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Panama Silver, Asian Gold : Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean ( Digital Humanities Course Syllabu...

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Material Information

Title:
Panama Silver, Asian Gold : Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean ( Digital Humanities Course Syllabus for the University of Miami )
Physical Description:
Syllabus
Language:
English
Creator:
Francis, Donette
Publisher:
Department of English, University of Miami
Place of Publication:
Miami, FL

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Digital Humanities
Syllabus
Caribbean Studies
Black Studies
Caribbean Literature
Digital Library of the Caribbean ( dLOC )
Distributed Online Collaborative Course ( DOCC )
Genre:
Spatial Coverage:

Notes

Abstract:
Course description from the syllabus: This seminar considers two overlooked labor migrations that have profoundly affected the emergence of modern Caribbean literature: the immigration of indentured laborers from India and China into the West Indies and the emigration and return of the Afro-Caribbean workers who built the Panama Canal. Both groups worked under difficult conditions for exploitative wages. However, both used their savings to bankroll their entry into the educated middle class, thereby fostering the conditions that produced the first generation of nationalist politicians, as well as the first generation of Caribbean writers to achieve international acclaim. In this course, students will learn how to use archival material related to these nineteenth- and twentieth-century migrations, including photos, court cases, newspaper reports, popular songs, and first person accounts of the migrants’ experiences, to enrich their understanding of Caribbean literature. This course is a PILOT course for inter-collegiate collaborative learning and instruction in digital humanities. It will be taught as a graduate seminar in collaboration with Professor Leah Rosenberg at The University of Florida, Gainesville, and as an undergraduate seminar with Professor Rhonda Cobham-Sander at Amherst College, and we will be assisted by librarians and IT staff at each institution. The course makes extensive use of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com), an open-access digital archive, whose technical hub is at UF. Students will have an opportunity to add their annotations to the finding aids in the dLOC collection. Some class discussions will be held via videoconference, and some assignments will be researched collaboratively. We hope this initial experiment will sow the seed for future collaborative courses involving students at other institutions, in the United States and abroad. We are counting on the resources you help us develop to ground such future collaborations. Your level of commitment and participation will matter for students beyond this class. So be prepared to complete a significant amount of the work through independent research and cross-campus collaboration.
General Note:
Digital Humanities course syllabus. Course description for Fall 2013 course at Amherst College, Black Studies 452 and English 474. The course is being taught simultaneously at Amherst College, the University of Florida, and the University of Miami, and has been designed by faculty and librarians at the three institutions.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
System ID:
AA00013935:00003


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1 Professor: Dr. Donette Francis Location: MM 101 Depa rtment of English, ENG 360 /AAS390 Office Address: Ashe 410 Fall 2013 T elephone: 305 284 6508 M/W 3:35 4:45 pm (H) Email: d.francis@miami.edu Office Hours: Wednesday s 12 2 :30 pm Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of Modern Caribbean Literature COURSE DESCRIPTION: T his seminar considers t wo overlooked labor migrations that have profoundly affected the emergence of modern Caribbean literature: t he immigration of indentured laborers from India and China into the West Indies and the emigration and return of the Afro Caribbean workers who built the Panama Canal. Both groups worked under difficult conditions for exploitative wages. However, both used their savings to bankroll their entry into the educated middle class, thereby fostering the conditions that produced the first generation of nationalist politicians, as well as t he first generation of Caribbean writers to achieve international acclaim. In this course, students will learn how to use archival material related to these nineteenth and twentieth century migrations, including photos, court cases, newspaper reports, pop ular literature. This course is a PILOT course for inter collegiate collaborative learning and instruction in digital humanities. It will be taught as a graduate seminar in collaboration with Professor Leah Rosenberg at The University of Florida, Gainesville, and as an undergraduate seminar with Professor Rhonda Cobham Sander at Amherst College and we will be assisted by librarians a nd IT staff at ea ch institution. Th e course makes extensive use of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com) an open access digital archive, whose technical hub is at UF. Students will have an opportunity to add their annotati ons to the finding aids in the d LOC collection S ome class discussions will be held via videoconference and some assignments will be researched collaboratively. We hope this initial experiment will sow the seed for future collaborative courses involving students at other institutions, in th e United States and abroad. We are counting on th e resources you help us develop to ground such future collaborations. Your level of commitment and participation will matter for students beyond this class. So be prepared to complete a significant amount of the work through independent research and cross campus collaboration. LEARNING OBJECTIVES : To understand key concepts, themes, tropes, styles, and aesthetic concerns of Caribbean literary discourse through examining literary representations of the two m igrations under study. To analyze creative texts in relation to historical events, as well as other disciplinary modes of inquiry such as history, anthropology, and sociology. To develop and hone skills of literary analysis and research such as archival practice, close reading, critical argumentation, critical synthesis, and thesis writing. To illuminate some of the limitations of the colonial archive records of subaltern and disenfranchised people and the stakes involved in articulating the history of t he majority of Caribbean people for literary writers and scholars.

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2 To introduce students to the technology used in digital archiving (producing metadata, exhibit labels, finding guides) and digital humanities (e.g. Omeka, PBworks, timelines, Zotero) and explore challenges posed by digital archiving (how can we avoid reproducing the colonial structure of existing historical archival materials?). Students are encouraged to produce and publish digital research projects (such as finding guides, curated exhib its, t ime lines ) that will be included in the Digital Library of the Caribbean ( www.dloc.com ) and when appropriate the conference and exhibits celebrating the Centennial of the completion of the Panama Canal to be held at UF in spring 2014. GRADING : Attendance and Participation (in class discussion and responses to wiki postings beyond the required contributions ) 20% Weekly Reading and Writing Assignments #1 6 5 0% Assignment #7 Meta Data Assignment 10% Assignment # 8 Final Research Project 2 0% REQUIREMENTS: Attendance and active participation are mandatory. Twenty percent (20%) of your grade will be based on your active listening, your reading your engagement in class discussions and your attendance of office hours. Readings : Assigned readings are listed in the syllabus for each week. On most days there will be a literary text as well as an article or two meant to help you with your assignment. Readings a re available on E RESER VES in Blackboard and d LOC. Underlined titles in dicate that there is a link to d LOC directly from the syllabus. Please bring a copy of each reading to class with you. Exercises and Assignments : During the first half of the course, you will complete weekly assignments, parts of which you will share online with other students at the three campuses. In the second half of the course you w ill complete a metadata project and a final research project. Assignments 1 6 are due by 9:00pm on th e Friday of the week in which they are assigned. Assignment 7 is due on Friday, November 15th and Assignment 8 (final project) is due on Friday, December 13 th If you are collaborating on a group project, you must post a rough draft of your assignment by midnight on Wednesday and then post your final draft by 9:00pm on Friday of that week. Upload all final drafts both to your course page and to the wiki page for the assignment. There is a detailed explanation of each assignment at the end of this syllabus C lass Attendance and Punctuality: I expect you to come to class on time, and to attend regularly. Failure to do either will affect your final grade. Skype lectures will be recorded and played in class the day after the live presentation; but, we will have a live option for those student s who choose to join me for the live lecture s on slotted Tuesdays Class Participation: This class is a seminar. I expect you to come to class having read the assigned materials and having prepared for in means participating in discussion generated by the class leader, as well as paying attention to and offering respectful cri tiques of in class and online presentations by other students.

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3 Office Hours. I have scheduled regu lar office hours for Wednesdays from noon to 2 :30 pm. Our librarian Beatrice Skokan will hold office hour from 1 2 on Mondays. You should plan to see us singly or with a classmate, at least three times in the semester We will be checking in at the beginning of the semester to make sure that everyone in the class can make one of the posted times. REQUIRED TEXTS: Most Readings fo r the course will be pos ted on d LOC or made available through E RESERVES in Blackboard Students should have their own copies of the following books which are available at the University of Miami B ookstore : Verene Shepherd, H.G. d e Lisser, Susan Proudleigh (also available via dLOC ) Eric Walrond, Tropic Death Edgar Mittelholzer, Corentyne Thunder Ramabai Espinet, The Swinging Bridge Maryse Conde The Tree of Life Week 1 INTRODUCTION: SEEING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT August 26 August 28 Readings: Trouillot, Ralph Silencing the Past (Boston: Beacon Press, 1995), 1 30. in A Fierce Hatred of Injustice: Claude McKay's Jamaica and His Poetry of Rebellion pp. 211 214. (poem) Collected Poems pp. 100 102 (poem) Haunted by Empire: Geographies of the Intimate in North American History, ed. Ann Laura Stoler, Duke UP, 2006. pp. 191 212. My Gardening Book pp. 143 152. Talk: Juan Pablo Sanchez Williams ASSIGNMENT 1 : SE EING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT (in Class) Week 2 INDENTURED WOMEN IN THE ARCHIVE Sep. 4 Readings: Hartman, The Dead Book Lose Your Mother pp. 136 154. Shepherd, Verene. Read Preface Introduction and Chpt. 1 Guest Librarian Lecture: T echnology and Library Unit 1: PBWorks basics & Z otero with Beatrice Skokan Week 3 INDENTURED WOMEN IN THE ARCHIVE Sep t 9 Readings: Shepherd, Verene. Read Chapters 2, 3 and appendices 1 12.

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4 Sept. 10 Sept. 11 From The Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry please read the following: 270. 190. VERENE SHEPHERD LIVE SKYPE LECTURE Shepherd, Verene. Read Conclusion & appendices 13 26. *Guest lecture via Skype: Verene Shepherd ASSIGNMENT 2 : READING THE COLONIAL ARCHIVE Week 4 THE PANAMA CANAL ENTERS MODERN WEST INDIAN LIT. Sep. 16 Sept.18 Readings : de Lisser, Herbert. Susan Proudleigh p p.1 85 (approx. 295 pages) Available on dLOC, however I recommend you buy your own copy. The Colon People: Part I, Jamaica Journal 11 (1977), pp. 62 72. Watch/Listen : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czQi7S6iMrs Readings: de Lisser, Herbert. Susan Proudleigh p p. 86 154. Coniff, Michael. in Black labor on a white canal: Panama, 1904 1981, pp. 3 16. *Guest Library Lecturer: Technology and Library Unit 2: Introduction to dLOC (individual accounts) and other relevant digital resources for the class. NO ASSIGNMENT THIS WEEK Week 5 NEWSP APERS AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF I DENTITY Sep. 23 Sept. 24 Sept. 25 Readings: de Lisser, Herbert. Susan Proudleigh p p. 155 224. Tropic Death please read all of the following stories: Discerner of Hearts pp. 57 74. RHONDA FREDERICK LIVE SKYPE LECTURE

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5 Marginal Migrations: The Circulation of Cultures within the Caribbean pp 43 76. The Colon People: Part II Jamaica Journal 42 (1978), pp. 87 103. ASSIGNMENT 3 : REPRESENTING WEST INDIANS IN THE PANAMA CANAL ZONE Guest Lecture via Skype : Rhonda Frederick Week 6 INDO CARIBBEANS ENTER MODERN CARIBBEAN LITERATURE Sept. 30 October 2 Readings: Mittelholzer, Edgar. Corentyne Thunder Read Chpts. 1 15. of Indentured Coolies in the Nineteenth Journal of Asian American Studies 10:3 (October 2007), pp. 283 311 Guest Lecture: Daniel O. Suman RMAS Mittelholzer, Edgar. Corentyne Thunder Read Chpts. 16 29. Guest Librarian Lecture : WORKING WITH NEWSPAPERS Week 7 INDO CARIBBEANS ENTER MODERN CARIBBEAN LITERATURE Oct. 7 Oct. 8 Oct. 9 Readings: Mittelholzer, Edgar. Corentyne Thunder. Read Chpts. 30 41. Miguel Street pp. 24 31. Jahaji Bhai: An Anthology of Indo Caribbean Literature ed. Frank Birbalsingh, pp. 15 21. VICTOR CHANG LIVE SKYPE LECTURE Mittelholzer, Edgar. Corentyne Thunde r. Read Chpts. 42 52. ASSIGNMENT 4: WORKING WITH NEWSPAPERS Week 8 THE CHINESE CARIBBEAN EXPERIENCE Oct. 14 Oct. 16 Readings: Chang, Victor. (Story), Small Axe No. 2 (1997), pp. 103 108. Lee Loy, Ann The Chinese Shop as Nation Theatre in West Indian Fiction, Anthurium 5:1 (Spring 2007). Guest lecture via Skype: Victor Chang Readings: Colonialist Photography: Imag(in)ing

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6 Race and Place pp 20 29. Colonial Photography and Exhibitions pp. 1 14. VIEW Visual Materials: Cheuk Kwan Chinese Restaurants Fung, Richard. (1900). ( Film ) 49min long Chong, Albert. ( Slides ) Please click through all 9 slides. (Click A Negro Nurse with Chinese Children ( Painting ) from the travelogue, The West Indies (1900). Further Recommendations for Photography Readings: Hight, Eleanor M. and Gary D. Sampson, eds. Colonialist Photography: Imag(in)ing Race and Place. New York and London: Routledge, 2002. Edwards, Elizabeth, ed. Anthropology and Photography, 1860 1920 New Haven: Yale UP, 1993. Smithsonian Institute: Click! Photography Changes. Available online at: http://click.si.edu/Story.aspx?story=463 Thompson, Krista. An Eye for the Tropics : Tourism, Photography, and Framing the Caribbean Picturesque Durham and London: Duke UP, 2006. ASSIGNMENT 5: VISUALIZING THE ARCHIVE Week 9 CONTEMPORARY INDO CARIBBEAN WOMEN NEGOTIATE THE ARCHIVE Oct. 21 Oct. 22 Oct. 23 Readings: Espinet, Ramabai. The Swinging Bridge Read -----World Literature Written in English 29.2 (1998), pp. 116 26. ESPINET LIVE SKYPE LECTURE ESPINET RECORDED SKYPE LECTURE Espinet, Ramabai. The Swinging Bridge Read Women on the English Engendering History: Caribbean Women in Historical Perspe ctive (Chapter 4), pp. 63 93. Mahase, Anna. My mother's daughter: the autobiography of Anna Mahase Snr., 1899 1978 Browse 1 st 50 pages (approx. 144 pages) Other Resources (see explanation of Assignment 6): Week 10 CONTEMPORARY INDO CARIBBEAN WOMEN NEGOTIATE THE ARCHIVE Oct. 28 Readings:

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7 Oct.30 Espinet, Ramabai. The Swinging Bridge. Read Mahase, Anna. My mother's daughter: the autobiography of Anna Mahase Snr., 1899 1978. Browse 2 nd 50 pages. Espinet, Ramabai. The Swinging Bridge Read Mahase, Anna. My mother's daughter: the autobiography of Anna Mahase Snr., 1899 1978. Browse last 50 pages Other Resources (see explanation of Assignment 6): Panama Canal Museum oral histories Voices from Our America. Oral Histories of Afro Panamanians Persaud, Alice Persaud (1892 1952) Autobiography ASSIGNMENT 6: LISTENING IN THE ARCHIVES Week 11 CONTEMPORARY NOVELISTS NEGOTIATE THE PANA MA ARCHIVE Nov. 4 Nov. 6 Readings: Conde, Maryse. The Tree of Life Read Chpts. 1 17 Brodber, Erna. "Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History in the Caribbean" Jamaica Journal 16.4 (November 1983), pp. 2 10. Guest Librarian Lecture: Collaborative Guides and Annotations In Class V i e wing: Foster, Roman. Diggers ( Film ) 90min long; Readings: Conde, Maryse. The Tree of Life Read Chpts. 18 30 US Senate Hearing This series includes several Senate hearings about Panama Canal Matters. See especially pp. 931 981abo ut the Guadeloupian women accused of prostitution on pp.941 ff Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies 4.3 (2009), pp. 331 341. -----, Making Selves. Afro Latin Americans of British Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies 4.3 (2009), pp. 221 230. NO ASSIGNMENT THIS WEEK Week 12 CONTEMPORARY NOVELISTS NEGOTIATE THE PANAMA ARCHIVE (cont.)/ DIGITAL ARCHIVING AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE Nov. 11 Nov. 13 Readings: Conde, Maryse. The Tree of Life. Read Chpts. 31 49. Guest Librarian Lecture: Metadata, Digital Archiving and the construction of knowledge Conde, Maryse. The Tree of Life. Read Chpts. 50 65. Guest Lecture via Skype by Laurie Taylor on Metadata, digital archiving and the

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8 Construction of Knowledge found important and look closely at what kinds of information the catalog entry gives about this source. Examine what information it includes and try to imagine what informat ion it excludes. NO ASSIGNMENT THIS WEEK Week 1 3 DIGITAL ARCHIVING AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE (cont.)/ PLANNING WEEK FOR COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL PROJECT / PLANNING WEEK FOR COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL PROJECT Nov. 18 Nov. 20 Guest Librarian Lecture on Metadata and digital archiving PLANNING FOR ASSIGNMENT 8: Explore the digital projects linked in assignment 8 and consider what project you would like to undertake. You may explore other digital humanities projects and introduce them to the class via the wiki and class discussion. ASSIGNMENT 8 Part 1 : Write a 250 word proposal for your project that includes: a title, tentative thesis, and list of sources. Post it to Wiki, and email it to Joan Flores iequaljoan@gmail.com (Doctoral Student, African Diaspora History, New York University). Due Friday 22 November. ASSIGN MENT 7: Collaborative Guides and Annotations. Due Friday, Nov. 15 Week 14 Nov. 23 Dec. 1 THANKSGIVING BREAK AT University of Miami NO CLASS Week 15 PLANNING FOR ASSIGNMENT Dec. 2 Dec. 3 In class, please report briefly on your progress towards Part 2 of your project. Guest Lecture by Joan Flores on using primary sources for research ASSIGNMENT 8 Part 2 : Review and select an appropriate technology for delivering the project. Write a proposal (300 words) explaining how the selected technology supports the project. Due Friday 6 December. Week 16 PROJECT PRESENTATIONS Dec. 13 FINAL PROJECT DUE FRIDAY 13 DECEMBER


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