Panama Silver, Asian Gold : Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean ( Digital Humanities Course Syllabu...

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Panama Silver, Asian Gold : Migration, Money, and the Making of the Modern Caribbean ( Digital Humanities Course Syllabus for Amherst College )
Physical Description:
Syllabus
Language:
English
Creator:
Cobham-Sander, Rhonda
Publisher:
Department of Black Studies, Amherst College
Department of English, Amherst College
Place of Publication:
Amherst, MA

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Digital Humanities
Syllabus
Caribbean Studies
Black Studies
Caribbean Literature
Distributed Online Collaborative Course ( DOCC )

Notes

Abstract:
Course description from the syllabus: Two overlooked labor migrations have profoundly affected the emergence of modern Caribbean literature: the immigration of indentured laborers from India and China into the West Indies and the emigration and return of the Afro-Caribbean workers who built the Panama Canal. Both groups worked under difficult conditions for exploitative wages. However, both used their savings to bankroll their entry into the educated middle class, thereby fostering the conditions that produced the first generation of nationalist politicians, as well as the first generation of Caribbean writers to achieve international acclaim. In this course, students will learn how to use archival material related to these nineteenth- and twentieth-century migrations, including photos, court cases, newspaper reports, popular songs, and first person accounts of the migrants’ experiences, to enrich their understanding of Caribbean literature. This course is a PILOT course for inter-collegiate collaborative learning and instruction in digital humanities. It will be taught as a graduate seminar in collaboration with Professor Leah Rosenberg at The University of Florida, Gainesville, and as an undergraduate seminar with Dr. Donette Francis at the University of Miami, and we will be assisted by librarians and IT staff at each institution. The course makes extensive use of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com), an open-access digital archive, whose technical hub is at UF. Students will have an opportunity to add their annotations to the finding aids in the dLOC collection. Some class discussions will be held via video conference, and some assignments will be researched collaboratively. We hope this initial experiment will sow the seed for future collaborative courses involving students at other institutions, in the United States and abroad. We are counting on the resources you help us develop to ground such future collaborations. Your level of commitment and participation will matter for students beyond this class. So be prepared to complete a significant amount of the work through independent research and cross-campus collaboration.
General Note:
Digital Humanities course syllabus. Course description for Fall 2013 course at Amherst College, Black Studies 452 and English 474.. The course is being taught simultaneously at Amherst College, the University of Florida, and the University of Miami, and has been designed by faculty and librarians at the three institutions.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Applicable rights reserved.
System ID:
AA00013935:00002


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Rhonda Cobham Sander Office: Cooper House 102 ccobhamsande@amherst.edu Office hours: W/TH 2 4 phone (413) 542 5832 BLACK STUDIES 452/ENGLISH 474 Panama Silver, Asian Gold: Migration, Money, and the Making of Modern Caribbean Literature TU 1 4: COOPER HOUSE 101 COURSE DESCRIPTION: Two overlooked labor migrations have profoundly affected the emergence of modern Caribbean literature: t he immigration of indentured laborers from India and China into the West Indies and the emigration and return of the Afro Caribbean workers who built the Pa nama Canal. Both groups worked under difficult conditions for exploitative wages. However, both used their savings to bankroll their entry into the educated middle class, thereby fostering the conditions that produced the first generation of nationalist po liticians, as well as the first generation of Caribbean writers to achieve international acclaim. In this course, students will learn how to use archival material related to these nineteenth and twentieth century migrations, including photos, court cases, newspaper reports, popular songs, and first person This course is a PILOT course for inter collegiate collabo rative learning and instruction in digital humanities. It will be taught as a graduate seminar in collaboration with Professor Leah Rosenberg at The University of Florida, Gainesville, and as an undergraduate seminar with Dr. Donette Francis at the Univers ity of Miami and we will be assisted by librarians a nd IT staff at each institution. Th e course makes extensive use of the Digital Library of the Caribbean (www.dloc.com) an open access digital archive, whose technical hub is at UF. Students will have an opportunity to add their annotati ons to the finding aids in the d LOC collection S ome class discussions will be held via video conference and some assignments will be researched collaboratively We hope this initial experiment will sow the seed for futur e collaborative courses involving students at other institutions, in the United States and abroad. We are counting on th e resources you help us develop to ground such future collaborations. Your level of commitment and participation will matter for student s beyond this class. So be prepared to complete a significant amount of the work through independent research and cross campus collaboration. LEARNING OBJECTIVES : To understand key concepts, themes, tropes, styles, and aesthetic concerns of Caribbean li terary discourse through examining literary representations of the two migrations under study. To analyze creative texts in relation to historical events, as well as other disciplinary modes of inquiry such as history, anthropology, sociology. To develop and hone skills of literary analysis and research such as archival practice, close reading, critical argumentation, critical synthesis, and thesis writing

PAGE 2

To illuminate some of the limitations of the colonial archive records of subaltern and disenfranch ised people and the stakes involved in articulating the history of the majority of Caribbean people for literary writers and scholars. To introduce students to the technology used in digital archiving (producing metadata, exhibit labels, finding guides) and digital humanities (e.g. Omeka, PBworks, timelines, Zotero) and explore challenges posed by digital archiving (how can we avoid repro ducing the colonial structure of existing historical archival materials?). Students are encouraged to produce and publish digital research projects (such as finding guides, curated exhibits, t ime lines ) that will be included in the Digital Library of the Ca ribbean ( www.dloc.com ) and when appropriate the conference and exhibits celebrating the Centennial of the completion of the Panama Canal to be held at UF in spring 2014. GRADING : Attendance and Participation (in c lass discussion and responses to wiki postings beyond the required contributions) 20% Weekly Reading and Writing Assignments #1 6 40% Assignment #7 Meta Data Assignment 10% Assignment # 8 Final Research Project 30% REQUIREMENTS: Attendance and active participation are mandatory. Twenty percent (20%) of your grade will be based on your active listening, your reading your engagement in class discussions and your attendance of office hours. Readings : Assigned readings are listed in the syllabus for each week. On most days there will be a literary text as well as an article or two meant to help you with your assignment. Readings a re available on E RESERVES and d LOC. Underlined titles in dicate that there is a link to d LOC directly from the syllabus. Please bring a copy of each reading to class with you. Exercises and Assignments : During the first half of the course, you will complete weekly assignments, parts of which you will share online with other stu dents at the three campuses. In the second half of the course you w ill complete a metadata project and a final research project. Assignments 1 6 are due by 9:00pm on the Friday of th e week in which they are assigned Assignment 7 is due on November 12 and Assignment 8 (final project) is due on December 13. If you are collaborating on a group project, you must post a rough draft of your assignment by midnight on Wednesday and then post your final draft by 9:00pm on Friday of that week. Upload all final drafts both to your course page and to the wiki page for the assignment. There is a detailed explanation of each assignment at the end of this syllabus.

PAGE 3

C lass Attendance and Punctuality: I expect you to come to class on time, and to attend regularly. Fail ure to do either will affect your final grade. Class Participation: This class is a seminar. I expect you to come to class having read the assigned materials and having prepared for in means participating in discussion generated by the class leader, as well as paying attention to and offering respectful critiques of in class and online presentations by other students. Office Hours. Since this class meets only once a week, you should plan to see me, singly or with a classmate at least three times in the semester I have scheduled regular office hours for Wednesdays and Thursdays and I will be checking in at the beginning of the semester to make sure that everyone in the class can make one of the posted times. REQUIRED TEXTS: Most Readings fo r the course will be posted on d LOC or made available through E RESERVES. Students should have their own copies of the following books which are available at AMHERST BOOKS: Verene Shepherd, Misery H.G. d e Lisser, Susan Proudleigh Eric Walrond, Tropic Death Edgar Mittelholzer, Corentyne Thunder Ramabai Espinet, The Swinging Bridge Plus ONE OF THE FOLLOWING: (see W eek 8) Maryse Conde The Tree of Life Kerry Y oung Pao Ismith Khan, The Jumbie Bird George L amming In the Castle of My Skin Shani M ootoo, Cer e us Bloom s at Night Staceya nn C hin The Other Side of Paradise Peggy Mohan Jahajin Andrew Salkey, The Late Emancipation of Jerry Stover Week 1 INTRODUCTION: SEEING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT Sep. 3 Readings: Haunted by Empire pp. 191 212. Trouillot, Ralph in Silencing the Past pp. 1 30. Kincaid, Jamaica My Gardening Book pp. 143 152 Collected Poems pp. 100 102 (poem)

PAGE 4

McKay Claude. s in A Fierce Hatred of Injustice: Claude McKay's Jamaica and His Poetry of Rebellion pp. 211 214. (poem) ASSIGNMENT 1: SE EING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT Technology and Library Unit 1: PBWorks basics & Zotero (with Laurie Taylor and Missy Roser) Week 2 INDENTURED WOMEN IN THE ARCHIVE Sep. 10 Readings: Hartman, S The Dead Book Lose Your Mother pp. 136 154. Shepherd, Verene Read entire book, including Preface & Introduction. (approx. 90 pages) From The Came in Ships: An Anthology of Indo Guyanese Prose and Poetry please read the following: Mahadai 270. pp. 189 190. ASSIGNMENT 2 : READING THE COLONIAL ARCHIVE Guest lecture via Skype: Verene Shepherd Week 3 THE PANAMA CANAL ENTERS MODERN WEST INDIAN LITERATURE Sep 17 Readings : de Lisser Herbert Susan Proudleigh Read entire book. (approx. 295 pages) Available o n d LOC however I recommend you buy your own copy. Senior, Olive The Colon People: Part I, Jamaica Journal 11 (1977), pp 62 72. Coniff, Michael. in Black labor on a white canal: Panama, 1904 1981 pp. 3 16. NO ASSIGNMENT THIS WEEK Technology and Library Unit 2: Introduction to d LOC (individual accounts) and other relevant digital resources for the class. Week 4 NEWSPAPERS AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF INDENTITY

PAGE 5

Sep 24 Readings: From Eric Tropic Death please read all of the following stories : Senior, Olive Discerner of Hearts pp. 57 74. Frederick, Rhonda of Panam Canal Migration s: Eric n Marginal Migrations: The Circulation of Cultures within the Caribbean pp 43 76. Senior Olive The Colon People: Part II Jamaica Journal 42 (1978), pp. 87 10 3 ASSIGNMENT 3 : REPRESENTING WEST INDIANS IN THE PANAMA CANAL ZONE Guest Lecture: Rhonda Frederick Week 5 INDO CARIBBEANS ENTER MODERN CARIBBEAN LITERATURE Oct 1 Readings: Mittelholzer, Edgar Corentyne Thunder Read entire book. (approx. 2 0 0 pages) Naipaul, Miguel Street pp 24 31. S elvon, Samuel. in Jahaji Bhai: An Anthology of Indo Caribbean L iterature ed. Frank Birbalsingh pp. 15 21. Representations of Indentured Coolies in the Nineteenth Century British West Journal of Asian American Studies 10:3 (October 2007), pp. 283 311. ASSIGNMENT 4: WORKING WITH NE WSPAPERS Week 6 T HE CHINESE CARIBBEAN EXPERIENCE Oct. 8 Readings: Chang, Victor Small A xe No. 2 (1997), pp. 103 108.

PAGE 6

Croft, B in Colonialist Photography: Imag(in)ing Race and Place p p 20 29. Lee Loy, Ann Marie. The Chinese Shop as Nation Theatre in West Indian Fiction, Anthurium 5:1 (Spring 2007) Maxwell, Anne. Colonial Photography and Exhibitions pp. 1 14. VIEW Visual Materials : Fung Richard (1900). ( Film ) 49min long ; Streamed on E RESERVES Chong Albert ry ( Slides ) Please click through all 9 slides. Forrest, A.S. A Negro Nurse with Chinese Children ( Painting ) from the travelogue, The West Indies (1900) Further Recommendations for Photography R eadings: Hight, Eleanor M. and Gary D. Sampson, eds. Colonialist Photography: Imag(in)ing Race and Place. New York and London: Routledge, 2002. Edwards, Elizabeth, ed. Anthropology and Photography, 1860 1920 New Haven: Yale UP, 1993. Smithsonian Institute: Click! Photography Changes A vailable online at: http://click.si.edu/Story.aspx?story=463 Thompson, Krista. An Eye for the Tropics : Tourism, Photography, and Framing the Caribbean Picturesque Durham and London: Duke UP, 2006 ASSIGNMENT 5: V ISUALIZING THE ARCHIVE Guest lecture via Skype: Victor Chang O ct. 12 15 OCTOBER BREAK AT AMHERST COLLEGE Start reading Ramabai Espinet The Swinging Bridge (approx. 300 pages) Week 7 CONTEMPORARY INDO CARIBBEAN WOMEN NEGOTIATE THE ARCHIVE

PAGE 7

Oct. 22 Readings: Espinet, Ramabai The Swinging Bridge Read entire book. (approx. 3 0 0 pages) -----. Woman in West Indian Literature World Literature Written in English 29. 2 (1998), pp. 116 26 Brereton, Bridget Examination of some Texts by Women on the English speaking Caribbean, from the 1770s to the Engendering History : Caribbean Women in Historical Perspective ( Chapter 4), pp. 63 93 Mahase, Anna. My mother's daughter: the autobiography of Anna Mah ase Snr., 1899 1978 Browse entire book. (approx. 144 pages) Other R esources (see explanation of Assignment 6) : Panama Canal Museum oral histories Voices from Our America. Oral Histories of Afro Panamanians Persaud, Alice Persaud (1892 1952) Autobiography ASSIGNMENT 6: L ISTENING IN THE ARCHIVES Week 8 CONTEMPORARY NOVELIST S NEGOTIATE THE PANAMA ARCHIVE AND/OR ASIAN INDENTURE Oct. 29 Readings: Conde Maryse T he Tree of Life Read entire book OR read one of the following books : Kerry Y oung Pao Ismith Khan, The Jumbie Bird George L amming In the Castle of My Skin Shani M ootoo, Cer e us Bloom s at Night Staceya nn C hin The Other Side of Paradise Peggy Mohan, Jahajin Andrew Salkey, The Late Emancipation of Jerry Stover Brodber, Erna. "Oral Sources and the Creation of a Social History in the Caribbean" Jamaica Journal 16.4 (November 1983), pp. 2 10. Fo ster Roman Diggers ( Film ) 90min long ; Streamed on E RESERVES. US Senate Hearing This series includes several Senate hearings about Panama Cana l Matters See especially pp. 931 981about the Guadeloupian women accused of prostitution on pp.941 ff Voices from Our America: Interview with Emiliana Bernard Stephenson Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies 4.3 (2009), pp. 331

PAGE 8

341 -----. Introduction: Making Sense, Making Selves. Afro Latin Americans of British Caribbean Descent Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies 4.3 ( 2009 ), pp. 221 230 NO ASSIGNMENT THIS WEEK Week 9 DIGITAL ARCHIVING AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE Nov 5 Guest Lecture via Skype by Laurie Taylor on Metadata digital archiving and the Construction of Knowledge I talk, please Choose 3 dLOC sources you have found important and look closely at what k i nds of information the catalog entry gives about this source Examine what information it includes and try to imagine what information it excludes *Assignment 7 is due Tuesday Nov 12! Week 10 DIGITAL ARCHIVING AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF KNOWLEDGE (continu ed) Nov 12 ASSIGNMENT 7: Collab orative Guides and Annotations D ue T ues 12 Nov. Week 11 PLANNING WEEK FOR COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL PROJECT Nov 19 PLANNING FOR ASSIGNMENT 8: Explore the digital projects linked in assignment 8 and consider what project you would like to undertake. You may explore other digital humanities projects and introduce them to the class via the wiki and class discussion. ASSIGNMENT 8 Part 1 : Write a 250 word proposal for your project which includes: a title, tentative thesis, and list of sources Post it to W iki and email it to Joan Flores iequaljoan@gmail.com ( Doctoral Student, African Diaspora History New York University ) Due F riday 22 Nov ember. Nov. 26 THANKSGIVING BREAK AT AMHERST COLLEGE NO CLASS Week 12 Guest Lecture by Joan Flores on using primary sources for research Dec. 3 In class, please r eport briefly on your prog ress towards P art 2 of your project. ASSIGNMENT 8 Part 2 : R eview and select an appropriate technology for

PAGE 9

delivering the project. Write a proposal (300 words) explaining how the selected t echnology supports the project. D ue Friday 6 December Week 13 PROJECT PRESENTATIONS Dec. 10 FINAL PROJECT DUE FRIDAY 13 DECEMBER *Note for Assignments: Preparation work does not need to be posted or turned in. ASSIGNMENT 1: SE EING THE ARCHIVE IN THE TEXT [ Due 6 September] Learning Objective: U nderstand how and why scholars use archival sources. Prep work: 1. Choose a book of interest from the titles provided in class. 2. Read and analyze its introduction and bibliography using the reading form Assignment s (please complete both) : Post your completed reading form to the Wiki page. Post a n annotated entry (1 paragraph) about your findings to Zotero. This means entering the bibliographic information about your book into the Group Library for this course, and to the book entry that explains your f indings. ASSIGNMENT 2: READING THE COLONIAL ARCHIVE [Due 13 September] Learning Objective: Understand how scholars evaluate and collate materials in the colonial archive to reconstruct coherent narratives. Prep work: 1. Focus on one witness testimony from Verene Shepherd's Maharani's Misery 2. How do you evaluate the significance of this testimony? 3. How do you use other testimonies to qualify (e.g., verify, contradict, etc.) this version? 4. What other conditions influence how we read these sources (e.g., addit ional historical contexts, the acknowledged absence of information, etc.)? Assignment s (please complete both) : Document your reasoning and analysis (500 words) and post it to the Wiki page. Using Hartman as your model, imagine your version of events (500 words) and post it to the Wiki page.

PAGE 10

ASSIGNMENT 3: RE PRESENTING WEST INDIANS IN THE PANAMA CANAL Z ONE [Due 27 September] Learning Objective: Examine how literary texts transform the historical record. Prep Work: 1. Choose a scene from Susan Proudleigh that represents a specific historical event ( e.g., reasons for migrating to Panama, passage to Panama, encounters with Americans, living conditions, indu strial accidents, etc.). 2. Locate 2 related historical sources. (The assignment page in PBworks lists suggested sources ) 3. How do the novel and your 2 historical sources differ in the ways they present the West Indian characters (e.g., body, race, color, class, gender, skills, profession, and an individual's reasons for migration, et c.)? For each, examine what the author includes and excludes. Assignment: Explain how selections and inte r pretive choices transform the historical record (500 750 words) and post it to the Wiki page. ASSIGNMENT 4: WORKING WITH NEWSPAPERS [ Due 4 October ] Learning Objective: Explore how newspapers create historical meaning. You may focus on any aspect of the Panama or Asian migration for this assignment. Prep work: 1. Browse the newspapers assigned for your campus. 2. Select a news item related to one of the migrant group s. 3. Read the entire issue of the newspaper in which the item appears. 4. Characterize the newspaper. What kind of items does this newspaper carry (e.g. ads, editorials, letters, news, literary pieces, cartoons etc. )? 5. What can you tell about the newspaper's readership and political orientation? Assignment: Evaluate the newspaper as a source of information about your chosen migrants (500 750 words) and post it to the Wiki page. ASSIGNM ENT 5: VISUALIZING THE ARCHIVES [Due 11 October] Learning Objective: Explore how photography historically has constructed the raced subject. Prep work: 1. Choose 1 image from the photo gallery

PAGE 11

2. Examine the photo and consider the following: o Note the gender of the subjects; their position in relation to machines, animals, vegetation, buildings or other racial subjects. o What do these selections and interpretive choices tell you? o Is the photograph dated? o Is there a caption? o What do you know about the photographer or what do you imagine he/she was like? Assignment: Write a Wiki entry (500 750 words) on the provenance of the photograph and the way it constructs its subject. Paste the photo from the photo gallery into your Wiki entry. ASSIGNMENT 6: LISTENING IN THE ARCHIVES [ Due 25 October ] Learning Objective: Learn to evaluate oral histories, memoirs, and personal accounts. Prep work: 1. C hoose 1 oral account or memoir (see readings). 2. Who is speaking? 3. How do es the speaker characterize his/her relationship to the event describe d ? 4. What do t hese narrative choices tell you? Assignment: Relate your observations to some aspect of a text y ou've read so far in the course (500 750 words) and post it to the Wiki page. ASSIGNMENT 7: COLLABORATIVE GUIDES & ANNOTATIONS (Due 12 November) Learning Objective: Learn basic skills in digital archiving, and understand how the digital archive constructs knowledge. Prep work: 1. Choose 1 primary source relevant to your final project from dLOC. 2. Consider what's included and what's missing in the citation (the citation inclu des the record information or metadata). o e.g. L ook at the citations for any items by Herbert G. de Lisser. De Lisser was ethnically Jewish and he was editor of The Gleaner for nearly 40 years, but there is nothing in the citation s that make that known. o e .g. Letters from the Isthmian Canal Construction Workers, which does not exist in any known online library catalog and is only listed in the bibliography of Rhonda Frederick's 3. In the source you selected, what additional information do y ou think should be included to make the source more useful for scholars?

PAGE 12

Assignment: Complete the form for your selected item, and post it to the Wiki. ASSIGNMENT 8: BUILDING A COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL PROJECT Learning Objective: Explore how Caribbean Literature engages the archive in the digital age. You may work individually or in a group. Assignment Details: Create a digital project t hat contributes to scholarly conversations about how Caribbean Literature engages the archives. Your response could be thematic, theoretical, and/or it can use any combination of sources, media, and technologies. You may use the resources in dLOC, along with any other technologies you deem appropriate for your academic goal. You should draw on any of the assignmen ts created for this course. Please remember to cite all sources properly including work created by your classmates. Assignment Components: Part 1: Write a proposal for your project (250 words) which includes: a title, tentativ e thesis, and list of so urces. Post this proposal to the Wiki and email it to Joan Flores iequaljoan@gmail.com ( Doctoral Student, African Diaspora History New York University ) ( Due 22 November ) Part 2: Review and select an appropriate technology for delivering the project. Write a proposal (300 words) explaining how the selected t echnology sup ports the project. ( Due 6 December ) Part 3: Design and deliver a digital project. ( Due 13 December ) Project Examples/Ideas : Wendy Ewald class work from 2012 Diaries of a Prolific Professor Journal created from class papers (example with Haitian Creole) TimelineJS (simple example, for use with larger projects) Historical book reception (reading of a book with responses to book, and critical analysis) Teaching materials Online exhibits Online exhibits by the University of Miami Online exhibits by the University of Florida About Face Digital scholarship projects As far as the eye/I can see: Caribbean Art & Visual Culture Slave Resistance: A Caribbean Story