Mango : bits & bites

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Material Information

Title:
Mango : bits & bites
Physical Description:
34 p. : ill (col.) ; 22 cm
Language:
English
Creator:
Clarke, Clarice C.
Publisher:
St. Croix, V.I. : UVI, Cooperative Extension Service
Place of Publication:
St. Croix, V.I. : UVI, Cooperative Extension Service,

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
mango, cooking (mangoes)   ( lcsh )

Notes

General Note:
Published in conjunction with the annual celebration of "Mango Melee - a festival fruits and family fun."

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Virgin Islands
Holding Location:
University of Virgin Islands
Rights Management:
All rights reserved by the source institution.
Resource Identifier:
SB379 .M28 M35 1999
System ID:
AA00014303:00001


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text







I rig









Mango: Bits & Bites


Editing, Layout, Design and Photos
by
Clarice C. Clarke
Public Information Specialist
UVI Cooperative Extension Service







ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


Many thanks to those who offered technical assistance: Dr. Christopher
Ramcharan, Associate Professor, UVI Agricultural Experiment Station, Clinton
George, Program Leader, Agriculture and Natural Resources, UVI Cooperative
Extension Service, Alice Henry, Extension Specialist, Foods and Nutrition, UVI
Cooperative Extension Service, Stafford Crossman, Research Specialist, UVI
Agricultural Experiment Station, Ruby Mason, UVI Student and Marvin Williams,
UVI Assistant Professor.


Copies available from:
University of the Virgin Islands
Bookstore
RR02, Box 10,000
Kingshill, St. Croix 00850
(340)692-4162
or
2 John Brewer's Bay
St. Thomas, USVI 00802-9990
(340) 693-1561

University of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service
RR02, Box 10,000
Kingshill, St. Croix USVI 00850
(340) 692-4080



Mango: Bits & Bites is desktop published by the University of the Virgin Islands Cooperative
Extension Service, Kwame Garcia, Sr., State Director. Contents of this publication constitute public
property. Neither endorsement of products or firms is intended, nor criticism implied of those not
mentioned. Issued by the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service and the U.S. Department of
Agriculture in furtherance of the acts of May 8 and June 30, 1914. Extension programs and policies
are consistent with federal and state laws and regulations on nondiscrimination regarding race, color,
national origin, religion, gender, age, disability or gender preference.







FOREWORD


The mango has been a favorite fruit in the Caribbean region for centuries. In the
US Virgin Islands, this fruit is rapidly gaining special status among the hierarchy of
fruits. For the past two years, on the island of St. Croix, ordained mango growers hold
a one-day celebration called "Mango-Melee." The divine purpose of this family
celebration is to educate the populace about the benefit of cultivating and consuming
the illustrious mango fruit.

At the University of the Virgin Islands, Cooperative Extension Service, our staff
are also deeply involved in uplifting the genetic quality, nutritional value and
palatability of the "King of Fruits." By using the internet, communicating by e-mail, the
telephone, and regular mail, our horticulturists and food production specialists are in
daily contact with fellow scientists worldwide, ever seeking to gain even the smallest
bit of knowledge to further elevate the mango. Indeed over the years, new and
improved varieties have been developed. And so, I have requested our staff to put
together a brief document that also pays tribute to the mango fruit. This publication,
Mango: Bits & Bites, provides description, varietal selection, care and maintenance,
nutritive value and recipes.

Mango: Bits & Bites is published in conjunction with the annual celebration of
"Mango Melee A Festival Fruits and Family Fun." Enjoy the information and mango
recipes presented in this book.




Kwame Garcia, Sr.
State Director
Cooperative Extension Service
University of the Virgin Islands






TABLE OF CONTENTS

Foreword ......................................................................................................... 3
Introduction ...................................................................................................... 5
Description ..................................................................................................... 5
Varieties ............................................................................................................ 6
Soils & Clim ate................................................................................................. 6
Planting & Fertilizing .................................................................................... 7
Pruning ......................................................................................................... 8
Propagation .................................................................................................. 8
Pests................................................................................................ .............. 9
Harvesting ...................................................................................................... 10
Storage & Uses .............................................................................................. 11

MANGO RECIPES
M ango Sauce.................................................................................................. 15
M ango Upside-Down Cake............................................................................ 16
M ango Chiffon Pie ...................................................................................... 17
M ango Brown Betty....................................................................................... 18
M ango Crum ble.............................................................................................. 19
M ango Bread .................................................................................................. 20
M ango Nut Bread ...................................................................................... 21
M ango Drop Nectar........................................................................................ 22
M ango Drop Dessert...................................................................................... 22
M ango Sherbet............................................................................................... 23
M ango-Papaya M ousse.................................................................................. 24
Baked Custard With Sliced Mangoes ......................................................... 25
M ango Ice Cream ........................................................................................ 26
M ango Chutney .............................................................................................. 27
Sweet M ango Relish ..................................................................................... 28
Spiced M ango Pickle...................................................................................... 29
Curried Chicken & Mango Salad .................................................................. 30
Mango Tarts .................................................................................................... 31
M ango-Papaya Jam ....................................................................................... 32
M angoade ........................................ ..................................... ........... ............ 33
M ango Punch .................................................................................................. 34






INTRODUCTION


Mango (Mangifera in-
dica) originated in the Indo-
Burma region and has been
cultivated in India for more
than 4,000 years. Its distri-
bution gradually spread and
the fruit is now grown n
throughout the tropical world
including the Virgin Islands
where it is one of our most
popular fruits. Mango be-
longs to (Anecardiaceae)
the same family of plants as
the cashew, local plums
and golden apple. The tree
itself is tough and drought
tolerant. It also makes an
excellent shade tree in the
landscape.

Mango is probably a more
important fruit in the tropics
than is apple in the temperate zone and is universally considered one of the finest
fruits in the world.

DESCRIPTION
The mango is a medium to large evergreen tree with small pinkish-white flowers
borne in inflorescent clusters usually from December to April. Although the size
and shape of the fruit is variable, most are either greenish, yellow or red in color.
The fruits can ripen on the tree, but to avoid damage from the feeding of birds and
bats or falling to the ground, they should be harvested as soon as they are mature.
This is usually indicated by fruits changing color from green to yellow.






VARIETIES
There are numerous varieties, the most popular being Kidney, Julie, Manzano
and some of the Florida varieties. Fruit and tree characteristics are summarized in
Table 1 and 2.


SOILS AND CLIMATE
Mango grows best in a deep, well-drained fertile soil but will grow and produce
on a wide variety of soil types. The plant has a strong, vigorous rooting system
which will penetrate a large area to obtain nutrients. There may be some problem in
soils containing caliche or calcium carbonate (lime) as occurs in the Virgin Islands.
The plant will thrive with rainfall ranging between 30 to 100 inches per year, but for
maximum fruit production a prolonged and severe dry season is necessary. Climatic
conditions in the Virgin Islands are therefore ideal for good production. Mangoes
are prone to irregular or biannual bearing but this habit varies between varieties.
Although no cause or solution has yet been found, climatic conditions appear to
have considerable effect on this characteristic. The longer and more severe the
dry season, the more regular the cropping habit. Potassium nitrate sprays (see
Fertilizing) can be used to overcome the biannual bearing problem in susceptible
cultivars (e.g. Haden).







PLANTING
A hole large enough
to accommodate the
rooting system is dug
at the planting site,
taking care to remove
all large stones. The
soil is then mixed with
an equal volume of
rotted manure or peat
moss, and the young
plant is planted to the
same level as it was
in the container. It is
not necessary to form ...... "i n
a large mound around
the plant, but the soil
should be formed so as to prevent collection of water around the base of the plant.
Planting distance depends upon soil conditions, current technology, and economic
factors. Under Virgin Islands conditions, plants are normally planted 15 to 30 ft.
apart within rows and 30 ft. between rows. In the dry season newly planted trees
should be watered twice or more per week with about 4 to 6 gallons until they are
established. Dried vegetation can be used as mulch, which benefits even large
mature trees. In windy areas, young transplants should be staked. Mangoes do
not need windbreaks. However, they do provide a most effective windbreak for
other crops while giving a valuable economic return.

FERTILIZING
During the first year, young trees should receive fertilizer every 2 months begin-
ning with a 1/4 lb. and gradually increasing to 1 lb./tree. After the first year, 3 to 4
applications per year in amounts proportionate to the increasing size of the tree are
adequate. Fertilizer mixtures containing 6 to 10 % nitrogen, 6 to 10 % available
phosphorus, 6 to 10 % potash and 4 to 6 % magnesium give good results with
young trees (see Gardeners Factsheet #16 for details on fertilizer labels). For
bearing trees, potash should be increased to 9 to 15 % and available phosphorus
reduced to 2 to 4 %. Large bearing trees should be fertilized immediately when the
trees start to bloom and after the final harvest of the season. About 1/4 lb. of





fertilizer per inch of tree trunk diameter is a
good application. Fertilizer should be scat-
tered well away from the trunk and out as far
as the limbs of the tree extend.

Plants growing in high calcium soils
(caliche) often show zinc, copper and
manganese deficiency symptoms. These
problems can be corrected by applying trace
element mixes (see Gardeners Factsheet
#16). Encouraging results have been
obtained in the Virgin Islands with foliar
sprays of Kocide 101, a copper fungicide,
which can correct copper deficiency while
also giving good protection from leaf spots,
scab and blight diseases. In conjunction with CleoAscencio, USDA (retired), preparing
stem (soluble trace element mix), this scion (stem) for grafting mango.
treatment is recommended for trees affected
by the mango decline problem.

PRUNING
Periodic inspections of the newly planted tree are necessary to insure that growth
from the stock region does not grow up and weaken the scion (see Gardeners
Factsheet #14). This is most likely to occur during the first year's growth. All
growth originating below the graft union must be gradually removed. Little pruning
of young trees is necessary except for the removal of dead or dying branches;
when removing branches, cut cleanly back to the branch origin without leaving a
stub. Deflowering of young newly-planted grafted trees is recommended.

PROPAGATION
Mangoes are propagated vegetatively and by seed. Plants produced from seeds
vary considerably in their growth habits, disease resistance and fruit characteristics.
They usually grow to a large size before flowering and fruiting, e.g., the Kidney
mango found throughout theVirgin Islands. These produce vigorous seedlings and
are good stock material for producing grafted plants (see Gardeners Factsheet
#14). Most of the desired varieties are propagated by grafting and budding. The
side-veneer graft is the most common method used, but chip and shield budding





are also practiced. The local Manzano produces fruit in 3 to 5 years from seed.

Grafted trees will begin to bear 3 to 4 years after planting and average yields of
3 to 5 bushels (174 to 290 Ibs.) can be expected from mature trees. Propagation
by cuttings and air layers have been reported but these are rare and not very
practical. Recently, good success with air layering using a 2% NAA Lanolin-based
paste has been obtained at UVI Agricultural Experiment Station.

PESTS
Mangoes are relatively free from insect pests. Occasionally, there may be some
infestation with scales, mites, aphids or thrips. For young trees, a thorough wash-
ing with mild detergent or application of Malathion or Azadirachtin plus horticultural
oil is often adequate. When a serious infestation occurs, you can contact the Uni-
versity of the Virgin Islands Cooperative Extension Service for more information on
control measures.


Anthracnose fungal disease is probably the most serious problem with mango.
This fungus causes black spotting of leaves, flowers and fruits. Affected flowers
and fruitlets are shed and the entire crop may be lost. Mature fruit may develop
tear stains and even fruits which appear clean will develop anthracnose spotting
upon ripening. Anthracnose can be avoided by planting the trees in well-drained






exposed areas which have free air movement
and consistent low humidity during the flower-
ing and fruiting season.

Areas with prolonged and pronounced dry
season are favorable for flowering and fruiting
as well as anthracnose control. Proper spacing
to avoid crowding of trees also promotes proper
flower development and reduces incidence of
diseases. Successful disease control can also
be achieved by using Benomyl and copper fun-
gicides. For more information, contact the UVI
Cooperative Extension Service.

Mango scab is also caused by a fungus. Infec-
tion spots on leaves are small, angular and dark
brown to black in color. On fruits, brown irregu-
lar spots appear which become corky and
cracked. Scab is not as severe or common on
mango as anthracnose. Copper sprays are rec- Jakarta
ommended for scab control.

HARVESTING
Most varieties can be picked several days before ripening and be of good quality.
Julie mango must be picked very close to ripening for best quality so that a particular
tree should be harvested over a 2 to 3 day interval. Fruits should be handpicked and
handled gently at all times to avoid bruising. Long handled bags can be used to pick
fruits high up on trees. After picking, fruits should be packed in rigid 30 lb. containers
(wood or plastic) that are lined with a soft material such as straw or polyfoam.
Anthracnose spotting of ripe fruits can occur and this renders fruits unsightly and
unsellable. This problem can be reduced or eliminated by hot water treatment of
fruits after harvesting, at a temperature of 1240 to 1250F (510 to 51.50C) for 15
minutes. The temperature and timing for this treatment are critical. If exceeded,
fruit injury will result but treatment is also ineffective if the correct temperature and
time are not observed. Recent research at UVI Agricultural Experiment Station
(AES) indicated that foliar sprays of 4-6% KNO3 applied from September to November
before flowering can produce more uniform flowering and fruiting.






STORAGE
Mangoes may be stored cold before ripening at 500F (100C) and after ripening
from 450 to 500F (7.20 to 100C). Below these temperatures chilling effects appear
which include failure to ripen properly, anthracnose spotting and development of
other skin blemishes.

USES
The mango fruit is used in many ways, with fresh consumption being the most
important. The pulp is delicious as well as very nutritious. It is a source of vitamin
A and C, contains fair levels of thiamin and niacin and 10 to 20 % sugar. Mangoes
can also be frozen, dried, canned or cooked in jams, jellies, preserves, pies, chutney
and ice cream.


Keitt







TABLE I


Valencia Pride


MANGO CHARACTERISTICS OF FRUIT

Maturity Color Flesh Embryo Recommended
Cultivar Season When Ripe Size (Ibs.) Fiber Texture Type Use

EARLY
Edwards M.J.JL pink, yellow 3/4 1 1/2 None Medium Mono H
Flodigon M.J,JL green, yellow 1/2 1 None Soft Poly H
Manzano M,J,JL red,pink,yellow 1-2 Little Medium Poly H

MID SEASON
Care JJL yellow 3/4 1 None Soft Mono H
Haden JJL red.orange,yellow 1 11/2 Very little Firm Mono H
Irwin J.JL red,pink,yellow 3/4 1 None Soft Mono C,H
Julie J.JL pink, yellow 3/4 1 None Soft Mono C,H
Kidney J.JL yellow 1/2 3/4 Very fibrous Soft Poly H
Tommy Atkins J.JL red,pink,yellow 1 1 1/2 Very little Firm Mono C,H

LATE MID SEASON
Graham J.JLA yellow 1 1/4-2 Very little Soft Mono C,H
Jakarta J.JLA orange-yellow 1 1/4-2 Very little Medium-soft Mono C,H
(orange-red blush)
Parvin JLA greenish-yellow 1 -1 3/4 LiUttle Firm Mono C,H
with dark red blush
Sensation JLA red,pink,yellow 3/4 1 Very little Soft Mono H
Smith JL,A yelow-orange 1 1/4 2 Medium Firm Mono H
(crimson blush)
Springfels JLA pink,yellow 2-4 Very MWie Medium Mono H
Valencia Pride JLA yellow with pink 3/4-2 Little fiber Firm Mono C,H
to dark-red blush

LATE SEASON
Keitt JLA,S pink.yellow 1 1/2 -4 Very little Medium Mono C,H
Kent JLA,S red.pink,yellow 1 1/2-2 None Soft Mono C,H
Palmer JL,A,S red,yellow 1 1 1/2 None Medium Mono C,H


M= May, J=June, JL=July, A=August, S= September, Mono= Monoembryonic, P= Polyembryonic,
H= Home, C= Commercial





TABLE 2


MANGO CHARACTERISTICS OF MATURE TREE

Rate of Fruit
Cultivar Size Growth Foliage Production


EARLY
Edwards
Florigon
Manzano


MID SEASON
Carrie
Haden
Irwin
Julie
Kidney
Tommy Atkins


Medium
Medium
Large


Dwarf
Large
Dwarf
Dwarf
Very large
Large


LATE MID SEASON
Graham Medium
Jakarta Med. to large


Parvin

Sensation
Smith


Springfels
Valencia Pride


LATE SEASON
Keitt
Kent
Palmer


Medium

Medium
Large


Small
Large



Large
Large
Large


Moderate
Moderate
Fast


Moderate
Fast
Slow
Very slow
Fast
Moderate


Moderate
Moderate

Vigorous

Fast
Vigorous


Dense
Dense
Dense


Dense
Dense
Semi open
Dense
Dense
Dense


Dense
Dense

Dense


Low
Moderate
Heavy


Moderate
Moderate to Heavy
Heavy
Heavy
Heavy
Heavy


Moderate
Moderate

Moderate


Semi open Heavy
Dense Moderate


Very slow Semi open Moderate to Heavy
Vigorous Open Moderate


Moderate
Moderate
Moderate


Open
Dense
Semi open


Heavy
Moderate to Heavy
Heavy




Mango


Recipes


""w





Mango Sauce

3 pints green mangoes, peeled and sliced
1 cup water
1 1/2 cups light brown sugar OR
3/4 cup light brown sugar and
3/4 cup corn syrup


Steam or cook green mangoes in water until tender. The green mango is very
acidic and gives the best product. Many varieties cook quickly to a mush.

Sweeten mangoes according to acidity and family preferences and cook for 5
minutes longer. Serve like apple sauce as a dessert, or use for mango sauce cake,
in sherbert, mousse, or in ice cream.

To Can:

Pack the boiling hot sauce in hot sterilized jars; seal and immediately process in
water-bath 10 minutes at boiling. The fruit may be canned, sweetened or unsweetened,
as preferred. If the mangoes are stringy, press through a sieve to remove fiber.

To Freeze:

Cool sauce. Pack in freezer containers. Seal, label and freeze.

Serves 16 (approximately 1/2 cup sauce per serving).



Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
140 0 0 36 8 0





Mango Upside-Down Cake

2 cups sliced-ripe mangoes
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 tablespoon margarine
1/3 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1/2 cup sugar
1 egg, beaten
1/2 cup milk
1 1/4 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt


Pour lemon juice over mangoes and let stand for 15 minutes. Melt margarine in
8-inch cake pan or casserole (do not use iron skillet as mangoes will darken). Add
brown sugar and cover with mango slices.

To prepare cake batter, cream butter or margarine and sugar; add beaten egg. Sift
dry ingredients and add alternately with milk. Pour over mangoes and bake 50 to 60
minutes at 3750 F. When cake is done, turn upside down and serve while warm.

Serves 8.





Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) W (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
276 9 4 48 246 44
(with butter and whole milk)





Mango Chiffon Pie

1 cup sweetened green mango sauce
4 eggs, separated
3/4 cup sugar
1 tablespoon gelatin
1/4 cup cold water
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 baked 9-inch pie shell
1/2 cup sweetened whipped cream


Soak gelatin in 1/4 cup cold water. Press mango sauce through a sieve. Beat egg
yolks slightly. Add the mango sauce and 1/4 cup sugar. Cook the mixture over hot
water until it thickens. Add gelatin. Stir until gelatin dissolves, remove from heat.

Add lemon juice and cool. Add salt to egg whites, beat until stiff, then beat in
remaining sugar. When the gelatin mixture begins to thicken, fold in the egg whites,
and pour into the pie shell. Place the pie in the refrigerator to chill.

Before serving spread the top with sweetened whipped cream.

Serves 5-6.





Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
354 14 7 50 414 146





Mango Brown Betty


2 cups half-ripe mango slices, firmly packed
3 tablespoons butter or margarine
2/3 cup bread crumbs, divide into 3 equal parts
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 lemon rind, grated
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 tablespoons water


Melt butter or margarine and add bread crumbs. Place a thin layer of buttered
crumbs in an oiled baking dish and add a layer of mango. For firm mangoes, sprinkle
with 1 tablespoon water.

Combine sugar and cinnamon. Sprinkle the fruit with half the sugar mixture, lemon
juice and rind. Add another layerof crumbs and repeat process. Top with remaining
bread crumbs.

Bake in a 350 F oven until mangoes are soft, about 1 hour.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates
(g) (g) (g)


Sodium Cholesterol
(mg) (mg)


252 6 2 49 149 15
(with butter)

Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
252 6 2 49 157 0
(with margarine)




Mango Crumble

2 cups mangoes, chopped (approximately 4 mangoes)
1 cup flour
1/4 cup margarine
1/3 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup corn flakes, crushed
1/4 cup white sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Pare and cut mangoes into small pieces. Set aside. Cut margarine into flour, add
brown sugar. Sprinkle this mixture into a well greased pie pan, press firmly into the
shape of the pan. Chill. Mix corn flakes with white sugar and cinnamon.

Preheat oven to 4000 F and remove pie pan from refrigerator. Arrange the mango
evenly over the top of the chilled flour mixture. Cover with the crumb mixture.

Bake 20-30 minutes or until brown. Remove from oven, cool slightly, then cut into
serving portions. Serve when cooled.

Serves 8.

Each serving provides:



Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
205 6 2 37 103 0






Mango Bread


2 tablespoons white sugar
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1/4 cup margarine
1/4 cup shortening
1 pkg. yeast
4 cups enriched flour
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1 egg, beaten
3/4 cup mango puree or (a very ripe crushed mango)
1/2 cup water, 2 tablespoons powdered milk
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
2 teaspoons orange rind (grated)
1 teaspoon salt


In a small bowl, add yeast to warm water, let rest for 2-3 minutes. Combine flour
and baking powder.

In a large bowl, cream margarine, shortening, sugar, essence and egg; beat well.
Add mango puree, yeast mixture, milk, salt, orange rind and 1 cup of flour; beat well
for about 3 minutes. Set aside until bubbly.

Gradually add remaining flour to form a stiff dough. Turn onto floured board and
knead for 3 minutes. Cover and let rise until doubled in bulk. Shape into loaf and place
in loaf pan. Let rise until doubled.

Bake at 450 F for 1 hour. Serving size = 1/10 of loaf.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
315 10 7 48 302 2





Mango Nut Bread

1/2 cup butter, softened
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 1/4 cups diced mango
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 tablespoon lime juice
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/4 cup dry milk
1/2 cup nuts, chopped (cashews, pecans or walnuts)


Mix butter and sugartogether. Add eggs and mix well. Add mango. Add remaining
ingredients and mix well. Bake in a 9 x 5-inch loaf pan in preheated 3500 F oven for
45 minutes.


Serving = 1/10 of loaf.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates
(g) (g) (g)


255


6 6


Sodium Cholesterol
(mg) (mg)
149 3


Courtesy: Georgia Home Economics





Mango Drop Nectar


Permit drops to turn yellow; collect. Wash and slice fruit with skin from seed.
Chop in blender with 1/2 cup water added.

Strain through cheese cloth or fine strainer. Add water and sugar to taste. Chill
and serve. To make sauces and pie filling, handle as you would mature or ripe fruits.

The term "drop" refers to young fruits that fall from the tree before the mature
stage.







Mango Drop Dessert



Peel fruit, slice and soak in salted water overnight to remove excess acid. Rinse
well. Cook in light syrup until soft. Chill. Serve with custard sauce.


Nutrient composition for mango drops is unavailable.





Mango Sherbet

2 cups sugar
3/4 cup water
2 cups thick green mango sauce
1/3-1/2 cup orange or pineapple juice
3 cups milk
1 egg white


Dissolve sugar in water by bringing to the boiling point. Add juice. Cool the syrup.
Add fruit and milk. Add the unbeaten egg white.

Pour into freezing container and freeze, using 8 parts of ice to 1 part of rock salt.
The mixture may curdle, but this does not affect the finished product.

For freezing in a mechanical refrigerator, dissolve 2 cups sugar in water and
combine with fruit and milk. Pour into freezing tray and freeze quickly.

When partially frozen, beat egg white until stiff. Add 1/2 cup sugar and beat until
sugar is dissolved. Fold into mango mixture. Continue freezing. Stir every half hour
until frozen to sherbert stage.

Yield: 1 1/2 quarts. Serving size: 1 cup.



Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
374 4 5 84 73 16
(with orange juice and whole milk)

Mangoes are a good source of vitamin A and Beta Carotene.





Mango-Papaya Mousse


cup ripe papaya pulp
cup half-ripe mango pulp
cup very ripe mango pulp
tablespoons sugar
tablespoons lemon juice
cup evaporated milk


Peel papaya and mangoes and press through sieve. Add sugar and 1 tablespoon
lemon juice. Set aside until sugar is dissolved.

Chill evaporated milk and 1 tablespoon lemon juice in a small bowl in freezing
compartment of refrigerator until small crystals appear around the sides.

Whip milk until stiff. Fold in the mango-papaya mixture. Pour into a refrigerator pan
and freeze for 4 to 6 hours.

Serves 4.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates


Sodium Cholesterol


(mg)


(mg)


167 3 3 36 36 9
(with whole evaporated milk)

Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
150 0 3 37 39 1


(with skim evaporated milk)






Baked Custard With Sliced Mangoes


cups milk
cup sugar
teaspoon salt
eggs
teaspoon vanilla essence
cup sliced ripe mangoes


Heat milk to the simmering point and add sugar and salt. Beat eggs slightly and
add to hot milk. To add eggs pour a little hot mixture over eggs; pour back into cooking
container while stirring. Add vanilla.

Place mango slices in bottom of custard cups or baking dish and pour custard over
slices.

Set dishes in a pan of water and bake in a slow oven (3000 F) about 1 hour. To
test, insert a knife blade, and if it comes out clean, remove the custard from oven.
Cool and serve.

Serves 6.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates
(g) (g) (g)


Sodium Cholesterol
(mg) (mg)


134 5 5 19 106 82
(with whole milk)

Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)


2 5


19
(with nonfat milk)


108





Mango Ice Cream


4 eggs
2 1/2 cups sugar
4 cups half and half (milk)
4 cups heavy cream
2 1/2 cups ripe mango chunks
2 tablespoons vanilla essence
1/2 teaspoon salt


Beat eggs until fluffy. Add sugar and salt. Blend in half and half, heavy cream
and vanilla essence. Add 2 1/2 cups mango chunks. Cool and chill. Pour into ice
cream freezer and churn until stiff.

Serves 24.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates
(g) (g) (g)


Sodium Cholesterol
(mg) (mg)


20 3


302





Mango Chutney

6 ripe but firm mangoes
1 cup ripe papaya, peeled and chopped
1 cup vinegar
1 cup raisins
2 garlic cloves
1 large piece fresh ginger, peeled and grated*
2 tablespoons dry mustard
1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste
1 cup brown sugar
1 hot pepper (optional)
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg

Wash and peel the mangoes. Separate the fruit from the seeds and cut into small
pieces. Put into a heavy pot with papaya and 1/2 cup vinegar. Boil until soft.

Chop raisins, garlic, nutmeg, ginger, and pepper; add to mango and vinegar
mixture. Add mustard and salt, mix well and continue cooking on moderate heat. Mix
sugar and remaining vinegar in small saucepan and bring to a boil. Add to mango
mixture and cook a few minutes longer, stirring constantly.

Store in refrigerator. Total cooking time approximately 30 minutes. Makes 3 cups.

*Piece is about 2 inches by 2 inches. 1/4 cup = 1 serving.




Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
185 1 1 47 108 0






Sweet Mango Relish


1 quart green mature mangoes, chopped
1 large onion
2 large sweet red peppers
1 tablespoon salt
2 teaspoons mustard seeds
2 teaspoons celery seeds
3-4 cups sugar
1 cup vinegar
2 cups raisins (optional)


Peel green mangoes, cut from seed, chop or put through coarse blade of food
chopper enough to make one quart. Chop or grind onions and sweet red peppers.
Add one tablespoon of salt, one tablespoon each white mustard seed and celery
seed, four cups sugar and one cup vinegar. Two cups raisins may be added if
desired.

Combine all ingredients. Bring to a boil for 10 minutes. Let stand overnight. Next
morning cook until slightly thickened. Pack while hot into sterilized jars. Cool. Seal.

Makes 4 pints.

Each 1/2 cup serving provides:




Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
156 .4 .8 41 3 0
(with raisins)






Spiced Mango Pickle


1-1/2 cups white vinegar
1-1/2 cups water
3 cups sugar
5 small sticks cinnamon, or 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 tablespoon whole cloves
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon chopped fresh ginger root
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
3 pounds peeled, sliced green mangoes (six slices from each of
17 mangoes)


Combine all ingredients except mangoes. Boil syrup for five minutes. Add sliced
mangoes; cook until tender and clear, 30-45 minutes. Strain off syrup. If mangoes
are sour, add 1/4 to 1/2 cup more sugar to syrup. Pack mangoes into hot sterilized
jars. Add syrup and seal. Yield: 3 pints.

Six slices provide:





Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
182 .2 .4 49 31 0





Curried Chicken & Mango Salad


3/4 cup plain nonfat yogurt
1 tablespoon lime juice
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon curry powder
1/8 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
1 small head romaine lettuce, chopped
1 large carrot, shredded
1 green bell pepper, diced
2 cups cooked, cut-up chicken (from canned or leftover
rotisserie-cooked chicken)
1 cup diced mango
4 whole-grain rolls

Combine yogurt, lime juice, honey, curry powder, salt and pepper in a small mixing
bowl. Stir to blend well. Set aside.

Toss together lettuce, carrot and bell pepper. Divide evenly among 4 serving
plates.

Toss together chicken and mango; spoon over tossed salad. Spoon dressing
over salad. Serve immediately, along with whole grain rolls.

Makes 4 servings.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates Sodium Cholesterol
(g) (g) (g) (mg) (mg)
225 3 28 38 170 75


Courtesy: Daily News.





Mango Tarts


4 mangoes
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon cornstarch
2 egg yolks, beaten
2 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
8 pastry tart shells, baked
Whipped cream
Water

Peel mangoes and slice thinly into saucepan; add sugar and 1/2 cup water. Cook
over low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Mix cornstarch with 2 teaspoons
water and gradually beat into egg yolks. Gradually stir hot fruit into egg yolk mixture.
Return to heat. Continue to cook, stirring constantly, or until thick and smooth. Stir
in butter and cinnamon; cool. Fill pastry tart shells and decorate with a border of
whipped cream.

Makes 8 medium size tarts.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates
(g) (g) (g)


Sodium
(mg)


Cholesterol
(mg)


12 2


Courtesy: Mangoes, Anyway You Like Them.


325






Mango-Papaya Jam

8 cups peeled.mango slices (ripe)
4 cups water
8 cups green papaya slices
8 cups sugar



Cook mango slices in 2 1/2 cups water until tender. Press through a coarse
strainer. Cook the papaya in the remaining water until soft.

Combine papaya and mango, add sugar, and cook slowly until of proper consis-
tency for jam. Pack in hot sterile jars and seal with paraffin.

Makes approximately 20 cups.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates
(g) (g) (g)


470 0 12 0 0


(per one tablespoon)


Sodium Cholesterol
(mg) (mg)





Mangoade

1/4 cup sugar
3 cups water
1 1/2 cups ripe mango pulp pressed through sieve
1 cup orange juice
1/4 orange rind, grated

Combine sugar, water, and orange rind and bring to the boiling point. Cool. Add
mango pulp and fruit juice and chill. Pour the mixture over cracked ice before serving.


Calories Fat Protein Carbohydrates
(g) (g) (g)


Sodium Cholesterol
(mg) (mg)


820 1 21 1 0




Mango Punch

1 cup mango pulp
1 quart of water and sweetener to taste
Juice of 1 or 2 limes

Blend mango pulp and one cup of water in blender. Add sweetener, lime juice and
balance of water and cracked ice. Taste and serve.

To above recipe, you may add 1/2 cup of passion fruit which will give it an added
variety.


Calories Fat
(g)
60 0


Protein Carbohydrates
(g) (g)
1.5 15


Sodium
(mg)
4


Cholesterol
(mg)
0


' Analyzed without sugar added.

Note: Each teaspoon of sugar added will add 15g calories and 4g carbohydrate.





Courtesy Mangoes, Anyway You Like Them.











































University of the Virgin Islands
Cooperative Extension Service
RR02, Box 10,000
Kingshill, St. Croix USVI 00850
(340) 692-4080
Kwame Garcia, Sr., State Director




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