqnof South County
_Pag
-ell
eparations an Embarrassing Problem r*
Bv DAVID KANTOR thp irr ...
By DAVID KANTOR
JONN (JTA)
ie Bonn government's
ist material gesture"
ird Jewish victims of
izism has been an em-
Irrassing issue here for
Wral years. Last Dec. 14,
lidi-lines for an arrange-
?nt to pay new repara-
>ns were agreed upon
[tween the major political
inics. However, the
lications are that the
harrassment will in-
jase.
Binder the suggested formula,
linn will make available a total
140 million Marks over a
piod of four years, of which 240
lion Marks will be paid this
ar Of that amount, 40 million
irks will go to the Central
ganization of Jewish Com-
inities in West Germany
mtnilrut). In each of the years
1982 and 1983, 100 million
larks will be made available.
[The bulk of the money is to go
the New York-baaed Con-
rence on Jewish Material
aims Against Germany, which
I to distribute it among sur-
i-nrs of the Holocaust.
I'l'ln' government of Israel has
portedly reached an agreement
th the Claims Conference on
w and where a part of the
>ney will be invested. But no
btails are as yet available.
?]
THE IDEA of the last
1970s after t was made clear that
many Jewish survivors of Nazi
persecution were not in a position
to forward their claims against
Germany in time to benefit from
the original reparation
agreement.
Most of the Jewish survivors
lived in the Soviet Union or other
East European countries when
the deadline for filing claims
expired; they were neither in-
formed nor legally able to take
the necessary measures in order
to get financial compensation for
suffering, or to recover property
plundered by the Nazis.
Former Chancellor Willv
Brandt, chairman of the ruling
Social Democratic Party,
negotiated the matter with Dr.
Nahum Goldmann, chairman of
the Claims Conference. He
reportedly promised that 1 billion
Marks would be made available
for the so-called "hard cases"
among the Jewish survivors. But
it became obvious that Brandt
had gone too far both politically
and financially.
HIS SUCCESSOR, Chancellor
Helmut Schmidt, felt himself
committed to the idea of a "last
gesture" but adopted a much
more pragmatic and realistic
attitude. He nominated former
Finance Minister Alex Moeller to
continue the negotiations with
the Claims Conference.
After a long period of
hesitation, Goldmann accepted
an offer of 660 million Marks
which seemed to reflect a sincere
desire of the Bonn government to
make final amends. But Schmidt
made the arrangement con-
ditional on the support of the
Christian Democratic opposition.
Despite lobbying efforts from
both Social Democrats and
Jewish organizations, this
support could not be assured, at
least not in advance.
According to the Frankfurter
Allgemeine Zeitung, the
agreement between Goldmann
and Moeller was opposed by
Franz-Joseph Strauss, leader of
the Bavarian Christian Social
Union who is now the opposition
candidate for chancellor.
FOLLOWING a new round of
negotiations in which leading
Israeli politicians were also oc-
casionally engaged, all three
parliamentary factions in the
Bundestag agreed to a "last
gesture" to be fixed at 440
million Marks.
Differences of opinion
remained about who should
present the necessary parliamen-
tary motion on the issue. The
opposition argued that it was up
to the government to include the
sum in its budget. The ruling
Social Democrats sought a joint
initiative of all parties
represented in the Bundestag.
Last Dec. 11, the government
included the 440 million Marks
"last gesture" in its budget for
1980 and asked the opposition to
accept it in advance. No
agreement could be reached,
however, in the Bundestag
THE MAIN problem was
caused by the Christian
Democratic Union (CDU) and the
Bavarian Christian Social Union
(CSU) joint faction which
demanded additional clarification
as to the use of the money to be
paid.
Later on it was made clear that
the issue involved a move to link
the "last gesture" payment to
the financial claims of certain
groups of civil servants of the
Third Reich, among them people
who were never cleared by the de-
Nazification tribunals and who
were barred from material
benefits under the Constitution.
1
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'''Way. Jwmary2j.
________The J ewisn r *.-------- .-------------; -------------^=5
Bonds Chairman Rifkin Urges a BiggerTftroJ
Irvin Rifkin, Palm Beach I
South County chairman for Israel
Bonds, has announced that Mrs.
Michael Comay, wife of the
former Israel Ambassador to the
UN., and Robert D. Rapaport,
Florida regional chairman, Israel
Bonds, installed the officers and
members of the Cabinet and the
Board of Governors at a cocktail
party Wednesday, Dec. 19, at the
Boca Teeca Country Club.
Rifkin is regarded as a leader in
the American Jewish community.
It is through his efforts that the
Israel Bond campaign has grown
from humble beginnings to where
it is now responsible for the sale
of more than $1 million in Israel
Bonds annually.
MEMBERS OF the Board of
Governors include:
Marjorie Baer, Molly
Brownstein. Robert Bymes, Cecil
Cohen. Solon Cohen, H. Phil
Cohn. Barbara Dunhauer. Dr.
Karl Enselberg, Murray Finard.
Benjamin Frankel, Leonard
Frankel, Barry Friedberg,
Florence Fuller, Irving Gennet.
Gerald Colden, Bruce Gilbert.
Max Halpert, Benjamin Jaffe,
Dr. Goldie Kaback, Philip
Klein, Allan Lake, Robert Lerner
Milton Levenberg, Samuel
London, and Robert Lurie.
Also, Joseph Maharan, Abe
Meltzer, Martin Moldow, Dr.
Myron Persoff, Hyman Rap-
paport, Charlotte Robinson,
Budd I. Rockower, Harry E.
Rockower, Mrs. Ruth Rosenz-
weig, Richard G. Schanz, Dr.
Albert Schiff, Martin Schugar.
Harry Segall, Bernard Sher, Max
Shustek, William Shipley. Rose
Viener, Dr. Ben Wetchler, and
Harold Yaffe.
INSTALLED AS members of
the Cabinet were:
Walter Ackerman, Dave Alper,
James Baer, Abe Bleier, Henry
Bloom. Morris Brownstein,
Robert Brynes, Morris Cofman,
Wilfrid Cohen, Marvin
Dekelboum, Abraham Elovitch,
Julius Elovitch. Maurice
Elovitch. Dr. Karl Enselberg,
Harry Fine, Saul Bluekman,
George Goldstein, Martin
Grossman. Ed Hatton. Herman
Herst Jr., Sidney Hildebrand,
David Kend. Ben Kessler,
Samuel Klein, Merw.n Kobacker,
Louis Medwin, Samuel Melton
Herman Meltzer Martin
Moldow, Harry MoskowiU. Dr.
Saul Newman, Julian Northcrolt.
Dr. Myron Persoff. Morns
Robinson. Arnold Rosenthal. Ur.
Samuel Rubin. Hy Safran. Abe
Savin, Richard Schanz, Joe
Schenck, Israel Shuster. Melvin
Schwartz, Arthur Taubman.
Ruben Tebeleff, Rubin Viener.
Burton Wollowick. and Philip
Zinman.
Members of the Honorary
Cabinet include Shepard Broad.
A very H. Fonda. Rabbi Moms
Silberman. Rabbi Samuel Silver.
Rabbi Merle Singer, Rabbi Bruce
Warshal. and Rabbi Nathan
Zelizer.
RIFKIN SAID that with the
assistance of such a
distinguished group, he is
confident that this years
campaign will be responsible lor
an even greater sale of Israel
Bonds than last year.
"It is important to remember.'
he went on. "that we must
redouble our efforts in behalf of
which are the
of funds with
Israel
created by the Wg"*"fiJ
between Israel and Egypt- We
are waging peace now,^not war.
And the redeployment
of
population from the Sim],,,
Negev is even more costly n
any battle. If everyone of u,H
has purchased an Israel BoJj
the past will sell one new,
chaser, we can reach our I
And I am sure that we will 4,.
The Concord Hotel
Invites You And Your Family
TO Share The Tradition Of
PASSOVER
Mon. March 31-Tues. April 8
Leaders Mourn Meany's Passing
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Jewish community leaders joined
with other Americans of all ranks
in mourning the loss of George
Meany who died last Thursday
after suffering a cardiac arrest at
the age of 85 at George
Washington University Hospital.
He retired three months ago after
being president of the AFL-CIO
for 27 years.
"No American was more
devoted to Israel's freedom as an
independent Jewish State than
George Meany." said Albert
Zack. who had been closely
associated with Meany for 22
years as director of public
relations for the AFL-CIO. "If
proof were needed of Meany's
feeling for Israel, it was
evidenced in the innumerable
acts of association and devotion
to Israel, in his speeches, his
appeals to the Congress and his
personal encouragement and
support to all Americans to help
Israel materially," Zack said.
A GOOD friend of all Israeli
leaders through the years, Zack
pointed out that Meany
"cherished among his closest
relationships his friendship with
Golda Meir." Ironically, Friday
was Zack's last day as the
"voice" of the AFL-CIO, since he
was retiring at age 62. His
successor is Saul Miller, director
of the AFL-CIO department of
publications since 1958, AFL-
CIO president Lane Kirkland
said.
Richard Maass, president of
the American Jewish Committee,
said the Committee "mourns the
passing of George Meany, a truly
great American whose lifetime
was devoted to enhancing the
dignity and welfare of working
men and women. American Jews
are particularly indebted to him
for his stalwart support in such
overriding issues as the security
of Israel, the plight of Soviet
Jewry, and the fight for the
preservation of human rights
everywhere."
Maxwell Greenberg, chairman
of the Anti-Defamation League,
and Nathan Perlmutter, ADL
director, said in a statement,
"We are proud to have fought
shoulder to shoulder with him in
the advancement of social justice
for all people. Throughout his
life, Mr. Meany forth rightly
opposed all forms of
totalitarianism, whether from the
right or left. He was a staunch
defender of American friendship
for Israel and was in the forefront
of the struggle against anti-
Semitism everywhere. The
Jewish people, like the nation and
the world, are bereaved."
B'NAI B'RITH president Jack
Spitzer observed that Meany
"was always in the forefront for
the protection of minorities and
for the cause of Soviet Jewry and
other oppressed people. He was
an outspoken supporter of Israel
and a vigorous opponent of all
forms of bigotry, violence and
terrorism."
In Israel, Histadrut secretary
general Yeruham Meshel
described Meany as a "great
labor leader and a friend of Israel.
He was a true democrat, a fighter
for freedom and for social justice.
He was a courageous man who
never hesitated to voice criticism
of the American establishment
and Administrations when they
violated the principles of freedom
and justice or harmed Israel."
George Meany
Cantor HERMAN
MALAMOOD
assisted by the
Concord Symphony Choir
directed by Jonathan Weiss
will officiate for the Services & Sedarim
Rabbi SIM0H C0H1H *
Rabbi S0L0M0H 8APHHR
supervise scrupulous Dietary Observance
Plus-a program of Lectures k Seminars, and
Special Holiday Entertainment
Counselor Supervised Day Camp Baby Sitters Availabla
Nite Patrol Teen Activities Special Children's Ratal
THE CONCORD HOTE
Kiamesha Lake. New York 12751 Hotel 914-794-4000
See your Travel Agent________^^


ky.January25, 1980
The J ewisHJ?loijjgian of South County
Page 13
fot All Jews Rich; Religious Ties Weak
Continued from Page 1
itions synagogues,
rations, fraternal
inizations humanize
iselves, that is reach beyond
established core to the young
u naff ilia ted. our heritage
not be transmitted to future
Irations," warns Dr. Sand-.
study, which the authors
Iribe as "a full and fair
ction of Jewish life," includes
following statistical ob-
lations:
linety-three percent of
indents declared themselves
jy to have been bom Jewish,
only 18 percent see being
lish as primarily religious,
le 61 percent perceive Jews as
Ithnic-cultural group.
HE SHIFT from a religious
^n ethno-cultural outlook "is
of the most significant
iges in Jewish life in the last |
leration," observes Dr.
Id berg.
imong members of
[ugogues and temples 29
bent total respondents 19
cent describe themselves as
lodox, 47 percent Con-
k-stive and 32 percent Reform.
ne 45 percent of respondents
Id they belonged to a
Igregation at one time, but had
jped out.
lowever, even the non-
lagogue members cling to
religious traditions, led by
ticipation in Passover seders
percent), lighting Chanukah
Idles (58 percent) and fasting
("om Kippur (49 percent).
)N THE material level, 40
cent of the Los Angeles
.i-h population is
jnomically marginal" (under
f,000ayear),while23 percent
i well-to-do ($40,000 or more a
Only 37 percent are self-
|ployed and, of those working
family firm, only 13 percent
Beet that business to continue
the family. Medicine, law,
bounting, teaching and social
k are becoming increasingly
ang Jewish professions.
Politically, Jews are retaining
their old loyalty to the
Democratic Party, with 80
percent identifying themselves as
Democrats and only 7 percent as
Republicans. In a more
meaningful categorization, 41
percent said they were liberals, 16
percent conservatives, and 5
percent radicals.
The latter figures contradict
both the old stereotype of Jews
as radicals and the recent per-
ception of a strong Jewish swing
to the conservative side.
However, there has been some
erosion in the strong Jewish civil
rights stand, in action if not in
words. While 88 percent of
respondents felt that Jews should
work to stop racial
discrimination, less than half
that number, 40 percent, ap-
proved busing their own children
to achieve school integration.
WITH ALL their diversity,
Los Angeles Jews are almost
unanimous in their support of
Israel. Although 83 percent have
never belonged to a Zionist
organization, and 71 percent have
never visited Israel, the over-
whelming majority (83 percent)
declared themselves very willing
to pressure U.S. policy in favour
of Israel.
In a sharp break with Jewish
passivity of earlier decades, 59
percent of respondents (and two-
thirds of the young educated
ones) said they would be willing
to use force to oppose Nazi-type
groups in the United States.
Dr. Sandberg expressed some
surprise at this attitude "as Jews
have always been strong civil
libertarians," but he attributes
the change to "an underlying fear
that anti-Semitism could again
become virulent."
JEWS now represent 2.7
percent of the total American
population, and intermarriage,
coupled with a low birthrate and
high median age (48 years for
Jews versus 29.4 for the country
as a whole) are seen as threats to
Jewish survival by the two
sociologists.
The survey found that 19
percent of respondents were
Sadat, Begin Look Forward
lASWAN (JTA) Prime
mister Menachem Begin and
esident Anwar Sadat wound
their summit meeting here
th a joint press conference at
liich both leaders acknowledged
at they had failed to reach
reement on the issue of
Itonomy and how it might
late to Jerusalem.
[They reaffirmed, however, that
normalization of relations
tween Israel and Egypt will
sed according to the
netable laid down by their
feace treaty.
[BEGIN TOLD reporters that
r-ial and telephonic com-
Jnications as well as civilian
ml. sea and air links would be
ened between the two countries
Jan. 26, followed by the ex-
range of Ambassadors on Feb.
iat reiterated that he in-
ided to implement nor-
Klization in accordance with the
Iter and the spirit of the peace
"ty. But he expressed
Bappointment over the impasse
autonomy for the West Bank
1 Gaza Strip.
M would have hoped to make
ogress on the autonomy issue,"
| said. He added, "We still have
"'." indicating that more
am it meetings will be needed.
e peace treaty calls for the
|tonomy negotiations to be
apleted by May 26.
*EGIN TOLD the press
reference that he would consider
Mat's propasal to implement
Itonomy first in the Gaza Strip
ONr OM'Hr MOST HFAL'I IH.I.
KrSOR'ISANYWHMU-.SAI.l'll'S
mi IHI MONDAYOt I IHI RAMON.
PASSOVER
M..H Man*HI-T.i.- \|.r.lK
CANTOR
IRVING ROGOFF
ANDIMh
NhVI IT SYMPHONY < HOIK
(:<)NI )l'( 11 I > H> < I II H WD NADM
ShRVK IS-NHHRIM
DR. CHAIM
ISRAEL ETROG
VOX OFFER A PROGRAM Of
LECTURES ANDCONIMXT
SKMINARS WRING THE HOLIDAY
H.ITNVII.IT.NhWYCWk L'O
HOIII. TII.:VI4*17*I>
married to non-Jews, and of those
with children, 26 percent have
children married to non-Jews.
"Only 1 percent of the im-
migrant generation in-
termarried, says Dr. Sandberg,
"while among iheir children, the
second generation, the rate
jumped to 10 percent, and to 18
percent among the third
generation." He has not yet
analyzed the data for the fourth
generation today's young men
and women but a widely ac-
cepted survey of a few years ago
placed the rate as well above 40
percent.
"The unprecedented social
freedom that Jews today enjoy in
the United States could well be
the greatest threat to their
survival," concludes Dr. San-
dberg.
To Jan. 26 Open Links
where the inhabitants are
believed to be more amenable
than on the West Bank. Egypt
believes it still exerts some in-
fluence in that territory which it
ruled until 1967. Begin said he
would submit the suggestion to
his Cabinet for consideration.
jt]' ';
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Page 14
The Jewish Fbrid^anofSouthCoun
rv
Friday, January
25.
Bury Old Dreams
U.S. Should Get Out of the UN
By DR. FRANKLIN
H. LITTELL
Some time ago the writer of
this column concluded, and
published his opinion, that the
United States should get out of
the United Nations and get the
UN out of the United States. At
the time, it seemed that the
vermiform appendix to world
order which is now the UN might
be allowed to pass away in the
elephants' graveyard of in-
ternational dreams Geneva,
Switzerland.
Now that it has become so
shameless a tool of the lynch
mobs of Islam and the neo-
colonialism of the Communist
empire, it seems quite wrong to
disgrace the city of John Calvin.
Let the remains of the UN be
interred in one of the places
representative of the standards of
those who run the organization:
say, Cambodia or Equatorial
Guinea, Libya or the Gulag
Archipelago.
LAST MONTH the Com-
munist and Muslim blocs
combined to push through the
UN Assembly two draft
resolutions which go far toward
guaranteeing war in the near
future, even if it can be avoided in
the Iranian crisis. One of them
recognized the terrorist
organization, the PLO, as a
necessary participant in all
Middle East negotiations. The
second declared the Egyptian-
Israeli peace treaty invalid.
Reasonable people still find it
hard to realize that the howling
mobs crying for the blood of
Carter, Begin, Sadat and the
Shah, and whipping themselves
into a frenzy of posturing
potential martyrdom outside the
violated U.S. Embassy in
Teheran, are not exceptions to
the rule.
On the contrary, they syn-
chronize perfectly in mood and
mind with the blood-thirsty mobs
that a few months ago greeted Idi
Amin and Arafat with wild
applause in the same UN
Assembly, and that have now set
out to negate any of the painful
steps toward peace which have
been taken in the Middle East.
The fact is, however, that Idi
Dr. Franklin H. Littell is a mem-
ber of the National Institute on
the Holocaust.
Amin and Arafat and Khomeini
are their kind. Most of the
governments represented in the
UN are either old-fashioned
despotisms or modern dic-
tatorships clerical fascist,
Muslim or Communist.
AMERICAN POLICY in
international affairs would be
greatly improved if Americans
would remind themselves from
time to time how few peoples
have ever heard of republican
principles, of checks and
balances, of liberty and self-
government let alone ex-
perienced them. For one thing,
we would not be startled and
dismayed when confronted with
mobs of howling primitives like
those raging in Teheran.
We would know that countries
whose supposedly educated
delegates to international bodies
like the UN will applaud an Idi
Amin and Aratat wildly are
capable of kidnapping and other
violations of basic diplomatic
rules at any time.
For another thing, we will
understand that three-fourths of
the countries of the world are
used to despots or dictators,
having never known anything
else yet, and that we cannot let
ourselves be dragged into ap-
plying a double moral standard in
preferring one arbitrary ruler to
another.
A FLOOD of propaganda,
including for example three
"news stories" in one day in the
New York Times, has been
launched against the Shah of
Iran. Now the Shah was never an
elected ruler, and it is no doubt
accurate to contrast the con-
ditions in the palace with the
conditions in the slums of
Teheran. The question is why the
same contrast is not made
between the palaces in Saudi
Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar, Libya,
Iraq, Syria, etc. and the slums in
those countries?
Compared with some of those
rulers, the Shah was a very
decent ruler, just as contrasted
with Khomeini and his secret
government the Shah was a very
enlightened despot.
About six years ago a flood of
stories critical of the Shah o Iran
and President Marcos of the
Philippines began to appear in
the newspapers and magazines
Both of them *."*"_
vulnerable to sharp criticism, in
terms of abstract principles. Bu
e,ther was as bad as .evenJ
dozens of rulers- from Bokassa
U> Qadaffi to Ho Chi Minn -
who remained virtually immune
from liberal" and informed
outside criticism. Why?
A LOOK at the world map
provides a ready answer as
with South Korea, another
vulnerable and frequently
criticized arbitrary government,
under the Shah and Marcos and
Park. Iran and the Philippines
and South Korea remained
soundly pro-Western barriers
against the expansion of Com-
munist hegemony in very
strategic positions.
We do not have to love any of
these arbitrary rulers to know
that they were singled out for a
barrage of media and
organizational attacks for
reasons other than their
brutalities and arbitrary style.
Outfits like the World Council
of Churches which never uttered
a word against the Syrian in-
vasion of Lebanon and the
destruction of Maronite villages,
which never breathed criticism of
the genocide of the Kurds, or the
National Council of Churches -
which has been a pipeline for
PLO propaganda for years, are
scarcely credible witnesses
against the Shah.
THEY ARE simply too
selective in their criticism of
some arbitrary rulers and praise
of others, their complaint against
some brutalities and their silenct
on others not to mention their
failure to deal with the crimes o!
terrorists of the left as well as thi
right to be given a respectful
hearing.
Policing the world is too big a
task for even the United States to
take on. We would do better
simply to see to it that our own
citizens are not abused or vic-
timized by despots or dictators
anywhere. But we might, in view
of the recent votes in the UN
Assembly, start making a
checklist of governments that
over the years live on American
credits and supplies and then
serve the interests of Muslim
terrorism and Communist
hegemony in every showdown.
We certainly cannot bring
down despotic or dictatorial
governments all around the world
_ 75 percent of the nations
would be left without govern-
ments of any kind, at that rate!
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But we don't have to
support for governn.,
operating in defiance'
republican principles, either.
For many years, the I
Assembly has welC0DJ
representatives of govern^'
that had declarations of war*,
against other member state, u
now has become the major worli
sounding board for pro-war ri
anti-peace combines. CommiZ
and Muslim.
IT IS TIME for the IJniJ
States to bury old dreams and
face present realities. It istimet.
swallow old sentiments and w
out of the UN, concentrating or,
those international cooperative
associations with our friends and I
allies that are available.
New Chapter of Pioneer Women
The newly formed Boca
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Women is the 38th Jewish
organization formed here in
South County.
Anyone interested in joining
the new Boca Raton Pioneer
Women may contact Mrs. Id
Kasova, Cornwall "D" 4067
Boca Raton, Florida 33434, the
new president of the group.
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January 26, 1980
The Jewish Floridian of South County
Page IS
ackground Report
No Real Solutions at Aswan
v DAVID LANDAU
AN (JTA) Israeli-
jan agreement on the
j involved in the Iranian and
anistan crises should serve
^ foundation of good will, co-
ition and understanding on
re shall build in the
is was the central message
Kmi" Minister Begin's public
fks at a dinner here
i-inn a working session of his
nit with President Anwar
hank God," said Begin,
lei and Egypt are on the side
kht. not wrong; justice, not
[opposite; freedom, not
ry" in the face of these two
Irks for the West.
THERE was no in-
[on from either Begin or
or their aides, that the
outlook would express
in specific operational terms
I immediate future.
I the bilateral issues between
\v.o countries, it was Sadat
let the tone in his after-
Ir comments when he said
f"We have overcome in the
Imuch more difficulties than
facing now."
le two leaders seemed
ted and at ease in each
i company during a dinner
by the Sadats for the
ns at the Israeli Prime
ster's hotel. They exchanged
er freely, and even at
nis when the conversation
Eii. there was none of the
Hy awkwardness between
that characterized their
er encounters.
A 50-minute meeting
er. which Begin described as
Id of tourd'horizon," the two
frs discussed regional and
developments and put off
(oday a detailed review of
outstanding bilateral
It ions: autonomy and nor-
pat ion.
idat was pointedly positive in
references at the dinner
Jess to the "progress that has
achieved." Continuing, he
ired:
M e both agreed that if any-
J had told either of us three
ts ago that all this would be
lMd today, neither I nor my
friend Menachem Begin, the
He Minister of Israel, could
believed it .
[hanks to God and to the
ts and genuineness of such
ers as Menachem Begin and
Jews Must
Stop Fearing
Criticizing Blacks
|EW YORK (JTA, A
ar Black leader, speaking
re the executive committee of
National Council of Jewish
ien (NCJW), said that some
are too "timid" when it
es to criticizing Black
rters of the Palestine
fration Organization (PLO>.
don't believe," said Norman
director of the A. Philip
lolph Institute, "that Jews
jld be timid when it comes to
ing disagreement about the
'HEN ANY Black leader or
Jl' embarks on a political
he which might very well
Irrnine the peace process in
I Middle East while at the
lime aiding the PLO the
fanatical enemy of Israel
the Jewish community
Jews have a right, indeed a
fusibility to disagree."
Jimmy Carter, we have reached
this point ... We have laid the
cornerstone for a just and
comprehensive settlement and
for peace to prevail forever." It
would be "only a matter of time,"
Sadat asserted, before others
joined the peace process.
"History never goes back," he
assured.
THE SIGHTSEEING part of
Begin's stay in upper Egypt
began with a somewhat hurried
visit to the famed temple of
Ramses II at Abu Simbel. The
Prime Minister allowed himself
only a brief half-hour to take in
the wonders of this ancient site.
200 miles south of here.
Begin listened without
reacting to the erudite ex-
planations offered by the en-
thusiastic young curator of Abu
Simbel, Dr. Atef Abu Dahab. His
wife, Aliza. though, showed lively
interest in the artistic and
mythological significance of the
rich bas reliefs that adorn the
temples. Later, she invited Dr.
Abu Dahab to visit Israel and see
the archaeological excavations
there.
Aliza Begin was especially fas-
cinated by Abu Dahab's account
of the precision geometry and
astronomy of the ancient Egyp-
tians, whereby they ensured in
the building of the temple that
the sun's rays shone into the holy
of holies precisely on the day of
the King-God's birthday.
ASKED TO sum up his im-
pressions after the tour, Begin
said, "This is a pagan temple
3,500 years old, and we have seen
with great admiration all that
they built. This is Egypt."
Arafat Reported
Quitting Attacks
By BARBIE ZELIZER
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- The leader of a U.S.
Congressional delegation
visiting the Middle East
said here that Palestine
Liberation Organization
Chief Yasir Arafat told
them he would no longer
attack Israel from
Lebanon.
Rep. Toby Moffett (D.,
Conn.), who is of Lebanese
origin, also said there was
"a case to be made" for
Israel's retaliatory raids on
Palestinian terrorist bases
in south Lebanon.
AT A meeting with Labor
Party Chairman Shimon Peres in
the Knesset, Moffet said his
group had met with Arafat in
Beirut earlier to exchange views
on the security of both Lebanon
and Israel. "He (Arafat) pledged
to keep his promise not to attack
Israel anymore from Lebanon
for whatever that is worth,"
Moffett said.
He said he and five other
members of Congress on the
study mission to the region were
shown "the damage done by
Israel in south Lebanon." He
said "We can't fully understand
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Begin and his party were flown
to Abu Simbel and back aboard
Sadat's Boeing 737 jet.
Accompanying them were Egyp-
tian Housing Minister Ahmed
Hifnawi and his wife who were
delegated as the Begins' official
hosts during this visit.
yet what happened. Only Israel
can fully understand how
frustration can lead to
retaliation. But we know there is
a case to be made, that the Israeli
actions did some good to the
security situation."
Moffett also told Peres that he
had warned Syrian President
Hafez Assad in Damascus that
the presence of his forces in
Lebanon was wearing thin and
that he had counseled the Syrian
leader that the Lebanese central
government should bring
together all the groups without
engaging the assistance of
outsiders. Moffett added that his
group felt that the role of the
United Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL) should be
expanded.
PERES SAID that Israel's
policy in south Lebanon was
"coordinated tacitly with the
national leadership in the north."
He said Lebanon had always
managed to preserve a delicate
communal balance before the
PLO upset the equilibrium.
"Israel does not distinguish
between Moslems and Christians,
just between terrorists and those
who keep the peace," Peres said.
He noted further that the Labor
Party sought a binational Jor-
danian-Palestinian solution to
the problem of some 200,000
Arab refugees still living in
camps in Lebanon.
Robert K. Alsofrom, Ph.D., PA
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Page 16
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